Breaking News Bar
posted: 9/7/2012 11:58 AM

Libertyville's Adalyze launches new fantasy sports game, could go international

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • Gary Dollinger

      Gary Dollinger

  • This low-radiation scanner is a Discovery CT 750 HD, which will be used in Advocate hospitals.

      This low-radiation scanner is a Discovery CT 750 HD, which will be used in Advocate hospitals.
    Courtesy of Advocate Health Care

 
 

Libertyville-based Adalyze Technologies Inc., known for its work with electronic medical records and the social networking site BFFGemz.com, is now expanding in the fantasy sports market that could go international.

The updated version of Fantasy Player Exchange launched last week and is a multisport daily game that allows you to compete against others for free or for cash, legally, using players from any sport in the same game. You can create a team in under five minutes, said Adalyze CEO Gary Dollinger.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

Games start after the beginning of the first game on that day, with a second round of games starting at the beginning of the first game after 6 p.m., with the exception of the free game that only runs once a day. Each day you can choose from any athletes playing on that day. There is no membership fee or other costs to join. Users can play each day in the free game, which they can win cash prizes for first place. Other games on the site have a buy-in amount that correlates to the number of entries and total prizes. Buy-in ranges from $1 to $50, Dollinger said.

The first version of the game, that launched in July, had about 300 members and Dollinger is aiming to get even more this time.

"Considering the fantasy sports market in the United States is around $6 billion with about 20 million players, we would like to get out of that 0.1 percent," said Dollinger. "Additionally, we are looking at the United Kingdom market too, which is around another 8 million players, and none are doing daily fantasy sports yet."

The first version was based on a monthly game concept. From doing beta testing, they learned that users liked the concept but wanted more immediate results. This led to changing the concept to a daily game, Dollinger said.

Dollinger, of Round Lake, and Chief Marketing Officer Jay Dainas of Highland Park also are running a large promotion with ESPN Radio in Philadelphia over the entire NFL season. Philadelphia is a top fantasy sports market in the country, Dollinger said.

"Each week on Sunday our members will get a chance to go head-to-head with the Commish, a fantasy football expert that has his own ESPN Radio talk show. The winner over the entire season wins $1,000," Dollinger said. The Commish is a nickname for Henry Bryk, an ESPN Radio talk show host from Philadelphia.

And thanks to Congress in 2006, fantasy sports is one of the last legal games where you can pay money to win prizes online, he said.

"Since fantasy sports are considered games of skill and not chance, it was explicitly deemed legal in the online gambling laws, whereas poker was deemed illegal," he said.

Surfing: Oak Brook-based Advocate Health Care is using a new technology called DoseWatch, which is software that hardwires and monitors a lower effective radiation dose to the patient for every scan. Advocate and GE are deploying DoseWatch on all 51 scanners across the Advocate hospital system, with 44 completed. The rest are expected to be complete by late 2013. This means patients will receive the lowest possible dose all the time at every Advocate facility, said Advocate spokesman Vincent Pierri.

The system can reduce radiation up to 50 percent by using new algorithms, which create images with improved detail. It provides diagnostic scans while avoiding unnecessary repeat scans due to poor image quality. This technology is especially beneficial to patients who require multiple scans over extended periods. The new technology will not raise costs for patients, Pierri said.

• Oakbrook Terrace-based Geneca is expected to hire about 20 more workers this year, including software developers, business analysts, quality analysts and project managers. According to Geneca's Director of Recruiting Mike Denton, software developers are particularly in short supply. Co-workers are helping with the hunt and can earn a $3,000 bonus for successful referrals. Geneca's newly launched website features its employees and gives you a real time feel of what Geneca's culture is like at www.geneca.com.

•Follow Anna Marie Kukec on LinkedIn and Facebook and as AMKukec on Twitter. Write to her at akukec@dailyherald.com

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.