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updated: 2/3/2014 6:41 AM

Indiana homeschool group says state intruding

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Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -- An Indiana homeschool group says a state commission acted improperly when it found the group discriminated against a student who was expelled after her family complained it didn't provide for the girl's food allergy at a dinner-dance.

The state Supreme Court will hear arguments in the case Monday.

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The Indiana Civil Rights Commission found the Fishers Adolescent Catholic Enrichment Society did accommodate the girl's disability, but discriminated by expelling her family in retaliation after they filed a complaint with the state.

A national law firm called the Thomas More Society is representing the homeschool group. The More Society argues that Indiana's civil rights law doesn't apply to private religious associations.

The group was established to provide enrichment opportunities for the homeschooled children of its member families.

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