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Article posted: 2/3/2013 6:00 AM

Washington, D.C., puts out welcome mat for Lincoln fans

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A Secret Service agent stands watch while President-elect Barack Obama, not shown, visits the Lincoln Memorial with his family in Washington. The 16th president was one of America's most admired, rising from humble roots in a frontier cabin to become a self-educated lawyer and brilliant politician.

Associated Press File Photo

The interior of Ford's Theatre, where President Lincoln was shot while attending a play in 1865, was re-created in the 1960s to look the way it did when Lincoln was shot.

Courtesy of Ford's Theatre

A statue of President Lincoln on his horse sits outside President Lincoln's Cottage, a historic site in Washington, D.C.

Associated Press

Within 16 months of the President Lincoln's assassination at Ford's Theatre, the theater was closed and the federal government turned the building into office space. The building became a working theater again in the 1960s.

Courtesy of Ford's Theatre

Ford's Theatre, at left, was the scene of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln in Washington, D.C., in 1865.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

The newly renovated Anderson Cottage, which came to be known as Lincoln's Cottage, at the Old Soldiers' Home, is located three miles from the White House in Washington, D.C.

Associated Press

The top hat President Abraham Lincoln wore the night he was assassinated is on display at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in the "Changing America: The Emancipation Proclamation, 1863 and the March on Washington, 1963" exhibit.

Courtesy of the Smithsonian

Mary Todd Lincoln's purple velvet gown, displayed in "The First Ladies" exhibit, was made by her seamstress and confidante, Elizabeth Keckley, an African-American woman who had purchased her own freedom.

Courtesy of Smithsonian's National Museum of Ameri

Visitors explore the Lincoln Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Associated Press

About this Article

Whether you're interested in Abraham Lincoln the president or "Lincoln" the movie, Washington is a downright thrilling destination. Many museums are offering special exhibits for the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the Emancipation Proclamation. Other sites can be visited any time: the Lincoln Memorial, the cottage where he summered, Ford's Theatre, where he was shot, and the Petersen House, where he died.
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    • A Secret Service agent stands watch while President-elect Barack Obama, not shown, visits the Lincoln Memorial with his family in Washington. The 16th president was one of America's most admired, rising from humble roots in a frontier cabin to become a self-educated lawyer and brilliant politician.
    • The interior of Fordís Theatre, where President Lincoln was shot while attending a play in 1865, was re-created in the 1960s to look the way it did when Lincoln was shot.
    • A statue of President Lincoln on his horse sits outside President Lincolnís Cottage, a historic site in Washington, D.C.
    • Within 16 months of the President Lincolnís assassination at Fordís Theatre, the theater was closed and the federal government turned the building into office space. The building became a working theater again in the 1960s.
    • Fordís Theatre, at left, was the scene of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln in Washington, D.C., in 1865.
    • The newly renovated Anderson Cottage, which came to be known as Lincolnís Cottage, at the Old Soldiersí Home, is located three miles from the White House in Washington, D.C.
    • The top hat President Abraham Lincoln wore the night he was assassinated is on display at the Smithsonianís National Museum of American History in the ďChanging America: The Emancipation Proclamation, 1863 and the March on Washington, 1963Ē exhibit.
    • Mary Todd Lincolnís purple velvet gown, displayed in ďThe First LadiesĒ exhibit, was made by her seamstress and confidante, Elizabeth Keckley, an African-American woman who had purchased her own freedom.
    • Visitors explore the Lincoln Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.
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