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Article posted: 11/17/2013 6:00 AM

In banner year for black films, the hope is for momentum

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Chiwetel Ejiofor in a scene from "12 Years A Slave." From "12 Years a Slave" to "The Butler" to "Fruitvale Station," 2013 has been a banner year for movies directed by black filmmakers. Like seldom before, African American stories are being told on the big screen without white protagonists.

Associated Press/Fox Searchlight Films

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Michael B. Jordan in a scene from "Fruitvale Station." From "12 Years a Slave" to "The Butler" to "Fruitvale Station," 2013 has been a banner year for movies directed by black filmmakers. Like seldom before, African American stories are being told on the big screen without white protagonists.

Associated Press/The Weinstein Company

Forest Whitaker as Cecil Gaines in "Lee Daniels' The Butler." From "12 Years a Slave" to "The Butler" to "Fruitvale Station," 2013 has been a banner year for movies directed by black filmmakers. Like seldom before, African American stories are being told on the big screen without white protagonists.

Associated Press/The Weinstein Company

About this Article

Oprah Winfrey has heard this story before. A wave of high-profile films about black people receives accolades. A heart-warming trend of greater on-screen equality is declared. Hollywood basks in its multiculturalism -- and then returns to business as usual.
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    • Chiwetel Ejiofor in a scene from “12 Years A Slave.” From “12 Years a Slave” to “The Butler” to “Fruitvale Station,” 2013 has been a banner year for movies directed by black filmmakers. Like seldom before, African American stories are being told on the big screen without white protagonists.
    • Michael B. Jordan in a scene from “Fruitvale Station.” From “12 Years a Slave” to “The Butler” to “Fruitvale Station,” 2013 has been a banner year for movies directed by black filmmakers. Like seldom before, African American stories are being told on the big screen without white protagonists.
    • Forest Whitaker as Cecil Gaines in “Lee Daniels’ The Butler.” From “12 Years a Slave” to “The Butler” to “Fruitvale Station,” 2013 has been a banner year for movies directed by black filmmakers. Like seldom before, African American stories are being told on the big screen without white protagonists.
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