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updated: 1/13/2014 5:14 PM

No electronics allowed at Libertyville after-school game program

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  • Nathan Rojas, left, and Evan Dunbar, both 7 and from Libertyville, play a game of "Chutes and Ladders" on Monday during an after-school program called Games Galore at Rockland Elementary School in Libertyville.

       Nathan Rojas, left, and Evan Dunbar, both 7 and from Libertyville, play a game of "Chutes and Ladders" on Monday during an after-school program called Games Galore at Rockland Elementary School in Libertyville.
    Steve Lundy | Staff Photographer

  • Brayden Brafford, 8, of Libertyville plays "Head Bandz" on Monday during an after-school program called Games Galore at Rockland Elementary School in Libertyville.

       Brayden Brafford, 8, of Libertyville plays "Head Bandz" on Monday during an after-school program called Games Galore at Rockland Elementary School in Libertyville.
    Steve Lundy | Staff Photographer

 
 

When you mention games to kids these days, they'd probably think of the electronic variety.

But not at Rockland Elementary School's after-school program called Games Galore.

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For an hour, children get to play any board game they desire. Everything from "Battleship" and "Stratego" to "Monopoly" and "Jenga." No electronic games are allowed.

Twenty-seven students participate in the program started in 2009 by teachers Danya Sundh and Nicole Lesniewicz. The program runs on Mondays and Thursdays in Libertyville.

"It's a great way to get kids in first through fifth grade to work together in teams on problem solving in a laid-back environment," Sundh said. "It's also a nice opportunity for those kids who don't necessarily have a sport to go to but want to take part in a school-related activity."

At the beginning of the program, students donate $5 and get to vote on what games they would like to buy. The program lasts for 12 weeks in the winter months.

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