Breaking News Bar
updated: 9/20/2013 7:24 PM

Chicago shooting shows gap in policing

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • A woman becomes emotional Thursday near the scene of a shooting at Cornell Square Park in Chicago's Back of the Yard neighborhood that left multiple victims, including a 3-year-old boy. Thursday night's attack was the latest violence in a city that has struggled to stop such shootings by increasing police patrols.

      A woman becomes emotional Thursday near the scene of a shooting at Cornell Square Park in Chicago's Back of the Yard neighborhood that left multiple victims, including a 3-year-old boy. Thursday night's attack was the latest violence in a city that has struggled to stop such shootings by increasing police patrols.
    Associated Press

  • Chicago police detectives investigate the scene where a number of people, including a 3-year-old child, were shot in a city park on the Southwest Side Thursday night. Authorities said no one has been taken into custody in connection with the shooting.

      Chicago police detectives investigate the scene where a number of people, including a 3-year-old child, were shot in a city park on the Southwest Side Thursday night. Authorities said no one has been taken into custody in connection with the shooting.
    Associated Press

  • A Chicago police detective investigates the scene where a number of people were shot Thursday in a Southwest Side park.

      A Chicago police detective investigates the scene where a number of people were shot Thursday in a Southwest Side park.
    Associated Press

 
Associated Press

A shooting that injured a 3-year-old boy and 12 others in Chicago occurred just outside a section of the city that police have flooded with officers, reigniting outrage over the toll of the community's gun violence and the inability of stepped-up police action to stop it.

Residents had gathered in a neighborhood park Thursday to watch a late-night basketball game when assailants armed with an assault rifle indiscriminately sprayed the crowd with bullets.

On Friday, residents grappling for answers decried the perpetrators' disregard for those caught in the crossfire, the invasion of drugs into their communities and a lack of local leaders to stand up for them. A prominent rap artist, meanwhile, said more must be done to understand the city's youth, and a frustrated police chief again called for tougher gun laws.

"We can do a lot of really good policing. ... We can reduce crime, like we're doing, but we're not going to have success occur as long as these guns keep flowing into our community," police Superintendent Garry McCarthy said during a news conference.

"Illegal guns, illegal guns, illegal guns drive violence," he said as he called on lawmakers to toughen the nation's gun laws.

The shooting happened shortly after 10 p.m. in Cornell Square Park -- in the Back of the Yards neighborhood on the city's southwest side.

The assailants used a 7.62 mm rifle fed by a high-capacity magazine, a type of weapon that belongs on a "battlefield, not on the street or a corner or a park in the Back of the Yards," McCarthy said.

McCarthy said officers were "interviewing a number of people" but there was no one whom he would describe as being in police custody.

Among those hit was 3-year-old Deonta Howard, who was shot in the face, and two teenagers, a 15-year-old and a 17-year-old.

Deonta was alert when he arrived at the hospital and was apparently doing well, his family and friends said early Friday. He was in critical condition, as were two other shooting victims. The others were in serious or fair condition when taken to hospitals, according to the Chicago Fire Department. Hospital officials declined to provide updates Friday evening.

"It's devastating," said one of the boy's relatives, Morris Shadrach Davis, 63. He said one of the boy's uncles was fatally shot during a violent Labor Day weekend in the city that claimed a total of eight lives and left 20 others wounded.

"We are not a bad family," he said, struggling to make sense of his family's double tragedy and the larger tragedy unfolding in the city.

"The black community is really messed up now," he said at his home on the city's West Side. "We had leaders before. ... Drugs have infiltrated our community. We as a people have been totally forgotten."

In response to a surge in violence last year, the police department stepped up its crime-fighting efforts, including paying overtime to add patrols to some neighborhoods, including the Back of the Yards. Through the first six months of 2013, the department had spent more than $57 million on overtime for officers, more than half of it from a program that saturates dangerous neighborhoods with hundreds of officers every night.

The park where the shooting took place slipped through the cracks, demonstrating the difficulty of trying to contain all of the city's gang hot spots. Police said they had "impact zones," with intensified patrols, three blocks north and three blocks south of the park.

But police were well aware that the area was what McCarthy called "a high-gang conflict zone." Some of the victims were gang members, McCarthy said, but detectives were not clear on the intended target.

Violent crime is down this year in Chicago compared with 2012, when homicides surged past 500 for the first time since 2008. Police have recorded 305 homicides so far this year, 21 percent fewer than the 389 slayings recorded over the same period last year.

Rap artist Common, a Chicago native who has spoken eloquently about his hometown's violence, said the city needs to better understand its young people and be more consistent in its efforts to help them. Speaking at a city-sponsored summit aimed at helping local musicians develop their careers, he noted that while the violence remains a problem, so does increasing poverty and other hardships that families face.

"It makes me think I got to do more, we got to do more," said Common, who has a foundation that helps expose disadvantaged young people to the creative arts. "Young people, we have to meet them where they are. Some of them may not be in a place where they can say, `OK I'm going to stop.' It may be a process. You have to deal with that."

Some residents responded with resilience.

At the park where the shooting took place, two men with a well-worn basketball came onto the courts Friday afternoon to proclaim the site safe.

"We're not going to let an act of evil discourage us," T.T. Turner, pastor at Mount Sinai Baptist Church, said as he shot baskets with Cleo Miller, a 26-year-old with Michael Jordan "Jumpman" logo earrings.

"Those that did this will be caught," Turner said.

Share

Interested in reusing this article?

Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.

The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.

Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Name * Company Telephone * E-mail *

Message (optional)

Success - Reprint request sent Click to close
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.
    help here