Daily Archive : Saturday November 4, 2017

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    FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2017, file photo, then-President-elect Donald Trump and his wife Melania Trump and family wave at the conclusion of the pre-Inaugural "Make America Great Again! Welcome Celebration" at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. Four years ago, well before the furor over allegations Moscow engaged in cybermeddling to help get Donald Trump elected, at least 195 web addresses belonging to Trump, his family or his business empire were hijacked by hackers who may have been operating out of Russia, The Associated Press has learned. The Trump Organization denied the domain names were ever compromised. But it was not until this week _ after the Trump camp was asked about it by the AP _ that the last of the tampered-with addresses were repaired. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip. File)

    AP finds hackers hijacked at least 195 Trump web addresses

    The Associated Press has learned that four years ago, at least 195 web addresses belonging to Donald Trump, his family or his business empire were hijacked by hackers possibly operating out of Russia

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    In this Nov. 2, 2017, photo, President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting on tax policy with Republican lawmakers in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, with House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., and Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, right. Terrorism, taxes and Russia tribulations provided fertile ground for President Donald Trump and others to sow confusion over the past week. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

    AP FACT CHECK: Trump on terrorism, taxes and Russia probe

    AP FACT CHECK: Terrorism, taxes and Russia tribulations gave Trump fertile ground to sow confusion

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    United flight returns to Beijing after passenger altercation

    An altercation between a passenger and a member of the flight crew forced a United Airlines flight bound from Washington to turn around and return to Beijing

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    Will Forza 7 look as good on the console as it does in the demos?

    Xbox One X review: Two things to ask yourself before buying

    Before you rush out to buy the new $499 4K Xbox One X, there are two main questions you should ask: How much power do I need and what am I going to play on this thing?

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    Apple’s new iPhone X. Instead of scanning a finger to unlock it, now you stop and look at it for a second like you’re taking a selfie. This phone recognizes you.

    Apple iPhone X review: Say goodbye to the home button

    Is the $1,000 iPhone X for you? It’s no slam dunk. Compared to your current phone, the tenth-anniversary iPhone is missing a key element: the home button. The whole front is just screen. You have to learn new gestures to operate it.

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    Tesla updated its website for customer reservations on Wednesday, including a table that shows the base Model 3 won’t be available until some time next year. (Courtesy of Tesla Motors via AP)

    How the Model 3 delay is burning Tesla’s other projects

    There will be no $35,000 Teslas in 2017, and CEO Elon Musk says the company is in the “eighth level of hell.” Here are five key products still waiting to catch an elevator out of the inferno.

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    Some of the Facebook ads linked to a Russian effort to disrupt the American political process and stir up tensions around divisive social issues, released by members of the U.S. House Intelligence committee, are photographed in Washington, on Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017.

    How social media made it easy for Americans to get played

    On Wednesday, Congress released some of the 3,000 Facebook ads and Twitter accounts created by Russian operatives to sway American voters. These disturbing messages, seen by up to 126 million Americans, raise thorny questions about Silicon Valley’s responsibility for vetting the information it publishes.

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    The $799 Royole Moon “mobile theater” combines noise-cancelling headphones with twin 1920 × 1080 curved optical displays that, according to the website of Fremont, Calif.-based Royole Corp., creates an experience equivalent to seeing a movie on an 800-inch screen from 65 feet.

    For $799 you can have IMAX quality on the go

    The Royole Moon, a $799 “mobile theater” that debuted earlier this year, creates an experience equivalent to seeing a movie on an 800-inch screen from 65 feet even when you’re sitting on an airplane.

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    An employee adjusts an iPhone X smartphone on display at the Apple store on Regent Street in London on Nov. 3, 2017.

    Analysis: How Alexander Graham Bell’s talking dog led to the iPhone X

    The story of the telephone begins with Alexander Graham Bell’s terrier. Around the world on Friday, scores of people lined up for Apple’s new iPhone, which Steve Jobs originally dreamed up with slightly more features than Bell’s original.

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    From left, Facebook’s General Counsel Colin Stretch, Twitter’s Acting General Counsel Sean Edgett, and Google’s Senior Vice President and General Counsel Kent Walker, are sworn in for a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Russian election activity and technology, Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington.

    Analysis: What is Qiwi, and how is it related to Russian election ads?

    Representatives from big-name tech companies faced a grilling on Capitol Hill this week over questions about how Russian operatives were able to use ads on their platforms to influence the election. But another name that you may never have heard of popped up among the discussion of these ads: Qiwi.

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    In the game industry of today, titles like Pokemon Go are free for most people because there’s a small number of players who pay for extras like special weapons and more lives.

    Game makers use AI to profile players and keep them hooked

    In the game industry of today, titles like Clash Royale and Pokemon Go are free for most people because there’s a small number of players who pay for extras like special weapons and more lives. Game developers have to strike a delicate balance between drawing the masses and encouraging big spenders — and they need both.

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    PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds, published by South Korea’s Bluehole Inc., has been the surprise hit of the gaming industry in 2017, selling more than 13 million copies globally. The title sells for about $30 a copy and is played on PCs.

    Why the world’s hottest PC game could get locked out of China

    A Chinese gaming association said in an announcement posted online that PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds is too bloody and violent for sale in the country.

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    Battery-powered cars will make up about half of the global automotive market by 2030, as environmental regulations, falling prices and the deployment of driverless taxis fuel demand, according to a new study by the Boston Consulting Group. (AP File Photo/Richard Vogel)

    Study: Battery-powered cars to be half of global auto market by 2030

    Battery-powered cars will make up about half of the global automotive market by 2030, as environmental regulations, falling prices and the deployment of driverless taxis fuel demand, according to a new study by the Boston Consulting Group.

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    The price of components — specifically, mobile memory and storage chips, as well as AMOLED displays (the kind Apple finally used in the iPhone X after many Android device makers adopted them years ago) — are putting pressure on phone manufacturers’ margins.

    Analysis: iPhone component makers are turning the tables

    Smartphones are getting more expensive globally and across the entire price range — and smartphone makers aren’t happy about it. But it’s getting harder for them to maintain their profit margins because components are getting costlier.

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    The Northwest Community Healthcare Wellness Center in Arlington Heights will add more space and equipment as part of a $1 million improvement project.

    Upgrades planned at Arlington Heights hospital’s Wellness Center

    The Northwest Community Healthcare Wellness Center in Arlington Heights will undergo $1 million worth of renovations, adding 100 new pieces of equipment and 5,000 square feet of training area space.

Life & Entertainment

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    Haley Reinhart performs at Lincoln Hall in Chicago on Sunday, Nov. 5.

    Sunday picks: ‘Idol’ vet Haley Reinhart headlines Chicago’s Lincoln Hall

    Wheeling native and “American Idol” veteran Haley Reinhart headlines an intimate concert bill Sunday with Waxworks and Todd Kessler at Lincoln Hall. More on this and other fun events happening today.

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    This undated photo provided by the Portland Police Department shows Lou Diamond Phillips. The actor has been charged with DWI in Texas just hours before a scheduled appearance in Corpus Christi. Police in nearby Portland arrested Phillips early Friday, Nov. 3, 2017. Jail records show bond wasn't immediately set for Phillips, who starred in "La Bamba." (Portland Police Department via AP)

    Actor Lou Diamond Phillips apologizes for DWI in Texas

    Actor Lou Diamond Phillips has apologized for his arrest in Texas on a charge of driving while intoxicated

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    FILE - In this Feb. 21, 2014 file photo, former Olympic figure skater Nancy Kerrigan after a screening of a new documentary about the 1994 attack on Kerrigan which will aired the day of the 2014 Winter Olympics closing ceremony in Sochi, Russia. Kerrigan is sharing her heartbreaking experience with multiple miscarriages. The Olympic figure skating star is scheduled to deliver the keynote address Saturday, Nov. 4, 2017, at a New England infertility conference in Newton, Massachusetts. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

    Olympian Nancy Kerrigan headlines infertility conference

    Nancy Kerrigan is sharing her heartbreaking experience with multiple miscarriages

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    Emmy Award-winning TV chef Lidia Bastianich discusses her new cookbook Thursday, Nov. 9, in Belushi Performance Hall at the McAninch Arts Center at the College of DuPage.

    Author events: Lidia Bastianich, Jason Segal sign books in suburbs

    TV chef Lidia Bastianich discusses her new cookbook Thursday, Nov. 9, at the McAninch Arts Center at the College of DuPage. Plus, meet Jason Segal, Krysten Ritter and Jeff Kinney this week at suburban appearances.

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    It's time for the annual Medicare open enrollment.

    It's Medicare enrollment time: Here's what you need to know

    It's time for the annual Medicare open enrollment. Most beneficiaries have through Dec. 7 to decide which of dozens of private plans offer the best drug coverage for 2018 or whether it's better to leave traditional Medicare and get a drug and medical combo policy called Medicare Advantage.

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    Children should be encouraged to play sports for the health benefit, focusing on the effort, not the outcome, says Dr. Albert Knuth, pediatric orthopedic surgeon at Advocate Children’s Hospital.

    It’s time to put the ‘play’ back into playing sports

    To encourage children to continue participating in sports, we need to praise them for their efforts not the outcome of the game, says Dr. Albert Knuth, pediatric orthopedic surgeon at Advocate Children’s Hospital.

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    The winner of the 2017 Chicago Paint & Coatings Association’s Painted Ladies Competition, 214 S. State St. in Elgin. Coincidently, the same house won in 2002, and after being sold and repainted, it went on to win this year’s competition.

    Repeat winner in Chicago’s Finest Painted Ladies Competition
    For the first time, a former “Painted Ladies” winning home has taken a second title in the Chicago competition. Lynda Quindel’s home at 214 S. State St. in Elgin was named as the grand prize winner in the 2017 Chicago’s Finest Painted Ladies and her Court Competition.

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    Family may need two lawyers to sell grandfather’s house

    Q. My father-in-law is moving from his home of 60 years to assisted living. One of his grandchildren wants to buy the house, possibly in a cash deal. What is the best way to set a fair market value? Are we naive to think we can make the transaction with just a lawyer and no Realtor? What “gotchas” should we be careful about?A. A real estate broker’s primary obligation is to produce a ready, willing and able buyer. Your father-in-law already has that, so there’s no need for an agent. You could, though, ask a broker for a simple one-page written estimate of value. Or, you might ask two brokers and then use the average of their two figures.In your state, it’s customary to use attorneys for real estate transfers, so a lawyer, preferably one active in real estate matters, could certainly handle the paperwork. It might be more appropriate to retain two lawyers, one representing each party. They’ll know whether any special precautions need to be taken.In another state, you would simply follow local settlement procedures.Q. My mother gave me a lake home for $1 in 1985. She passed away in 1999. I am considering selling it. It is my understanding that if I sell it, my cost basis would be $1 plus the cost of any improvements. Is there a way to avoid capital gains on the entire value? Is there a way to sell it to a family member in order to avoid or minimize taxes? It’s written in my will that my nephew will receive it upon my death. Do you have any suggestions?A. You really received the place as a gift. You also received your mother’s cost basis. That figure, plus the cost of improvements, is your cost basis.Q. We will put our house on the market without a broker, for sale by owner. We would like any advice about what to do when somebody says they want to buy it.A. First off, understand that the Statute of Frauds requires that certain contracts be in writing in order to be legally enforceable, and that includes any contract for the sale of real estate.Oral agreements are not binding. Someone could offer to buy with cash in front of five witnesses. You could shake hands and accept a $20,000 good-faith deposit. But that person could still back out of the deal the next day and demand return of the deposit. As far as the law is concerned, there would’ve been no contract.There’s no point in oral dickering, and you wouldn’t be able to hold them to it anyhow. Your best response is “We’ll be happy to consider any written offer.”Ask your lawyer for a blank copy of a typical sales contract used in your location. Study it carefully ahead of time. When you receive an offer, ask about the buyers’ financial situation. If they offer all cash, where is the money coming from? If they require a loan, what’s their credit rating and their income? It’s helpful if they already have a lender’s written acknowledgment that they qualify for a loan.The offer may contain contingencies. For example, they will buy, but only if:• They are able to obtain a mortgage loan for a certain amount.• Their present house sells.• They receive a satisfactory home inspector report.To protect against getting the house tied up indefinitely, each contingency should have a time limit. You won’t run much of a risk if you take the house off the market for a few days while waiting for an inspector report.If, on the other hand, you’re willing to wait around until their house is sold, you could insert some provisions about the matter into a written counteroffer. An escape clause would allow you to continue showing your house. If you wanted to accept a later offer, those first buyers would have a few days to remove the contingency and agree to buy, come what may. Otherwise, they’d have to drop out, leaving you free to negotiate with your new purchaser.

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    Determining percentage of ownership

    Q. I believe percentage of ownership in the common elements in a condominium is based on square footage of the condominium units. Is that correct? Can you explain how percentage of ownership in a condominium is determined?

Discuss

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