Breaking News Bar
updated: 11/22/2013 10:34 AM

Images: 50th anniversary of JFK's assassination

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • President Kennedy and the first lady Jacqueline Kennedy receive an enthusiastic welcome as they arrive in Dallas Love Field, Nov. 22, 1963. Later that day the president was assassinated as his motorcade moved through the city.

      President Kennedy and the first lady Jacqueline Kennedy receive an enthusiastic welcome as they arrive in Dallas Love Field, Nov. 22, 1963. Later that day the president was assassinated as his motorcade moved through the city.
    Associated Press

  • In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, President John F. Kennedy, center on foreground platform, addresses a rain-soaked crowd in Fort Worth, Texas. In an interview, Secret Service agent Clint Hill recalled, "I heard the noise outside" of a large, friendly crowd gathering, despite the drizzle, for a speech; Kennedy's first event of a packed day.

      In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, President John F. Kennedy, center on foreground platform, addresses a rain-soaked crowd in Fort Worth, Texas. In an interview, Secret Service agent Clint Hill recalled, "I heard the noise outside" of a large, friendly crowd gathering, despite the drizzle, for a speech; Kennedy's first event of a packed day.
    Associated Press

  • The motorcade of President John F. Kennedy is shown cruising down Main Street in Dallas on the morning of Nov. 22, 1963, moments before shots were fired at his limousine.

      The motorcade of President John F. Kennedy is shown cruising down Main Street in Dallas on the morning of Nov. 22, 1963, moments before shots were fired at his limousine.
    Associated Press

  • U.S. President John F. Kennedy and first lady Jacqueline Kennedy are riding in the back seat of an open limousine on Main Street at Ervay Street as the presidential motorcade approaches Dealey Plaza in downtown Dallas, Texas, on November 22, 1963. Only moments later the ride ends in the president's assassination. Texas Gov. John Connally, who will be wounded in the ambush attack, and his wife Nellie are seated in the limousine's jump seat.

      U.S. President John F. Kennedy and first lady Jacqueline Kennedy are riding in the back seat of an open limousine on Main Street at Ervay Street as the presidential motorcade approaches Dealey Plaza in downtown Dallas, Texas, on November 22, 1963. Only moments later the ride ends in the president's assassination. Texas Gov. John Connally, who will be wounded in the ambush attack, and his wife Nellie are seated in the limousine's jump seat.
    Associated Press

  • President John F. Kennedy is seen riding in motorcade approximately one minute before he was shot in Dallas, Tx., on Nov. 22, 1963. In the car riding with Kennedy are Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy, right, Nellie Connally, left, and her husband, Gov. John Connally of Texas.

      President John F. Kennedy is seen riding in motorcade approximately one minute before he was shot in Dallas, Tx., on Nov. 22, 1963. In the car riding with Kennedy are Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy, right, Nellie Connally, left, and her husband, Gov. John Connally of Texas.
    Associated Press

  • Secret servicemen standing on running boards follow the presidential limousine carrying President John F. Kennedy, right, rear seat, and first lady Jacqueline Kennedy, left, as well as Texas Gov. John Connally and his wife, Nellie, in Dallas, Texas, Nov. 22, 1963. Moments later, President John F. Kennedy was shot by an assassin.

      Secret servicemen standing on running boards follow the presidential limousine carrying President John F. Kennedy, right, rear seat, and first lady Jacqueline Kennedy, left, as well as Texas Gov. John Connally and his wife, Nellie, in Dallas, Texas, Nov. 22, 1963. Moments later, President John F. Kennedy was shot by an assassin.
    Associated Press

  • In this Friday, Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, seen through the foreground convertible's windshield, President John F. Kennedy's hand reaches toward his head within seconds of being fatally shot as first lady Jacqueline Kennedy holds his forearm as the motorcade proceeds along Elm Street past the Texas School Book Depository in Dallas. Gov. John Connally was also shot.

      In this Friday, Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, seen through the foreground convertible's windshield, President John F. Kennedy's hand reaches toward his head within seconds of being fatally shot as first lady Jacqueline Kennedy holds his forearm as the motorcade proceeds along Elm Street past the Texas School Book Depository in Dallas. Gov. John Connally was also shot.
    Associated Press

  • President John F. Kennedy slumps down in the back seat of the Presidential limousine as it speeds along Elm Street toward the Stemmons Freeway overpass after being fatally shot in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963. Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy leans over the president as Secret Service agent Clinton Hill rides on the back of the car.

      President John F. Kennedy slumps down in the back seat of the Presidential limousine as it speeds along Elm Street toward the Stemmons Freeway overpass after being fatally shot in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963. Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy leans over the president as Secret Service agent Clinton Hill rides on the back of the car.
    Associated Press

  • Secret Service agent Clint Hill climbs into the back seat of the limousine a moment after President John F. Kennedy and Governor John Connally of Texas were shot in Dallas, Nov. 22, 1963. Black arrow points to Mrs. Connally ducking bullets, and white arrow points out the agent's foot, mistakenly thought to be the president's when the photo first ran.

      Secret Service agent Clint Hill climbs into the back seat of the limousine a moment after President John F. Kennedy and Governor John Connally of Texas were shot in Dallas, Nov. 22, 1963. Black arrow points to Mrs. Connally ducking bullets, and white arrow points out the agent's foot, mistakenly thought to be the president's when the photo first ran.
    Associated Press

  • The limousine carrying mortally wounded President John F. Kennedy races toward the hospital seconds after he was shot in Dallas, Tx., Nov. 22, 1963. With secret service agent Clinton Hill riding on the back of the car, Mrs. John Connally, wife of the Texas governor, bends over her wounded husband, and Mrs. Kennedy leans over the president.

      The limousine carrying mortally wounded President John F. Kennedy races toward the hospital seconds after he was shot in Dallas, Tx., Nov. 22, 1963. With secret service agent Clinton Hill riding on the back of the car, Mrs. John Connally, wife of the Texas governor, bends over her wounded husband, and Mrs. Kennedy leans over the president.
    Associated Press

  • President Kennedy's limousine speeds along Elm Street toward the Stemmons Freeway overpass moments after he was shot at Dealey Plaza in Dallas, Tex., Nov. 22, 1963. Secret Service agent Clint Hill is seen on the back of the car as Jacqueline Kennedy tends to her fatally wounded husband.

      President Kennedy's limousine speeds along Elm Street toward the Stemmons Freeway overpass moments after he was shot at Dealey Plaza in Dallas, Tex., Nov. 22, 1963. Secret Service agent Clint Hill is seen on the back of the car as Jacqueline Kennedy tends to her fatally wounded husband.
    Associated Press

  • In this Friday, Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, Jacqueline Kennedy, with bloodstains on her clothes, holds hands with her brother-in-law, Attorney General Robert Kennedy, as the coffin carrying the body of President John F. Kennedy is placed in an ambulance after arriving at Andrews Air Force Base, Md. near Washington. President Kennedy was assassinated earlier that afternoon in Dallas.

      In this Friday, Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, Jacqueline Kennedy, with bloodstains on her clothes, holds hands with her brother-in-law, Attorney General Robert Kennedy, as the coffin carrying the body of President John F. Kennedy is placed in an ambulance after arriving at Andrews Air Force Base, Md. near Washington. President Kennedy was assassinated earlier that afternoon in Dallas.
    Associated Press

  • Her stockings and dress soiled, widowed first lady Jacqueline Kennedy reaches for the door of the ambulance carrying the body of her slain husband at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., on Nov. 22, 1963. The late President's brother, Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, accompanies her at right. The first lady had just arrived from Dallas with her husband's body aboard a presidential jet. (AP Photo)

      Her stockings and dress soiled, widowed first lady Jacqueline Kennedy reaches for the door of the ambulance carrying the body of her slain husband at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., on Nov. 22, 1963. The late President's brother, Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, accompanies her at right. The first lady had just arrived from Dallas with her husband's body aboard a presidential jet. (AP Photo)
    Associated Press

  • In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, Lyndon B. Johnson is sworn in as President of the United States of America in the cabin of the presidential plane as Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy stands at his side in Dallas, Tex. The historic aircraft is on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio.

      In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, Lyndon B. Johnson is sworn in as President of the United States of America in the cabin of the presidential plane as Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy stands at his side in Dallas, Tex. The historic aircraft is on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio.
    Associated Press

  • Lee Harvey Oswald sits in police custody shortly after being arrested on charges of assassinating U.S. President John F. Kennedy in Dallas, Texas, Nov. 22, 1963. Oswald was shot and killed two days later by Jack Ruby, a local club owner, as he was being transferred to a city jail.

      Lee Harvey Oswald sits in police custody shortly after being arrested on charges of assassinating U.S. President John F. Kennedy in Dallas, Texas, Nov. 22, 1963. Oswald was shot and killed two days later by Jack Ruby, a local club owner, as he was being transferred to a city jail.
    Associated Press

  • Lt. J.C. Day of the Dallas, Texas, police crime lab holds a fingerprint record of Lee Harvey Oswald, who is formally charged with the assassination of U.S. President John F. Kennedy, on November 22, 1963.

      Lt. J.C. Day of the Dallas, Texas, police crime lab holds a fingerprint record of Lee Harvey Oswald, who is formally charged with the assassination of U.S. President John F. Kennedy, on November 22, 1963.
    Associated Press

  • Police Lt. J.C. Day holds aloft the bolt-action rifle with telescopic sight which was allegedly used in the assassination of U.S. President John F. Kennedy, Dallas, Texas, on November 22, 1963.

      Police Lt. J.C. Day holds aloft the bolt-action rifle with telescopic sight which was allegedly used in the assassination of U.S. President John F. Kennedy, Dallas, Texas, on November 22, 1963.
    Associated Press

  • Lee Harvey Oswald, suspected assassin of U.S. President John F. Kennedy, holds up his manacled hands at police headquarters in Dallas, Texas, where he is held for questioning, on Nov. 22, 1963. New testing on the type of ammunition used in the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy raises questions about whether Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone, according to a study by researchers at Texas A&M University.

      Lee Harvey Oswald, suspected assassin of U.S. President John F. Kennedy, holds up his manacled hands at police headquarters in Dallas, Texas, where he is held for questioning, on Nov. 22, 1963. New testing on the type of ammunition used in the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy raises questions about whether Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone, according to a study by researchers at Texas A&M University.
    Associated Press

  • Lee Harvey Oswald is shown early Nov. 23, 1963, as he stood before newsmen in a Dallas police station where he repeatedly denied that he had assassinated President Kennedy yesterday. "I did not kill President Kennedy," he said. "I did not kill anyone. I don't know what this is all about." He was brought before the newsmen just after formal charges of murder were filed against him.

      Lee Harvey Oswald is shown early Nov. 23, 1963, as he stood before newsmen in a Dallas police station where he repeatedly denied that he had assassinated President Kennedy yesterday. "I did not kill President Kennedy," he said. "I did not kill anyone. I don't know what this is all about." He was brought before the newsmen just after formal charges of murder were filed against him.
    Associated Press

  • Lee Harvey Oswald, assassin of President John F. Kennedy, reacts as Dallas night club owner Jack Ruby, foreground, shoots at him from point blank range in a corridor of Dallas police headquarters, Nov. 24, 1963. At left is Detective Jim Leavelle. Leavelle wanted to secretly take Oswald out the side door of Dallas police headquarters on that day forty-five years ago. His boss wanted to keep a promise to reporters. So Leavelle handcuffed himself to President Kennedy's assassin, stepped into a crowded basement and became an accidental part of history.

      Lee Harvey Oswald, assassin of President John F. Kennedy, reacts as Dallas night club owner Jack Ruby, foreground, shoots at him from point blank range in a corridor of Dallas police headquarters, Nov. 24, 1963. At left is Detective Jim Leavelle. Leavelle wanted to secretly take Oswald out the side door of Dallas police headquarters on that day forty-five years ago. His boss wanted to keep a promise to reporters. So Leavelle handcuffed himself to President Kennedy's assassin, stepped into a crowded basement and became an accidental part of history.
    Associated Press

  • In this Saturday, Nov. 23, 1963 file photo, the flag-draped casket of President John F. Kennedy lies in state in the East Room of the White House in Washington. "Jackie Kennedy sent word that she wanted the East Room, where the president would lie in state, to look as it did when Lincoln's body lay there," remembers Richard Goodwin, a speechwriter and adviser to the administration. He and others went to work. Someone was sent to the Library of Congress for a sketch and a newspaper description from Lincoln's time; artists and upholsterers were called in, and black crepe was carefully hung. "In the midst of all these activities we would alternately break down in tears," Goodwin says.

      In this Saturday, Nov. 23, 1963 file photo, the flag-draped casket of President John F. Kennedy lies in state in the East Room of the White House in Washington. "Jackie Kennedy sent word that she wanted the East Room, where the president would lie in state, to look as it did when Lincoln's body lay there," remembers Richard Goodwin, a speechwriter and adviser to the administration. He and others went to work. Someone was sent to the Library of Congress for a sketch and a newspaper description from Lincoln's time; artists and upholsterers were called in, and black crepe was carefully hung. "In the midst of all these activities we would alternately break down in tears," Goodwin says.
    Associated Press

  • In this Sunday, Nov. 24, 1963 file photo, mourners form a long line as they assemble in front of the Capitol to pay their respects to slain President John F. Kennedy in Washington.

      In this Sunday, Nov. 24, 1963 file photo, mourners form a long line as they assemble in front of the Capitol to pay their respects to slain President John F. Kennedy in Washington.
    Associated Press

  • In this Sunday, Nov. 24, 1963 file photo, the casket of President John F. Kennedy reaches the Capitol in Washington on a horse-drawn caisson, accompanied by a symbolic riderless horse named Black Jack, with boots reversed in the stirrups, symbolizing a fallen leader.

      In this Sunday, Nov. 24, 1963 file photo, the casket of President John F. Kennedy reaches the Capitol in Washington on a horse-drawn caisson, accompanied by a symbolic riderless horse named Black Jack, with boots reversed in the stirrups, symbolizing a fallen leader.
    Associated Press

  • In this Sunday, Nov. 24, 1963 file photo, a horse-drawn caisson bearing the body of President John F Kennedy heads from the White House, background, to the Capitol for him to lie in state.

      In this Sunday, Nov. 24, 1963 file photo, a horse-drawn caisson bearing the body of President John F Kennedy heads from the White House, background, to the Capitol for him to lie in state.
    Associated Press

  • In this Sunday, Nov. 24, 1963 file photo, mourners stand in a line which lasted through the night, to pay their respects to the slain President John F. Kennedy, in Washington, with the illuminated U.S. Capitol in the background.

      In this Sunday, Nov. 24, 1963 file photo, mourners stand in a line which lasted through the night, to pay their respects to the slain President John F. Kennedy, in Washington, with the illuminated U.S. Capitol in the background.
    Associated Press

  • In this Sunday, Nov. 24, 1963 file photo, Jacqueline Kennedy looks toward the casket of her slain husband, President John F. Kennedy, during eulogies in the Capitol rotunda in Washington.

      In this Sunday, Nov. 24, 1963 file photo, Jacqueline Kennedy looks toward the casket of her slain husband, President John F. Kennedy, during eulogies in the Capitol rotunda in Washington.
    Associated Press

  • The statue of Abraham Lincoln in the Capitol rotunda looks down on the flag-draped casket of the late President John F. Kennedy, as he lies in state, in this Nov. 24, 1963 photo in Washington.

      The statue of Abraham Lincoln in the Capitol rotunda looks down on the flag-draped casket of the late President John F. Kennedy, as he lies in state, in this Nov. 24, 1963 photo in Washington.
    Associated Press

  • In this Sunday, Nov. 24, 1963 file photo, Jacqueline Kennedy kisses the casket of her husband, President John F. Kennedy, lying in state in the rotunda of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, accompanied by their daughter Caroline, kneeling alongside.

      In this Sunday, Nov. 24, 1963 file photo, Jacqueline Kennedy kisses the casket of her husband, President John F. Kennedy, lying in state in the rotunda of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, accompanied by their daughter Caroline, kneeling alongside.
    Associated Press

  • In this Monday, Nov. 25, 1963 file photo, 3-year-old John F. Kennedy Jr. salutes his father's casket in Washington, three days after the president was assassinated in Dallas. Widow Jacqueline Kennedy, center, and daughter Caroline Kennedy are accompanied by the late president's brothers Sen. Edward Kennedy, left, and Attorney General Robert Kennedy.

      In this Monday, Nov. 25, 1963 file photo, 3-year-old John F. Kennedy Jr. salutes his father's casket in Washington, three days after the president was assassinated in Dallas. Widow Jacqueline Kennedy, center, and daughter Caroline Kennedy are accompanied by the late president's brothers Sen. Edward Kennedy, left, and Attorney General Robert Kennedy.
    Associated Press

  • In this Monday, Nov. 25, 1963 file photo, Marie Tippit, widow of police officer J.D. Tippit who was slain during the search for President John F. Kennedy's assassin, is led weeping from Beckley Hills Baptist Church in Dallas after funeral services for her husband. The services began about the time those for Kennedy were ending in Washington.

      In this Monday, Nov. 25, 1963 file photo, Marie Tippit, widow of police officer J.D. Tippit who was slain during the search for President John F. Kennedy's assassin, is led weeping from Beckley Hills Baptist Church in Dallas after funeral services for her husband. The services began about the time those for Kennedy were ending in Washington.
    Associated Press

  • In this Monday, Nov. 25, 1963 file photo, Caroline Kennedy, 5, looks to her mother, Jacqueline Kennedy, as she clutches her hand, accompanied by John F. Kennedy, Jr., 3, while leaving St. Matthew's Cathedral after the funeral Mass for President John F. Kennedy in Washington. It is his third birthday; his sister will turn 6 two days later. Behind them are Robert P. Fitzgerald, first cousin of the president, Rose Kennedy, mother of the president, and Robert F. Kennedy, his brother, far right. Men at left are unidentified.

      In this Monday, Nov. 25, 1963 file photo, Caroline Kennedy, 5, looks to her mother, Jacqueline Kennedy, as she clutches her hand, accompanied by John F. Kennedy, Jr., 3, while leaving St. Matthew's Cathedral after the funeral Mass for President John F. Kennedy in Washington. It is his third birthday; his sister will turn 6 two days later. Behind them are Robert P. Fitzgerald, first cousin of the president, Rose Kennedy, mother of the president, and Robert F. Kennedy, his brother, far right. Men at left are unidentified.
    Associated Press

  • Members of the Kennedy family attend U.S. President John F. Kennedy's burial at Arlington Cemetary, in Arlington, Va. on Nov. 25, 1963. At center with veil is JFK's mother, Rose Kennedy; his brother Attorney General Robert Kennedy; and far right, his widowed wife, Jacqueline Kennedy.

      Members of the Kennedy family attend U.S. President John F. Kennedy's burial at Arlington Cemetary, in Arlington, Va. on Nov. 25, 1963. At center with veil is JFK's mother, Rose Kennedy; his brother Attorney General Robert Kennedy; and far right, his widowed wife, Jacqueline Kennedy.
    Associated Press

  • In this Monday, Nov. 25, 1963 file photo, President Charles de Gaulle of France, center, and other dignitaries salute as servicemen hold an American flag above the casket of President John F. Kennedy in Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va.

      In this Monday, Nov. 25, 1963 file photo, President Charles de Gaulle of France, center, and other dignitaries salute as servicemen hold an American flag above the casket of President John F. Kennedy in Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va.
    Associated Press

  • The caisson bearing the flag-draped coffin of President John F. Kennedy, is shown leaving the White House in procession down Pennsylvania Avenue, in Washington, en route to Arlington National Cemetery, November 25, 1963.

      The caisson bearing the flag-draped coffin of President John F. Kennedy, is shown leaving the White House in procession down Pennsylvania Avenue, in Washington, en route to Arlington National Cemetery, November 25, 1963.
    Associated Press

 

3

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close
Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.
    help here