Fittest loser
Article updated: 7/15/2013 9:43 AM

Blacks feeling less stigmatized in seeking mental health treatment

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Jinneh Dyson didn't seeking counseling for her severe depression until she was at college. The treatment ended up having a huge impact on her life.

Eric Kayne for The Washington Post

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Damian Waters and Sonja Williams share a therapy practice in Upper Marlboro, Md.

Maddie Meyer/The Washington Post

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Many people, regardless of race, have a hard time talking about mental illness. But for many African Americans, the topic has carried particularly negative connotations -- to the point where it's easier to talk about drug or alcohol addiction than depression or anxiety. In 2008, whites received mental health treatment or counseling at nearly twice the rate of blacks, and whites received prescription medication for mental health-related issues at more than twice the rate of blacks. However, African Americans' acceptance of therapy has been rising over the past decade, providers say, particularly among the young and those with more education and in those urban areas with large black populations.
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    • Jinneh Dyson didn't seeking counseling for her severe depression until she was at college. The treatment ended up having a huge impact on her life.
    • Damian Waters and Sonja Williams share a therapy practice in Upper Marlboro, Md.
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