Fittest loser
Article updated: 12/23/2012 6:23 AM

Mentally ill say more suburban housing options needed

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The Guagenti family -- mom Shirley, daughter Amanda and father Lou, all of Arlington Heights -- are hoping for supportive living housing for people with mental illness in the suburbs. Amanda is battling mental illness.

Bill Zars | Staff Photographer

The Guagenti family -- father Lou, daughter Amanda and mom Shirley -- of Arlington Heights are hoping for supportive living housing for people with mental illness in the suburbs. Amanda is battling mental illness.

Bill Zars | Staff Photographer

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The Meyers Place development is progressing at the corner of Dempster Street and Busse Road in Mount Prospect. The building will be a supportive living facility for people with mental illness.

Bill Zars | Staff Photographer

A group of residents opposing the Philhaven development gather outside the Wheeling village board meeting last May.

Courtesy of Dina Sternquist

About this Article

Having a home of their own is one more struggle for those living with mental illness. "People with mental illness in this area are forced to live with their parents or in nursing homes, or they have to leave their communities to live in the city," an expert at one suburban agency says. But specialized housing, as proposed in Arlington Heights and Wheeling, is often opposed by residents.
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    • The Guagenti family — mom Shirley, daughter Amanda and father Lou, all of Arlington Heights — are hoping for supportive living housing for people with mental illness in the suburbs. Amanda is battling mental illness.
    • The Guagenti family  father Lou, daughter Amanda and mom Shirley  of Arlington Heights are hoping for supportive living housing for people with mental illness in the suburbs. Amanda is battling mental illness.
    • The Meyers Place development is progressing at the corner of Dempster Street and Busse Road in Mount Prospect. The building will be a supportive living facility for people with mental illness.
    • A group of residents opposing the Philhaven development gather outside the Wheeling village board meeting last May.
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