Breaking News Bar
updated: 1/25/2014 5:41 PM

Founder: Final Ruby Foundation splash will be April dinner

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • DAILY HERALD PHOTO Paul Ruby, center, visits with guests at the 2008 fundraiser to benefit Parkinson's disease research.

      DAILY HERALD PHOTO Paul Ruby, center, visits with guests at the 2008 fundraiser to benefit Parkinson's disease research.

 
 

Since its creation in 2007, the Paul Ruby Foundation for Parkinson's Research has raised close to $1 million.

The foundation enjoyed success each year and continues to build momentum, making it the perfect time to phase it out and let another foundation lead future fundraising efforts.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

What, you ask? Yes, you read that correctly.

Paul Ruby, the general manager of the Herrington Inn in Geneva, is the man behind the foundation since his challenges with the disease became public about eight years ago. He feels it is time to let a bigger group with national aspirations take over.

It makes sense to transition the Paul Ruby Foundation to the Davis Phinney Foundation because it's tied in with the Sub 5 Century charitable bike riding events, which have become the major supporter of Ruby's foundation the past few years.

"I just came to the realization that the combination of the Phinney Foundation and the Sub 5 Century is so much more powerful than what we can do," Ruby said of the foundation created for Phinney, also a Parkinson's sufferer. "We were rather limited. But they can take it nationally, and it is a great opportunity to really grow."

Ruby said his organization is calling its April 26 dinner dance the Final Gala, an event that should push the group over the $1 million mark in funds.

"That's pretty amazing," Ruby said of what the local organization has accomplished.

Dawn Vogelsberg, who has been an executive with the foundation since its inception, said the two organizations plan to meet soon to discuss the transition. Some of that discussion will center on what is really important to Ruby and his foundation leaders: That support will continue for Northwestern Memorial Hospital's research for a Parkinson's cure.

"The Sub 5 Century is quite a dynamic group," Vogelsberg said. "I know that in 2015 they are talking about an event in Hampshire, and they want to continue to branch out."

Ruby mostly views the transition as a way for his foundation to "go out on top" while making sure it can still enjoy tremendous growth.

"Mostly, the money raised here will be kept regionally," he added.

Try Mexican this time: The small fast-food restaurant location on Lincoln Highway (Route 38) in St. Charles has had so many different suitors, it's been tough to keep track.

Two Brothers, a beef and hot dog joint, most recently occupied that spot but made a fairly quick exit. I was satisfied with my few visits to Two Brothers, but it's tough to compete in that beef sandwich world when Skippy's, Portillo's, Italian Dreams and Beef Shack all are within shouting distance.

Now the building has a hot lime green color to it, with the announcement that Salsa Verde will open there soon.

With the wild: Here's something interesting to bid on at a live auction: A photo safari trip to South Africa.

It's something you don't see too often at the various local fundraisers. But it's on the list for the Fox Valley Wildlife Center's annual Winter Dinner Auction Feb. 8 at the Fox Valley Country Club in North Aurora.

If you are the adventurous type, you can learn more about the dinner event and auction by calling (630) 365-3800 or visiting foxvalleywildlife.org.

Adds to the walk: A dreadful winter, like the one we are enduring, makes one anxious for spring to arrive. Reading about the new "If I Could Fly" sculpture to be placed on the Bob Leonard Walkway in St. Charles really makes me wish for warmer weather.

With or without this interesting new sculpture, the Bob Leonard Walkway is a very pleasant stroll in nice weather.

Will miss cookies: You hate to see any decent bakery close its doors, and that is true with Great Harvest Bread Co. in Geneva, which shuts its doors Feb. 1. Mostly, I'll miss those oatmeal and chocolate chip cookies. When a cookie fills your entire hand and tastes as good as these, you know you are encountering something quite special.

It should also be noted that, through the years, Great Harvest donated tons of breads and cookies to various charities putting on fundraising walks and runs.

Worth the wait: It dawned on me the other day I had not yet tried a cheeseburger and fries at Five Guys in the Geneva Commons. Mark it down as done.

In some places, it's called a double cheeseburger, because that's what it is. There are two hamburger patties and plenty of cheese.

But the fries caught my attention, since the bag was about as big as my head. And the hamburger and fries were both quite good.

My son asked how the portion of fries compared to the former Mike and Miguel's hot dog and beef joint in Geneva. That place was famous for a monstrous bag of fries greasy enough to lube your car's engine.

Five Guys is close. Not quite as many fries and not quite as greasy.

Is it like Dorian?: You could categorize one of my readers as either a wise guy or quite clever. Either way, he sent a note after recently reading about my calorie count as it relates to the food items I occasionally mention in this column. When I said I still weigh about the same as I did when starting this column 10 years ago, he responded with:

"What I figure is, as in 'The Picture of Dorian Gray,' somewhere in your attic is a painting showing the real you: a 500-pound mass made up of cookies, burgers and shakes."

Those empty spaces: As promised, watch next week for the ideas readers have shared about what types of stores could go into the area's many empty storefronts.

Here's a hint: They still want an Apple store. The location might surprise you.

Keep sending your ideas to the email below.

dheun@sbcglobal.net

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.