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posted: 11/23/2012 12:02 PM

Harper students building rockets for NASA

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Submitted by Harper College

Harper College has its own rocket scientists, and they're building rockets for NASA.

Scott Mueller of Elk Grove Village and Craig Babiarz of Rolling Meadows, both second-year Harper students, are leading a 10-person team to design and build a reusable rocket to be launched next spring at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.

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Their work includes the creation of a four-legged robot that will eject from inside the rocket and navigate its way back to the launch stand on its own, a project designed to simulate putting an unmanned ground vehicle on Mars.

Harper is one of only six two-year colleges to be selected for the University Student Launch Initiative, which features nearly 40 teams from institutions including MIT and Northwestern University.

For Babiarz, the project is a gateway to a career in aerospace engineering.

"As a student at a two-year college, it's a great opportunity to get my foot in the door," says Babiarz, who plans to transfer to the University of Illinois or Georgia Tech after completing his Harper education.

Physics Professor Maggie Geppert, the team's faculty sponsor, said the students -- seven from Harper and three from DeVry University -- have spent a "staggering" amount of time on the project.

In addition to doing research and building the rockets and cargo, the students are building a website and doing community outreach to inspire young people to learn more about engineering.

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