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Article updated: 12/30/2012 7:10 AM

Violence, gangs scar Chicago community in 2012

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A framed memorial shows some of the people who have lost their lives to street violence in the Auburn-Gresham neighborhood on Chicago's South Side.

Associated Press

Pam Bosley stands inside the Chicago's St. Sabina Catholic Church and poses with a photograph of her son, Terrell, who was gunned down in 2006. Bosley now works with kids 14 to 21 at the church, teaching them life and leadership skills and ways to reduce violence.

Associated Press file photo

Carlos Nelson, head of the Greater Auburn Gresham Development Corp., talks about the troubled neighborhood's future on Chicago's South Side earlier this month.

Associated Press

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Curtis Toler watches his team participate in a basketball tournament for reputed gang members and associates earlier this month at the St. Sabina Catholic Church in the Auburn-Gresham neighborhood on Chicago's South Side. Toler, 35, a former gang member and father of four, spent much of his life causing chaos. Now, he's preaching calm.

Associated Press

The Rev. Mike Pfleger of the St. Sabina Catholic Church speaks with a young man during a weekly basketball tournament earlier this month at the church gym where rival gangs can play in a league instead of walking the streets in the Auburn-Gresham neighborhood of Chicago's South Side.

Associated Press

A lone cross stands in a vacant lot on the corner of 79th and Loomis in the Auburn-Gresham neighborhood on Chicago's South Side. Up to 80 percent of Chicago's murders and shootings are gang-related, according to police.

Associated Press

Bobbie McComb sits on the sofa with her 14 year-old daughter, Cerria, at their home in the Auburn-Gresham neighborhood of Chicago's South Side. In the wrong place at the right time, Cerria and a friend were wounded when gunfire aimed at a reputed gang member struck them, with a bullet exploding in Cerria's right leg. "I'm angry," Mrs. McComb says. "I'm frustrated. I'm tired of them shooting our kids, killing our kids, thinking they can get away with it."

Associated Press

About this Article

In an empty lot on a corner of West 79th Street, a wooden cross stands tall in the winter night. Painted in red is a plea: "STOP SHOOTING." Gang violence isn't new, but it became a major theme in the Chicago narrative this year.
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    • A framed memorial shows some of the people who have lost their lives to street violence in the Auburn-Gresham neighborhood on Chicago's South Side.
    •  Pam Bosley stands inside the Chicago’s St. Sabina Catholic Church and poses with a photograph of her son, Terrell, who was gunned down in 2006. Bosley now works with kids 14 to 21 at the church, teaching them life and leadership skills and ways to reduce violence.
    •  Carlos Nelson, head of the Greater Auburn Gresham Development Corp., talks about the troubled neighborhood’s future on Chicago’s South Side earlier this month.
    •  Curtis Toler watches his team participate in a basketball tournament for reputed gang members and associates earlier this month at the St. Sabina Catholic Church in the Auburn-Gresham neighborhood on Chicago’s South Side. Toler, 35, a former gang member and father of four, spent much of his life causing chaos. Now, he’s preaching calm.
    •  The Rev. Mike Pfleger of the St. Sabina Catholic Church speaks with a young man during a weekly basketball tournament earlier this month at the church gym where rival gangs can play in a league instead of walking the streets in the Auburn-Gresham neighborhood of Chicago’s South Side.
    •  A lone cross stands in a vacant lot on the corner of 79th and Loomis in the Auburn-Gresham neighborhood on Chicago’s South Side. Up to 80 percent of Chicago’s murders and shootings are gang-related, according to police.
    •  Bobbie McComb sits on the sofa with her 14 year-old daughter, Cerria, at their home in the Auburn-Gresham neighborhood of Chicago’s South Side. In the wrong place at the right time, Cerria and a friend were wounded when gunfire aimed at a reputed gang member struck them, with a bullet exploding in Cerria’s right leg. “I’m angry,” Mrs. McComb says. “I’m frustrated. I’m tired of them shooting our kids, killing our kids, thinking they can get away with it.”
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