Breaking News Bar
posted: 7/14/2012 7:29 AM

The iPad is replacing evening news

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • The iPad is taking over the space Walter Cronkite used to for many Americans. Unlike their younger counterparts, who read news on smartphones and check headlines throughout the day, adults over 35 read news on their iPad at home, after 5 p.m. Presumably, they read longer stories and investigative pieces, which some feared would go extinct in the Internet age. Sixty percent of tablet owners say they prefer reading news on the tablet than in a newspaper.

      The iPad is taking over the space Walter Cronkite used to for many Americans. Unlike their younger counterparts, who read news on smartphones and check headlines throughout the day, adults over 35 read news on their iPad at home, after 5 p.m. Presumably, they read longer stories and investigative pieces, which some feared would go extinct in the Internet age. Sixty percent of tablet owners say they prefer reading news on the tablet than in a newspaper.
    Bloomberg

 
By Will Oremus
Slate

Old people love to read the news on the iPad. So says a new study by the Reynolds Journalism Institute, which finds that while youngsters like to read the news on their phones, adults in the ancient 35-and-up demographic favor large-media tablets. And while the smartphone crowd checks headlines throughout the day, half of those who prefer tablets do the bulk of their news reading at home, after 5 p.m.

In short, the iPad and its kin are helping a large and growing segment of the population to buck the 24-hour news cycle. Instead, they're returning to a more leisurely, old-fashioned way of consuming the day's news -- not over coffee in the morning, but on the couch after work. That presumably leaves them time to savor long narratives and investigative reports -- formats that media-watchers once feared would perish in the no-attention-span Internet age.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

And in a blow to those nostalgic for newsprint, 60 percent of tablet owners say they prefer the news-reading experience on their tablet to that of a printed paper. They prefer it to TV news and the radio by even larger margins. That may be why they report reading more news overall than non-tablet owners.

This all might excite media executives who are pinning their hopes on tablets. Those who read their news mainly on a tablet are much more likely to subscribe to digital news products than those who read it on a smartphone.

Still, no one should expect tablets -- or any other modern gadget -- to resuscitate the business models that once sustained daily p.m. newspapers in every major U.S. city. Instead, the growing tablet-news market seems likely to eat into the remaining audiences of evening TV newscasts, while perhaps nibbling on the dog-eared corners of the morning newspaper industry.

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.
    help here