Article posted: 2/2/2014 6:07 AM

Shibori: an ancient art now revamped and revisited

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Shibori lamp shades from the Suzusan Luminaires collection.

Associated Press/Suzusan

Oriana DiNella recently launched her own Web-based shibori line, OriShibori.com, including linen tableware, pillows and throws, and large leather wall hangings, are all made to order and hand-dyed in organic indigo.

Associated Press/iShibori.com

OriShibori tablecloth, runner, placemats, and napkins on a table. From tablecloths to duvet covers, iPhone cases to wallpaper and startling calf-skin wall hangings, the ancient Japanese resist-dying technique of shibori has gone mainstream.

Associated Press/iShibori.com

The technique of making Tesuji Shibori, an ancient Japanese resist-dyeing technique, involves tying, stitching or folding fabric in specific ways, then dyeing it. The stitching is then cut away, leaving patterns where the dye was not allowed to penetrate the fabric.

Associated Press/Suzusan, Hiroyuki Murase

About this Article

From tablecloths to duvet covers, iPhone cases to wallpaper and startling calf-skin wall hangings, the ancient Japanese resist-dying technique of shibori has gone mainstream. Vera Wang, Ralph Lauren, Eileen Fisher, Levi's and innumerable fiber artists are breathing new life into the craft.
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    • Shibori lamp shades from the Suzusan Luminaires collection.
    •  Oriana DiNella recently launched her own Web-based shibori line, OriShibori.com, including linen tableware, pillows and throws, and large leather wall hangings, are all made to order and hand-dyed in organic indigo.
    •  OriShibori tablecloth, runner, placemats, and napkins on a table. From tablecloths to duvet covers, iPhone cases to wallpaper and startling calf-skin wall hangings, the ancient Japanese resist-dying technique of shibori has gone mainstream.
    •  The technique of making Tesuji Shibori, an ancient Japanese resist-dyeing technique, involves tying, stitching or folding fabric in specific ways, then dyeing it. The stitching is then cut away, leaving patterns where the dye was not allowed to penetrate the fabric.
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