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updated: 6/18/2013 6:59 PM

Hawks look to end power play struggles

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  • Against Boston Bruins goalie Tuukka Rask, the Blackhawks power play unit is 0-for-11.

      Against Boston Bruins goalie Tuukka Rask, the Blackhawks power play unit is 0-for-11.
    Associated Press

 
 

BOSTON -- It's beginning to sound like a broken record.

The Blackhawks' power play needs to become a factor in this Stanley Cup Final series starting with Game 4 on Wednesday at TD Garden.

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The Hawks were 0-for-5 in their 2-0 loss to the Bruins in Game 3 and are 0-for-11 in the series.

"We need our power play to be better," defenseman Brent Seabrook said Tuesday. "We've got to try to generate more, whether we're scoring goals or just creating momentum.

"This series we haven't really created momentum off the power play, which has helped us in other series even if we weren't scoring.

"We've got to come out with our best effort (Wednesday night). The guys that are on the power play got to focus and be prepared to play the best minute or two minutes they can when they're out there, and if we're not scoring on it we've got to try to create momentum and get things rolling."

The Bruins have killed off 27 consecutive penalties dating to Game 5 of the Eastern Conference semifinals. The Hawks haven't scored on their last 20 chances.

The Hawks are 1-for-27 on the road on the power play in the playoffs.

"They've got a good penalty kill," Hawks winger Patrick Sharp said. "It's been successful for a number of years, and they've seen a lot of different looks.

"Without getting too technical, I'd like to think we've got a quick team with guys who can make plays. I guess it doesn't matter, X's and O's, it's just a matter of doing it."

Boston forward Brad Marchand isn't ready to throw dirt on the Hawks' power play.

"They have a ton of skill and talent," Marchand said. "They make a lot of really good plays. They had some really good looks last game and Tuukka (Rask) was able to stand tall.

"It's tough to shut guys like that down; they're really good. We're just trying to work hard and limit their opportunities."

So solid:

Not only does Patrice Bergeron win faceoffs, he scores big goals and is a leader of the Bruins.

Think Jonathan Toews with a "B" on his chest.

Bergeron scored a key power-play goal for the Bruins on Monday in their win and won 24 of 28 faceoffs, a spectacular number even for him.

"There's no doubt he's a great example," Bruins coach Claude Julien said. "As I said, for a coach, you know exactly what you're going to get from him every game.

"His work ethic, everything that comes with it is second to none. He's often used as a good example because he deserves it."

Bergeron's teammates love him.

"He's the nicest guy in the world," Brad Marchand said. "He always wants to help you out. He's not wrong; he's the perfect guy. If you have a daughter, he's the type of guy you want dating your daughter."

Thinking positive:

The Hawks don't believe they were badly outplayed in Game 3 despite what the final score said.

"I didn't think it was that bad; it was 2 goals," defenseman Johnny Oduya said. "It was an even-played game. With a couple of bounces, it could have been a bit different. I felt we played OK, but that's not going to be enough. We have to find ways to push down a little bit more and create more.

"It's going to be a collective effort from everybody. The little extra urgency, taking pucks to the net and putting pressure on them. It's a team game, a team effort that needs to jump up a little bit more. I think we have it in us."

Upper, lower, middle:

When Joel Quenneville and Claude Julien started coaching, teams weren't as reluctant to disclose injuries.

Now the NHL empowers coaches to say nothing specific, and they all take advantage of it.

"Everybody is suspecting now about (Marian) Hossa; everybody suspected about (Nathan) Horton," Julien said. "I think if it's something that doesn't put your player in danger, I don't see why you shouldn't talk about it.

"There are times where you have to protect your players, and I understand it. I know it's frustrating for you guys as media. You're trying to share that information.

"The most important thing for us, we can take the heat for that, is protecting your players."

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