2014 election guide

Daily Archive : Tuesday August 12, 2014

News

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    Wauconda Park District officials have proposed a $4.75 million expansion for the local community center.

    Community center plan headed to Wauconda voters

    A $4.75 million plan to expand the Wauconda Community Center now is in voters’ hands. The Wauconda Park District board on Tuesday unanimously agreed to put the proposal on the Nov. 4 ballot.

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    Rep. Jeanne Ives, center, works out with young runners Friday before taking off with them on a 1-mile fun run during her second annual Kids’ Fitness and Health Boot Camp at Cantigny Park in Wheaton.

    Ives hosts kids’ fitness, health boot camp in Wheaton

    More than 150 kids were educated Friday about how to stay active and eat healthy during State Rep. Jeanne Ives’ second Kids’ Fitness and Health Boot camp at Cantigny Park in Wheaton.

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    Holding sons Gavin, 2, left, and Brogan, 3, Army veterans Breg and Allison Hughes say they got support from several charities after he was wounded and burned by a roadside bomb while serving in Afghanistan in 2012.

    Barrington veteran creates charity to help spouses of wounded

    While many charities help the wounded warriors who come home from military service with physical and mental complications, a Barrington woman and her partner have created an organization to help the overburdened caretakers.

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    Police wearing riot gear stage outside the remains of a burned out convenience store Monday in Ferguson, Mo. Authorities in Ferguson used tear gas and rubber bullets to try to disperse a large crowd Monday night that had gathered at the site of a burned-out convenience store damaged a night earlier, when many businesses in the area were looted.

    Police cite threats, won't name cop who shot teen

    The police chief in a St. Louis suburb where a police officer fatally shot an unarmed black teenager said he's holding off on publicly identifying the officer because of death threats. Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson said he planned to release the officer's name on Tuesday but changed course after threats were called into the police department and City Hall, and posted on social media. The...

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    Former NBA superstar Shaquille O’Neal, shown here saluting fans in Los Angeles, will visit the Sears store in Woodfield Mall on Wednesday as part of a promotional appearance for Monster Powercard. O’Neal will take photos with fans and sign autographs during the one-hour visit.

    Shaquille O’Neal visiting Woodfield Sears today

    Shaquille O’Neal, four-time NBA champion and co-host of TNT’s “Inside the NBA,” will be at the Woodfield Mall’s Sears store from 2 to 3 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 13, to sign autographs and take pictures with fans.

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    Parents and students packed the board room Monday night at Glenbard High School District 87 to air views on the suspension of about 30 student-athletes.

    Glenbard District 87 suspensions stand, but school leaders want more feedback

    Glenbard High School District 87 officials confirmed Tuesday the decision to suspend about 30 athletes for attending parties where alcohol was present is final. But in light of protests by some parents about enforcement of the school's athletic code, school leaders say they'll be soliciting additional feedback.

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    Ken Bouche, chief operating officer of Chicago-based consultant Hillard Heintze, talks about business security during the Schaumburg Business Association’s “Good Morning, Schaumburg” breakfast Tuesday. Bouche last year served as Schaumburg’s interim police chief after the arrests for three police officers.

    Former Schaumburg chief talks business security

    Asset and employee security is among the most basic aspects of running a business, yet too often it’s a neglected aspect of the most agile and proficient companies around. That’s the opinion of Hillard Heintze Chief Operating Officer Ken Bouche, who last year served as Schaumburg's interim police chief.

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    Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn, left, is running for re-election against Republican Bruce Rauner.

    Rauner keeps up property tax pressure

    Republican governor hopeful Bruce Rauner has launched a website and enlisted a suburban homeowner for a robocall supporting his effort to freeze suburban property taxes. A recorded call from Joan Zaleski of St. Charles urges people to sign a petition at FreezeMyTaxes.com to back a plan that would keep local government from asking for more tax money unless voters approve. Gov. Pat Quinn, his...

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    Gov. Pat Quinn speaks to Illinois State Fair visitors Tuesday in Springfield after signing two new laws on emergency responses in rural areas.

    Quinn signs bills to better emergency response

    Gov. Pat Quinn has signed two pieces of legislation aimed at improving emergency response in rural areas of Illinois.

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    Tom Cross, left, and Michael Frerichs are running for state treasurer.

    State treasurer race heats up over accusations

    Republican candidate for treasurer Tom Cross’ campaign accused his Democratic opponent Tuesday of financial mismanagement and political patronage, stirring controversy in the race for a typically overlooked statewide office.

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    Rule would limit immigrant driver’s license calls

    Illinois wants to head off businesses that are swamping the secretary of state’s office with robotic requests for appointments for special immigrant driver’s licenses.

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    Francisco Espinal Quiroz

    Truck driver pleads innocent in fatal crash on I-55

    A semitrailer-truck driver has pleaded not guilty to charges relating to a crash last month in Will County that claimed five lives.Francisco Espinal Quiroz of Leesburg, Indiana, is accused of falsifying logbooks and failure to maintain proper records. He has been held on $1 million bail since the July 21 accident on Interstate 55 near Channahon.

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    Father, son plead innocent in beating death

    A father and his 15-year-old son have pleaded innocent to first-degree murder charges in the beating death of a Romeoville man.Mark Ballard and his 15-year-old son, Adam, are accused in the death of 55-year-old Richard Pollack, who beaten early Sunday during a fight near his home. The father and son are accused of striking Pollack in the head with a bat.

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    Adel Daoud of Hillside

    Lawyers ask for rehearing of secret-court issue

    A terrorism suspect’s attorneys have asked a full appeals court in Chicago to rehear the question of whether the defense can see secret intelligence-court records. Adel Daoud’s lawyers made the request in a Tuesday filing with the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals.

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    71-year-old man hurt in Aurora shooting

    A 71-year-old man was injured Monday night when multiple bullets were fired at an Aurora home, officials said Tuesday. The incident occurred on the 800 block of Spruce and the man suffered a graze wound in his thigh from one of the bullets. according to an email from Aurora spokesman Dan Ferrelli. The man was inside his home at the time of the shooting.

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    Then-Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, left, shakes hands with former NBA players Bill Russell, right, and “Downtown” Freddie Brown as Omar Lee looks on during an NCAA college basketball game between Washington and Oregon State on Jan. 25, 2014. Ballmer is officially the new owner of the Los Angeles Clippers. The team says the sale closed Tuesday.

    Steve Ballmer becomes owner of LA Clippers

    The Clippers moved on from months of ugliness Tuesday, with Steve Ballmer officially becoming the team’s new owner in a record $2 billion sale that ousted Donald Sterling as the NBA’s longest-tenured owner. Sterling bought the team in 1981 for $12 million and presided over decades of losing seasons before engaging in a fierce legal battle with his estranged wife to hold on to his...

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    Missing Elgin man has been found

    An Elgin man reported missing a few days ago has been found. Terrence Ivery, 25, was located Tuesday in Norridge, according to Cmdr. Dan O’Shea with the Elgin Police Department.

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    Hezekiah Whitfield waits to speak with Lake County Judge Mark L. Levitt at the Lake County Courthouse in Waukegan, on Tuesday. Whitfield waived his right to appear at his sentencing for the 1994 murder of Waukegan store owner Fred Reckling.

    Chicago man gets life in prison for 1994 murder of Waukegan store owner

    A Chicago man convicted of killing 71-year-old Waukegan business man Fred Reckling in 1994 was sentenced to life in prison Tuesday. Hezekiah Whitfield, 44, refused to attend the sentencing hearing. “The only appropriate sentence for him is natural life in prison without the possibility of parole,” Lake County Mark Levitt said in court.

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    Actor Humphrey Bogart holds actress Lauren Bacall in a tight embrace in their latest film “To Have and Have Not.” It was their first appearance on the screen together. The pair went on to marry in 1945.

    Lauren Bacall: 1924-2014
    A look a iconic actress Lauren Bacall through the years. Bacall died Tuesday at 89.

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    Robert J. Granger

    Hoffman Estates man pleads guilty to beating mother

    A 33-year-old Hoffman Estates man pleaded guilty to attempting to kill his mother last year. A Cook County judge sentenced Robert J. Granger to 7 years in prison. He must complete at least 85 percent of his sentence before he is eligible for parole.

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    Elgin teachers to vote on new contract Friday

    The Elgin Teachers Association representative assembly has approved a tentative agreement on a new three-year teacher’s contract. The current contract for Elgin Area School District U-46 teachers expires Aug. 18. The proposed new contract runs through the 2016-2017 school year. It spells out a base salary increase of 1.5 percent in the first year. The union membership will vote on the...

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    James A. Hansen, who died Sunday at age 88, served as police chief in Elgin and South Elgin. He also loved jazz, Notre Dame football and his family.

    Former Elgin, South Elgin police chief dies at 88

    James A. Hansen had four deep loves in his life — his family, Notre Dame football, jazz music and police work. He was a former police chief in Elgin and South Elgin. "I don’t think I could ever go anywhere that he didn’t run into somebody he knew," his daughter said.

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    Police reports
    George Hernandez, 25, of Montgomery, was charged with possession of 2.5 grams to 10 grams of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, no vehicle insurance, expired registration and disobeying a traffic control device after a traffic stop at 7:59 p.m. Thursday at West New York and North River streets near Aurora, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    This undated photo provided by Defenders Of Wildlife shows a wolverine that had been tagged for research purposes in Glacier National Park, Mont.

    Feds reverse course on protecting wolverines

    U.S. wildlife officials are withdrawing proposed protections for the snow-loving wolverine in a course reversal announced Tuesday that highlights lingering uncertainties over what a warming climate means for some temperature-sensitive species.

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    Thousands of fish were killed when Wildflower Lake in Sun City Huntley was contaminated following a truck fire on nearby Interstate 90, according to the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency.

    Sun City lake cleanup underway; thousands of fish killed

    A massive cleanup effort is underway to remove pollution and thousands of fish killed due to contamination of a lake at the Sun City retirement community in Huntley, officials said. The contamination was the result of a July 25 accident in which a semitrailer caught fire on westbound Interstate 90 near Huntley, Illinois Environmental Protection Agency spokeswoman Kim Biggs said. The truck...

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    Wind kicks up dust on an area that was once under water at Hemenway Harbor in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Nevada last month. As the lake levels drop the floating marinas move to adjust to the changing shoreline.

    Southwest braces as Lake Mead water levels drop

    Once-teeming Lake Mead marinas are idle as a 14-year drought steadily drops water levels to historic lows. Officials from nearby Las Vegas are pushing conservation but also are drilling a new pipeline to keep drawing water from the lake.News: Hundreds of miles away, farmers who receive water from the lake behind Hoover Dam are preparing for the worst.

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    The Wheaton City Council debated how to move forward in its battle against the Emerald Ash Borer during a planning session Monday.

    Ash borer fight costing Wheaton an extra $855,000

    The cost of taking down trees killed by the Emerald Ash Borer is costing the city of Wheaton $855,000 more than was anticipated. And though the city is trying to remove 1,700 ash trees that were listed last year as a “priority” for removal, the number of diseased trees likely has grown, said City Manager Don Rose.

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    Objection filed to Arlington Hts. term limit petition

    An Arlington Heights resident has filed an objection to a petition asking that voters decide whether the village’s elected officials should be subject to term limits. The electoral board — made up of the village clerk, Mayor Tom Hayes and the village’s more senior trustee, Bert Rosenberg — will meet at 4 p.m. Thursday to hear the objection and decide if a term-limit...

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    A building at Mill Creek Condominiums in Buffalo Grove on Tuesday.

    Buffalo Grove home invasion was second one in a month at same complex

    The home invasion in a Buffalo Grove condo early Saturday morning was the second one in about a month at the same complex, police said Tuesday. A woman on the 1100 block of Miller Lane woke up early Saturday morning to find a man straddling her in bed.

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    Serhiy Sosnovskyy

    Miami man charged with DUI after crashing into Schaumburg home

    A Miami man is facing drunk driving charges after crashing his Mercedes into a Schaumburg townhouse Saturday night, police said. The car was lodged about halfway into a bedroom, but no residents were injured.

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    Kane County Public Health Executive Director Barb Jeffers expressed excitement and relief Tuesday that she will have a non-interim director for the county’s animal control department. County board members, including Mark Davoust, unanimously approved the appointment of Brett Youngsteadt, who is employed as the shelter manager for Chicago’s Animal Care and Control Department.

    Kane County reaches into city for its animal control director

    Kane County has its first non-interim animal control director in more than two years. Brett Youngsteadt currently earns $67,000 a year as the shelter manager for Chicago’s Animal Care and Control Department. He’ll receive $75,000 for his new Kane County duties. County officials said they believe Youngsteadt will bring stability and veterinary expertise to a troubled county...

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    Kane County Sheriff Pat Perez checks out one of the entries in his annual car show in Elburn several years ago. Perez hosts his eighth car show Aug. 30. He has partnered with sheriffs from Kendall and DeKalb counties to raise money for the Make A Wish Foundation of Illinois.

    Kane sheriff wants final charity car show to finish strong

    Kane County Sheriff Pat Perez will host his eighth and final car show Aug. 30 in Elburn. This year, he's chosen the Make A Wish Foundation as the charity to benefit and also enlisted support from sheriffs in Kendall and DeKalb counties.

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    Elgin police are asking for the public’s help in identifying a man they said robbed a Family Dollar store June 3 and Aug. 2.

    Man robs same Elgin store in June, August

    Elgin police are asking for the public’s help in identifying a man they say robbed the same store twice since June. The man robbed the Family Dollar store at 611 Dundee Ave. in June and August.

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    Arlington Hts. meets on village manager search this week

    Arlington Heights is getting closer to hiring a new village manager. The village board met in a closed-door session Tuesday night — and will conduct similar meetings Wednesday and Thursday night — to discuss the village manager search, said interim manager Diana Mikula.

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    O’Malley quits commission:

    Former Island Lake trustee Donna O’Malley has resigned from the village's fire and police commission, village documents released to the media Tuesday revealed. O’Malley had led the three-member commission, which oversees police department hirings and related issues, since last year.

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    Renovated museum opens:

    The public is invited to the grand opening of the newly renovated Andrew C. Cook House and Museum, home of the Wauconda Township Historical Society, at 711 N. Main St., Wauconda, from noon to 1 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 23.

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    Library to host comic con:

    The Vernon Area Public Library will hold its inaugural Mini Comic Con on Saturday, Nov. 8. The event will run from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the library, 300 Olde Half Day Road, Lincolnshire.

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    Ideas sought for new dog park:

    The Lake County Forest Preserve District is seeking public input on development of a new 40-acre off-leash dog exercise area at Waukegan Savanna Forest Preserve.

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    Police reports
    Patrick K. Managlia, 21, of Sleepy Hollow, was charged with attempting to defraud a drug screening test at 10:15 a.m. Friday at the sheriff’s office, 37W777 Route 38, St. Charles, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    Townships, Motorola team for job fair Sept. 9

    Motorola Solutions and Schaumburg and Palatine townships are partnering to sponsor a job fair next month for seniors, persons with disabilities and veterans. The job fair will take place from 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9, at Schaumburg Township, 1 Illinois Blvd., in Hoffman Estates.

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    Signs alert drivers the Route 83 railroad crossing in Grayslake will be closed for track repairs starting Monday, Aug. 18. The work is to last 10 days.

    More railroad crossing work scheduled in Grayslake

    While Route 120 in Grayslake is expected to reopen Wednesday night at a railroad crossing that’s been closed due to repairs, drivers should brace for similar work a few blocks away at Route 83.

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    Pianists sought for American Grands concert

    Starting Friday, Aug. 15, pianists of all levels may apply to perform in the Elgin Community College Arts Center’s American Grands XX. The 20th anniversary of this concert event will be held on Saturday, Jan. 24, at ECC.

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    Twelve-year-old Bailey Cates, a guitarist and pianist, will perform a concert to raise money for the Kaneland Arts Initiative.

    Solo concert by 12-year-old to benefit the Kaneland Arts Initiative

    At 4 p.m. Aug. 17, Bailey Cates, age 12, from Elburn, will perform a solo concert to raise money for the Kaneland Arts Initiative. Bailey Cates will be a seventh-grader at Kaneland Harter Middle School, where she was the guitarist for the jazz band as the only sixth-grade member during the 2013-2014 school year.

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    Fire guts Palatine home

    Palatine Fire Department investigators are trying to determine what started a fire Tuesday morning that left a vacant, single-family home uninhabitable. Firefighters were dispatched at 4:09 a.m. to the two-story building at 132 S. Plum Grove Road.

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    Rollover crash in South Barrington injures woman

    A rollover crash at Algonquin and Barrington roads in South Barrington sent one person to the hospital this morning, authorities said. Police have reopened the eastbound lane of Palatine Road at Algonquin Road in in South Barrington after the 5:30 a.m. crash.

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    Actor and comedian Robin Williams was pronounced dead at his home in California on Monday.

    Sheriff official: Robin Williams hanged himself

    Robin Williams committed suicide by hanging himself at his San Francisco Bay Area home, sheriff’s officials said Tuesday. Marin County Sheriff’s Lt. Keith Boyd said Williams was found in a bedroom by his personal assistant on Monday at his Tiburon home. Boyd said toxicology tests will be performed and the investigation is ongoing.

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    Round Lake Area Unit District 116 teachers and the school board have reached a tentative agreement on a four-year contract.

    Tentative agreement reached on contract for District 116 teachers

    Round Lake Area Unit District 116 teachers and the school board have reached agreement on a tentative contract.

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    Deb Perryman’s love for the environment started at an early age and has become her life’s passion. The Elgin High School teacher was recently named the 2014 Environmental Educator of the Year by the Environmental Education Association of Illinois.

    Elgin science teacher uses nature to engage students

    She’s the 2014 Environmental Educator of the Year and her work with students has been featured in two PBS documentaries. Deb Perryman has received many accolades in her 24-year teaching career. What’s the secret to her success with students? “I’m always looking for a way to go outside of a book, looking for a way to bring in the real world,” said Perryman, who...

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    Dr. Keith Brown uses an optical microscope to examine the salt crystal seen on the monitor. The optical microscope uses a system of lenses and light to magnify very tiny things so they can be inspected closely.

    How lenses bend and shape light to help us see

    A young patron at the Grayslake Public Library District asked: "How do magnifying glasses make things bigger?"

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    Tanya Singleton, a cousin of former New England Patriots football player Aaron Hernandez, pleaded guilty to criminal contempt in connection with the investigation of murder charges against Hernandez. She was spared jail time only because of her advanced cancer, a judge said Tuesday in sentencing her to two years of probation.

    Hernandez cousin pleads guilty to contempt charge

    A cousin of ex-New England Patriots player Aaron Hernandez was spared jail time only because of her advanced cancer, a judge said Tuesday in sentencing her to two years of probation. Tanya Singleton pleaded guilty to refusing to testify before a grand jury even though she had been granted immunity.

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    Deadline to clear up health law eligibility near

    The administration is warning hundreds of thousands of consumers they risk losing taxpayer-subsidized health insurance unless they act quickly to resolve issues about their citizenship and immigration status.

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    Cars are stranded along a flooded stretch of Interstate 696 at the Warren, Mich., city limits Tuesday morning, Aug. 12, 2014. Police divers are searching for anyone trapped in their vehicles.

    Detroit area hit by severe flooding; 1 woman dies

    A woman died when her vehicle became stranded in 3 feet of water in suburban Detroit, after heavy rain across southeastern Michigan left many roads impassable. Fearing more motorists could become stranded a day after a storm dumped more than 6 inches of rain in some places in and around Detroit, the state warned commuters against driving in affected areas Tuesday morning.

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    U.S. drone attacks Iraq militant mortar position

    WASHINGTON — U.S. military officials say an armed American drone has attacked and destroyed a mortar position of Islamic militants in northern Iraq.The U.S. Central Command issued a brief statement saying the Tuesday morning attack targeted a mortar position that was firing on members of the Kurdish militia who were defending civilians attempting to evacuate the Sinjar area.

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    Sen. Dick Durbin, the No. 2 ranked Democrat who voted against President George W. Bush’s Iraq war authorization 12 years ago, said the White House assured him no U.S. boots on the ground were required. “While this is strictly an air mission, I still have concerns,” he declared, saying American troops couldn’t solve Iraq’s underlying problems.

    Iraq isn’t Syria: Congress on board this time

    Little of the impassioned debate that fractured lawmakers last year over possible military intervention in Syria is happening now as American war planes strike extremist targets in Iraq. The Obama administration’s emergency action is attracting surprisingly broad bipartisan support, though some in Obama’s own party expressed reservations. “While this is strictly an air...

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    Mundelein Elementary District 75’s new superintendent, Andy Henrikson, shakes hands with Giselle Hernandez as she exits the bus for the first day of classes at Mechanics Grove School in Mundelein. Henrickson and Principal Kathleen Miller greeted students Tuesday.

    Mundelein elementary students nervous, excited during first day of school

    Nervous children stepped off the bus Tuesday and were greeted with a warm smile and a handshake at Mechanics Grove Elementary School in Mundelein. “I remember every first day,” said new Mundelein District 75 superintendent, Andy Henrikson, who greeted students.

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    Iraqis chant pro-government slogans and display placards bearing a picture of embattled Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki during a demonstration in Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, Aug. 11, 2014.

    Iraq’s Maliki tells army to keep out of politics

    Iraq’s incumbent prime minister ordered the security forces on Tuesday not to intervene in the current political crisis over who will be the next prime minister, amid fears that he might go to any lengths to stay in power.

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    A convoy of 280 Russian trucks headed for eastern Ukraine early Tuesday, one day after agreement was reached on an international humanitarian relief mission.

    Ukraine: Russia aid can enter with Red Cross supervision

    A convoy of 280 Russian trucks reportedly packed with aid headed for eastern Ukraine on Tuesday, but Kiev said it would only allow the goods through under the close supervision of the international Red Cross.

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    Pope Francis is sending Cardinal Fernando Filoni as his personal envoy to Iraq to show solidarity with Christians who have been forced from their homes by Islamic militants.

    Vatican to Muslim leaders: Condemn Iraq barbarity

    VATICAN CITY — The Vatican is urging Muslim leaders to denounce the “barbarity” of the Islamic State’s attacks against Christians and other minorities in Iraq, saying their credibility is on the line.

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    Spanish priest Miguel Pajares, who was infected with the Ebola virus while working in Liberia, was evacuated last week after testing positive for Ebola but died on Tuesday Aug. 12, 2014 in the Carlos III hospital in Madrid where he was being treated.

    Spanish priest dies of Ebola; UN debates ethics

    A Spanish missionary priest being treated for Ebola died Tuesday in a Madrid hospital amid a worldwide debate over who should get experimental Ebola treatments. After holding a teleconference with medical experts around the world, the World Health Organization declared it is ethical to use unproven Ebola drugs and vaccines in the current outbreak in West Africa provided the right conditions are...

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    The White House said the president and first lady planned to see Hillary Rodham Clinton Wednesday at a party on Martha’s Vineyard for Ann Jordan, wife of Democratic adviser Vernon Jordan. Clinton is on the Massachusetts island for a memoir-signing session at a bookstore, while the Obamas are in the midst of a two-week vacation.

    Obama, Clinton to attend Martha’s Vineyard party

    President Barack Obama will spend a bit of his summer vacation with Hillary Rodham Clinton, a get-together that comes amid signs that the former secretary of state is seeking to distance herself from Obama’s foreign policy ahead of a possible 2016 White House bid.

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    A Palestinian boy rides a donkey next to the destroyed Nada Towers residential neighborhood in the town of Beit Lahiya, northern Gaza Strip, Monday, Aug. 11, 2014.

    Gaza talks to continue in Cairo as truce holds

    A temporary Israel-Hamas truce was holding for a second day Tuesday as marathon, indirect negotiations on a lasting cease-fire and a long-term solution for the battered Gaza Strip were set to resume in Cairo.

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    Israel OK’s gay Jews to immigrate with spouses

    Israel says it will now allow Jews to immigrate to Israel with their non-Jewish same-sex spouses. In a directive publicized Tuesday, Israeli Interior Minister Gideon Saar told immigration authorities not to differentiate between married gay and straight couples.

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    St. Charles Unit District 303 School Board President Steven Spurling, right, said he has a hard time swallowing the size of his property tax bill. But when Superintendent Don Schlomann, left, said class sizes would rise without a property tax increase, Spurling voted with the majority in approving a tax increase for the next school year.

    St. Charles school board narrowly OKs property tax increase

    St. Charles Unit School District 303 school board members came close to rejecting a property tax increase Monday night. But they backed down when learning it would result in increased class sizes.

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    Triplet panda cubs rest in an incubator at the Chimelong Safari Park in Guangzhou in south China’s Guangdong province Tuesday Aug. 12, 2014. China announced Tuesday the birth of extremely rare panda triplets in a further success for the country’s artificial breeding program. The three cubs were born July 29, but breeders delayed an announcement until they were sure all three would survive, the official China News Service said.

    China announces birth of rare panda triplets

    China announced Tuesday the birth of extremely rare panda triplets in a further success for the country’s artificial breeding program. The three cubs were born July 29 in the southern city of Guangzhou, but breeders delayed an announcement until they were sure all three would survive, the official China News Service said.

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    Officials at Edinburgh Zoo said Tuesday Aug. 12, 2014 they believe a female giant panda, Tian Tian, is finally pregnant after months of anticipation.

    Giant panda ‘believed’ pregnant at Edinburgh Zoo

    A giant panda at a Scottish zoo appears to be finally pregnant after months of dashed hopes and anticipation. Edinburgh Zoo said Tuesday the latest scientific data it has suggests that Tian Tian — Chinese for Sweetie — has conceived following artificial insemination in April, and may give birth at the end of the month.

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    Time is running out for the Brainerd Building in Libertyville. Demolition is planned for October.

    Brainerd campus demolition could cost $484,800

    If a love of Lake County history or a sense of schoolyard nostalgia is pushing you to say goodbye to Libertyville’s Brainerd Building and Jackson Gym, you’d better act quickly. The Libertyville-Vernon Hills Area High School District 128 board’s facilities and finance committee on Monday reviewed newly delivered demolition bids for the long-shuttered buildings on Route 176.

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    Police: Gun used in suicide also use in murders

    Police in the northern Illinois city of Dwight say a gun recovered from the scene of a suicide was used in the murder of two women. The .40 caliber Glock handgun used in the June 26 suicide was reported stolen during a residential burglary in Morris, Illinois.

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    Lesley McSpadden, right, the mother of 18-year-old Michael Brown, watches as Brown’s father, Michael Brown Sr., holds up a family picture of himself, his son, top left in photo, and a young child during a news conference Monday, Aug. 11, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. Michael Brown, 18, was shot and killed in a confrontation with police in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson, Mo, on Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014.

    Missouri shooting victim called quiet, respectful

    “Big Mike,” as some of his friends called Michael Brown Jr., wasn’t the type to fight, family and neighbors said, though he lived in a restless neighborhood where police were on frequent patrol. His parents and neighbors described him as a good-hearted kid with an easy smile who certainly wouldn’t have condoned the violence and looting that spread though his north St.

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    Husband of caller champ doesn’t ‘miss any meals’

    A Beverly Hills, Illinois, woman is the state fair’s champion husband-caller. Cheryl O’Reilly was a first-time participant in the popular contest Sunday in Springfield. She says her award-winning style is the one she uses at home. Her husband, Frank, says, “I don’t miss any meals.”

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    University of Chicago electrical fire injures 8

    The Chicago Fire Department says at least eight people have been taken to hospitals following an electrical fire in a University of Chicago building. A department spokesman says at least three firefighters, one child and four civilians were injured Monday.

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    Matt Rivers, a detective with the Urbana Police Department, shows a .38 Special revolver owned by the department’s police chief in 1933.

    Urbana police mine their history

    It’s hard to believe in this age of instant information, but if you wanted to know who the Urbana police chief was in 1940, you might not be able to find out so easily. A group of Urbana police officers is trying to rectify that.

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    Illinois man charged in argument over remote

    Illinois police say a man has been charged with beating his 68-year-old father following an argument over a remote control.The (Champaign) News-Gazette reports 40-year-old Troy Humphrey of Champaign was charged Monday with felony aggravated battery to a senior citizen.

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    Illinois man dies in fall while trimming trees

    Southwestern Illinois officials say a 75-year-old man has died from a fall while trimming trees.The Madison County coroner said Monday that Dan Dauderman was found dead on Saturday in Alhambra. His preliminary cause of death is a broken neck and severing of the spinal cord.

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    Dawn Patrol: Robin Williams as healer; Parents debate suspensions

    Dann Gire on Robin Williams as healer for Christopher Reeve. Packed Dist. 87 meeting: Not all against athlete suspensions. Jelly Belly production leaving North Chicago. Illini 4000 bike journey completed by Naperville woman. Police search for suspect in bank shooting. Mount Prospect suspends liquor license of Blues Bar. Bears special teams not so special in preseason opener.

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    The Patricia Lopez Escaramuza Team performs at last year’s Festival of the Horse and Drum. This year’s event is Saturday and Sunday at the Kane County Fairgrounds in St. Charles.

    ‘United Nations of horses’ returns to Kane County

    The Festival of the Horse and Drum returns to the Kane County Fairgrounds Saturday and Sunday. Visitors can check out the many different horse displays and demonstrations. Part of the festival grounds will be divided by themes, such as a cowboy town, a renaissance village and a Mexican salsa village.

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    Geneva ready to order new $506K fire truck

    Geneva is ready to spend $506,022 on a new fire engine pumper, to replace one that is 30 years old.

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    Elgin Area School District U-46 Superintendent José Torres’ last day on the job is Sept. 12, after which he will take the helm of the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy in Aurora.

    U-46 board seeking interim to replace Torres

    Elgin Area School District U-46 officials have been mum about plans to replace outgoing Superintendent José Torres. The school board met behind closed doors Monday night to discuss options for bringing someone on board to lead the district for the 2014-15 school year. “We’re just looking for an interim,” school board President Donna Smith said. She added, the search for...

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    A gazebo and swimming pond are among the highlights of the new K-9 Dog Park set to open this fall in Schaumburg. Dog owners who want their pets to enjoy the park must first secure one of 500 memberships available beginning Sept. 4.

    New Schaumburg dog park could run out of room fast

    A dog park more than two years in the making is set to open this fall in Schaumburg, but pet owners who want their dogs to enjoy the new facility should act soon or risk missing out, officials said Monday. The K-9 Dog Park, at 120 Remington Road, will be a leash-free, 6.5-acre space with features that include a large pond with a specially designed ramp to help the dogs get in and out of the water...

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    The 2013 state education reports are being held up by a delay in collecting school districts’ teacher and administrator salary details.

    School salary data still unavailable in state reports

    Even though the annual school district report cards were released 10 months ago, information about each district's average teacher and administrative salary has been witheld. Illinois State Board of Education officials said there's a problem "collecting" that specific data from the school districts. Meanwhile, legislators are flummoxed as to why a 2012 change in reporting requirements eliminated...

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    Deadline for CLC art exhibit:

    The deadline to submit online entry forms for the College of Lake County’s Recent Works 2014 exhibit is 11 p.m. Monday, Sept. 8.

Sports

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    Jimmy Clausen, shown here against the Eagles in Friday’s preseason opener, will continue his quest to be the Bears’ backup quarterback Thursday against the Jaguars at Soldier Field in the second preseason game.

    Jimmy Clausen to follow Cutler against Jaguars

    Jimmy Clausen will follow Jay Cutler at quarterback in Thursday night's second preseason game, switching spots in the QB rotation with Jordan Palmer, who will play third. Clausen and Palmer are still competing for the No. 2 job. “They’re both making plays," coach Marc Trestman said. "They’re competing. I’ve talked to both of them (and said) that nothing’s set in stone from last week."

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    Cubs starting pitcher Kyle Hendricks did not allow a run in 7⅓ innings in Tuesday night’s victory over the Brewers.

    Cubs’ Hendricks gets it; he really gets it

    Rookie pitcher Kyle Hendricks is using a tried and true method and is enjoying early success with the Cubs. He's getting the ball and throwing it. He made quick work of the Milwaukee Brewers Tuesday night, working into the eighth inning of a 3-1 victory.

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    Cougars rally for 4-3 walk-off win

    It’s hard to top a 15-inning contest as far as memorable games, but somehow the Cougars did. Just two days after a marathon in Cedar Rapids, the Cougars (30-20, 75-45) took advantage of a handful of Quad Cities mistakes Tuesday night to walk off with a 4-3 victory over the River Bandits (25-25, 60-59) at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark.

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    Boomers roll to 12-5 win

    The Schaumburg Boomers scored early and often Tuesday night in a 12-5 victory over the visiting Evansville Otters.

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    Cubs continue to stress the fundamentals

    The Cubs came out several hours ahead of Tuesday night's game against the Brewers to work on some early fielding. Manager Rick Renteria said he's generally pleased with the team's fundamental play this season.

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    Trainer Wayne Catalano

    Best home stretch ever for trainer Catalano

    Late Tuesday morning, Wayne Catalano gingerly walked out of the rehabilitation center at St. Alexius Medical Center in Hoffman Estates and headed home.Pretty amazing stuff considering that just three weeks earlier the 11-time training champion at Arlington Park was admitted to the hospital suffering from H1N1 influenza and pneumonia.

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    Bears tight end Zach Miller hauls in a Jordan Palmer pass for one of his 2 touchdowns in Friday’s 34-28 victory in the preseason opener.

    Bears’ Miller happy to find he still belongs

    Bears tight end Zach Miller’s 2-touchdown performance in Friday’s preseason opener confirmed to a lot of people, including himself, that he still has what it takes to play in the NFL. “It’s been awhile,” said Miller who didn’t play at all last season, spent 2012 on injured reserve and missed the last 12 games in 2011.

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    Fire fired up for U.S. Open Cup semifinal
    Even if it is the underdog, the Chicago Fire isn’t going to give up on its best hope for a championship this season.

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    Ontario County Sheriff Philip Povero, left, at a news conference Sunday Aug. 10, 2014, in Canandaigua , N.Y., says that investigators don’t have any evidence at this point to support criminal intent in the fatal crash that killed Kevin Ward Jr., and involved racing superstar Tony Stewart. At right is Sergeant James Alexander. (AP Photo/The Daily Messenger, Melody Burri)

    Stewart could still face criminal charges in Ward crash

    Tony Stewart could still face criminal charges for running down Kevin Ward Jr. with his sprint car, even if the three-time NASCAR champion didn’t mean to kill Ward, hurt him or even scare him. Ontario County Sheriff Philip Povero, who announced on Tuesday that the investigation is continuing, has said that his initial findings have turned up nothing that would indicate criminal intent in the crash at the Canandaigua Motorsports Park.

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    FILE - In this Jan. 25, 2014, photo, then-Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, left, shakes hands with former NBA players Bill Russell, right, and “Downtown” Freddie Brown as Omar Lee looks on during an NCAA college basketball game between Washington and Oregon State in Seattle. Ballmer is officially the new owner of the Los Angeles Clippers. The team says the sale closed Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014, after a California court confirmed the authority of Shelly Sterling, on behalf of the Sterling Family Trust, to sell the franchise. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

    Steve Ballmer becomes owner of LA Clippers

    The Clippers moved on from months of ugliness Tuesday, with Steve Ballmer officially becoming the team’s new owner in a record $2 billion sale that ousted Donald Sterling as the NBA’s longest-tenured owner.Sterling bought the team in 1981 for $12 million and presided over decades of losing seasons before engaging in a fierce legal battle with his estranged wife to hold on to his most prized asset.

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    Nicole Jeray, the only LPGA golfer from Illinois, needs a good finish to keep her spot on the tour. She finished eighth at last week’s Meijer Classic.

    NIU’s Jeray fighting to keep her LPGA card

    Nicole Jeray, Chicago’s only LPGA Tour player, needs one big tournament to give her career a boost. Len Ziehm has more in this week's golf column, which includes an update on a big week for Carlos Sainz Jr. on the Web.com Tour.

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    Cleveland Browns quarterbacks Brian Hoyer, left, and rookie Johnny Manziel are locked in a preseason battle to win the starting job.

    Preseason NFL action doesn’t disappoint

    Mike North reviews preseason football with Johnny Manziel and Jadeveon Clowney on their pro football debuts.

Business

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    Paul Michna/pmichna@dailyherald.com Paul Kreiner is the brewmaster at Noon Whistle Brewery in Lombard, slated to open this fall.

    New Lombard brewery hopes to open doors in November

    Construction begins this week for a new brewery called Noon Whistle, which hopes to open Nov. 1 at 800 E. Roosevelt Road in Lombard. The brewery will include a tasting room, where eight rotating beers will be available on tap.

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    The stock market pulled back slightly Tuesday, following two days of gains, as investors focused on the damage that ongoing geopolitical tensions were causing the global economy. Energy stocks were among the biggest decliners, dragged down by lower oil prices.

    U.S. stocks fall as geopolitical risks remain

    The stock market pulled back slightly Tuesday, following two days of gains, as investors focused on the damage that ongoing geopolitical tensions were causing the global economy. Energy stocks were among the biggest decliners, dragged down by lower oil prices.

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    Nicholas S. Giuliano, left, is chairman and co-CEO and Frank C. Cerrone is president, vice chairman and co-CEO of Pan American Bank. They are acquiring Bank of Palatine.

    Pan American acquires Bank of Palatine

    Pan American Bank, based in Melrose Park, said Wednesday it has acquired Bank of Palatine.

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    A Wal-mart representative demonstrates the now-discontinued Scan & Go mobile application on a smartphone at a Wal-mart store. Instead of looking at the app as a failure, Wal-Mart took what it learned from “Scan & Go” to create another service.

    Wal-Mart willing to try, try again

    Wal-Mart thought shoppers would like the opportunity to use a smartphone app to scan items they want to buy as they walk through store aisles. But customers couldn’t figure out how to work the “Scan & Go” app during tests in 200 stores, so Wal-Mart nixed it. Instead of looking at the app as a failure, though, Wal-Mart took what it learned from “Scan & Go” to create another service.

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    This Ferrari 250 GTO Berlinetta owned by the scion of a wealthy Italian family for 49 years may race off as the world’s most expensive car when it’s auctioned for as much as $75 million.

    Red Ferrari coupe may race to record $75 million in California

    A Ferrari 250 GTO Berlinetta owned by the scion of a wealthy Italian family for 49 years may race off as the world’s most expensive car when it’s auctioned for as much as $75 million. Bonhams will offer the 1962 red two-seat coupe Aug. 14 in Carmel, California. The sale is among six days of events and auctions for vintage car collectors starting today .

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    An inventory crunch for entry- level houses has only worsened during the past year as discounted foreclosures become scarce and cash-paying investors snap up affordable listings to convert to rentals.

    First-time homebuyers shut out of growing U.S. supply

    The four-bedroom house that Ilia Nielsen-Dembe purchased in west Denver earlier this year wasn’t her top choice. The first-time buyer had to settle on a home in a neighborhood with a high crime rate after losing out on bids for five properties in more desirable areas.“I definitely sacrificed in terms of location,” said Nielsen-Dembe, 33, who lives with her husband and two daughters in the house she bought in April for $184,500. “I had to cross streets that were not ideal in order to get a house.”While the supply of U.S. homes for sale is at an almost two-year high and price gains are moderating, buyers such as Nielsen-Dembe wouldn’t know it. An inventory crunch for entry- level houses has only worsened during the past year as discounted foreclosures become scarce and cash-paying investors snap up affordable listings to convert to rentals. Properties at the lower end of the market are also the most likely to have underwater mortgages, keeping would-be sellers from moving.“There is inventory coming on line, albeit slowly,” said Nela Richardson, chief economist for Redfin, a Seattle-based brokerage. “The problem is it’s not equally distributed. There is more turnover at the higher end. At the more affordable end of the spectrum, people are stuck.”The number of U.S. homes for sale in the bottom third of the market -- below $198,000 -- fell 17 percent in June compared with a year earlier, according to a Redfin analysis of 31 large U.S. metropolitan areas. The supply was up 3 percent in the middle market and jumped 15 percent at the top, the data show.National GainThe inventory of all existing homes for sale rose 6.5 percent in June from a year earlier to 2.3 million, an increase from a 13-year low of 1.8 million in January 2013, according to the National Association of Realtors. That’s a 5.5-month supply at the current sales pace, less than the six months that is considered equilibrium between buyers and sellers.The rising inventory of more expensive properties is giving a boost to sales and easing the bidding wars of the past two years as historically low mortgage rates fueled competition for a short supply of homes. At the bottom of the market, first-time buyers, even those with the credit, savings and income to overcome tougher underwriting requirements, must face off against other bidders, ready to pounce.Denver, AtlantaIn Denver, entry-level listings in June were down 51 percent from a year earlier, while the upper-end supply was up 4 percent, according to Redfin. Austin, Texas, inventory jumped 14 percent in the top third of the market and fell 34 percent at the bottom. In Atlanta, where Wall Street-backed investors descended to buy homes to turn into rentals, low-end supply declined 13 percent. Top-third listings rose 18 percent.“It’s bad news for people looking for a starter home that all the choices are disappearing,” Lawrence Yun, chief economist at NAR, said. “People shouldn’t expect inventory to show up on the low end. It’s not available.”Competition in the entry-level market intensified during the past few years as Blackstone Group LP and other Wall Street investors paid cash to absorb foreclosed homes from Florida to Arizona. Today, fewer properties are available to buy because many investors are holding them as long-term rentals. Foreclosures and short sales, in which the borrower sells for less than what’s owed, accounted for 11 percent of transactions in June, down from 15 percent in June 2013, data from NAR show.Prices RiseAverage list prices on the low-end jumped 15 percent in June from a year earlier, and increased 13 percent in the middle and 9 percent at the top, according to Redfin’s analysis of large metro areas.

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    Terrence Slaybaugh, director of aviation for Dayton International Airport, at one of the airport’s prairies in Vandalia, Ohio. In an effort to keep birds away from aircraft, the airport is experimenting by planting the tall prairie grass. Heavy birds like geese, which cause the most damage to planes, are believed to avoid long grasses because they fear predators might be hiding within.

    Airport tests new way to avoid deadly bird strikes

    When birds and planes collide, the results can be deadly. That’s why airports around the world work hard to keep birds away, even resorting to shooting or poisoning large flocks. One Ohio airport is now experimenting with a new, gentler way to avoid bird strikes: planting tall prairie grass.

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    Russian economy stalls as Putin’s reprisal threatens spillovers

    Russia’s economic growth slumped to the weakest in five quarters, underlining the risks to a recovery in the region as President Vladimir Putin retaliates after penalties imposed over the deepening conflict in Ukraine.

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    Pandora jewelers will add Mickey Mouse and other Disney characters to its array of gold and silver charms later this year .

    Mickey joins Pandora as jeweler teams up with Disney

    Pandora A/S will add Mickey Mouse to its array of gold and silver charms later this year after the Danish jeweler signed an alliance with Walt Disney Co. A collection featuring many of Disney’s best-known characters will go on sale in Pandora stores starting in November,

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    Chicago printing company shuts down Argentina operation

    Chicago-based global printing company R.R. Donnelley & Sons shuttered its plant Monday in Argentina amid tough economic times in the South American country.Employees of the plant on the outskirts of Buenos Aires showed up to find the gates locked and a note on the door informing them the operation is now closed.

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    Tesco exec joins Kmart as president

    Hoffman Estates-based Sears Holdings Corp. said Monday that Alasdair James has joined the company as president and chief member officer for its Kmart business, a new position. James, 44, was most recently the commercial director for British supermarket giant Tesco’s global business unit.

Life & Entertainment

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    Sterling Murset washes a car at the home of Todd Blanchieri in Pensacola, Fla. The Murset family toured the country this summer doing chores for families in need.

    Family’s summer travel teaches hard work, service

    The Murset children spent their summer doing chores — just not at their own home. Financial planner Gregg Murset and his wife, Kami, loaded their six children, ages 7 to 16, in the Phoenix family’s RV to do volunteer work at the homes of families in need across the country. Murset said he wanted to combat the mindset of the “entitled generation” one chore at a time. “I think they initially thought, ‘Dad, the chore thing has gone too far, you know, you are crazy.’ But as we started reading stories about the people we were going to go serve, it all started to jell for them. They saw the bigger picture,” Murset said.

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    Flowers were placed in memory of actor/comedian Robin Williams on his Walk of Fame star in the Hollywood district of Los Angeles Monday, the day the actor/comedian died in an apparent suicide. He was 63.

    Robin Williams: Mourning a manic genius

    Daily Herald copy editor Sean Stangland has seen a lot in his time at the paper. But Monday's news about Robin Williams hit him as hard as anything he's experienced in his 13 years on the desk. Here's a look at the emotions he felt while putting together the news on the brilliant comedian's death.

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    Comedian Jim Breuer performs at the Improv Comedy Showcase in Schaumburg.

    Weekend picks: Jim Breuer brings stand-up to Schaumburg

    Comedian Jim Breuer (“Saturday Night Live,” “Half Baked”) hits Schaumburg for a weekend of stand-up at the Improv Comedy Showcase. Quirky alt-pop band OK Go is coming back to its old stomping grounds for a show Friday at Lincoln Hall in Chicago. Twista, the hip-hop artist from Chicago known for his lightning-fast rapping style, will celebrate the release of his new record, “The Dark Horse,” with a show at HOME Bar in Arlington Heights. Conductor James Conlon leads a Mozart opera performance of “The Marriage of Figaro” in the Ravinia Festival's intimate Martin Theatre in Highland Park. All this and more in Friday's Time out!

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    Lauren Bacall

    Screen, stage actress Lauren Bacall dies at 89

    Lauren Bacall, a bewitching actress whose husky voice and smoldering onscreen chemistry with her husband Humphrey Bogart made her a defining movie star of the 1940s and who decades later won Tony Awards in the Broadway musicals “Applause” and “Woman of the Year,” has died at 89.

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    People pause by a bench at Boston's Public Garden Tuesday, where a small memorial has sprung up at the place where Robin Williams filmed a scene during the movie, “Good Will Hunting.”

    Fans leave Williams tributes at Boston park bench

    A bench in Boston has become a quiet memorial to Robin Williams, whose Academy Award-winning performance in “Good Will Hunting” was filmed in the city. In the 1997 movie, Williams, playing an empathetic therapist, and his patient, a blue-collar genius played by Matt Damon, have a conversation on a bench in Boston's Public Garden. Dozens of people quietly visited it Tuesday. Some left tributes — pinwheels, flowers, bottles of beer, a teddy bear, an autographed baseball.

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    Actor-comedian Robin Williams performs for a USO tour at Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan. Members of the armed forces have long held special affection for Williams, 63, who died Monday.

    Williams remembered fondly by military

    Robin Williams was a superstar in movies, on television and at comedy clubs. But some of his biggest laughs came at military bases. Members of the armed forces have long held special affection for Williams, who died Monday at age 63 after he hanged himself in his San Francisco Bay Area home. Williams never served in the military, but he was a tireless participant in USO shows and also was remembered for playing real-life Air Force sergeant and disc jockey Adrian Cronauer in the 1987 film “Good Morning, Vietnam.”

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    Jane Lynch arrives at the 65th Primetime Emmy Awards at Nokia Theatre on Sunday Sept. 22, 2013, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

    Jane Lynch tapped to announce 2014 Jeff nominees

    Emmy Award-winning actress and Dolton native Jane Lynch will preside over the announcement of the equity Joseph Jefferson Award nominations Thursday, Aug. 21, in Chicago

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    North Suburban High School Dist. 214 teachers learn how to use iPads in their curriculum at Prospect High School in Mount Prospect.

    Technology growing in school; parents play a role in monitoring it

    Children have been arriving to their elementary schools with computer skills for years. First it was because they grew up playing on their parents’ desktops. Later, it was laptops. Now, it is the touch screen of a smartphone or tablet.

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    Husband feels tempted by wife’s friend to cheat

    Husband says his wife's friend seriously flirts with him when his spouse isn't around. He's already been caught cheating once, and is afraid he may do it again.

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    Thin-sliced zucchini, carrots and onions make for a refreshingly light summer salad.

    Lean and lovin’ it: Everyone loses (weight, that is!) when fats go back into their diet

    Don Mauer hasn't stopped thinking about "The Big Fat Surprise" and the conclusions author Nina Teicholz drew: that low-fat diets triggered Americans’ hefty weight gain over the last 20 years; saturated fat consumption does not cause heart disease; and that reducing cholesterol levels has a minimal effect on heart disease and lower cholesterol levels could raise risk factors for other diseases. In the past two months, he's taken her advice to heart and has seen the scale trend downward.

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    Thin-sliced zucchini, carrots and onions make for a refreshingly light summer salad.

    Simple Zucchini Summer Salad
    Don Mauer uses thin-sliced zucchini, carrots and onions for a refreshingly light summer salad.

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    Charles Esten, center, performs on “Nashville: On the Record,” ABC Music Lounge’s and ABC Digital Media Studio’s “Nashville”-inspired docu-web series. During the season three premiere, Esten will perform a song he co-wrote with Grammy-winning country singer Deana Carter, “I Know How To Love You Now.”

    ‘Nashville’ goes live in new season premiere

    Actor Charles Esten has more at stake in the new season of the ABC drama “Nashville” than resolving the cliffhanger that left his character, singer-songwriter Deacon Claybourne, in the midst of a lyricist love triangle. During the live season-three premiere, Esten will perform a song he co-wrote with Grammy-nominated country singer Deana Carter, “I Know How to Love You Now.”

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    When someone as sparklingly witty as Robin Williams commits suicide, our first reaction is disbelief at the incongruity. Perhaps it shouldn’t be. Psychologists believe that some styles of humor can mask a greater susceptibility to depression.

    Was Robin Williams’ humor a symptom of his disease?

    When someone as sparklingly witty as Robin Williams commits suicide, our first reaction is disbelief at the incongruity. Perhaps it shouldn’t be. Psychologists believe that some styles of humor can mask a greater susceptibility to depression. In fact, a certain sense of humor may be a symptom of a widespread, often untreated disease that disables and kills.

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    Robin Williams performed at the 6th Annual Stand Up For Heroes benefit concert for injured service members and veterans in 2012. Williams, whose free-form comedy and adept impressions dazzled audiences for decades, died Monday. He was 63.

    Robin Williams a comic force, versatile actor

    Robin Williams, who died in an apparent suicide Monday, was a comic force of nature. The world got to know him as the wild alien in “Mork & Mindy,” a comedian who elevated improvisation to an art form and also demonstrated a rare versatility in more serious roles. He moved seamlessly from comedy to drama to tragedy to comedy again during a Hollywood heyday in the 1980s and 1990s. His Academy Award as a supporting actor in “Good Will Hunting” came in a drama.

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    Nathan Followill of the band Kings of Leon, was injured in a tour bus accident over the weekend, forcing the band to cancel nine shows. Followill broke his ribs when the band’s tour bus driver was forced to stop short when a pedestrian crossed the street in front of the vehicle Saturday after their show in Boston.

    Broken ribs force Kings of Leon to cancel shows

    The Kings of Leon will be off the road for two weeks while drummer Nathan Followill recovers from broken ribs, a statement from the band says. But Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson is coming to the rescue for Tuesday night’s appearance on “The Tonight Show With Jimmy Fallon.” Kings of Leon is canceling nine shows.

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    Kevin Kilgore uses tomatoes from his backyard garden for his Fat Stax Tomato Salad.

    Cook of the Week: Stunning dinners start in garden for Prospect Heights cook

    Like many home cooks, Kevin Kilgore first learned to cook by watching his mom and dad. Sitting around the table with his four younger siblings, he remembers feasting on his mom’s tuna noodle casserole and shrimp creole. On weekends, his father manned the grill. In high school, Kevin was one of the few male students in classes such as family meals and creative cooking. “These were the classes I looked forward to the most,” he said. But this Prospect Heights cook also credits his time as a waiter at the long-gone Rusty Pelican in Arlington Heights with inspiration.

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    Singer Femi Kuti performing last year at the New Afrika Shrine in Lagos, Nigeria. The son of Fela Kuti, whose career as a musician and political activist was celebrated by the three-time Tony Award-winning play “Fela!,” has in recent days been thinking more than ever about his father with the release of the latest work on his life, “Finding Fela,” the documentary by Academy Award-winning director Alex Gibney.

    Son of Fela Kuti talks of father’s legacy ahead of doc screening

    Femi Kuti is, like his father, a recording artist and an activist. Now he’s a storyteller as well, advising Academy Award-winning director Alex Gibney on the documentary “Finding Fela,” about the life of his father, Nigerian musician and activist Fela Kuti. The film plays at 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 16, at the Music Box Theatre in Chicago. “I didn’t want to be the replica of my father ... and I believe this was from the training he gave me, to have your own mind,” he said.

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    Churros
    Churros have become a summer festival favorite and guess what? You can make them at home. Eleven-year-old Henry Gabriel shows us how.

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    If deer and rabbits are a problem, choose bulbs that are less attractive to them, such as this winter aconite.

    Seed bare spots in your lawn now

    It is time to plan for and order spring-flowering bulbs for your garden. These plants need well-drained soil, so any area that remains wet for long periods of time or has standing water is unsuitable for bulbs.

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    Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child balance suspense with ancient history in “The Lost Island.”

    Stellar writing in clever ‘Lost Island’

    “The Lost Island,” the third novel to feature master thief and brilliant scientist Gideon Crew, is another clever and compelling tale from Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child. Gideon has a rare condition that will kill him within a year unless he finds a cure. He works for Eli Glinn, a mysterious man with unlimited wealth, who asks Gideon to steal one page from the priceless Book of Kells, an Irish tome on display at a New York library. The page may have a clue to the cure for his condition.

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    Churros rolled in cinnamon and sugar bring summer festival food home.

    Move over Jerome, Henry’s in the kitchen ... making churros

    With Jerome Gabriel away at camp his younger brother, Henry, takes over the kitchen to learn how to make churros. The 11-year-old adds chocolate to the batter and learns that deep frying should be an adult-supervised pursuit.

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    The foliage of Aureola hakone grass arches gracefully.

    Shade garden design easy with award-winning perennials

    The Perennial Plant Association has chosen a Perennial of the Year since 1990 and plenty of their choices are suitable for shady sites. It’s easy to create a beautiful design if you begin with these plants.

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    Sinead O’Connor’s “I’m Not Bossy. I’m The Boss” shows she still has considerable talent, even if her music sounds mostly generic now.

    A forlorn Sinead O’Connor on ‘I’m Not Bossy’

    After a rough few years for Sinead O’Connor, as she dealt with a 16-day marriage and canceled a tour due to mental illness, it’s heartening to see her confident image on the cover of the new disc, “I’m Not Bossy, I’m the Boss.” What’s striking about her new set of songs is how needy, even forlorn, she sounds.

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    Al-Jazeera America marks its first anniversary on the air next week. The news network has recorded some startlingly low ratings and recently shown signs of retrenchment with layoffs and by cutting some live newscasts.

    Al-Jazeera America logs first anniversary

    Al-Jazeera America marks its first anniversary on the air next week, and if you haven’t watched much, you’re not alone. The news network has recorded some startlingly low ratings and recently shown signs of retrenchment with layoffs and by cutting some live newscasts. Al-Jazeera America has also won awards for its work, seen some recent audience growth and its chief executive insists a steady growth plan is on target.

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    “Cool Science Tricks” by Daniel Tatarsky (2012 Portico Books, distributed by IPG), $14.99, 112 pages.

    ‘Cool Science Tricks’ will chase boredom away

    You will not be bored this summer. There’s no way you’ll give Mom any reason for extra chores. You’ll keep busy enough so that Dad doesn’t come up with “ideas” for your time. With the book “Cool Science Tricks” by Daniel Tatarasky in your hand, you definitely won't be bored.

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    Kevin Kilgore tops off his Fat Stax Tomato Salad with balsamic vinegar.

    Fat Stax Tomato Salad
    Kevin Kilgore says a sweet tomato, such as a Big Rainbow, Mr. Stripey or Brandywine, work best for his Fat Stax Tomato Salad.

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    Using a mandoline will ensure thin slices of cucumber and onion for this carpaccio-like salad.

    Cucumber Carpaccio
    You'll want to use a mandoline to slice the vegetables very thin for Kevin Kilgore's Cucumber Carpacio.

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    Grill Roasted Stuffed Sweet Peppers
    Select lean ground beef for stuffing sweet peppers. Cook of the Week Kevin Kilgore says this recipe can be cooked in the oven, but is better when grilled.

Discuss

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    Editorial: All of us have work to do to make rails safer

    Everyone, not just safety experts, has work to do to improve rail safety, a Daily Herald editorial says.

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    Myths abound about the social safety net

    Columnist Catherine Rampell: “Another Kid” is one little song in one little show, but it reflects much broader misperceptions about the U.S. social safety net: that it is a cushy “hammock” that discourages large numbers of moochers and lucky-duckies from working,

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    Does church ‘right’ include Crusades?
    An Elgin letter to the editor: A letter in the Aug. 10 Daily Herald states that the Catholic Church exists to inform us what is right or wrong, and the Church needs to speak truth into all of our lives.

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    Time for America to care for its own
    A Dundee letter to the editor: I agree with all the points Inez Tornblom stated in her letter, “Can we just say “Stop” to Isreal?” The land of Palestine was the home to many peoples. When the UN created Isreal there was also to have been another state called Palestine.

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    Please remain in president’s way
    A St. Charles letter to the editor: A recent letter encouraged the GOP to get out of President Obama’s way. I for one hope the GOP stays firmly in the way of his destructive agenda.

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    Distressing news on DuPage lobbyist
    A Naperville letter to the editor: I found it very distressing that a lobbying firm being considered for a contract, V.A. Persico Consulting, has also contributed to the campaigns of some of the county board members.

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    One way to block Russian aggression
    A St. Charles letter to the editor: If the U.S. wants to reduce Russia’s ability to blackmail European nations to not stand up to her aggressions in Ukraine and elsewhere, we ought to sell European nations some of our natural gas.

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    Tend to needs of Illinois’ own kids’ first
    A letter to the editor: Mayor Rahm Emanuel has announced Chicago, thus Illinois, will become home for 1,000 illegal immigrant children. Emanuel says “the test and measure of a city is how it treats its children.” What does it say about a city and state that denies basic care for over 23,000 cognitively impaired, vulnerable, U.S. citizens labeled developmentally disabled?

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    State inspector’s Metra report justified
    A letter to the editor: In contrast to statements a Metra spokesman made, the recently published report by the Office of Inspector General will not cause “unjustified public confusion.” Although Metra is free to question the value of our public investigations, its passengers should rest assured that my office will investigate allegations involving public safety.

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    Chairman, coroner spat doing no good
    A Batavia letter to the editor: I have followed for several months now this ongoing battle between the Kane County chairman and the coroner. I’m concerned that I don’t see a lot of push back from any of the board members regarding this.

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    (No heading)
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Even though almost 10 million Americans have qualified for health insurance through Obamacare the right-wing Republicans continued to believe it’s a “failure.”

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