Breaking News Bar
posted: 1/20/2014 2:15 PM

U.N.: More than 200 million jobless last year

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • Audience members hold signs appealing for jobs as they attend a Democratic news conference about extending unemployment insurance benefits which expired Dec. 28, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Unemployment in America has gone down in the last several years, but it remains a serious drag on the economy.

      Audience members hold signs appealing for jobs as they attend a Democratic news conference about extending unemployment insurance benefits which expired Dec. 28, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Unemployment in America has gone down in the last several years, but it remains a serious drag on the economy.
    ASSOCIATED PRESS

 
Associated Press

GENEVA -- The United Nations' labor agency says the number of unemployed people around the world rose above 200 million last year as job opportunities failed to grow at the same pace as the global workforce.

The International Labor Organization said Monday that an estimated 201.8 million people were unemployed in 2013. That's 4.9 million more than the previous year.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

An annual ILO report points to an uneven global economic recovery and says East and South Asia together accounted for more than 45 percent of last year's increase.

The agency puts last year's global unemployment rate at 6 percent, unchanged from 2012. It says it expects little improvement this year, projecting that the jobless rate will edge up to 6.1 percent and the number of unemployed will rise another 4.2 million.

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.