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updated: 10/18/2012 11:26 AM

Suburban punk rockers Counterpunch performing worldwide

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  • Counterpunch, a punk rock band from the suburbs, performs in Prague during their European tour earlier this year.

      Counterpunch, a punk rock band from the suburbs, performs in Prague during their European tour earlier this year.
    Photo courtesy of KidsAndHeroes.com

  • Counterpunch, a punk rock band with suburban roots, performs in Prague during a recent European tour.

      Counterpunch, a punk rock band with suburban roots, performs in Prague during a recent European tour.
    Photo courtesy of KidsAndHeroes.com

  • JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.comMembers of the punk band Counterpunch pose outside the Atlas Studio in Chicago while recording their new EP, "Bruises." Band members, from left to right, are Brian Phee of Oak Lawn, Jared Rohde of Fox River Grove and Eric Hausser of Palatine. Not pictured is drummer Jim Margle of suburban Detroit.

      JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.comMembers of the punk band Counterpunch pose outside the Atlas Studio in Chicago while recording their new EP, "Bruises." Band members, from left to right, are Brian Phee of Oak Lawn, Jared Rohde of Fox River Grove and Eric Hausser of Palatine. Not pictured is drummer Jim Margle of suburban Detroit.

  • JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.comMembers of the punk band Counterpunch pose outside the Atlas Studio in Chicago while recording their new EP, "Bruises." Band members, from left to right, are Brian Phee of Oak Lawn, Jared Rohde of Fox River Grove and Eric Hausser of Palatine. Not pictured is drummer Jim Margle of suburban Detroit.

      JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.comMembers of the punk band Counterpunch pose outside the Atlas Studio in Chicago while recording their new EP, "Bruises." Band members, from left to right, are Brian Phee of Oak Lawn, Jared Rohde of Fox River Grove and Eric Hausser of Palatine. Not pictured is drummer Jim Margle of suburban Detroit.

  • JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.com Members of the punk band Counterpunch pose outside the Atlas Studio in Chicago while recording their new EP, "Bruises." Pictured, from left to right, are Eric Hausser, Brian Phee and Jared Rohde. Not pictured is drummer Jim Margle of suburban Detroit.

      JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.com Members of the punk band Counterpunch pose outside the Atlas Studio in Chicago while recording their new EP, "Bruises." Pictured, from left to right, are Eric Hausser, Brian Phee and Jared Rohde. Not pictured is drummer Jim Margle of suburban Detroit.

  • JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.comMembers of the punk band Counterpunch pose outside the Atlas Studio in Chicago while recording their new EP, "Bruises." Pictured from left to right are Eric Hausser, Brian Phee and Jared Rohde. Not pictured is Jim Margle.

      JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.comMembers of the punk band Counterpunch pose outside the Atlas Studio in Chicago while recording their new EP, "Bruises." Pictured from left to right are Eric Hausser, Brian Phee and Jared Rohde. Not pictured is Jim Margle.

  • Members of the punk band Counterpunch pose outside the Atlas Studio in Chicago while recording their new EP, "Bruises." Pictured, from left, are Eric Hausser, Brian Phee and Jared Rohde.

       Members of the punk band Counterpunch pose outside the Atlas Studio in Chicago while recording their new EP, "Bruises." Pictured, from left, are Eric Hausser, Brian Phee and Jared Rohde.
    JOE LEWNARD | Staff Photographer

  • "Bruises"

      "Bruises"
    Photo courtesy of Counterpunch

 
 

One of the three songs on Counterpunch's new EP, "Bruises," is about a sad scene band co-founder Jared Rohde witnessed in his Fox River Grove subdivision.

During the recession, his good-hearted, hardworking neighbors fell on hard times and the bank foreclosed on their house. The day they moved out, Rohde and other neighbors tried to help -- carrying boxes to the moving van and giving them money toward a deposit on a short-term apartment.

The event had a profound impact on Rohde, who converted his sadness, anger and frustration into lyrics for the title track of "Bruises," the band's new three-song EP:

Life lived how could we stop it

Love lost on empty pockets

Pointing fingers in the wrong way woah oh oh

Captivated by the thought of sinking in woah oh

Eyes hung from hollow sockets

Bloodshot and out of solace

Taking issue with society today is the specialty of Counterpunch, a suburban-rooted punk band fresh off a second European tour. The band is headed to Costa Rica next month for a few shows, including one Nov. 11 with Rise Against. And Friday, Oct. 19, they'll play songs from "Bruises" at Cobra Lounge, 235 N. Ashland Ave., in Chicago. The show will be a tribute to the late Tony Sly, of the California punk band No Use for a Name, who was an inspiration to Counterpunch.

"(Sly) was a huge influence," said Counterpunch guitarist and vocalist Eric Hausser, of Palatine. "Their music was so tight, and you wanted to sing along with it, but it was so aggressive that it was different. It was a natural transition into what Counterpunch does."

Counterpunch originated in the suburbs eight years ago, playing melodic, early 1990s Southern California skate punk music in small venues and gradually building a fan base.

The band features founders Rohde and Hausser, both vocalists and guitar players, along with vocalist/guitarist Brian Phee of Oak Lawn and drummer Jim Margle of suburban Detroit.

"It's been a slow process," said Hausser, who has been playing music with Rohde since 2002.

"Punk rock is not enormous in the States, so we had to go elsewhere and then bring some of that attention back to the States."

Rohde said the show with Rise Against, also a punk band with suburban roots, is "huge for us."

"We're starting to check off the things that we've always wanted to do," Rohde said. "There aren't a lot of well-known punk bands that go to Europe and Central America in the same year. For me, it's like a little world tour."

Even though making music is not yet a full-time job, they have managed to keep moving forward for the past eight years and have no intention of stopping now.

"The whole goal is to write good music and to be able to play it for people," Rohde said.

And the music is catchy, melodic punk with a frenetic pace.

"It's not a lot of screaming," Hausser said.

"It's more about the melodies and the harmonies and the message."

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