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posted: 10/28/2012 4:00 AM

Other newspapers' presidential endorsements

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Chicago Tribune

Four years ago, when we endorsed Obama's run for the White House, we said he would act with decisiveness and intellectual rigor. Ironically he has shown those attributes most where Americans might have expected them least. ...

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Bolstered by his steadiness in office, cognizant of the vast unfinished business before him, we endorse the re-election of Barack Obama.

Orlando (Fla.) Sentinel

While the nation's economy is still sputtering nearly four years after Obama took office, the federal government is more than $5 trillion deeper in debt. It just racked up its fourth straight 13-figure shortfall.

We have little confidence that Obama would be more successful managing the economy and the budget in the next four years. For that reason, though we endorsed him in 2008, we are recommending Mitt Romney in this race.

Cleveland Plain Dealer

Today, we recommend President Obama's re-election. He has led the nation back from the brink of depression. Ohio in particular has benefited from his bold decision to revive the domestic auto industry. Because of his determination to fulfill a decades-old dream of Democrats, 30 million more Americans will soon have health insurance. His Race to the Top initiative seeded many of the education reforms embodied in Cleveland's Transformation Plan. He ended the war in Iraq and refocused the battle to disrupt al-Qaida and its terrorist allies. He ordered the risky attack inside Pakistan that killed Osama bin Laden.

And yet our endorsement this year comes with less enthusiasm or optimism.

Salt Lake (Utah) Tribune

It was Romney's singular role in rescuing Utah's organization of the 2002 Olympics from a cesspool of scandal, and his oversight of the most successful Winter Games on record, that make him the Beehive State's favorite adopted son. After all, Romney managed to save the state from ignominy, turning the extravaganza into a showcase for the matchless landscapes, volunteerism and efficiency that told the world what is best and most beautiful about Utah and its people.

In short, this is the Mitt Romney we knew, or thought we knew, as one of us. ...

Where, we ask, is the pragmatic, inclusive Romney, the Massachusetts governor who left the state with a model health care plan in place, the Romney who led Utah to Olympic glory? ...

The president has earned a second term. Romney, in whatever guise, does not deserve a first.

Northwest Herald (Crystal Lake)

Frankly, we can't say we are better off today than we were four years ago. And we see nothing in Obama's policies that lead us to believe we will be better off with four more years of Obama in the White House. ...

The Republicans' nominee for president, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, represents a return to America's founding principles: Personal responsibility, smaller government, more people contributing to the overall good of the nation.

His record as governor of Massachusetts is better than Obama's as president.

Boston Herald

The simple fact is that this nation can't afford four more years of Barack Obama, four more years of his divisive class warfare rhetoric, four more years of his Chicago-style eco-cronyism and four more years of an administration that will lie and obfuscate -- even about the death of a U.S. ambassador -- to save its sorry hide ...

Not when in Mitt Romney voters have the choice of a strong, smart hand on the helm, a decent, caring man, who lives his faith, who loves his country and would serve it well. For all of those reasons, the Boston Herald is pleased to endorse Mitt Romney for president.

(Nashville) Tennessean

America needs strong leadership; yet, our leaders in Washington have seldom looked more impotent. The Democratic Obama administration and Republican leaders in Congress have butted heads for four years, and the American people have little to show for it ...

Barack Obama was elected in 2008 with a call for hope and change. Perhaps the change he spoke of could only come with the help of Mitt Romney.

Sacramento (Calif.) Bee

Voters often say they want their elected leaders to keep their promises and, at crucial moments, show real political backbone. President Barack Obama deserves a second term largely because he has delivered on both of these fronts ...

Obama -- unruffled by Looney Tunes claims that he is a "socialist" and a "Marxist" -- has pursued a consistent, moderate path that has pulled this country back from the brink and put it on a path toward recovery. In a second term, with just a little help from Congress, he could finish the job and pursue other priorities.

Columbus Dispatch

After nearly four years of economic stagnation, massive unemployment, record-setting debt and government intrusions into the economy that have paralyzed the private sector, the United States needs a new direction. For this reason, The Dispatch urges voters to choose Republican Mitt Romney for president in the Nov. 6 election.

In 2008, The Dispatch warned of the problems that would result if Barack Obama were chosen as president. ... Four years later, the nation is in the grip of the worst economic recovery since the Great Depression.

Arizona Republic

We believe the nation's best opportunity to escape the compounding woes of spiraling debt and economic stagnation lies with a president who believes in the free market's capacity to heal its own wounds.

That leader is Romney. The nation's economy now is in desperate need of the kind of jobs-creating animal spirits that President Romney would encourage.

Winston-Salem (N.C.) Journal

Four years ago on this page, we endorsed Republican U.S. Sen. John McCain of Arizona over Barack Obama. We wrote that we were impressed with Obama, but McCain would "bring the Iraq War to a successful conclusion, work to end American dependence on foreign oil, reduce America's output of climate-changing gases and begin the rebuilding of our economy.

The Democratic president has done all those things and more. He is calm under pressure and courageous in standing up for the rights of all Americans, including the poor, veterans, the elderly, women, gays and immigrants. In contrast, we've sometimes found it hard in the last few weeks to tell just what Obama's challenger, former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, really stands for.

Chattanooga (Tenn.) Times Free Press

This election, the Republican Party nominee has failed to demonstrate a consistent commitment to conservative principles. As a result of his failure to provide clear methods for reducing the size and scope of the federal government, unwillingness to address structural flaws with entitlement programs, reliance on government to intervene in issues best left to families and individuals, and sporadic support of the Constitution and America's founding principles, Mitt Romney is too flawed to earn the Free Press' endorsement.

Romney may be less eager to tax, spend, attack personal freedoms and disregard the constitutional limits on government than his Democratic opponent, President Barack Obama, but only slightly.

As a result, the Free Press editorial page endorses Libertarian Party presidential candidate Gary Johnson for President of the United States.

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