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updated: 7/19/2013 6:24 PM

FAA wants Dreamliner transmitters inspected

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  • An airport worker approaches a Japan Airlines Boeing 787 aircraft as it sits on the tarmac Friday at Terminal E at Logan International Airport in Boston. The JAL aircraft's flight to Tokyo returned to Boston on Thursday because of a possible fuel pump issue. It's the latest trouble for the new Dreamliner aircraft.

      An airport worker approaches a Japan Airlines Boeing 787 aircraft as it sits on the tarmac Friday at Terminal E at Logan International Airport in Boston. The JAL aircraft's flight to Tokyo returned to Boston on Thursday because of a possible fuel pump issue. It's the latest trouble for the new Dreamliner aircraft.
    Associated Press

 
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -- U.S. aviation officials say they want the emergency locator transmitters on all Boeing 787 "Dreamliners" inspected following a fire this week aboard one of the airliners parked at London's Heathrow Airport.

The Federal Aviation Administration said late Friday that after reviewing recommendations by British accident investigators, the agency is working with Boeing to develop instructions for airlines on how to conduct the inspections.

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The FAA statement said the inspections would ask airlines to examine for proper wire routing, damage or pinching, and to inspect the transmitter's lithium battery compartment for heat or moisture.

An order making the inspections mandatory for U.S. operators is expected in the coming days. Aviation authorities in other countries are expected to follow suit. There are 68 of the planes in service worldwide.

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