Fittest loser
Article updated: 6/21/2013 5:27 AM

Why turtles cross suburban roads (and get hurt)

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A common snapping turtle suffered damage to its shell and jaw when it was hit by a car. It's in rehab with two other turtles at the Willowbrook Wildlife Center in Glen Ellyn.

Bev Horne | Staff Photographer

A sign along Algonquin Road, just west of Randall Road, shows where turtles like to cross the road.

Brian Hill/bhill@ dailyherald.com

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Rose Augustine, wildlife specialist, cares for turtles recovering at the Willowbrook Wildlife Center in Glen Ellyn after being struck by cars, including the painted turtle at right with a damaged shell and a broken leg.

photos by Bev Horne | Staff Photographer

A common snapping turtle that was hit by a car is almost healed and soon will be ready to be rereleased back into the wild.

Bev Horne | Staff Photographer

Three turtles that were hit by cars are in rehab at the Willowbrook Wildlife Center in Glen Ellyn, including this painted turtle with a damaged shell and a broken leg.

Bev Horne | Staff Photographer

A sign on the border of Lake in the Hills and Algonquin along Algonquin Road, just west of Randall Road, warns of the large number of turtles on the roads.

Brian Hill | Staff Photographer

About this Article

It's that time of year again when pregnant turtles leave their watery homes to look for higher and drier spots to lay their eggs. But their travels often take them across area roads and highways, putting themselves and sometimes motorists in danger. "When the females go up to nest, they are on a mission," said Kevin Luby, of the Willowbrook Wildlife Center in Glen Ellyn. "Nothing really is going to deter them."
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    • A common snapping turtle suffered damage to its shell and jaw when it was hit by a car. It's in rehab with two other turtles at the Willowbrook Wildlife Center in Glen Ellyn.
    • A sign along Algonquin Road, just west of Randall Road, shows where turtles like to cross the road.
    • Rose Augustine, wildlife specialist, cares for turtles recovering at the Willowbrook Wildlife Center in Glen Ellyn after being struck by cars, including the painted turtle at right with a damaged shell and a broken leg.
    • A common snapping turtle that was hit by a car is almost healed and soon will be ready to be rereleased back into the wild.
    • Three turtles that were hit by cars are in rehab at the Willowbrook Wildlife Center in Glen Ellyn, including this painted turtle with a damaged shell and a broken leg.
    • A sign on the border of Lake in the Hills and Algonquin along Algonquin Road, just west of Randall Road, warns of the large number of turtles on the roads.
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