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posted: 7/24/2012 1:52 PM

Budget office: Obama's health law reduces deficit

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  • Congressional Budget Office Director Douglas Elmendorf testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington last January.The nonpartisan budget arm of Congress has released its findings on the effects of the health care reform law, the first in-depth look at the law since the Supreme Court ruled it constitutional.

      Congressional Budget Office Director Douglas Elmendorf testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington last January.The nonpartisan budget arm of Congress has released its findings on the effects of the health care reform law, the first in-depth look at the law since the Supreme Court ruled it constitutional.
    ASSOCIATED PRESS

 
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -- Congress' budget scorekeepers are taking a new look at President Barack Obama's health care law -- and they still say it is expected to reduce federal deficits.

It's the first in-depth look by nonpartisan experts since the Supreme Court upheld most of the law last month.

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The court made one exception: States don't have to sign on to a planned expansion of Medicaid for their low-income residents. The Congressional Budget Office said Tuesday that that could reduce the number of people covered by several million. But taxpayers would also save on costs.

Overall, spending cuts and tax increases in Obama's law more than offset new spending,

Repealing the law, as Republicans want to do, would increase the deficit by $109 billion from 2013 to 2022.

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