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updated: 4/1/2011 11:49 PM

The good, and bad, in White Sox' bizarre win

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  • White Sox DH Adam Dunn hits a two-run home run off Cleveland Indians starting pitcher Fausto Carmona in the third inning Friday in Cleveland.

      White Sox DH Adam Dunn hits a two-run home run off Cleveland Indians starting pitcher Fausto Carmona in the third inning Friday in Cleveland.
    associated press

  • Chicago White Sox starting pitcher Mark Buehrle throws during the second inning against the Cleveland Indians Friday.

      Chicago White Sox starting pitcher Mark Buehrle throws during the second inning against the Cleveland Indians Friday.
    associated press

  • Carlos Quentin, right, is congratulated by Paul Konerko after Quentin hit a 2-run home run in the third inning against the Cleveland Indians on Friday in Cleveland.

      Carlos Quentin, right, is congratulated by Paul Konerko after Quentin hit a 2-run home run in the third inning against the Cleveland Indians on Friday in Cleveland.
    Associated Press

 
 

CLEVELAND -- One of the big points White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen tried making during his team meeting on Thursday focused on the difficulty of playing baseball for a living in Chicago.

"I told them about Chicago, the Chicago fans," Guillen said. "I told them about the Chicago media, I told them about the Chicago expectations. They play in Chicago. They have to have thick skin."

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With that in mind, let's start poking at the bad stuff from Friday's season-opening 15-10 win over the Indians at Progressive Field.

There was plenty of it after Carlos Quentin (3-for-4, home run, 5 RBI) and newcomer Adam Dunn (2-for-4, HR, 4 RBI) helped stake the Sox to a ridiculous 14-0 lead in the fourth inning.

With the Sox still leading by 2 touchdowns in the bottom of the sixth, Guillen emptied his bench like it was a Cactus League game.

"When I came out it was like we were going to cruise, and all of a sudden the Indians' bats picked up," said second baseman Gordon Beckham (3-for-4, 3 runs scored), who was replaced in the sixth by Brent Lillibridge (0-for-2, 2 strikeouts).

Two other reserves also struggled as Cleveland mounted its improbable comeback -- catcher Ramon Castro (0-for-2, 2 strikeouts) and left fielder Lastings Milledge, who doubled in his lone trip to the plate but couldn't make a fairly routine catch in the eighth inning that was scored a 2-run double.

So let's just say the White Sox' bench is bad. At least for one game.

The Sox' bullpen? Even worse.

My 15-year-old son is already adept enough to spot a shaky signing when he sees one, and he's asked me on several occasions why the White Sox gave relief pitcher Will Ohman to a two-year, $4 million contract this winter.

"Because he's a left-handed specialist," I finally told the boy. "If you don't like it, learn how to pitch left-handed."

Think Ohman is taking heat from others beside my son after debuting with the White Sox on Friday and allowing 3 runs on 3 hits (2 home runs) before being pulled after two-thirds of an inning?

He was so inept, Guillen replaced Ohman with right-hander Tony Pena to face left-hander Travis Hafner.

And Ohman, who is with his sixth team in the last five seasons, didn't exactly tear it up in spring training (6 runs in 9 innings).

"He has been struggling for a couple of weeks already, but no, I don't worry about him," Guillen said. "I start worrying about him in the first game and I'm not going to enjoy my life. I don't know the kid. It's the first time he pitched for us. He's going to be back out there and it's up to him to turn the game around and pitch better."

Same goes for Chris Sale and Jesse Crain, who also struggled out of the bullpen as the Indians came to life late.

But enough of that -- let's get to the good stuff.

"We won," Guillen said. "We started very well. Our offense was very good."

Early on, the offense was great.

The Sox jumped all over Fausto Carmona, Cleveland's lone legitimate starting pitcher, scoring 2 runs in the first inning, 4 in the third and 8 in the fourth.

Just like all of that bad stuff, you'd be foolish to even attempt making any concrete decisions based on one game.

But with Dunn slotted third in the order sandwiched by Beckham (No. 2), Konerko (No. 4), Alex Rios and Quentin, who bats in front of A.J. Pierzynski, Alexei Ramirez and rookie Brent Morel, scoring 15 runs in a game could be a weekly occurrence.

"I'm assuming we are going to do this every time," Dunn said with an obvious smirk. "We are one-for-one, right?"

Yes, the White Sox are.

But as they showed in this odd opener, there is plenty of room for improvement.

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