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Article updated: 7/11/2013 8:15 AM

Rabbits rule since crows vanished from neighborhood

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Acting out Aesop's fable about a smart crow, a rook, a member of the crow family, drops stones into a tube to raise the water level and bring a worm into reach during this experiment a few years ago at the University of Cambridge.

Associated Press/The University of Cambridge

Examples of "as the crow flies" have been more difficult to see since the West Nile virus devastated the suburban crow population.

Daily Herald file photo

This 2002 photo shows a dead crow, probably a victim of the West Nile virus, in Glen Ellyn. The suburban crow population went from a record high in 2001 to a record low because of the deadly virus.

Daily Herald file photo by Bev Horne/bhorne@dailyh

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When I pull into my garage, I know they'll be be waiting in my backyard. At least one, maybe a half dozen. Fearless, brazen rabbits treat my yard as their own personal salad bar. That's when I wish I had my crows back. In the local battle of fur vs. feathers, I always rooted for the crows. Even with a wingspan of 3 feet and a body that weighs a pound and stands a foot high, it isn't that easy for adult crows to kill baby bunnies.
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    • Acting out Aesop's fable about a smart crow, a rook, a member of the crow family, drops stones into a tube to raise the water level and bring a worm into reach during this experiment a few years ago at the University of Cambridge.
    • Examples of “as the crow flies” have been more difficult to see since the West Nile virus devastated the suburban crow population.
    • This 2002 photo shows a dead crow, probably a victim of the West Nile virus, in Glen Ellyn. The suburban crow population went from a record high in 2001 to a record low because of the deadly virus.
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