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posted: 10/28/2013 1:54 PM

Nominations sought for History Teacher of the Year

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  • Madhu Krishnamurthy

      Madhu Krishnamurthy

 
 

Who's the best American history teacher in the United States?

Find out by nominating candidates for the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History's annual National History Teacher of the Year Award. The nomination deadline is Feb. 1.

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The national winner will be chosen from among nominees from the 50 states, district and U.S. territory.

The Illinois History Teacher of the Year will compete for the national award, sponsored by the Gilder Lehrman Institute, Preserve America and HISTORY (the History Channel).

Nominations for the National History Teacher of the Year can be made by a student, parent, colleague, supervisor (including department head, principal, superintendent or curriculum director), or other education professional familiar with the teacher's work. State winners receive $1,000 and an archive of books and other resources for their schools. Each winner is honored in a ceremony in his or her home state. The national winner receives $10,000.

Elementary school teachers (grades K-sixth) and middle and high school teachers (grades seven-12) are honored in separate categories in alternate years. The 2014 National History Teacher of the Year Award will honor a middle or high school-level teacher.

To nominate a teacher and learn more about the award, visit gilderlehrman.org/nhtoy, email nhtoy@gilderlehrman.org or call (646) 366-9666. Contact the state coordinator, Sarah McCusker, of the Illinois State Board of Education, at (217) 524-4832 or smccuske@isbe.net.

U-46 launches business, civic leadership advisory council:

Elgin Area School District U-46 is forming a Business and Civic Leadership Advisory Council to increase civic participation in the district.

The advisory council will help the superintendent and district administration with business and community involvement, including strategic initiatives targeted to improving student achievement.

The council will help with:

• researching and reaching consensus on current and long-range programs and procedures

• providing technical assistance on operational aspects

• participating in advocacy work locally and in Springfield

• assisting in resource development

Any person or groups interested in serving on the council can complete an online interest form at u-46.org. Forms will be accepted until Nov. 8.

All council meetings will be held at noon at the Educational Services Center, 355 E. Chicago St., Elgin. Meeting dates scheduled are: Friday, Nov. 15, Jan. 17, March 14, May 16.

Bartlett police, high school host heroin awareness: The Bartlett Police Department in collaboration with Elgin Area School District U-46 and Bartlett High School is hosting a forum on heroin awareness, "It Couldn't Happen Here -- The Realities of Heroin Addiction in Our Community," at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 30, in Bartlett High School's auditorium, 701 W. Schick Road, Bartlett.

The free event is open to Bartlett parents and students attending South Elgin High School, Eastview Middle School, Kenyon Woods Middle School, and Tefft Middle School.

Bartlett Village President Kevin Wallace, Bartlett Police Chief Kent Williams, and DuPage County Coroner Richard Jorgensen will speak at the event and answer questions at the end of the presentation addressing the drug's prevalence, addictiveness, and effects, how to detect heroin use, and how to deal with this epidemic. It will also include testimony from recovering heroin addicts and their family members.

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