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updated: 8/5/2012 7:48 PM

Car show returns to North Aurora Days

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  • Mike Prete of Harvard cleans up his 1998 Suzuki Intruder at the car, truck and bike show during North Aurora Days Sunday at Mooseheart. Prete, a plumber by trade, hand crafted the copper flames on the bike from discarded copper pipe.

       Mike Prete of Harvard cleans up his 1998 Suzuki Intruder at the car, truck and bike show during North Aurora Days Sunday at Mooseheart. Prete, a plumber by trade, hand crafted the copper flames on the bike from discarded copper pipe.
    BRIAN HILL | Staff Photographer

 

Maryann Hupp and her husband own a 1969 Dodge Charger they take to car shows in the summertime. Years ago, the North Aurora couple could stay home for one show, until the event got scrapped from the North Aurora Days schedule. This year, though, it's back.

The Car, Truck and Bike Show at Mooseheart was part of the final day of the three-day community festival, thanks to Hupp's organizing efforts and the work of a small group of volunteers. More than 60 cars showed up with spectators coming and going during the 7-hour event.

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"It was a great event in the past, and we're hoping to make it even better in the future," Hupp said. "We think we're off to a good start."

Butch Hartman brought his replica 1903 Oldsmobile to the show, taking neighborhood streets at 20 miles per hour from his North Aurora home. Hartman has had the car for about seven years but finally added brakes to the car two weeks ago. The golf cart engine runs inside a body he purchased from a display at the San Diego Aerospace Museum.

Parked next to Hartman's vehicle was an Acura NSX from the other end of the century.

Andrew Rarey's 1991 bright red speedster was one of relatively few foreign cars at the show and one of only about 8,000 ever made in the United States. Rarey said Honda designed it to compete with Italian cars like the Ferrari, changing the fast car world by making one that could top 200 miles per hour but still be reliable. He has another car for day-to-day use, but Rarey said he drives this one on Fridays -- because he feels like he should.

"I'm proud of it," Rarey said. "I like to show it off."

Albert Tijerina and his two sons, 14-year-old Sergio and 10-year-old Andrew, strolled through the show Sunday, admiring the sleek looks of vehicles from throughout the 1900s. Tijerina said they were planning to go shopping but stopped to take advantage of the free show. The family enjoyed both Hartman's and Rarey's vehicles -- one for its age and uniqueness, the other for its design similar to Tijerina's own Honda. The Aurora man also has a 1985 Mustang his son Sergio hopes to inherit one day, which is fine with him.

"It's got to continue on in the family," Tijerina said. "We've always been Ford fans."

About two dozen awards went to vehicles in categories including Best of Show, Best Bike and Mayor's Choice for the inaugural event.

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