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Daily Archive : Wednesday August 20, 2014

News

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    Volunteers sought to share skills:

    The Community Action Partnership of Lake County is seeking volunteers for its Retired & Senior Volunteer Program, a “placement service” for people 55 and older to share their experience, skills and talent.

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    War veterans wanted for interviews:

    Lake County circuit court again will host a day for war veterans to tell their stories. It will take place on Veteran's Day morning, Nov. 11, at the Lake County courthouse in Waukegan.

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    Archdiocese clears former Schaumburg pastor of abuse allegation

    New information has cleared a former pastor of St. Matthew Catholic Church in Schaumburg of allegations he sexually abused a young parishioner, leading to his reinstatement as a priest in good standing, the Archdiocese of Chicago confirmed Wednesday. An independent review board on July 24 removed the Rev. Joseph Wilk from a list of clergy with a substantiated allegations of abuse against them.

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    Dave Fuglestad, a Buffalo Grove High School teacher, is recovering from a motorcycle accident at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. Last week he got his first few minutes of fresh air since his accident on Aug. 2.

    Buffalo Grove teacher paralyzed in motorcycle crash

    Popular Buffalo Grove High School science teacher Dave Fuglestad didn't return to his classroom Wednesday with everybody else. Instead, he is rehabbing after an Aug. 2 motorcycle accident that left him without the use of his legs - but determined to get back to BGHS.

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    UberX driver sued in fatal Hoffman Estates crash

    A Hoffman Estates man who rear-ended a cabdriver who then died on the Jane Addams Tollway is being sued by the driver's son. Jasbir S. Dhaliwal, 45, was at the wheel of his sport utility vehicle when he struck cabdriver Melba R. Farr, 56, of Elgin June 8.

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    New principal Jeff Wardle addresses students during a back-to-school pep rally to kick off the first day of school at Buffalo Grove High School.

    Northwest suburban high schoolers head back to class

    More than 12,000 high school students in the Northwest suburbs headed back to classes Wednesday as Northwest Suburban High School District 214 celebrated the first day of the 2014-2015 school year. Students at Buffalo Grove High School started the year with a festive pep rally led by new principal Jeff Wardle.

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    Sophomores Olivia Wood, left, and Cara Murphy, dump ice water on Geneva High School Principal Tom Rogers in the ALS Bucket Challenge at the annual Geneva All Sports Booster’s corn boil on Wednesday evening. $275 was raised during the lunch hours during the day, with more cash donations collected during the corn boil. The donations will be counted and announced Thursday.

    Geneva High administrators accept ALS challenge

    The high school marching band and athletic teams at Geneva High School perform the ALS Bucket Challenge by pouring ice water over the heads of administrators.

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    Attorney General Eric Holder talks with Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri State Highway Patrol on Wednesday in Florrissant, Mo.

    Holder says he understands mistrust of police

    Attorney General Eric Holder sought Wednesday to reassure the people of Ferguson about the investigation into Michael Brown’s death and said he understands why many black Americans do not trust police, recalling how he was repeatedly stopped by officers who seemed to target him because of his race. Holder made the remarks during a visit to the St. Louis suburb that has endured more than a...

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    Jury upholds firing of DuPage County worker

    A federal jury upheld the firing of a DuPage County employee in 2012 who filed suit against the county saying the termination violated her rights, DuPage officials said.

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    Kirk Dillard

    Metra could get extra RTA money for improvements

    The RTA's budget proposal for 2015 estimates about 4 percent in sales tax growth. New ideas include a $100 million bond sale to aid Metra, the CTA and Pace. What's uncertain is whether the three agencies will fight over a $200 million fund that's up to the RTA's discretion.

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    Joanna Sojka

    Des Plaines outlines succession plan following alderman’s death

    Des Plaines leaders Wednesday outlined the succession plan following the unexpected death of 29-year-old Alderman Joanna Sojka. Mayor Matt Bogusz will make an appointment of someone from the ward to fill Sojka’s 7th Ward seat. The appointment is subject to city council approval.

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    Residents protest not being allowed to enter the area leading to their homes. Security forces deployed Wednesday to enforce a quarantine around a slum in the Liberian capital, stepping up the government’s fight to stop the spread of Ebola and unnerving residents.

    Liberian slums barricaded as Ebola sets new record

    Riot police and soldiers acting on their president’s orders used scrap wood and barbed wire to seal off 50,000 people inside their Liberian slum Wednesday, trying to contain the Ebola outbreak that has killed 1,350 people and counting across West Africa.

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    Mourners chant angry slogans Wednesday during the funeral of Widad Mustafa Deif, 27, who was killed along with her 8-month-old son in Israeli strikes in Gaza City late Tuesday. Widad was the wife of Mohammed Deif, the leader of the Hamas military wing.

    Airstrike kills wife and child of Hamas figure

    Hamas’ shadowy military chief escaped an apparent Israeli assassination attempt that killed his wife and infant son, the militant group said Wednesday as Israel’s prime minister warned that the bombardment of Gaza will continue until rocket fire out of the Palestinian territory stops. The airstrike on a home where Mohammed Deif’s family members were staying — and the...

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    Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner speaks with reporters during a term limits news conference Tuesday in Springfield.

    Appeals court says term limits can’t be on ballot

    Proponents of term limits for Illinois lawmakers were preparing a last-minute appeal to the state Supreme Court after an appeals court ruled Wednesday that a measure asking voters to approve such a measure could not appear on the November ballot.

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    Man sent to prison for impregnating 12-year-old

    A McHenry County man has been sentenced to 15 years in prison after impregnating a 12-year-old girl.

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    Sex assault charge leads to officer’s firing

    A police lieutenant in the Kankakee County community of Grant Park has been fired after being charged with criminal sexual assault.

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    U of I can expect presidential pay to rise

    An employee of the firm helping the University of Illinois search for a new president says the school should expect to pay a salary in line with its status as a top university.

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    Crash forces evacuations in Hoffman Estates

    One person was injured and five homes evacuated when a car crashed into a garage in Hoffman Estates early Wednesday morning, fire officials said.

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    St. Charles Unit District 303 Superintendent Don Scholmann made a point of getting to know new students Wednesday during their first day at school.

    St. Charles superintendent visits schools, students on Day 1

    The first day of school in St. Charles Unit District 303 through the eyes of Superintendent Don Schlomann as he tries to get to as many of the district's 17 schools as possible.

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    James Foley, a journalist from Rochester, New Hampshire, was killed by the Islamic militant group ISIS. Foley received his master’s degree from Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications.

    Northwestern classmates, colleagues mourn slain journalist

    The shock and sadness surrounding the beheading of American journalist Jim Foley by Islamic militants hits home at Northwestern University, where Foley was a graduate and noted speaker.

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    Bartlett officials will pay up to $1.4 million to a contractor clearing trees ravaged by the emerald ash borer through fall 2015.

    Emerald ash borer to cost Bartlett up to $1.4 million next year

    Bartlett trustees have agreed to pay a Wauconda contractor up to $1.4 million next year as the village speeds up work to remove trees destroyed by the emerald ash borer. "(W)e need to spend more and pick up the pace because our residents would really like to get those dead trees out of their front yards," Village Administrator Valerie Salmons said.

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    Lindenhurst boy dies after three-vehicle crash in Wisconsin

    Wisconsin authorities say a 9-year-old Lindenhurst boy has died after a three-vehicle accident last week. Officials said Ilan Hurtado died Tuesday from injuries suffered in the Aug. 15 crash in the town of Beaver Dam. He was in a car driven by a 45-year-old woman also from Lindenhurst.

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    Work to begin next week on Hough-Main project in Barrington

    Construction will begin Monday on a long-awaited retail development at Hough and Main streets in downtown Barrington, the village announced Wednesday. The project involves the construction of two new one-story retail buildings and 132 public parking spaces.

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    Former Downers Grove South High School football coach Jack McInerney led the sixth annual golf tournament for visually impaired veterans at the Willow Crest Golf Club in Oak Brook.

    Visually impaired veterans tackle DuPage links

    More than 46 years have passed since a mortar blast in Leroy Bailey’s tent took his vision and destroyed his face in Vietnam. Despite the debilitating injury, Bailey still can enjoy some of the finer things in life, such as sinking two 20-foot putts on a sunny August afternoon. Bailey, 68, of LaCrosse, Indiana, was one of 10 visually impaired and blind veterans participating in...

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    People flocked to Main Street in Wauconda on Tuesday for a car show, but some business owners were upset the roadway was closed for the event.

    Wauconda merchants upset about events’ impact on parking, access

    Car shows, a farmers market and an annual music-and-food festival have brought people to downtown Wauconda this summer — but they’ve also got some local business owners steaming. They say temporary street and public parking lot closures implemented to accommodate the events hurt access to shops.

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    Water service restored in Gurnee:

    Gurnee officials say water service has been restored to a neighborhood after a water main break this week.

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    Island Lake committee meets:

    Island Lake’s fire and police commission will meet Friday to appoint a new chairman. The previous chairwoman, Donna O’Malley, resigned from the panel.

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    Vernon Hills skunks:

    Skunks are not an issue this season in Vernon Hills, according to Police Chief Mark Fleischhauer.

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    Second-grade teacher Maggie Alfredson helps answer a question for a new student during the first day of school Wednesday at Mill Creek Elementary in Geneva.

    Geneva teachers hit 25-year mark

    Wednesday was the first day of school in Geneva District 304, and two teachers at the high school were celebrating 25 years in the classroom.

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    Students converge on Madison Junior High School in Naperville for the first day of classes Wednesday in Naperville Unit District 203. The school got a $769,000 front entrance and vestibule this summer to increase safety.

    New year begins to ‘Celebrate 203’

    A new front entrance for one school, a renovated science lab for another and students ramping up toward all-day kindergarten at seven more schools marked the first day of class Wednesday in Naperville Unit District 203. District officials said they are beginning the year with a “Celebrate 203” theme to recognize developments including the availability of all-day kindergarten at all...

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    Dist. 57 receives awards for communication efforts

    Mount Prospect Elementary District 57 has received two awards from the National School Public Relations Association for the district’s recent communications efforts, officials announced. The NSPRA gave District 57 the 2014 “Golden Achievement Award,” which recognizes efforts to inform the public in a cost-effective manner, and the 2014 “Award of Merit,” which...

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    Erika Stientjes of Des Plaines fills her cart on the opening day of the new Walmart Neighborhood Market in Des Plaines.

    First suburban Walmart Neighborhood Market opens in Des Plaines

    The first Walmart Neighborhood Market in the suburbs is officially open for business. The 24/7 grocery store opened Wednesday at 727 W. Golf Road, located within the Des Plaines Market Place shopping center.

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    Sheriff: Hostage takers shot through door

    Cook County Sherriff Tom Dart said hostage takers shot twice through a door as officers stormed up a stairway in an ultimately successful rescue attempt at a home in Harvey.

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    Mt. Prospect board debates couple’s lakeside deck

    Andrew and Alice Kalinowski's new patio and deck behind their Mount Prospect home has been widely praised by neighbors and even Mayor Arlene Juracek. But it also violates village zoning rules. Now village leaders are trying to decide how to bring the property back within the rules without dismantling the couple's work.

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    William Scott, who identified himself as a teacher concerned about young people in Chicago dying because of illegal drug trade, asks a question Wednesday in Chicago during the last of three town hall meetings. The meetings concerned how the application process will work in the state’s four-year pilot program. Scott wanted to know if there would be educational opportunities for youth in the program. A standing-room-only crowd of more than 500 attended the meeting.

    Marijuana town hall attracts hundreds in Chicago

    Will retailers be able to open a package of marijuana to give customers a whiff? Will a master grower be able to work for multiple cultivation centers? Is medicinal marijuana chocolate considered candy? Those were among the questions at a standing-room-only town hall meeting about the application process for Illinois’ new medical marijuana program.

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    Brady VanRossum, 5, of Geneva, holds on tight to his mom, Carrie, while lining up to head into kindergarten during the first day of school Wednesday at Mill Creek Elementary.

    Images: First Day of School Wednesday in the Suburbs
    Images of the first day of the new year for schools in Burlington, Geneva, Buffalo Grove, Naperville, and St. Charles.

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    Illinois students improve slightly on ACT

    Illinois students’ 20.7 average score on the four-subject test this year edged the previous year’s 20.6, but it fell just short of the national average of 21. The test is graded on a 36-point scale.

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    Heather Mack has been charged in the death of her mother in Bali, Indonesia.

    2 Americans arrested in Bali under suicide watch

    An American couple arrested in Indonesia on suspicion of murdering the woman’s mother and stuffing her body into a suitcase at a resort hotel are being held under a suicide watch, their appointed lawyer said Wednesday.

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    Stepping onto the tarmac at O'Hare International Airport, these members of the Illinois Army National Guard's 66th Brigade were bound for Operation Enduring Freedom in 2002.

    Constable: National Guard recruiting, roles evolving

    Surburban students heading off to college get a pitch from the National Guard, telling teens how they can "graduate from college with a degree, not debt." With the Guard having served in Afghanistan and Iraq, and now trying to keep the peace in Missouri, how is recruiting going?

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Ronnie J. Anderson, 29, of Elgin, was charged Tuesday with battery, criminal damage to property and resisting/obstructing a police officer, court records show. Anderson shoved and kick a police officer, causing an ankle injury and damaging the officer’s bulletproof vest.

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    Vernon Hills High School new principal Jon Guillaume talks with students Wednesday in the hallway during the first day of classes.

    New principal greets Vernon Hills High School students

    Students arrived for the first day of classes at Vernon Hills High School on Wednesday — and so did new principal Jon Guillaume. “To have 1,330 kids fill our halls feels good and right,” he said.

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    Peter L. Jacobson

    Elgin man charged with sexual assault

    Peter L. Jacobson, 55, of Elgin was being held on $1 million bond in Kane County jail after being charged with multiple counts of criminal sexual assault, according to court records. He was in bond court Wednesday in Elgin.

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    Bartlett bracing for traffic delays around Route 59 bridge project

    Bartlett police are warning drivers to brace for construction delays around the Route 59 bridge over the Metra tracks. The Illinois Department of Transportation will begin a nine-month long project on the bridge Monday.

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    Dawn Patrol: 4-hour wait for a Cubs win; U-46 minority program flap

    The Cubs win -- with a short game and a loooong rain delay. 12-year-old girl who drowned in Arlington Heights pool identified. U-46 criticized for paying parents $1,000 in minority leadership program. Paniagua guilty of 2010 Mount Prospect murder. Ex-Arlington Hts. PTA president charged with theft. Batavia customers file suit against electricity provider. DuPage courts expert Lapinski to lead...

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    President Barack Obama, speaking Wednesday in Edgartown, Mass., said the U.S. will continue to confront Islamic State extremists despite the brutal murder of journalist James Foley. Obama said the entire world is “appalled” by Foley’s killing.

    Obama: U.S. won’t stop confronting Islamic State

    The United States stood firm Wednesday in its fight against Islamic State militants who beheaded a U.S. journalist in Iraq, pledging to continue attacking the group despite its threats to kill another American hostage. President Barack Obama denounced the group as a “cancer” threatening the entire region as the administration weighed sending even more American troops to Iraq.

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    Denilson J. Martinez-Rodriquez

    Waukegan man accused of attacking jogger on bike path pleads not guilty

    A Waukegan man pleaded not guilty Wednesday to the June 15 attack on a female jogger on the North Shore Bike Path near Libertyville. Denilson J. Martinez-Rodriguez, 21, remains held in Lake County jail on $500,000 bail.

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    This sketch released by Palatine police Wednesday depicts the man who they believe attempted to abduct a Palatine teenage girl shortly after 9 p.m. Sunday.

    Palatine police release sketch of suspect in attempted abduction

    Palatine police released a sketch of a man they say attempted to abduct two girls Sunday night on the 500 block of West Helen Road. “This is a case where we are trying to put out as much information as possible so we can hopefully find someone out there who knows more and can help us,” Cmdr. Michael Seebacher said.

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    Times that test us help build character

    Although none of us likes going through these tests, God uses them as a valuable tool to build character in us.

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    Backpacks given out by College of Lake County’s Womens Center.

    School supplies drives ease back-to-school costs for needy families

    School supply drives at College of Lake County and Elgin Community College are among the many events and efforts across the suburbs aimed at easing some of the rising back-to-school costs for low-income families.

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    A bighorn sheep is stuck in a canal near the Arnold Palmer course at the PGA West Country Club in La Qunita, Calif.

    Bighorn sheep escapes canal in California desert

    LA QUINTA, Calif. — A bighorn sheep is back in the hills of Riverside County after being rescued from a golf-course canal in the desert near Palm Springs.Animal control officials said this week that algae or moss made the concrete canal too slick for the normally sure-footed sheep to escape.

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    2 Pat Quinns accept ‘ice bucket challenge’ to raise money for ALS

    Gov. Pat Quinn is getting a hand from someone with a familiar name to raise money for Lou Gehrig’s disease. The governor’s office says the Democrat will appear Wednesday in Chicago with Pat Quinn of Yonkers, New York. The other Quinn is credited with helping jumpstart the so-called “ice bucket challenge” to raise money for the disease also known as ALS. He was...

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    The Wal-Mart in East Dundee along Route 25 just south of Route 72 will close if the company buildings a supercenter in Carpentersville.

    East Dundee, Carpentersville continue Wal-Mart feud

    The feud over a new Wal-Mart proposed for Carpentersville continued this week when East Dundee filed a lawsuit arguing Carpentersville had withheld information in a recent Freedom of Information Act request. East Dundee, which will lose its Wal-Mart if the new one is built, argues Carpentersville did not include the retailer's application for special taxing district funding in the FOIA response.

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    Naperville Mayor and Liquor Commissioner George Pradel said the city has “waited too long” to impose additional regulations on bars that contribute to a sometimes rowdy night scene in the city’s downtown.

    Naperville looking at 8 regulations to curb rowdy night life

    Naperville is moving toward eight new regulations to help curtail excessive downtown drinking and rowdy night life conditions that some say are hurting the city’s image. “I don’t think anybody here could deny that this is detracting from the Naperville brand,” council member Robert Fieseler said about “the whole rowdiness thing.” “We can do something...

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    Wauconda dispatcher Wauconda officials are considering plans to close the 911 center at the police station.

    Trustees, residents want to settle Wauconda 911 dispatch center issue

    A small group of residents and some Wauconda village trustees and complained about the unresolved proposal to outsource 911 services. “I think it has dragged on too long,” Trustee Linda Starkey said. “I think the board should make a decision.”

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    James Foley of Rochester, N.H., a freelance contributor for GlobalPost, in Benghazi, Libya. In a horrifying act of revenge for U.S. airstrikes in northern Iraq, militants with the Islamic State extremist group have beheaded Foley — and are threatening to kill another hostage, U.S. officials say.

    American photojournalist executed, another hostage at risk

    In a horrifying act of revenge for U.S. airstrikes in northern Iraq, militants with the Islamic State extremist group have beheaded American journalist James Foley — and are threatening to kill another hostage, U.S. officials say. The White House must now weigh the risks of adopting an aggressive policy to destroy the Islamic State against resisting any action that could result in the death...

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    Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn, left, is running for re-election against Republican Bruce Rauner.

    Governor candidates don’t agree on debates, either

    After weeks of pressure from Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn, Republican candidate Bruce Rauner agreed to eight forums and debates including one in Lake County, but the governor slammed the choices and said his opponent is “hiding.” So far, the two candidates have agreed to three meetups in common, including one hosted by ABC 7 in Chicago.

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    Naperville City Council members listen to Jeff Bjorklund, left, who spoke on behalf of faculty members involved with the design of a new science center approved Tuesday night to be built at North Central College.

    Naperville overturns denial, OKs NCC building

    North Central College is getting a new science center. Despite neighbors’ concerns about the size of the 125,000-square-foot building, the college received city council approval Tuesday night to go forward with the plan. “This facility is really a linchpin to the strength of this college going forward,” North Central College President Troy Hammond said.

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    Harvey Mayor Eric J. Kellogg, left, and city spokesman Sean Howard, center, accompany Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart at a news conference Wednesday after about two dozen heavily armed law enforcement officers stormed a home in the suburb to free four remaining hostages and capture two suspects, ending a standoff that lasted more than 20 hours. The two adults and two children still being held at the home were freed midmorning without a shot being fired.

    Officers storm house to free hostages in Harvey standoff

    About two dozen heavily armed law enforcement officers stormed a home in Harvey Wednesday to free four remaining hostages and capture two suspects, ending a standoff that lasted more than 20 hours. The two adults and two children still being held at the home in the small city of Harvey were freed midmorning without a shot being fired, said Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart.

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    U.S. official: More airstrikes in Iraq

    American fighter jets and drones conducted nearly a dozen airstrikes in Iraq since Tuesday, a U.S. official said, even as Islamic State militants threatened to kill a second American captive in retribution for any continued attacks. The strikes came in the hours after militants released a gruesome video Tuesday showing U.S. journalist James Foley being beheaded.

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    Virginia prepares for possibility of gay marriage

    Virginia officials are preparing for the possibility that same-sex couples will be able to wed in the state Thursday by drafting a revised marriage license form for courthouse clerks to use as soon as they open their doors.

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    Texas Gov. Rick Perry talks with media and supporters at the Blackwell Thurman Criminal Justice Center after he was booked, Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014, in Austin, Texas. Perry was indicted last week on charges of coercion and official oppression for publicly promising to veto $7.5 million for the state public integrity unit run.

    Texas’ Perry smiles for mug shot, but what’s next?

    Republican Texas Gov. Rick Perry gave a confident, wry smile beneath flawless hair for his mug shot. Then he went out for a vanilla ice cream. That’s how the possible 2016 presidential candidate greeted his booking on criminal charges of abuse of power. But what’s next for the longest-serving governor in Texas history isn’t so glib: Perry’s high-powered and pricey...

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    Former state Attorney General Dan Sullivan became the latest mainstream Republican to turn back a Tea Party challenger, winning the Alaska GOP primary to become his party’s candidate to take on U.S. Sen. Mark Begich in the fall.

    Sullivan beats Tea Party in Alaska GOP Senate race

    Former state Attorney General Dan Sullivan became the latest mainstream Republican to turn back a Tea Party challenger, winning the Alaska GOP primary to become his party’s candidate to take on U.S. Sen. Mark Begich in the fall. Republicans see the Alaska race as a key contest in their attempt to capture the Senate majority from Democrats.

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    In this aerial photo, survivors and rescue workers sit on the roof of a damaged house after a massive landslide swept through residential areas in Hiroshima, western Japan, Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014.

    36 dead, 7 missing in Hiroshima landslide

    Rain-sodden slopes collapsed in torrents of mud, rock and debris Wednesday on the outskirts of Hiroshima city, killing at least 36 people and leaving seven missing, Japanese police said. Public broadcaster NHK showed rescue workers suspended by ropes from police helicopters pulling victims from the rubble. Others gingerly climbed into windows as they searched for survivors in crushed homes.

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    Sakari Momoi, a 111-year-old Japanese retired educator, was recognized as the world’s oldest living man on Wednesday, succeeding Alexander Imich of New York, who died in April at the age of 111 years, 164 days.

    111-year-old from Japan recognized as oldest man

    A 111-year-old retired Japanese educator who enjoys poetry has been recognized as the world’s oldest living man. Sakari Momoi received a certificate from Guinness World Records on Wednesday. He succeeds Alexander Imich of New York, who died in June at the age of 111 years, 164 days. The world’s oldest living person is also Japanese: Misao Okawa, a 116-year-old woman from Osaka.

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    A worker takes a selfie before removing a yellow and blue Ukrainian flag attached by protesters atop Stalin-era skyscraper in Moscow, Russia.

    Protesters plant Ukraine flag on Moscow skyscraper

    Protesters on Wednesday scaled one of Moscow’s famed Stalin-era skyscrapers and painted the Soviet star on its spire in the national colors of Ukraine. The dangerous prank, which set Russian social networking sites abuzz, drew a harsh response from the police. The protesters also attached a yellow and blue Ukrainian flag to the top of the 580-foot building east of the Kremlin along the...

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    A Russian military truck carries a MSTA-S self-propelled howitzer about 10 kilometers from the Russia-Ukrainian border control point at town Donetsk, Rostov-on-Don region, Russia, Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014.

    Fighting in eastern Ukraine kills 43 in 24 hours

    Government troops fought to gain control of the rebel-held city of Donetsk and a key highway in eastern Ukraine on Wednesday — battles that left 34 residents and nine troops dead in just 24 hours, authorities said.

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    Sen. Kay Hagan, D-N.C., faces heavy outside spending but has Emily’s List backing. The Emily’s List network of committees raised more than most other outside groups, including the GOP-backed American Crossroads and the anti-tax Club for Growth.

    Senate control could rest with well-funded women

    Control of the Senate could lie in the fortunes of female candidates and the deep-pocketed donors, like former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who are sending piles of cash their way. So far this election cycle, donors have handed over $46 million to a collection of political committees and candidates linked to Emily’s List, which backs female contenders who support abortion rights.

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    On Aug. 16 Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon declared a state of emergency and imposed a curfew in Ferguson. The first night of the curfew ended with tear gas and seven arrests, after police in riot gear use armored vehicles to disperse defiant protesters who refused to leave.

    Key events following the death of Michael Brown

    A timeline of key events following the fatal police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson, Missouri.

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    A 1955 LaSalle II Roadster concept car, owned by Joe Bortz, sits with its sister car, a sedan still being restored, at the intersection of Third and Fulton Streets at last year’s Geneva Concours d’Elegance. The show, which features vintage, classic and luxury cars, is expected to display about 275 vehicles and draw 20,000 to 25,000 visitors to the city.

    Geneva Concours d’Elegance celebrates ‘the art of the car’

    This Sunday, the streets of downtown Geneva will be filled with cars and car lovers, when the 10th annual Concours d’Elegance rolls into town. The event will showcase 175 invitational cars from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and admission is free. Car clubs are expected to display about 100 more cars in the Kane County Courthouse parking area as well.

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    Roosevelt University to cut back Schaumburg campus

    Lagging enrollment and financial woes have prompted Chicago’s Roosevelt University to eliminate many programs at its Schaumburg campus.In a letter to the university’s board of trustees, President Chuck Middleton said the university is overcommitted in Schaumburg and will relocate some staff to Chicago.

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    Indiana wants ban on abortion pill law lifted

    State attorneys asking a federal judge to lift an order blocking an Indiana abortion pill law that critics claim targets a Planned Parenthood clinic in Lafayette say women could seek the procedure elsewhere.

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    Mary O’Connor, owner of Take a Bite Food Coaching Services, prepares ingredients as she makes a loaf of gluten-free bread in her shop in Bloomington. O’Connor has branched out to offer gluten-free baked goods and vegan lunches and dinners. O’Connor started an online funding campaign to raise $3,000 on Kickstarter so she can catch up on bills and stay above water the next few months.

    Websites offer new revenue options

    Mary O’Connor is struggling to keep her business open, so she turned to social media. The owner of Take A Bite Food Coaching Services, a Bloomington vegan and gluten-free bakery, restaurant and cooking class business, started an online funding campaign to raise $3,000 on Kickstarter so she can catch up on bills and stay above water the next few months..

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    Wauconda officials have hired engineers to examine the town’s roads.

    Engineers to study Wauconda roads, suggest repairs

    Wauconda officials on Tuesday hired an engineer to examine the village's streets and determine what repairs are needed on which roads.

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    Preliminary work for the Lake County Courts Expansion Project is expected to begin this fall.

    Lake County courthouse expansion moving ahead

    Pre-construction work on a $94 million Lake County court expansion project in downtown Waukegan is expected to begin this fall. The work includes an eight-story building with 15 courtrooms and the renovation of the adjoining Babcox facility to include two new unfinished floors for future court space.

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    A majority of Schaumburg trustees Tuesday agreed to allow two 400-square-foot LED signs on the parking garage of Streets of Woodfield shopping center as well as more ground signs.

    Schaumburg OKs LED signs at Streets of Woodfield

    After a further month of research and consideration, a majority of Schaumburg trustees Tuesday agreed to a request for two large LED signs and an increase in the number of ground signs at Streets of Woodfield shopping center. If approved by the full village board next week, the requested changes would be added to others already being planned for Streets of Woodfield this fall.

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    A tube of Naloxone Hydrochloride, also known as Narcan, is shown for scale next to a lipstick container. Narcan is a nasal spray used as an antidote for opiate drug overdoses. The drug counteracts the effects of heroin, OxyContin and other painkillers.

    Police in Kane County days away from getting overdose drug

    Nearly 30 local police departments received training through Kane County at the end of July in how to use Narcan to stop heroin overdoses. That means the first full wave of police using Narcan on the streets is just a couple of weeks away. “The cost is not that expensive, and the medication does have a shelf life of two years,” said Barb Jeffers. “But we're going to have to look...

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    Water ban lifted:

    A temporary outdoor watering ban in Lincolnshire and several other Lake County communities was lifted Tuesday after being in place for less than a day, officials said.

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    Hoffman Estates High School teachers, from left, Natalie Tindle, Jasmin Chung and Tyrone Jones collaborate Tuesday to learn new technology tools they can use during the school year.

    Teachers return to work in District 211

    Palatine-Schaumburg High School District 211 teachers returned to school Tuesday for the first of two institute days before classes resume Thursday, Aug. 21.

Sports

  •  
    Jordan Palmer looks down field for a receiver in the second quarter against Philadelphia in the Bears' first preseason game.

    Bears' Jordan Palmer will be No. 2 QB Friday

    The competition for the Bears' top backup QB spot continues Friday night against the Seahawks in Seattle, where both Jordan Palmer and Jimmy Clausen will face a standout defense in the NFL's noisiest outdoor stadium. “It's a great opportunity because of the environment,” Palmer said. “There's going to be some adversity that we're going to have to deal with (regarding) the noise. It's a great opportunity to show some composure and move the team down the field.”

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    Darth Vader throws out a ceremonial first pitch before the start of a baseball game between the San Francisco Giants and the Chicago Cubs on Wednesday in Chicago.

    Castro sidelined by family emergency

    The Cubs could be without all-star shortstop Starlin Castro for up to a week. Castro left the club Wednesday with what was described as a family emergency. It's likely the Cubs will put Castro on the bereavement list.

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    Bandits fall 2-1 in tournament opener

    Coverage of Chicago Bandits fastpitch softball:\Jessica Garcia doubled to drive home 2 runs in the sixth inning, and Lisa Norris pitched a complete game to lead the Akron Racers to a 2-1 victory over the Chicago Bandits in the opening game of the NPF Championship Series at Hoover Met Stadium on Wednesday night. Game 2 of the best-of-three series is today at 8 p.m. on CBSsports.com.

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    Germany’s Benedikt Hoewedes, left, and United States’ Jermaine Jones go for a header during a World Cup match in Brazil in June.

    Jermaine Jones destined for MLS — and maybe Fire

    U.S. midfielder Jermaine Jones has signed with Major League Soccer and should find out within the next 24-48 hours whether he will play for the Chicago Fire or New England Revolution, sources said.

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    Boys golf: Wednesday’s results
    Results of boys golf meets from Wednesday, Aug. 20.

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    Girls golf: Wednesday’s results
    Results of girls golf meets from Wednesday, Aug. 20.

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    Sloppy Mariners lose 4-3 to Phillies

    Wil Nieves doubled and had three hits and Cole Hamels got a victory when he wasn’t at his best as the Philadelphia Phillies defeated the Seattle Mariners 4-3 on Wednesday.

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    Martinez, Rangers top Marlins, 5-4

    Nick Martinez allowed two runs and struck out a career-high seven in six innings of work, Alex Rios drove in two runs and the Texas Rangers survived Miami’s last-inning rally to beat the Marlins 5-4 on Wednesday afternoon. Marcell Ozuna and Jarrod Saltalamacchia homered in the ninth for Miami, but the Rangers held on for a split of the quick two-game series.

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    Bautista, Blue Jays end Brewers’ 5-game win streak

    Jose Bautista’s three-run homer capped a five-run sixth inning and the Toronto Blue Jays outslugged Milwaukee 9-5 Wednesday, snapping the Brewers’ five-game winning streak.

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    Wheeler wins again, Mets end 3-game skid

    Lucas Duda hit a three-run homer, Eric Campbell also connected and the New York Mets beat the Oakland Athletics 8-5 on Wednesday to snap a three-game losing streak.

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    Hamilton drives in 3 runs, Angels beat Red Sox 8-3

    Josh Hamilton broke out of a slump with two hits and three RBIs, Howie Kendrick drove in two runs, and the Los Angeles Angels beat the Boston Red Sox 8-3 to increase their AL West lead on Wednesday night. Hamilton was in a 5-for-41 slump with 18 strikeouts but hit two sacrifice flies and then singled in the Angels’ final run in the ninth inning.

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    Rays blanked for 15th time, Porcello leads Tigers

    Rick Porcello became the latest pitcher to silence the Tampa Bay Rays. Porcello threw a three-hitter for his AL-leading third shutout, Victor Martinez hit a grand slam and drove in five runs, and the Detroit Tigers beat the Rays 6-0 Wednesday night.

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    McBride, De La Rosa lift Rockies past Royals, 5-2

    Matt McBride hit his first career grand slam and Jorge De La Rosa pitched eight crisp innings, helping the Colorado Rockies cool off the Kansas City Royals with a 5-2 win on Wednesday night.

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    Rookie T.J. House, 4 Indians relievers blank Twins

    Rookie T.J. House threw shutout ball into the sixth inning, combining with four relievers to pitch the Cleveland Indians past the Minnesota Twins 5-0 Wednesday night.

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    Pirates rally to beat Braves 3-2

    The Atlanta Braves held a two-run lead as Alex Wood cruised into the eighth inning after seven shutout innings. A sixth-straight win was inevitable for the Braves against a seemingly-listless Pittsburgh Pirates team that had lost seven games in a row. Then the script flipped and the Pirates defeated the Atlanta Braves 3-2 on Wednesday night.

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    Lynn, Peralta lead Cardinals to sweep of Reds

    Lance Lynn beat Cincinnati for the third straight time, Jhonny Peralta hit a bases-clearing double and the St. Louis Cardinals topped the Reds 7-3 Wednesday night to complete a three-game sweep.

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    Los Angeles gets a 4-3 comeback win at Colorado

    Landon Donovan scored in the 80th minute to give the Los Angeles Galaxy a 4-3 comeback victory over the Colorado Rapids on Wednesday night.

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    Feldman pitches Astros past slumping Yankees 5-2

    Scott Feldman shut down the slumping New York Yankees again, and Robbie Grossman snapped a seventh-inning tie with a two-run single that sent the Houston Astros to a 5-2 victory Wednesday night.

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    D’backs fall late to Nats, lose fifth straight

    The Arizona Diamondbacks proved they could hang with the NL East-leading Washington Nationals. That is right up until the last at-bat, once again. The Nationals won their ninth straight game when pinch-hitter Anthony Rendon singled home Bryce Harper in the ninth inning Wednesday night for a 3-2 victory over the Diamondbacks. Arizona has lost five straight, the last three to Washington, two by a single run.

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    St. Viator tabs Hayes as boys basketball coach

    St. Viator High School announced Wednesdsay that Quin Hayes would take the lead of the school’s boys basketball program. “We are thrilled to bring Quin in as our new head basketball coach,” St. Viator athletic director Marty Jennings said in a statement. “His love and passion for St. Viator was evident in every conversation with him.”

  •  
    Dominican Republic guard Juan Coronado (6), U.S. center DeMarcus Cousins and U.S. assistant coach Tom Thibodeau react as U.S. coach Mike Krzyzewski holds the ball while an official rules possession goes to the U.S. team in the first half of an exhibition basketball game Wednesday at Madison Square Garden in New York.

    Rose sits this one out

    Derrick Rose sat out Wednesday's Team USA exhibition romp over Dominican Republc in New York. Whether this was routine rest or a sign that Rose won't make the final roster for the FIBA World Cup remains to be seen.

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    Hall blasts Boomers past CornBelters

    The Schaumburg Boomers snapped the longest winning streak in the history of the Normal CornBelters at seven games with a 4-3 victory Wednesday night. Gerard Hall belted a 3-run homer in the top of the fourth inning to break a 1-1 tie.

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    Magee sharp for Mundelein

    Sophomore Ryan Magee fired a runner-up 71, as Mundelein’s boys golf team got its season off to a strong start Wednesday.

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    The grounds crew works on the field after a heavy rain soaked Wrigley Field during the fifth inning of a baseball game Tuesday between the San Francisco Giants and the Chicago Cubs in Chicago.

    Giants’ protest upheld; Cubs game to resume Thursday

    In a surprising reversal, Major League Baseball officials agreed with the San Francisco Giants, who protested Tuesday’s rain-delayed game, and ordered the two teams to resume play on Thursday afternoon at Wrigley Field. The game will resume at 4:05 p.m. with the Cubs batting in the bottom of the 5th inning. When that game ends, the Cubs and Giants will play their regularly scheduled game at 7:05 p.m.

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    Baltimore Orioles relief pitcher Darren O’Day pitches to Chicago White Sox’s Leury Garcia, during the eighth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014, in Chicago. Orioles’ won 4-3. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    Hahn, White Sox look to the future

    The White Sox lost again Wednesday night, and general manager Rick Hahn said the club might not be fully competitive for three or four more years.

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    Chicago Cubs center fielder Ryan Sweeney grounds out to first base in the eighth inning of a baseball game against the San Francisco Giants on Wednesday in Chicago.

    Peavy pitches Giants to 8-3 win over Cubs

    Jake Peavy pitched seven solid innings in his fifth start with San Francisco, and the Giants rolled past the Chicago Cubs 8-3 on Wednesday, hours after they won a protest regarding a rain-shortened loss from the night before.

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    Philadelphia pitcher Mo’ne Davis stands at first base after being removed as pitcher in the third inning of a United States semi-final baseball game Wednesday against Las Vegas at the Little League World Series tournament in South Williamsport, Pa. Philly lost to the Vegas team 8-1.

    Las Vegas spoils Mo’ne’s night, beats Philly 8-1

    Dallan Cave and Brennan Holligan hit two-run homers, lefty reliever Austin Kryszczuk got out of two big jams, and Las Vegas beat Philadelphia and star pitcher Mo’ne Davis 8-1 in the Little League World Series on Wednesday night. That puts Las Vegas in Saturday’s U.S. title game and sends Philadelphia into an elimination game on Thursday night against Chicago’s Jackie Robinson team.

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    Burlington Central second at Larkin invite

    It looks like life will go on just fine in the post-Matt Weber era for the Burlington Central boys’ golf team. In their first tournament since the departure of the Fox Valley area’s top golfer from a year ago, the Rockets finished in second place in the Larkin Invitational at The Golf Club of Illinois in Algonquin on Wednesday. Central recorded a team score of 320 just 2 strokes behind the tournament winner DeKalb.

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    Home plate umpire Eric Cooper watches Chicago White Sox’s Alexei Ramirez score on a sacrifice fly by Avisail Garcia, off a pitch from Baltimore Orioles’ Wei-Yin Chen during the sixth inning of a baseball game Wednesday in Chicago.

    Orioles complete three-game sweep over White Sox

    The Orioles, who are steaming toward the playoffs, completed a three-game sweep over the White Sox with a 4-3 win Wednesday night at U.S. Cellular Field. The Sox figure to call up 5-8 players when rosters can expand in September.

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    Cougars rally again to sting Bees for 10th straight win

    Coverage of Kane County Cougars baseball:The Kane County Cougars exploded for 5 runs in the eighth inning and captured their 10th straight victory, a 7-3 decision over the Burlington Bees on Wednesday at Fifth Third Ballpark in Geneva. The Cougars (38-20, 83-45) trail only the 2001 team, which set a franchise record with 88 wins and captured the Midwest League Championship. This edition of the Cougars tied a team mark with 50 home victories this season.

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    Top prospect Micah Johnson (hamstring) out for season

    Second baseman Micah Johnson, one of the White Sox' top minor-league talents, is being shut down for the rest of the season with a left hamstring injury.

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    Blocking Mulligan’s forte, but he likes to catch and pass now and then

    Bears backup tight end Matthew Mulligan has made an NFL career out of being an effective blocker, but he showed last week that he shouldn't be overlooked as a receiver. “Any opportunity you get in the NFL should be appreciated, whether it’s blocking like I’ve done for the last seven years or whether it’s playing special teams or catching a pass,” he said.

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    Hats off to heavy-fighting Cats

    Catfish aren't universally loved by anglers, but there's no denying the thrill of battling these big fish in moving waters.

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    Stratton Lock and Dam gets overhaul

    Construction will begin soon on a $16.7 million improvement project at the Stratton Lock and Dam on the Fox River in McHenry County. Illinois DNR officials claim the Stratton Lock and Dam Life Extension Project will improve three components of the lock and dam facility.

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    The grounds crew works on the field after a heavy rain soaked Wrigley Field during the fifth inning of a baseball game between the San Francisco Giants and the Chicago Cubs on Tuesday in Chicago. The Giants launched a successful protest after the Cubs were declared the winner. The game will resume Thursday.

    Giants win protest; rain-shortened game to resume

    The San Francisco Giants have won their protest filed with Major League Baseball, and will now get to resume a rain-shortened game the Chicago Cubs thought they had won. MLB ruled that tarp had not been properly put away after its previous use and therefore there was a “malfunction of a mechanical field device under control of the home club.” Because of that, it is now a suspended game that will resume at 4:05 p.m. Thursday. MLB says this is the first successful protest since 1986.

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    Mike Imrem says it’s OK that former Bears coach Mike Ditka has a difference of opinion with him on the use of “Redskins” as Washington’s nickname.

    Imrem: This is no time to sour on Da Coach

    Remember this whenever Mike Ditka goes on a rambling rant that you might disagree with: Even if he's a crank, he's our crank.

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    USA Basketball guard Derrick Rose of the Chicago Bulls shoots during a team practice Tuesday in at the Brooklyn Nets training facility in East Rutherford, N.J. Rose will sit out the exhibition game Wednesday night.

    Rose sits out US exhibition vs Dominican Republic

    Derrick Rose is sitting out the U.S. national’s team exhibition game against the Dominican Republic on Wednesday night, with coach Mike Krzyzewski saying he wants to look at other guards. Rose has sat out the last two practices as he works his way back into shape after sitting out most of the last two seasons, though there has been no indication from the Chicago Bulls star or U.S. officials that he is hurting. Rose said after Tuesday’s practice he just wanted extra rest.

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    Kristufek’s Arlington selections for Aug. 21

    Joe Kristufek's selections for Aug. 21 racing at Arlington International.

  •  
    Here’s a look at the design of the new basketball court installed at the Northern Illinois Univeristy Convocation Center.

    NIU’s basketball court gets a new look

    Thanks to an assist from the NCAA Women’s Basketball Tournament, Northern Illinois University has a new playing surface at its Convocation Center. University officials unveiled the new basketball floor and design Tuesday (see time-lapsed video attached). The new surface was originally used during the 2014 NCAA Women’s Basketball Tournament. NIU’s 12-year-old floor was traded in to Connor Sports Flooring.

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    Chicago pitcher Joshua Houston helped his Jackie Robinson West team win an elimination game Tuesday at the Little League World Series in South Williamsport, Pa. Chicago beat Texas 6-1 and will play again on Thursday.

    Chicago Little League team relaxed and confident

    The Great Lakes champions from Chicago, Jackie Robinsin West, slept in Wednesday morning after beating Texas 6-1 on Tuesday night in a Little League World Series elimination game. “I’m excited for the kids, for the city of Chicago, for the state of Illinois,” Chicago manager Darold Butler said after the victory. “We’re sleeping in. Just keep everything relaxed. Them still being in a bubble, it’s not overwhelming for them.” Chicago will play the loser of Wednesday night’s game between hard-hitting Las Vegas and hard-throwing Mo’ne Davis and her Philadelphia teammates, and the Chicago players plan to be there.

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    Mike North video: Preseason football works
    Between evaluating talent, watching some of the new stars in the league and fantasy football, Mike North hopes preseason remains at four games.

Business

  •  
    How much will Bank of America’s expected $17 billion mortgage settlement cost the company? The answer is, almost certainly not $17 billion.

    How painful is BofA’s $17 billion settlement?

    Bank of America has reached a record $17 billion settlement to resolve an investigation into its role in the sale of mortgage-backed securities before the 2008 financial crisis, officials directly familiar with the matter said Wednesday. One of the officials, who spoke with The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the announcement isn’t scheduled until Thursday at the earliest, said the bank will pay $10 billion in cash and provide consumer relief valued at $7 billion.

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    The stock market rose for a third straight day Wednesday despite a report from the Federal Reserve that showed a growing chorus of central bank officials willing to raise interest rates sooner rather than later. In the bond market, prices fell and yields rose as investors prepared themselves for higher interest rates.

    Stocks advance for third day, despite Fed minutes

    The stock market rose for a third straight day Wednesday despite a report from the Federal Reserve that showed a growing chorus of central bank officials willing to raise interest rates sooner rather than later.

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    Forbes says the Dallas Cowboys are the first U.S. sports franchise to top $3 billion in value. For the eighth straight year, the Cowboys are worth the most of all 32 NFL franchises, valued at $3.2 billion.

    Cowboys’ worth tops in NFL

    The Dallas Cowboys are the first U.S. sports franchise to top $3 billion in value. For the eighth straight year, the Cowboys are worth the most of all 32 NFL franchises, according to Forbes. They’re valued at $3.2 billion; only Real Madrid at $3.4 billion is worth more among global franchises.

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    Fed officials said job gains may bring faster rate increase

    Federal Reserve officials raised the possibility that they might begin removing aggressive stimulus sooner than anticipated, as they neared agreement on an exit strategy, according to minutes of their July meeting. “Many participants noted that if convergence toward the committee’s objectives occurred more quickly than expected, it might become appropriate to begin removing monetary policy accommodation sooner than they currently anticipated,” the minutes, released today in Washington, read.

  •  
    American cities looking to be more innovative in how they address local issues can now get a helping hand from former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s charitable foundation.

    Bloomberg offers grants to help cities innovate

    American cities looking to be more innovative in how they address local issues can now get a helping hand from former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s charitable foundation. Bloomberg Philanthropies on Wednesday is announcing that it’s putting $45 million into Innovation Delivery grants. The grants are to help cities create teams that use data and other tools to come up with ideas for how to tackle problems.

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    Final classic car show tonight at Randhurst

    Tonight is the last Cruise Night of the summer at Randhurst Village in Mount Prospect. The free show features classic cars and their owners, plus a Q&A with Daily Herald auto columnist Matt Avery and special exhibits. To correct earlier reporters, there is no free concert tonight.

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    Florida-based Sterling Organization said Wednesday it had purchased a majority of the Golf Mill Shopping Center in Niles for $60 million.

    Florida firm acquires Golf Mill property for $60 million

    The majority of the Golf Mill Shopping Center property in Niles has been sold to Palm Beach, Florida-based Sterling Organization for $60 million, the company announced Wednesday. The private equity real estate investment firm will acquire 912,382 square feet of the 1.1 million-square-foot shopping center. The property was purchased through the firm's institutional fund Sterling Value Add Partners, LP, for $60 million from the family that originally developed the shopping center over 50 years ago.

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    Fortune Brands to sell window business for $130 million

    Deerfield-based Fortune Brands Home & Security Inc. said Wednesday that it has agreed to sell its Simonton Windows business to building products maker Ply Gem Holdings Inc. for about $130 million. The deal is expected to close in October. Fortune Brands, which makes Master Lock padlocks, Kemper kitchen cabinets and Moen water faucets, said it is selling its window business to focus on its Therma-Tru door business and Fypon home trim business.

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    Staples Inc. plans to shut about 140 stores in North America this year as the office-supply retailer responds to online competition that has hurt sales.

    Staples to shut 140 North American stores in 2014 as sales stall

    Staples Inc. plans to shut about 140 stores in North America this year as the office-supply retailer responds to online competition that has hurt sales. Staples shut 80 outlets in the region in the first half, the Framingham, Massachusetts-based company said in a statement today. Net income in the fiscal second quarter through Aug. 2 dropped 20 percent to $82 million as Staples spent $101 million on the sales-network cutback.

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    Robert Niblock, chief executive officer of Lowe’s. Lowe’s second-quarter net income increased 10 percent, bolstered by improving weather.

    Lowe’s 2Q profit rises as weather improves

    Lowe’s second-quarter net income increased 10 percent, bolstered by improving weather. The home improvement company’s performance beat analysts’ expectations, but the Mooresville, North Carolina, company lowered its full-year revenue outlook slightly, citing its year-to-date sales and prior assumptions for the second half.

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    Internet needs cure for advertising addiction

    After reportedly being valued at $3 billion by Facebook and then at $10 billion by Alibaba -- neither deal actually happened -- the ephemeral messaging service Snapchat is finally getting a revenue stream. After deliberating for more than a year on how to make money, its solution is the most unoriginal imaginable: Advertising.

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    Apple, Google CEO contender seeking second act in Silicon Valley

    Joe Costello was once a contender for the top jobs at Apple Inc., Google Inc. and Yahoo! Inc. Then, he all but vanished from Silicon Valley’s elite circles. Now, the technology veteran is back, though in a smaller role. The 60-year-old recently became chief executive officer of Enlighted Inc., which develops products that help businesses cut their energy bills by monitoring building occupancy.

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    Prison company pays $8 million in back wages

    The nation’s largest private prison company has paid more than $8 million in back wages and benefits to current and former employees at its federal prison facility in California City. The U.S. Department of Labor said Tuesday that Corrections Corp. of America paid the money to staff at the California City Correctional Center after an investigation found it wasn’t paying the rates required of federal contractors.

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    The retailer Macy’s has agreed to pay $650,000 to settle allegations of racial profiling at its flagship store in Manhattan’s Herald Square.

    Macy’s to pay $650,000 in shopper-profiling probe

    The retailer Macy’s has agreed to pay $650,000 to settle allegations of racial profiling at its flagship store in Manhattan’s Herald Square. Under the agreement with New York’s attorney general, the company will adopt new policies on police access to its security camera monitors and against profiling, further train employees, investigate customer complaints, keep better records of detentions and report for three years on compliance.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    This time of year, summer rolls are a great way to use such powerhouse foods as watercress without falling into a salad slump.

    Watercress wrapped in nutritious glory

    A recent study at William Paterson University in New Jersey ranked the top “powerhouse fruits and vegetables,” based on the nutrients they provide per calorie. What topped the list? No, not kale or spinach (though they didn’t do too badly). The most powerful of the powerhouses was watercress.

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    John Barrowman, who stars as Malcolm Merlyn on The CW's “Arrow,” developed his love of science fiction while growing up in Joliet and Aurora. He appears at Wizard World Chicago Comic Con this weekend in Rosemont.

    Movies, comic books, TV all share spotlight at Chicago Comic Con in Rosemont

    It's back, suburban pop-culture fans — the Wizard World Chicago Comic Con, the four-day (Thursday through Sunday, Aug. 21-24) celebration of comic books, TV shows, movies, celebrities and more in Rosemont. This year's guests include "Arrow" star (and former Aurora resident) John Barrowman, comic-book writer Marv Wolfman and horror-film auteur John Carpenter.

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    FILE - This Feb. 28, 2004 file photo shows Oscar host Billy Crystal, center, and presenter Robin Williams, right, joking around after a writers' meeting for the 76th annual Academy Awards in Los Angeles. The producer of the Emmys says that Billy Crystal will pay tribute to Robin Williams during the awards ceremony. Executive producer Don Mischer said that Crystal will honor Williams as part of the traditional “in memoriam” segment for industry members who died during the past year. Williams was found dead by suicide in his Northern California home Aug. 11. (AP Photo/Kevork Djansezian, File)

    Emmys: Billy Crystal to pay tribute to Williams

    LOS ANGELES — Billy Crystal will pay tribute to Robin Williams, his longtime friend and fellow comedian, at next week’s Emmy Awards.Crystal will honor Williams as part of the traditional “in memoriam” segment for industry members who died during the past year, Emmy executive producer Don Mischer said in a statement Wednesday.Mischer said the memorial segment during Monday’s ceremony will include a performance from Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Sara Bareilles.Williams was found dead in his Northern California home on Aug. 11.At last year’s Emmys, Williams honored his friend and mentor Jonathan Winters during the tribute segment.The Emmy Awards will be broadcast by NBC.

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    FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2010 file photo, rapper Gucci Mane arrives on the red carpet for the BET Hip Hop Awards in Atlanta. Gucci Mane, who pleaded guilty to a federal firearms charge several months ago, is set to be sentenced. The 34-year-old, whose real name is Radric Davis, pleaded guilty in May to a charge of possession of a firearm by a convicted felon after reaching an agreement with prosecutors. He is to be sentenced Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014. (AP Photo/John Amis, File)

    Rapper Gucci Mane sentenced on federal gun charge

    Rapper Gucci Mane was sentenced Wednesday to serve three years and three months in prison after pleading guilty to a federal firearms charge several months ago.

  •  
    Oedipus (John Taflan) wanders the desert with his faithful daughter Antigone (Erin Barlow) in The Hypocrites’ “All Our Tragic,” Sean Graney’s adaptation of the 32 surviving Greek tragedies running through Oct. 5 at The Den Theatre.

    The Hypocrites’ epic theatrical event ‘All Our Tragic’ triumphs

    “All Our Tragic” is many things. A bold, galvanizing effort from adapter/director Sean Graney, this compilation of the 32 surviving Greek tragedies — in its world premiere at The Hypocrites — is an epic event in every sense of the word. Years in the making, Graney’s four-part theatrical marathon unfolds over nearly 12 hours (including intermissions and dinner breaks) in a loft-like storefront in Chicago’s Wicker Park. A fresh retelling of oft-told tales of love and betrayal, war and vengeance, duty and pride, “All Our Tragic” is contemporary, conversational and cannily crafted. It’s also hugely entertaining. But more than anything, “All Our Tragic” is a labor of love.

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    ‘Sid the Science Kid’ stage show to come to Genesee
    Tickets for "Sid the Science Kid Live!" on Sunday, Nov. 9, at Waukegan's Genesee Theatre go on sale to the public at 10 a.m. Friday, Aug. 22.

  •  
    In “Ultimate Dining Hall Hacks” author Priya Krishna shares ways to use common cafeteria foods to build interesting meals.

    From the Food Editor: College cuisine from food service and beyond

    Food editor Deborah Pankey didn't think the dorm food at University of Illinois was half bad, but granted that was a few decades ago before she developed a food critic's palette. Still, she was surprised that her alma mater didn't land on The Daily Meal's list of the 75 Best Colleges for Food in America for 2014. Only two Big 10 schools made the list — Northwestern and Purdue. University of Chicago and Wheaton College also got a nod.

  •  
    At this time of year, summer rolls are a great way to use powerhouse foods like watercress without falling into a salad slump.

    Shrimp-Watercress Summer Rolls
    Shrimp Watercress Summer Rolls highlight the newest superfood, watercress.

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    Lynda’s Garden Vegetable Casserole is a hearty way to serve the season’s bright and bountiful vegetables.

    Culinary adventures: Eating, preserving, sharing vegetables from the garden

    Penny Kazmier's desire to consume and preserve her precious summer produce has driven her to pickle cucumbers, jalapenos and even green tomatoes. Cucumber, tomato and onion salad has been on her dinner table almost every night; and she has zucchini shredded, measured and frozen for future zucchini bread recipes. Her favorite was to use up her garden's bounty has been Lynda’s Garden Vegetable Casserole. The hearty casserole won “two-thumbs up” from even the veggie-adverse around the table.

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    Lynda’s Garden Vegetable Casserole is a hearty way to serve the season’s bright and bountiful vegetables.

    Lynda’s Garden Vegetable Casserole
    Eggplant, zucchini and tomatoes come together in a cheesey summer casserole.

  •  
    James Rollins delivers more over-the-top action in “The 6th Extinction.”

    James Rollins delivers in 'The 6th Extinction'

    The Sigma Force discovers a threat that could destroy the human race in James Rollins' 10th book to feature his team of elite scientists and soldiers. In “The 6th Extinction,” a military research station located near Yosemite National Park experiences a breach. When help arrives, every living thing within 50 square miles is dead, including the bacteria in the dirt.

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    Ham, cheese and veggies work into a do-ahead dinner with leftovers that work for the next day’s breakfast.

    Do-ahead dinner makes back-to-school smoother

    A do-ahead dinner can be a lifesaver as families get accustomed to their new school routines. So we created this easy, kid-friendly ham and cheese casserole that can be prepped and refrigerated the night before, then just popped in the oven the next evening.

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    Ham mingles with vegetables, eggs and cheese and a make-ahead casserole that will bring everyone to the table.

    Easy Overnight Ham and Cheese Casserole
    Overnight Ham and Cheese Cassrole takes just 20 minutes of active time and leaves you with a weeknight dinner everyone will want to sit down for.

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    The stainless steel Splash Box and bag from ECOlunchbox has a tightfitting silicone lid that is easy to open but won’t leak.

    For parents, back to school means back on lunch duty

    Ready for another 180? Sure, you’ve braced your kids for the early mornings. You’ve bought them their shoes and shirts and binders and book covers. You’ve even scheduled their haircuts and made sure their backpacks can handle another year of abuse. But have you prepared yourself for another 180 school days of packed lunches?

  •  
    Have extra jam on hand? Try making a vinaigrette, like this one made with Mother’s Mountain strawberry rhubarb jam. Jams and jellies are good for adding oomph to everything, including sweet-and-sour chicken (apricot jam), barbecue pork ribs (seedless raspberry), beef marinades (orange marmalade), ham glazes (blackberry or cherry), sweet-and-savory dips for vegetables and crackers (red pepper jelly), even sandwich spreads.

    In a jam? It’s time to think outside the PB&J

    Fruit spreads account for some $959 million in sales a year in the U.S., where some 1 billion pounds are produced, according to the International Jelly and Preserve Association. And the leading variety? Strawberry, followed by grape, then raspberry. Besides making a PB&J, what else are they good for? Plenty, as Associated Press Food Editor J.M. Hirsch found out when he asked some pros how they use jams and jellies.

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    Enhanced plant waters are being touted as a healthier alternative to sugary soda.

    Plant waters grow into hot beverage market trend

    Soda and non-fresh juice sales are flat or slipping slightly, but plant-based products like coconut water — along with other alternative beverages such as kombucha and tea-based drinks — are growing, particularly those sold alongside your fruits and veggies, according to data compiled by market research firm Nielsen. “The one area of the store where we are just seeing phenomenal growth is the produce department,” says Sherry Frey, health and wellness expert for Nielsen.

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    Blue Angel is one of the largest blue hostas.

    Keep hostas ‘in the blue’ by controlling a few factors

    Blue hostas are fascinating types. Imposters all, their leaves are really green! A waxy coating, called cutin, is responsible for the blue color we see — the thicker the coating, the bluer the hosta. You can keep your hostas ‘in the blue’ as long as possible by controlling some environmental and cultural factors.

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    Brian Kelley, left, and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line will release their latest album, “Anything Goes,” on Oct. 14.

    ‘Anything Goes’ for Florida Georgia Line’s 2nd LP

    Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of country dude duo Florida Georgia Line know all eyes on Music Row are on them as they prepare to release their second album, “Anything Goes,” on Oct. 14. Everybody wants to see if country’s favorite party boys can keep the festivities rolling, and Kelley and Hubbard don’t really mind. “A little bit of that pressure creates some pretty good creativity,” Kelley said.

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    Production scripts and press materials from NBC’s “Will & Grace” are now on display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

    Smithsonian adds LGBT history to museum collection

    Hundreds of photographs, papers and historical objects documenting the history of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people were added to the Smithsonian Institution’s collection Tuesday, including items from the popular TV show “Will and Grace.” Show creators David Kohan and Max Mutchnick along with NBC donated objects to the National Museum of American History.

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    Ace Frehley’s “Space Invader” is his best solo album since his groundbreaking self-titled album in 1978.

    Ace Frehley outta this world on ‘Space Invader

    With seven-plus years of sobriety under his belt, original Kiss lead guitarist Ace Frehley has recorded his best solo album ("Space Invader") since his groundbreaking self-titled album in 1978. With walls of wailing guitars, droning feedback and snarling solos, Frehley launches an old-school ’70s-style hard-rock jam fest.

Discuss

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    Editorial: Don't dump cold water on this idea

    The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge is a huge success, and anyone finding negative issues with it should just move along, a Daily Herald editorial says.

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    The paradox of American diversity

    Columnist Michael Gerson: Events in Ferguson demonstrate the paradox of American diversity: An increasingly multicultural nation remains deeply divided by race and class.

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    The unattainable standard that dogs Israel

    Columnist Richard Cohen: Reagan’s wholly unrealistic idea of Israeli capabilities still haunts the Jewish state. It helps account for why the bombings of schools, hospitals and homes in Gaza are almost instantaneously denounced as war crimes — a purposeful atrocity and not, as sometimes happens in war, a mistake. Israel, some feel, is too good to be so bad.

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    Respect is vital to America’s success
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: Bravo to Mr. Gene Maril of Arlington Heights. His Aug. 4 letter (“President’s critics unfairly labeled racist”) was right on the mark. So much hypocrisy these days. Instead of disagreeing respectfully and working together for best interests of our great nation, childish, unfounded accusations fly about.

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    GOP interested only in discrediting Obama
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: If you are wondering why our Congress is so dysfunctional, perhaps you should Google this phrase: “Jan. 20, 2009 GOP meeting.” This GOP meeting took place in the Caucus Room at a Washington, D.C., restaurant and included 13 influential members of the Republican Congress and one nonmember — Newt Gingrich. Their project: How to bring Congress to a standstill regardless of how much it would hurt the American economy by pledging to obstruct and block President Obama on all legislation.

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    America is troubled — so do something
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: The national anthem, “The Star Spangled Banner,” is outdated. It was about the War of 1812. People can’t remember the words. We should adopt “America the Beautiful”; it describes our country. Or “God Bless America”; it reminds us that God cares and unfortunately we are pushing him away.

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    Look for miracles, not mistakes
    A Lake Zurich letter to the editor: Conform to the teachings of the church? How about conform to the teachings of Christ? Now that is a radical idea.

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