Facebook page calm

Daily Archive : Thursday August 7, 2014

News

  •  
    Karsten James

    Barrington Hills teen gets 90 days for fatal DUI crash

    A Cook County judge on Thursday sentenced a Barrington Hills teen to 90 days in Cook County jail and three years' probation for the 2013 head-on crash that killed a 61-year-old Elgin man and seriously injured the man's fiancee. In sentencing Karsten James Eilertsen, Judge Thomas Fecarotta said he was giving him “a taste” of what awaits him if he violates his probation.

  •  
    In this July 31, 2014 photo, Dr. Colin Brammer, an entomologist at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, displays a lone star tick in a lab in Raleigh, N.C. Doctors across the nation are seeing a surge of sudden meat allergies in longtime carnivores who were bitten by Lone Star ticks, which are found in the Southwest and eastern half of the U.S. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)

    Bad bite: A tick can make you allergic to red meat

    A bug can turn you into a vegetarian, or at least make you swear off red meat. Doctors across the nation are seeing a surge of sudden meat allergies in people bitten by a certain kind of tick.

  •  

    Naperville girl killed in motorcycle crash

    A 14-year-old Naperville girl was killed after a motorcycle crash on Interstate 55 while riding with her father, officials said. Ashley Wilson was riding with her 54-year-old father on southbound I-55 under I-355 around 9:35 p.m. Wednesday when the bike went down, struck the median and skated along the highway’s left shoulder, officials said.

  •  
    Metra has restored full service on the BNSF line after earlier announcing that four trains had ben canceled.

    Metra restores full service this morning on BNSF line

    Metra riders whose rush-hour commute home imploded Thursday afternoon after two people were killed on the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Line should only see minor delays this morning, according to the Metra website. Metra had canceled four trains scheduled to arrive at Union Station between 7 a.m. and 8:17 a.m., but announced at 5:30 a.m. that full service had been restored.

  •  
    Hub Arkush of Chicago Football Magazine, far right, talks about the Bears’ upcoming football season with, from left, sports columnist Barry Rozner, Bears beat writer Bob LeGere and sports writer Joe Aguilar, at a Daily Herald subscriber event Thursday at Coach’s Corner in Elk Grove Village.

    Daily Herald subscribers get jump start on football season

    While the Bears must wait to kick off their NFL preseason tonight at Soldier Field, Daily Herald subscribers got a jump on the season Thursday night in Elk Grove Village. Veteran Chicago sports journalists Hub Arkush, Bob LeGere and Joe Aguilar hosted a Q&A session with more than 100 Daily Herald subscribers to talk about football, from the preps to the pros, in a wide-ranging discussion at...

  •  

    Hanover Township’s health and wellness expo returns

    Flu shots, fitness demos and cholesterol tests are planned for Hanover Township’s health and wellness expo,coming up at 2-6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18, at the township’s headquarters.

  •  
    “As commander in chief, I will not allow the United States to be dragged into fighting another war in Iraq,” Obama said in the State Dining Room at the White House in Washington, Thursday.

    Obama OKs airstrikes ‘if necessary’ on rebels in Iraq

    President Barack Obama said tonight he approved targeted airstrikes “if necessary” against rebels in Iraq. He also approved airdrops of humanitarian supplies to thousands of religious minorities in Iraq who are under siege from the Islamic militants, he said. “Today, America is coming to help,” Obama said.

  •  

    Fire leaves car a total loss

    A car fire in a parking lot caught the attention of a Wildwood apartment building’s residents when someone pulled the lobby fire alarm, leading to the building’s evacuation. The vehicle fire, reported to authorities about 8 p.m. Thursday, didn’t extend to the three-story Savanna Ridge apartments building at 18400 Belvidere Road.

  •  
    John Cotton Jr.

    Police seek public’s help finding Elgin man

    Police are looking for a missing Elgin man who hasn’t been heard from since Tuesday. Elgin police asked for the public’s help Thursday night in finding 22-year-old John Cotton Jr., who has been missing since 8 a.m. Tuesday from his home in the 1400 block of Knotty Pine Drive.

  •  
    Sales of a new dual-dated 1964-2014 John F. Kennedy gold half dollar were suspended Thursday at the World’s Fair of Money at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont. Officials say the coins can still be purchased online at usmint.gov.

    Sales of Kennedy coin at Rosemont convention suspended

    Long lines outside the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont have led organizers of a coin show to suspend in-person sales of a popular John F. Kennedy gold half dollar, officials said Thursday. Collectors began lining up as early as Monday night for the chance to buy the Kennedy coins, unveiled Tuesday morning by the U.S. Mint at the World’s Fair of Money convention.

  •  
    In 2009, Bill Gnech was fed up with flooding in his neighborhood and camped out at Northwest Highway and Arlington Heights Road to voice his displeasure. Now, Gnech is trying to get term limits passed for local elected officials.

    Term limits may be on Arlington Hts. ballot in November

    An Arlington Heights resident is trying again to get term limits for elected officials enacted in Arlington Heights, and has presented petitions that may get the initiative on the Nov. 4 ballot.

  •  

    New U of I union will have to wait on raises

    Some members of a new union for faculty members who aren’t on tenure tracks at the University of Illinois will have to wait to get raises that had already been offered.

  •  
    Guest speaker and Medal of Honor recipient Sgt. Alan J. Lynch of Gurnee addresses the crowd gathered Thursday for the dedication of the monument to all Purple Heart recipients in McHenry County.

    McHenry County honors Purple Heart recipients with monument

    While about 200 people looked on Thursday, a monument was dedicated on Purple Heart Day to McHenry County residents who have won the award. The monument’s creation and dedication event at the McHenry County Courthouse was organized by retired Marine Corp. Richard W. Young of Woodstock.

  •  
    Stan and Barbara Hardwick’s home at 125 Stratford Road in Des Plaines was the hands-down winner of the Best Curb Appeal challenge.

    Winners announced in Des Plaines curb appeal contest

    It’s official: Barbara and Stan Hardwick of 125 Stratford Road have the most “curb appeal” in Des Plaines. The couple is taking home first prize in Des Plaines Mayor Matt Bogusz’s inaugural Curb Appeal Challenge, which he started to recognize residents who take great pride in their homes.

  •  
    BJ Park, a state representative from Georgia, right, speaks as Will Hurd, a congressional candidate from Texas, listens to him Thursday during the Republican National Committee summer meeting in Chicago.

    Republicans to approve post-2012 goals, not immigration

    Republicans are enthusiastic about wrapping up their year of sweeping party rule changes aimed at making the work of picking a candidate for president more efficient and less prone to infighting. Not a moment too soon. As members of the Republican National Committee meet this week in Chicago, several White House hopefuls are spending a few days in the Iowa — a full year and a half ahead of...

  •  
    Kane County Coroner Rob Russell announced his office is the first in Illinois to receive national accreditation.

    Kane Co. Coroner accreditation fuels new morgue talk

    Kane County Coroner Rob Russell announced Thursday his agency just became one of only 20 in the country to receive national accreditation from the International Association of Coroners & Medical Examiners. Russell said the process would not have been successful if he wasn't contracting with DuPage County for morgue space because Kane County's facility is too deficient to receive a passing grade.

  •  

    Police pension board opening:

    Vernon Hills is seeking a volunteer to serve as trustee on the village’s police pension board.

  •  

    Arbor Day Foundation offer:

    Everyone who joins the nonprofit Arbor Day Foundation in August with a $10 donation will receive 10 free Colorado blue spruce trees through the foundation’s Trees for America campaign.

  •  
    Keira Dallstream, 4, of Gurnee, gets some pointers from Gurnee Police Officer Marty DePerte during Thursday’s bike rodeo at Woodland Middle School in Gurnee.

    Kids test bike skills, learn about safety during Gurnee bike rodeo

    The parking lot at Woodland Middle School was turned into an obstacle course as kids participated in a bike rodeo Thursday. Kids maneuvered their bikes through various stations that tested their skills and helped to teach bicycle safety.

  •  

    Author to visit:

    Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Julia Keller will visit the Aspen Drive Library in Vernon Hills on Aug. 28.

  •  
    A new H&M store opened Thursday at Yorktown Center in Lombard.

    New H&M opens at Lombard’s Yorktown Center

    An international retailer has opened at The Shops on Butterfield at Lombard’s Yorktown Center. More than 150 people lined up in front of the H&M at 370 Yorktown Center Thursday morning to celebrate the store’s grand opening and receive giveaways and discounts. Women, men and children’s clothing is sold at the store, which according to the company’s website, offers...

  •  
    Tables full of books were available for children to choose from during Catholic Charities’ Back to School Fair at the Odeum Expo Center in Villa Park.

    Back-to-School Fair helps DuPage families in need

    Times are tough for Tiffany Harrison. The Villa Park mom recently was injured at work, she says, so there’s no money coming in. That’s always stressful, but even more so with the approaching start of school. Luckily for Harrison, a Back-to-School Fair this week lifted some of the financial weight off her shoulders.

  •  
    Six people want to fill a vacancy on the Geneva Public Library board of trustees.

    Six seek Geneva library board seat

    Six people have applied to fill a vacancy on the Geneva library board. Steven Andersson left the board last month, because he expects to be elected as representative of the 65th state House District in November.

  •  
    Asst. Prosecutor, Athina Siringas speaks during closing arguments in the Theodore Wafer case Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2014, in Detroit. The case of Wafer, a suburban Detroit homeowner who opened his front door and blasted an unarmed woman on his porch, has gone to the jury. Wafer is charged with second-degree murder and manslaughter in the death of 19-year-old Renisha McBride. (AP Photo/Detroit News, Clarence Tabb Jr.)

    Detroit homeowner convicted of killing woman on porch

    A suburban Detroit man who insisted he killed an unarmed woman on his porch in self-defense was convicted of second-degree murder Thursday after the jury rejected his tearful claim that he fired through a screen door in the wee hours because he feared his life was at risk.

  •  
    In this Aug. 4, 2014 photo Antony Alvarez, 6, of Honduras plays at the Senda de Vida migrant shelter in Reynosa, Mexico. Alvarez, along with his mother and grandmother, hope to join the thousands of families _ mothers or fathers with young children _ who have crossed the Rio Grande into the U.S. United States. (AP Photo/Christopher Sherman)

    Flow of child immigrants slows along Texas border

    Far fewer unaccompanied immigrant children are crossing the Texas-Mexico border, allowing the federal government to close the temporary shelters that it hurriedly opened to handle the surge, authorities say.

  •  

    Consumer spending bounces back fast in Illinois

    Just a year after they had seen the worst of the Great Recession, Illinois consumers were spending more than they were before the economic downturn. New federal data show that the average Illinois resident’s consumer spending has also grown faster than the average American consumer since that 2009 low.

  •  

    Appeals court rules against Bears on tax

    An Illinois appeals court says the Chicago Bears owe $4.1 million to Cook County in amusement taxes plus interest. A three-judge panel posted its ruling Thursday on the dispute between the football team and the county.

  •  

    Lindenhurst man dies in Wyoming crash

    A Lindenhurst man is dead after a semitrailer truck struck his car near Devils Tower, Wyoming. The Wyoming Highway Patrol says 65-year-old Bruce M. Hinton failed to yield when he exited a scenic pullout on Wyoming Highway 24. A 9-year-old child in Hinton's car was taken to a hospital and was in stable condition.

  •  

    Objection to petition of 62nd District House independent candidate upheld

    The Lake County electoral board on Thursday upheld an objection to the candidacy petition filed by Denise Rotheimer of Ingleside to run as an independent in the 62nd House district. She said she plans to seek a judicial review of the finding.

  •  
    Buffalo Grove firefighter-paramedics Ryan McCarthy, left, and Mike Spiro are honored Aug. 4 by the village board.

    Buffalo Grove firefighters honored for saving a life

    The lifesaving efforts of three Buffalo Grove firefighters were honored at the Buffalo Grove village board meeting this week. The crew from Tower 25, Lt. Dave Mahan and firefighter/paramedics Mike Spiro and Ryan McCarthy, were awarded a Company Citation for rescuing a man on Old Oak Drive May 7.

  •  

    Fire causes $150,000 damage to Wheaton house

    Firefighters are still probing the cause of a Wednesday night blaze that caused roughly $150,000 damage to a two-story house on the 1400 block of Avery Avenue in Wheaton. No injuries were reported, but officials said the house is uninhabitable.

  •  
    Cliff McIlvaine, who was sued by the city of St. Charles in an effort to get him to finish a project that he first pulled a permit for in 1975, stands in May 2013 on a landing between his original home to the left and new, super-insulated addition on the right, which he hopes to turn into a museum for his and his father’s inventions, along with city memorabilia.

    McIlvaine seeks extension stemming from 1975 project

    Embattled St. Charles homeowner Cliff McIlvaine was back in court Thursday, seeking an extension to remove construction materials from his land where he first began an addition in 1975. McIlvaine also has sued the city for damages after he said workers ripped off old super-insulated fiberglass materials on the home's roof and installed a conventional, asphalt shingle roof.

  •  
    Mark G. Lewis

    Kane judge: Cameras allowed for Geneva doctor’s rape case

    A Kane County judge will allow cameras to record the case of Geneva doctor Mark G. Lewis, accused of raping one of his patients in November 2012. But Judge John Barsanti could limit the use of cameras. “I can impose any kind of restrictions that I think are appropriate,” he said.

  •  

    Fox Valley police reports
    Shadontre Q. Smith, 21, of Elgin, was charged Thursday with criminal damage to government property, resisting or obstructing a police officer and obstructing identification, according to court records. He is accused of damaging an Elgin Police Department squad car. After causing the damage, which was less than $500, he ran from a police officer. Smith then gave false names to the officers once...

  •  
    Anthony Auston, right, has been named the new director of the Palatine Public Library, taking over for Susan Strunk.

    Palatine Library promotes Auston to director

    The Palatine Public Library District Board of Library Trustees Thursday announced it has named the assistant director, Anthony Auston, to succeed Susan Strunk as director of the library district. Board President Barbara Illian said in a news release that the library board interviewed several of the candidates before deciding that Auston was “the best fit.”

  •  
    Vernon Hills High School Principal Jon Guillaume, left, signs paperwork for teacher and coach Ross Caton. Guillaume started as principal July 1.

    Jon Guillaume promises to be “a visible principal” at Vernon Hills High

    As excited as Jon Guillaume is to be starting his first year as Vernon Hills High School’s principal, the veteran educator knows the job is a huge responsibility. “I am committed 100 percent to Vernon Hills High School,” he said. “I love this place. I love the kids at this place, I love the staff at this place, and together we’re going to do great things.”

  •  

    13 vehicles burgled in Arlington Heights this week

    Burglars in Arlington Heights broke into 10 locked vehicles and entered three unlocked cars between 10 p.m. Aug. 3 and 11:30 a.m. Aug. 5, stealing items and doing damage to create losses of more than $10,000.

  •  
    Veterans are expected to have an easier time getting government-paid health care from local doctors under a bill that President Barack Obama is set to sign into law Thursday.

    Obama signs veterans’ health care overhaul

    President Barack Obama says the government must ensure that the Veterans Affairs Department has the resources to keep up with the demands of troops returning from war.

  •  
    Scooter, a small, male terrier mix, is about 6 years old.

    Barking dogs need to be trained to stop the behavior

    With no rain in the forecast, moderate temperatures and a slight breeze, we have the windows open. It feels good to have fresh air and sunshine coming into the house. Sounds come in through the open windows too; birds singing, cars going down the street, lawn mowers, children playing and dogs barking.

  •  

    NRG to close Romeoville coal plant, modernize Waukean plant

    An energy company has announced plans to close one Illinois coal-fired power plant and convert another to natural gas to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The company says the move will eliminate 250 jobs.

  •  

    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Vandals discharged fire extinguishers inside two Mount Prospect Park District vehicles, doing an estimated $700 in damage. They broke into a 2008 Chevrolet Express van and a 2013 Ford bus between 6:30 p.m. July 11 and 7:45 a.m. July 12. The vehicles were parked at the district’s RecPlex, 420 W. Dempster St. The offenders used the fire extinguishers in the vehicles to spray foam inside.

  •  

    Illinois parents charged with baby’s death

    Authorities in western Illinois have arrested the parents who allegedly went to bed intoxicated and killed their 4-month-old son when they rolled on top of him.

  •  

    Barbecuers needed for BG Days contest
    Are you good with barbecue tongs? Do friends just happen to drop by whenever you pull out the grill? Then sign up for the Barbecue Challenge at this year's Buffalo Grove Days on Aug. 30.

  •  
    This image shows 1st Lt. William “Laddie” Bernier, whose remains have been identified and will be returned to family members 70 years after his B-24 bomber was shot down over Papua New Guinea during World War II. Bernier was the bombardier, stationed in a glass cockpit in the aircraft’s nose and responsible for sighting and releasing its bombs.

    Remains of airmen missing since WWII accounted for

    The remains of two missing airmen have been accounted for 70 years after they disappeared when their plane went down over Papua New Guinea during World War II, U.S. military officials said. The remains of 1st Lts. William Bernier and Bryant Poulsen were identified through DNA and other evidence collected from the crash site in a forest on the Pacific island nation, said U.S. Air Force Lt. Col.

  •  
    Gay marriage supporters march from the Potter Stewart United States Courthouse, rear, Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2014, to Fountain Square in Cincinnati. Three judges of the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati heard arguments Wednesday in six gay marriage fights from four states, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio and Tennessee.

    Judges weigh gay marriage cases from 4 states

    Judges Martha Craig Daughtrey and Deborah L. Cook made it clear fairly quickly they stood on opposite sides of the same-sex marriage debate. Their colleague, Judge Jeffrey S. Sutton, however, gave fewer hints as to where he may come down when the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals decides the fate of gay marriage bans in four states. The cases heard Wednesday pit states’ rights and...

  •  
    Jenise Paulette Wright. More than 100 officers from 10 law enforcement agencies are involved in the search for 6-year-old Jenise, who disappeared from her Washington state home over the weekend, sheriff’s officials said Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014.

    Missing Washington girl’s dad had previous molestation charge

    Law enforcement officers searching for a 6-year-old Washington state girl who vanished last weekend say they’re aware of a past molestation charge against her father but are focused right now on finding little Jenise Wright.

  •  
    This combination of four 2014 booking photos released by the San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office shows Marilyn Hartman. Federal law enforcement officials say Hartman tried at least three times to breach airport security before she was able to get through a checkpoint without a boarding pass at Mineta San Jose International Airport on Monday, Aug. 4, 2014.

    LA stowaway had mental treatment for past attempts

    The woman who flew from San Jose to Los Angeles without a boarding pass was a homeless loner who was briefly ordered into mental treatment earlier this year because of her past attempts to sneak aboard flights, officials said.

  •  
    A Palestinian boy flashes the V-sign as he participates in a Hamas rally in Gaza City, Gaza Strip, Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014. Thursday’s rally drew several thousand supporters and a senior Hamas official has told supporters at the rally that the war with Israel won’t be over until the group’s political demands are met.

    Hamas says Gaza war not over until demands met

    A senior Hamas official has told supporters at a Gaza City rally that the war with Israel won’t be over until the group’s political demands are met. The official, Mushir al-Masri, said Thursday that “our fingers are on the trigger and our rockets are trained at Tel Aviv.”

  •  
    Food vendors at Wood Dale’s Prairie Fest include regional favorites as well as local institutions like White Cottage Pizzeria. The festival continues through Sunday in Wood Dale’s Town Square.

    Fireworks and family at Wood Dale Prarie Fest

    Returning for its twelfth year in the village’s downtown, Wood Dale’s Prarie Fest has quietly expanded from a one-day picnic into a four-day festival with music, carnival attractions and firewworks. The festival, which now atracts 16,000 visitors over its four days with an expanding variety of entertainment, continues through Sunday, Aug. 10.

  •  
    The Wheaton Public Library will undergo some changes in response to the results of a community needs assessment.

    Changes coming to Wheaton Library after community needs assessment

    Since taking over as director of the Wheaton Public Library last October, Betsy Adamowksi has been working to create a larger teen section, update technology, increase partnerships with the business community and sort through outdated materials. She's pleased all those improvements and more were identified in a community needs assessment of the library that was recently completed by an outside...

  •  
    Khieu Samphan, the Khmer Rouge’s former head of state, sits inside the courtroom of a U.N.-backed war crimes tribunal in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014. Three and a half decades after the genocidal rule of Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge ended, the U.N.-backed tribunal on Thursday sentenced Khieu Samphan and Nuon Chea, two top leaders of the former regime, to life in prison for crimes against humanity during the country’s 1970s terror period that left close to 2 million people dead.

    Cambodia tribunal convicts Khmer Rouge leaders

    They were leaders of Cambodia’s infamous Khmer Rouge, the fanatical communist movement behind a 1970s reign of terror that transformed this entire Southeast Asian nation into a ruthless slave state. When the nightmare ended in 1979, close to 2 million people were dead. On Thursday, a U.N.-backed tribunal convicted two of the once all-powerful men who ruled during that era of crimes against...

  •  

    Naperville considers forming commission for seniors

    Already recognized by one magazine as the best city in the country for early retirees, the city of Naperville might soon take another step to be senior-friendly by creating a senior commission. “We must live up to that reputation,” said Bev Patterson Frier, a retired business owner who is pushing for a senior commission. “But we have a lot of work to do to justify that...

  •  

    Could a coffee shop be in the works at Wheaton Library?

    Residents responding to a community needs assessment for Wheaton Public Library made it clear they'd like to see a cafe or coffee shop inside the building, Director Betsy Adamowski said Wednesday. It's an idea library officials are quickly embracing.

  •  
    Oscar Pistorius listens to the state prosecutor summarizing his evidence during his trial, in Pretoria, South Africa, Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014. The chief prosecutor, Gerrie Nel said Thursday the double-amputee athlete’s lawyers have floated more than one theory in a dishonest attempt to defend against a murder charge for his killing of girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp.

    Prosecutor: Oscar Pistorius is ‘appalling witness’

    Oscar Pistorius was an “appalling witness” who repeatedly lied in his testimony in a crude attempt to defend against a murder charge for killing girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, the chief prosecutor said Thursday during closing arguments in the athlete’s trial. Prosecutor Gerrie Nel also harshly criticized the legal team of the double-amputee athlete, saying it floated more than...

  •  
    U.S. Veterans Affairs Deputy Secretary Sloan Gibson, right, and combat veteran Wendy Buckingham salute a color guard during the opening session of the National Order of the Purple Heart National Convention, at which Buckingham serves as Women Veterans Issues Director, in Denver, Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014.

    Major provisions of veterans health care bill

    A bill approved by Congress aims to alleviate delays many veterans have faced in getting treatment at Veterans Affairs hospitals and clinics and end the widespread practice of covering up long wait times for appointments. The legislation also makes it easier to fire hospital administration and other senior VA executives.

  •  
    Former NSA systems analyst Edward Snowden, who is wanted by the U.S. for leaking details about once-secret surveillance programs, has been granted permission to stay in Russia for three more years, his lawyer said Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014. Snowden last year was granted temporary asylum of one year in Russia, but that ran out on Aug. 1.

    Lawyer: Snowden can stay 3 more years in Russia

    Former NSA systems analyst Edward Snowden, who is wanted by the U.S. for leaking details about once-secret surveillance programs, has been granted permission to stay in Russia for three more years, his lawyer said Thursday. Snowden last year was granted temporary asylum of one year in Russia, but that expired on Aug. 1.

  •  
    An activist smokes a cigarette after clashes with a special forces police battalion in Independence Square, Kiev, Ukraine, Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014. Demonstrators on Thursday confronted city workers attempting to clear a central square, lighting tires on fire in protest against the city government’s move.

    Mortar hits hospital in eastern Ukraine; 1 killed

    A mortar hit a large hospital in the troubled Ukrainian city of Donetsk Thursday, killing at least one person, as government forces tighten their grip on the pro-Russian rebel stronghold. “There was a sudden explosion, a mortar round flew through the window, all the equipment was destroyed,” said Anna Kravtsova, a doctor at the Vishnevskiy Hospital. “They killed one person,...

  •  
    Women choose Dutch tomatoes at a supermarket in downtown Moscow on Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014. The Russian government has banned all imports of meat, fish, milk and milk products and fruit and vegetables from the United States, the European Union, Australia, Canada and Norway, Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev announced Thursday.

    Russia hits back on sanctions; bans food from West

    Russia banned most food imports from the West on Thursday in retaliation for sanctions over Ukraine, an unexpectedly sweeping move that will cost farmers in North America, Europe and Australia billions of dollars but will also likely lead to empty shelves in Russian cities. The announcement shows that while President Vladimir Putin doesn’t appear ready to heed Russian nationalists’...

  •  

    Acid spill closed streets near White Sox ballpark

    A tanker truck leaking acid on the Chicago’s South Side prompted authorities to temporarily close a train platform and streets near U.S. Cellular Field while a hazardous materials crew responded. Chicago Fire Department spokesman Larry Langford tells WBBM-TV that about 500 gallons of muriatic acid were leaked from the tanker on Wednesday afternoon.

  •  

    Glen Ellyn Park District seeking tax money for aquatic center

    Glen Ellyn Park District voters will get the chance in November to decide if they want to pay for construction of an indoor aquatic center. Park commissioners agreed Tuesday to put a referendum question on the fall ballot that will ask residents if they want the district to issue bonds to pay for building and equipping the proposed facility that would be attached to the Ackerman Sports & Fitness...

  •  
    Obama and Bush are coming together for the second time in just over a year to promote U.S. ties to Africa. They’re also deepening the personal ties between two first ladies from different generations and opposing political parties.

    Michelle Obama, Laura Bush push for girls’ education

    Michelle Obama and Laura Bush, first ladies from different generations and opposing political parties, spoke with one voice Wednesday on the importance of educating women and girls worldwide, saying countries will be more prosperous as a result. “You have to change attitudes before you can change behaviors,” Mrs. Obama said.

  •  
    A woman washes her hands before she is allowed to enter a building as part of a Ebola prevention campaign in the city of Freetown, Sierra Leone, Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2014.

    Liberia, Sierra Leone race to enforce Ebola quarantine

    Soldiers clamped down on people trying to travel to Liberia’s capital Thursday from rural areas hard-hit by the Ebola virus hours after the president declared a national state of emergency. Reports have emerged of families hiding sick relatives at home and of abandoned bodies being left in the streets. Similar efforts were under way in eastern areas of neighboring Sierra Leone after...

  •  
    Cambodian former Khmer Rouge servitors, Soum Rithy, left, cries as he hugs Chum Mey, right, after the verdicts were announced, at the U.N.-backed war crimes tribunal in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Thurdday, Aug. 7, 2014. Three and a half decades after the genocidal rule of Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge ended, the tribunal on Thursday sentenced two top leaders of the former regime to life in prison on war crimes charges for their role in the country’s terror period in the 1970s.

    Experts look at Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge trial

    A U.N.-assisted tribunal on Thursday sentenced two top leaders of Cambodia’s former Khmer Rouge regime to life in prison for crimes against humanity during their late 1970s reign of terror that left as many as 2 million people dead. The Associated Press asked legal and academic experts earlier this week to explore questions raised by the proceedings.

  •  

    Police: Muncie man living with 600 animals

    Police and animal shelter officials will remove more than 600 animals from a Muncie storefront. The Star Press reports that a building commissioner on Wednesday discovered a man at a strip mall with a collection of animals including an alligator, two hedgehogs and more than 500 mice.

  •  

    81-year-old Indiana farmer rescued from grain bin

    An 81-year-old farmer rescued after being buried beneath an avalanche of corn inside a grain bin on his family’s southwestern Indiana farm is back at work just two days after the near-fatal accident.

  •  

    Illinois firefighter pleads guilty to arson

    A volunteer firefighter has pleaded guilty to arson .The (Galesburg) Register-Mail reports 24-year-old Blake Walsh accepted a deal Wednesday in a Knox County court to plead guilty to three counts of arson.

  •  

    2nd man succumbs to injuries from lightning strike

    A second man who was injured in a lightning strike in Oconto County over the weekend has also died. A Press-Gazette Media report says 31-year-old Christopher Wold had been hospitalized since the lightning strike Sunday evening. Authorities said Wednesday he has died from his injuries.

  •  
    Target Corp. is adding its name to a legal defense of gay marriage, joining other large companies that have taken a stand on same-sex unions.

    Target publicly endorses same-sex marriage

    Target Corp. is adding its name to a legal defense of gay marriage, joining other large companies that have taken a stand on same-sex unions. Target says it signed a court brief backing marriage equality in a pending case. Starbucks, Intel and Apple have publicly backed gay marriage advocates in court cases or ballot issues.

  •  
    This image provided by NOAA taken Thursday Aug. 7, 2014 at 2 a.m. EDT shows Hurricane Iselle, left and Hurricane Julio. Iselle was supposed to weaken as it slowly trudged west across the Pacific. It didn't — and now Hawaii is poised to take its first direct hurricane hit in 22 years. The center of Hurricane Iselle is expected to pass very near or over the Big Island Thursday night and just south of the smaller islands Friday. Some weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours however Iselle is still expected to be near hurricane strength as it impacts the Big Island.

    Iselle to give Hawaii first hurricane in 22 years

    Barely holding on to hurricane strength, Iselle's outer edges brought rain and wind to Hawaii on Thursday as it approached landfall, poised to become the first hurricane or tropical storm to hit the island chain in 22 years and whose path another hurricane closely followed. Hurricane Iselle was expected to pass overnight across the Big Island, one of the least populated islands that is known for...

  •  
    One of the historic experimental coins from the collection of the late Texas businessman and philanthropist Harry W. Bass, Jr. that will be offered by Heritage Auctions at the 2014 World’s Fair of Money today in Rosemont.

    30 coins from 19th century to sell at Rosemont auction

    DALLAS — Thirty coins stamped by the U.S. Mint in the 19th century to test designs and metals are expected to sell at an auction in Rosemont today for more than $300,000

  •  

    Objection! Interrupting lawyer gets rare sanction

    A federal judge in Iowa meted out an unusual punishment to a lawyer for repeatedly raising objections and interrupting depositions: She must produce a training video showing why such tactics are inappropriate. Perhaps unsurprisingly, her law firm objected to the ruling.

  •  

    Wisconsin invites companies to join trade trip

    Gov. Scott Walker’s economic development agency is inviting Wisconsin companies on an overseas trade trip later this year.The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation plans to lead a trip to the Czech Republic, Poland and Turkey in early November.

  •  
    Indian, Mexican, Thai, Japanese and Chinese vegetarian dishes will be available at the international food court at the ninth annual Veggie Fest in Naperville. The free festival is scheduled for 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 9, and Sunday, Aug. 10, at the Science of Spirituality Meditation Center, 4S175 Naperville Road in Naperville.

    Veggie Fest in Naperville offers suggestions for eating better

    Like a field of corn in the summer, Veggie Fest in Naperville keeps on growing. The ninth annual fest Aug. 9 and 10 is expected to draw at least 25,000 people to Science of Spirituality Meditation Center in Naperville. “This is going to be our last year on the property because we've just grown too big,” Jonathan Krueger, one of the festival's organizers, said.

  •  

    Dawn Patrol: Nybo takes Dillard’s seat; 22 years for Lombard stabbing

    Nybo sworn into state Senate. Chicago man gets 22 years in Lombard attempted murder. Services Friday for Long Grove adventurer. North Aurora motorcyclist hurt in crash. Lake in the Hills man accused of child porn. $1 million bail for Aurora man facing drug charges. QB Clausen claims veteran’s mentality. Adam Eaton hurt in Sox loss.

  •  
    Tod Curtis, owner of Ye Olde Town Inn, inside the inn Wednesday afternoon that he fought to preserve despite what he says were village efforts to seize his property.

    How Ye Old Town Inn owner fought suburb, won millions

    You can't fight City Hall, the adage goes, but Tod Curtis fought Village Hall, and his side came away with $6.5 million. The 75-year-old owner of Ye Olde Town Inn in downtown Mount Prospect claimed in a 2008 lawsuit that village officials and a local development company conspired to seize his land and redevelop the area without him. “Nothing's changed me,” he said. “I'm still...

  •  
    The 8,200-square-foot Kane County Animal Control shelter opened in 2007 at Peck and Keslinger roads in Geneva. The county is set to hire a new administrator for the agency next week.

    No controversy with new Kane County animal director hiring

    Kane County officials are set to hire a new animal control administrator next Tuesday. The appointment will mark the second leader of the agency since Chairman Chris Lauzen was elected. The current process is a marked change from the emergency techniques employed by Lauzen in the hiring of former interim administrator Robert Sauceda, who resigned earlier this year after a suspension and...

  •  

    Wood Dale prepares for Prairie Fest opening

    The ever-expanding Prairie Fest opens for its 12th year Thursday in downtown Wood Dale. The festival, which features food from area restaurants and performances from regionally based musicians, continues through Sunday. Fest hours are 6 to 11 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 1 to 11 p.m. Saturday and 1 to 10 p.m. Sunday.

  •  
    Elgin Community College and its partners will give away thousands of backpacks filled with school supplies and food to students in need Saturday during the fifth Project Backpack.

    ECC to give backpacks full of help to needy students Saturday

    Elgin Community College and its partners will give away thousands of backpacks with school supplies and food to students in need Saturday during the college’s fifth annual Project Backpack. "There is still a great need (within) the school districts in our area, between homeless students and the students in need," Katie Storey of ECC said.

  •  

    Noise rules at Emmerich Park in Buffalo Grove under review

    Mount Prospect’s planning and zoning commission will be considering a request by the Bills Youth Football and Cheerleading Association for use of the public address system at Emmerich Park on Sunday mornings.

  •  
    Randy Gaitsch, owner of Randy’s Vegetables, keeps an eye on the ears of corn roasting at the third annual Corn Roast fundraiser in Sleepy Hollow. The event, which takes place Sunday, Aug. 10, raises money for Special Olympics Illinois.

    Sleepy Hollow corn roast will benefit Special Olympics

    The Northern Fox Valley has a chance to give the Special Olympics Illinois a financial shot in the arm by attending the annual corn roast at Randy’s Vegetable Stand in Sleepy Hollow on Sunday, Aug. 10.

  •  
    Hoping to set a world record for the most couples renewing their wedding vows, organizer Candice Milstein, president of Wyatt Austin Jewelers in Schaumburg, says the Aug. 22 event will be more than a fun party. “What's more meaningful than saying to the person you're married to that you'd do it all over again?” she says.

    Couples aiming for world record on vow renewals

    Whether you've been married 50 years or just tied the knot last weekend, you could add to those memories by being part of a suburban attempt this month to break a world record. A Schaumburg jeweler and hotel hope to attract more than 1,087 couples to a mass ceremony and party that would topple the record for the most couples renewing their wedding vows.

  •  

    Batavia council advances plan for Speedway station

    Batavia aldermen are prepared to approve the building of a Speedway gasoline station on land the city is selling at Kirk Road and Wilson Street.

  •  
    Joseph E. Pierre

    Police searching for missing Mt. Prospect man

    Mount Prospect police ask the public’s help in finding a 63-year-old Mount Prospect man with dementia who has gone missing.

Sports

  •  

    Elias, Ackley lead Seattle to rout of White Sox

    Roenis Elias took a no-hitter into the fifth inning, Dustin Ackley led a potent Seattle offense with a home run and four RBI, and the Mariners beat the White Sox 13-3 on Thursday night.

  •  
    Bears coach Marc Trestman gets his first opportunity this summer to do some serious game-situation evaluations Friday night when the Bears open the preseason against the Philadelphia Eagles at Soldier Field.

    4 Bears' offensive position battles to watch tonight

    After 11 training camp practices, the Bears get to face players in different jerseys Friday night, when they host the Eagles at Soldier Field. The Bears' offensive starters are set, but players battling for backup positions will have their best opportunities yet to impress coaches. It's what players do in those game-type situations that are most important to coaches who will make the final evaluations when the current 90-man roster is sliced to 53 (plus an eight-man practice squad) at the end of the month.

  •  

    Cougars fall 4-3 in 11 innings

    Cedar Rapids’ bullpen retired 18 of the last 19 batters before walking off in the bottom of the 11th inning Thursday night. The Kernels (27-19, 58-58) walk-off 4-3 victory opened a four-game series against the visiting Kane County Cougars (27-19, 72-44).

  •  

    Boomers’ big rally falls short

    The Schaumburg Boomers nearly overcame an 8-0 deficit Thursday night but suffered an 8-6 defeat to the Washington Wild Things.

  •  
    Tyler Saladino

    Injury a setback for White Sox prospect Saladino

    Emerging prospect Tyler Saladino was having a solid season at Class AAA Charlotte and he positioned himself to join the White Sox when rosters can expand in September. But Saladino will have to wait until next year after injuring his right arm in early July and having Tommy John surgery.

  •  
    Jim Furyk hits out of the bunker on the 11th hole during the first round of the PGA Championship at Valhalla Golf Club Thursday. Furyk shot a 66 and is tied with three others at 1 shot behind the leaders.

    Furyk’s 66 puts him 1 shot off lead in PGA

    World No. 1 Rory McIlroy showed how solid his game is in the first round of the PGA Championship, bouncing back from two bad holes with five birdies in the last seven at Valhalla.

  •  

    Kristufek’s Arlington selections for Friday

    Joe Kristufek's selections for Aug. 8 racing at Arlington International.

  •  
    United States midfielder Jermaine Jones (13) still hasn’t signed with MLS. He may be waiting for a spot to open on the Galaxy.

    No help in sight for Fire run at playoffs

    On the day of the Chicago Fire’s annual White Party charity fundraiser, Frank Yallop refused to raise the white flag. Fire fans saw it clearly anyway. Orrin Schwarz has more on the club, which could miss the playoffs again.

  •  
    The Cubs’ Javier Baez steps to plate to face the Colorado Rockies in the first inning of a baseball game in Denver on Thursday.

    Baez hits 2 HRs, drives in 4 as Cubs beat Rockies

    Rookie Javier Baez hit two more homers and drove in four runs Thursday, leading the Cubs over the Colorado Rockies 6-2.

  •  

    Wisconsin officials expand motorized trolling

    Mike Jackson's weekly notebook offers a local fishing update plus surprising news from state officials in Wisconsin regarding motorized trolling.

  •  
    A deal is in place for Minnesota Timberwolves forward Kevin Love (42) to join LeBron James in Cleveland. The Cavaliers will give up Andrew Wiggins, Anthony Bennett and a future first-round draft pick for Love.

    With Love joining Cavs, can Bulls compete?

    Cleveland and Minnesota have agreed in principle to a deal that will send all-star forward Kevin Love to the Cavs, according to multiple reports. With a star-studded cast emerging in Cleveland with Love, LeBron James and Kyrie Irving, do the Bulls have any chance to win the East?

  •  
    Tiger Woods reacts to a poor tee shot on the seventh hole Thursday during the first round of the PGA Championship at Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville, Kentucky.

    Tiger Woods struggles to 74; Westwood, Chappell lead PGA

    Maybe Tiger Woods should have stayed at home. Looking much like a guy who could barely bend over last weekend, Woods sprayed shots all over Valhalla and faced a daunting deficit at the PGA Championship before heavy favorite Rory McIlroy even teed off Thursday. “That wasn’t very good,” said Woods, who made only one birdie — and had to hole out from the fairway to do that — on the way to a 3-over 74. “A lot of bad shots.”

  •  
    Ethan Winchester displays the kind of big nighttime brown trout that has made the rivers of northern Michigan famous.

    Crossing the lake, and crossing off another bucket list item

    A ferry trip across Lake Michigan led to a terrific experience at the northern end of lower Michigan, where Boyne Outfitters helped provide a great experience in the pursuit of trout.

  •  

    Barrington Post 158’s streak ends in regional

    Barrington Post 158 saw its 15-game American Legion baseball winning streak come to an end in a 3-0 loss to Napoleon, Ohio, on Thursday in Great Lakes regional play in Terre Haute, Ind. Barrington next plays at 10 a.m. Friday in the tournament's double-elimination format.

  •  

    Mike North video: Finally! Preseason football!
    Mike North is happy preseason football kicks off tonight and can’t wait for the Chicago Bears game tomorrow.

Business

  •  
    Lisa Tomsheck, president of Arthur Clesen, Inc, speaks at the Daily Herald Business Ledger Newsmakers’ Forum on Family Business Thursday at European Crystal Banquets in Arlington Heights.

    Planning ahead key to successful family business

    Planning ahead and putting it all into writing can assure a family business survives from one generation to the next, a panel of experts told suburban businesss executives at the Daily Herald Business Ledger Newsmakers’ Forum on Managing a Family Business at the European Crystal Banquet & Conference Center in Arlington Heights.

  •  
    United Airlines has updated its mobile app to provide a new feature, the ability to scan your passport about 24 hours before your scheduled departure.

    United’s app now includes passport scanning for quicker check-in

    Kukec's eBuzz column features United Airlines updated app which now allows customers to scan their passports on their smartphones in order to check in at least 24 hours before their scheduled departure.

  •  
    Russian diners won’t be able to find creamy Dutch cheeses or juicy Polish apples in the grocery store or cook up chicken from the United States — the result of a Russian ban on most food imports from the West. Although the U.S., Canada and the European Union together will take more than a $17.5 billion hit, Russian consumers may feel it more than Western farmers.

    Western farmers take hit from Russia food ban

    Russian diners won’t be able to find creamy Dutch cheeses or juicy Polish apples in the grocery store or cook up chicken from the United States — the result of a Russian ban on most food imports from the West.Although the U.S., Canada and the European Union together will take more than a $17.5 billion hit, Russian consumers may feel it more than Western farmers.

  •  
    FILE - In this Nov. 28, 2013 file photo, a crowd waits for Macy's to open in the Fashion Show mall in Las Vegas. Consumer spending has recovered at a much slower pace in states with big housing busts, a stark illustration of how the housing downturn has weighed on the economy years after the recession. Spending in Nevada rose just 3.5 percent in the first three years after the recession ended, the weakest of any state and far below the national average of 10.7 percent. (AP Photo/Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher, File)

    Oil boom and housing bust alter U.S. spending trends

    North Dakotans, enriched by an oil boom, stepped up their spending at triple the national pace in the three years that followed the Great Recession. In Nevada, smacked hard by the housing bust, consumers barely increased their spending. Americans spend the most, per person, on housing in Washington, D.C., and the least in West Virginia.

  •  
    A screen above the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014 shows the closing number for the Dow Jones industrial average. Stocks are ending lower as investors worry about slowing global economic growth and simmering tensions between Russia and the West over Ukraine.

    Stocks decline on concerns about global growth

    NEW YORK — Concerns about slowing global growth and the threat of rising tensions between Russia and the West pushed stocks lower on Thursday. The stock market started the day higher as investors mulled the latest earnings reports and an encouraging report on jobs. By mid-morning, though, the market had given up its gains. While stocks slumped, government bond prices rose, pushing the yield on the 10-year Treasury note to its lowest level this year. Stocks have slumped since the Standard & Poor’s 500 index closed at a record last month amid worries that the rising tensions between Russia and the West will hurt global economic growth. European Central Bank head Mario Draghi cautioned Thursday that the crisis in Ukraine could crimp the fragile recovery in the region. “You’re getting some good earnings, but it’s just not enough to overwhelm the geo-political issues,” said Drew Wilson, an equity analyst with Fenimore Asset Management. The S&P 500 index fell 10.67 points, or 0.6 percent, to 1,909.57. The index closed at a record 1,987.98 on July 24. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 75.07 points, or 0.5 percent, to 16,368.27. The Nasdaq composite fell 20 points, or 0.5 percent, to 4,334.97. Phone and internet companies were among the day’s biggest decliners. Windstream Holdings fell 39 cents, or 3.4 percent, to $11.16 after the company reported that its earnings fell by 64 percent in the second quarter. The results missed analysts’ expectations.Eight of the 100 industry sectors in the S&P 500 fell. Health care and phone company stocks dropped the most, 1.2 percent and 1 percent respectively. Utilities stocks rose 1.1 percent, making them the biggest gainers, as investors bought safer assets. The market had started the day higher as investors assessed the latest encouraging news from the job market. Fewer people applied for U.S. unemployment benefits last week. Claims remain at relatively low levels consistent with stronger economic growth. Weekly applications fell 14,000 to 289,000, the Labor Department said. Some positive earnings reports helped lift stocks in early trading. 21st Century Fox rose $1.63, or 5 percent, to $33.96 after reporting better-than-expected fourth-quarter earnings late Wednesday. The company got a boost from films including “X-Men,” “Rio 2,” and “The Fault in Our Stars.” The company was adding to gains from a day earlier after dropping its bid for Time Warner and announcing a stock buyback. The gains for stocks were short-lived Thursday. The market started to head lower by lunchtime, and as stocks slumped, bond prices rose. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, which falls when prices rise, dropped to 2.41 percent from 2.48 percent on Wednesday. The yield on the note is at its lowest level in more than a year. At the start of this year, many investors and analysts had expected 10-year Treasurys to fall as the economy continued its recovery and the Federal Reserve wound down its economic stimulus program. Instead, the opposite has happened. Bonds have rallied as inflation has remained low and doubts have arisen about the prospects for long-term growth. U.S. Treasury securities also offer a higher yield than bonds issued by other governments. The yield on the 10-year German government bond is 1.06 percent, and French government bonds with the same maturity offer a yield of 1.5 percent. Investors are also buying Treasuries as geopolitical tensions rise around the world. “The Treasury market is going to continue to confound the bears,” said Bill O’Donnell, chief Treasury strategist at RBS. In commodities trading, the price of oil rose Thursday for only the second day in the past nine. There are concerns about intensifying violence in Iraq as the White House weighs air strikes to counter recent advances by insurgents.

  •  

    T-Mobile US owner sees no offers that beat standalone value

    Deutsche Telekom AG, which controls the fourth-largest U.S. wireless operator T-Mobile US Inc., hasn’t received any offers for the business that exceed its standalone value, its chief executive officer said. “We’re open to a transaction that creates value for all T- Mobile US shareholders, compared with continuing the business on its own,” Timotheus Hoettges said

  •  
    Associated Press Fannie Mae headquarters in Washington.Fannie Mae will give the Treasury Department $3.7 billion next month after the largest financier of U.S. mortgages posted its 10th-consecutive quarterly profit.

    Fannie Mae will pay treasury $3.7 billion after quarterly profit

    Fannie Mae will give the Treasury Department $3.7 billion next month after the largest financier of U.S. mortgages posted its 10th-consecutive quarterly profit. Washington-based Fannie Mae, owned by taxpayers after being seized by the government six years ago, had net income of $3.7 billion for the three months through June, according to a regulatory filing today.

  •  
    The euro sculpture in front of the headquarters of the European Central Bank, ECB, in Frankfurt, Germany. The crisis in Ukraine and a hesitant recovery in Europe are casting shadows over the European Central Bank’s meeting Thursday.

    ECB leaves rates on hold as Ukraine crisis looms

    The European Central Bank has left its benchmark interest rate unchanged at a record low of 0.15 percent as the crisis in Ukraine casts a shadow over Europe’s modest economic recovery. The decision Thursday was widely expected, in part because the ECB has little room to cut with rates so close to zero.

  •  
    Chrysler Group on Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2014 reported that it made $619 million in the April-through-June quarter, compared with $507 million a year ago.

    Chrysler 2Q profit up 22 pct. on rising US sales

    Chrysler Group’s second-quarter net profit rose 22 percent, fueled by rising sales in the U.S. The company on Wednesday reported that it made $619 million in the April-through-June quarter, compared with $507 million a year ago.

  •  
    Russian President Vladimir Putin has ordered government agencies to restrict imports of food and agricultural products from the countries that have imposed sanctions against Russia over the conflict in Ukraine.

    Putin orders import limits over sanctions

    President Vladimir Putin has ordered government agencies to restrict imports of food and agricultural products from the countries that have imposed sanctions against Russia over the conflict in Ukraine.

  •  
    Brightstar CEO Marcelo Claure, left, and longtime Sprint CEO Dan Hesse. Sprint on Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2014 said it is replacing Hesse with Claure on the heels of a report that it is dropping its bid for rival wireless carrier T-Mobile.

    Sprint names new CEO after dropping T-Mobile bid

    Sprint’s new owner is replacing its longtime CEO after dropping its bid for rival wireless carrier T-Mobile US. Marcelo Claure, the CEO of Miami-based cellphone distributor Brightstar, will replace Dan Hesse on Monday, Sprint Corp. said Wednesday.

  •  

    Stocks stabilize as energy sector rebounds

    NEW YORK — U.S. stocks stabilized on Wednesday as energy prices rebounded. The stock market dropped to its lowest level since May the day before as Russia massed troops near its border with Ukraine. Molson Coors jumped after reporting strong earnings. KEEPING SCORE: The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose two points, or 0.3 percent, to 1,923 as of 11:30 a.m. Eastern time. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 27 points, or 0.2 percent, to 16,456. The Nasdaq composite rose 13 points, or 0.3 percent, to 4,367. ENERGY REBOUND: Benchmark U.S. crude for September delivery rose for only the second day of the last eight. Oil rose 60 cents, or 0.6 percent, to $97.99 in New York. Natural gas prices also rose. Energy stocks were the biggest gainers in the S&P 500, climbing 1.3 percent. HIGHER BEER PRICES: Molson Coors rose $4.20, or 6.3 percent, to $71.43 after the company said its second-quarter profit rose 9 percent as better pricing offset a decline in the volume of beer sales globally. The beer maker earned $291 million, or $1.56 per share, for the period ended June 30. A year earlier it earned $267 million, or $1.45 per share.M&A UNDONE: Sprint plunged $1.21, or 16.5 percent, to $1.20 after reports that company was abandoning its pursuit of T-Mobile US because it would be too hard to convince regulators to approve a merger of the No. 3 and No. 4 cellphone carriers in the nation. Time Warner fell $9.08, or 10.7 percent, to $76 after Rupert Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox said it is abandoning its attempt to take over the company. The deal would have combined two of the world’s biggest media conglomerates. Twenty-First Century Fox gained $1.65, or 5.3 percent, to $32.95. UKRAINE JITTERS: Global markets dropped after news reports of a buildup of Russian troops on the Ukraine border. On Wednesday, Poland’s prime minister said he had information indicating that there is a growing threat of a “direct intervention” by Russia in Ukraine. TRADING RANGE: Stocks may oscillate in a trading range in coming days as investors follow developments in Ukraine and assess their impact on the global economy, said Peter Cardillo, chief market economist at Rockwell Global Capital. “The market’s worst enemy has always been, and always will be, uncertainty,” said Cardillo. STAYING PUT: Walgreen fell $8.86, or 12.8 percent, to $60.26 after the drugstore company said it will no longer pursue an overseas reorganization that would have trimmed the amount of U.S. taxes it pays.IN EUROPE: Germany’s DAX dropped 1.2 percent and the FTSE 100 in London shed 1.1 percent. France’s CAC was down 1 percent. U.S. markets looked set for another day of losses. CURRENCIES, BONDS AND COMMODITIES: The dollar fell to 102.38 Japanese yen. The euro dipped to a nine-month low of $1.3340. U.S. government bond prices rose. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note dropped to 2.45 percent from 2.48 percent on Tuesday. Gold rose $23.90, or 1.9 percent, to $1,309.50 an ounce.———Johnson reported from Mumbai, India.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    Six things to consider before renovating a basement
    A basement renovation can increase a home’s value anywhere from 15 to 20 percent, depending on the renovations and the market, said John Gutman, vice president of sales and acquisitions at Mack Estates.

  •  
    Noodle-udon comes with bok choy, carrots, crushed peanuts, ginger and fresh herb at Harvest in downtown Traverse City. It's the brainchild of Simon Joseph, an entrepreneurial chef who cruised into town three years ago aboard Roaming Harvest, the city's first food truck.

    Go for the food: Traverse City, Michigan's Harvest

    Let's face it: In today's hurry-up culture, there always will be a need for fast food. Even when you're enjoying a leisurely vacation in a place like Traverse City, a Lake Michigan resort community. For a quick, inexpensive meal there that includes items like Korean beef tacos, udon noodles and much more, head to Harvest. The menu is in constant flux, dictated largely by what sustainable, organic produce is available at local farms and markets.

  •  
    Michelangelo, Donatello and Leonardo return to action in “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.”

    'Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles' a generic reboot

    What the shell happened to “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles”? Those reptilian heroes have gone bland and generic. In this dull reboot, the Turtles may be able to best the villainous Shredder, but they're no match for the noisy CGI effects, confusing fight sequences, Brian Tyler's disruptively voluminous score, plus witless, perfunctory dialogue they're forced to work with for two long hours.

  •  
    George Clooney and his fiancée have posted a legal notice declaring their intention to marry in Italy. Clooney and Beirut-born London lawyer Amal Alamuddin announced their engagement in April, though the pair have not yet announced a date for their nuptials.

    George Clooney, fiancee post legal notice to marry

    George Clooney and his fiancée have posted a legal notice declaring their intention to marry in Italy. Clooney and Beirut-born London lawyer Amal Alamuddin announced their engagement in April, though the pair have not yet announced a date for their nuptials.

  •  
    Beyoncé is set to have a “Flawless” night at the MTV Video Music Awards. The singer will perform at the Aug. 24 show at The Forum in Inglewood, California. She leads in nominations with eight, including video of the year for “Drunk in Love.”

    Top nominee Beyonce to perform at MTV VMAs

    Beyonce is set to have a “Flawless” night at the MTV Video Music Awards. The singer will perform at the Aug. 24 show at The Forum in Inglewood, California. She leads in nominations with eight, including video of the year for “Drunk in Love.”

  •  
    Cheryl Boone Isaacs has been re-elected for another year as president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

    Boone Isaacs re-elected president of film academy
    Associated PressLOS ANGELES — Recognized as a trailblazer during her first term as film academy president, marketing executive Cheryl Boone Isaacs has been re-elected for another year.Film academy governors elected new officers late Tuesday.Boone Isaacs is the first black female president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and only the third woman to serve as president in the organization’s 87-year history. Academy officers may serve up to four consecutive one-year terms.Boone Isaacs was inducted into the NAACP’s Hall of Fame and received Essence magazine’s Trailblazer award this year. She has been an academy member for 22 years.

  •  
    The British edition of “The X Factor” is coming to U.S. television. Music entertainment cable channel AXS TV said Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2014, it will begin airing the singing contest’s 11th season on Labor Day weekend. “X Factor” creator Simon Cowell is on the judging panel.

    U.K. ‘X Factor’ coming to US on AXS TV channel

    The British edition of “The X Factor” is coming to U.S. television. Music entertainment cable channel AXS TV said Wednesday it will begin airing the singing contest’s 11th season on Labor Day weekend.

  •  

    Rapper Wiz Khalifa skips court date on pot charge

    EL PASO, Texas — A warrant has been issued for rapper Wiz Khalifa’s arrest after he skipped a court date on a marijuana possession charge in West Texas.Online court records show the 26-year-old performer, whose real name is Cameron Thomaz, failed to appear for a scheduled Wednesday arraignment in an El Paso County misdemeanor court. So County Court-at-Law Judge Ricardo Herrera issued a bench warrant for Khalifa’s arrest.The case started May 25 when Khalifa was arrested at El Paso International Airport after airport security officers reported finding a small canister of marijuana on him.Khalifa had been departing after appearing at a local music festival. Instead, he was charged with misdemeanor possession of marijuana and was released after posting $300 bail.Court records do not list an attorney.

  •  
    Hinsdale South High School graduate Matt Walsh stars as Pete, leader of a storm chasers documentary team in “Into the Storm.”

    Thriller 'Storm' can't weather disaster clichés

    Where “Twister” swept us along on clever “Wizard of Oz” references with moviemmakers who didn't take the absurd bad weather tale too seriously, “Into the Storm” feels like an old formula Irwin Allen made-for-TV disaster film (remember “Fire”?) with superior visual and sound effects. Trailers and TV commercials don't reveal the strained and unsustainable use of the “found-footage” gimmick.

  •  
    Father James (Brendan Gleeson, left) meets with a parishioner (Chris O'Dowd) in “Calvary.”

    'Calvary' exquisitely nuanced drama of redemption and guilt

    In "Calvary," Brendan Gleeson's performance as a man of profound integrity suffering for the sins of others is the linchpin of this immensely powerful drama, enriched by spiky black comedy but also by its resonant contemplation of faith and forgiveness. The director is utterly serious about exploring the uses and abuses of spirituality in a world of toxic disillusionment and cynicism.

  •  
    Madame Mallory (Helen Mirren) shows off a tray of pastries in “The Hundred-Foot Journey.”

    ‘Hundred-Foot Journey’ lacks needed spice

    Take one Oscar-winning British actress. Add an appealing supporting cast. Lather on the picturesque French countryside. Sprinkle liberally with gorgeous food shots, from bubbling, spicy Indian delicacies to perfectly composed French plates of pigeon and truffles. And then heap on a heavy serving of corn. That's Lasse Hallstrom’s “The Hundred-Foot Journey,” which -- despite all its stellar ingredients -- comes off a bit bland.

  •  
    The demand continues to grow for savory jams like, clockwise from top, Skillet Bacon Spread original bacon spread, Taste of Inspirations mango pepper jelly, The Prairie Gypsies red hot lover jam, Wozz Kitchen Creations triple ale onion jam and Terrapin Ridge Farms balsamic garlic and herb jam.

    Jams increasingly strutting their savory side

    Bacon jam may coast on its key attraction — that would be the bacon — but the idea of savory jam has been around for ages. Hot pepper jam has long been a Southern staple, topping slabs of cream cheese at cocktail parties and luncheons. But today, chefs, gourmet food companies and home canners are taking savory ingredients to the next level, turning everything from garlic and onions to carrots and saffron into sweet condiments.

  •  
    Wallace (Daniel Radcliffe) meets Chantry (Zoe Kazan) and it's instant flames for him in the rom-com “What If.”

    What happens when Wallace meets Chantry in 'What If?'

    The moment that Wallace (Daniel Radcliffe) meets Chantry (Zoe Kazan) at a party, we know instantly they connect, hit it off, are soul mates and were meant to be together. They share the same sense of humor and politics. By the end of their first conversation, each is practically finishing the other's sentences. Yep, they're a couple. Only, they're not.

  •  
    Sarah Jessica Parker supplies the balloons cliche in the comedy “Don't Know How She Does It.”

    Five visual cliches movies need to deep-6

    Balloons, fireworks and the "Wild Bunch" march: Dann presents his five most tiresome visual cliches he'd be fine never seeing again in movies.

  •  
    Women attending a recent crafting retreat on art and painting at the historic Chautauqua hosted in Boulder, Colo., by The Makerie. “It’s hard to find creative time in our busy lives — to feel the empowerment of making something with our hands,” says owner Ali DeJohn.

    Crafters find togetherness can inspire, nourish

    Four years ago, inspired by her love of crafting, Ali DeJohn began offering a mishmash of projects at weekend retreats near Boulder, Colo. Women came from around the world, and a business was born. Today, The Makerie hosts high-end crafting retreats in Colorado and New York City. Its July retreat was a full day of printing, knitting and cooking workshops plus three meals and cocktails outdoors at a Lyons, Colorado, farm. The cost was $365. Why pay hundreds of dollars to craft with strangers for a day? Community.

Discuss

  •  
    The GED exam is tougher this year, and the number of high school dropouts taking the test has fallen dramatically in the smaller collar counties.

    Editorial: Ensure that all have chance to earn GED

    As the suburbs see sudden drops in GED test particpation, it's up to education officials to find out why and ensure that all have a chance to succeed, a Daily Herald editorial says.

  •  

    Nixon’s lasting damage

    Columnist Richard Cohen: Richard Nixon was virtually a cinematic creation, a man of such character flaws, resentments, hatreds and insecurities that it’s hard to keep your eyes off him. Watergate and the cover-up were his downfall and they were, no doubt about it, breathtaking abuses of power, as obscene as the language he so often used. But what was once drama is now history. Not so the Southern strategy. It fouls our politics to this very day.

  •  

    Stop the campus rape numbers game

    Columnist Catherine Rampell: The Campus Accountability and Safety Act would, among other things, create new transparency standards for U.S. colleges, requiring them to conduct anonymous, standardized, representative surveys about student experiences with sexual violence.

  •  

    Base jumping should not be glorified
    A Palatine letter to the editor: First, our local delivery service is excellent. Thank you. Next, on the tragic story of Adam Rubin, the base jumper who died in Idaho, what exactly are you thinking? Why encourage, as your article did, people to go sky diving or base jumping?

  •  

    Herald has chance to be part of the solution
    A Barrington Hills letter to the editor: Thanks for your Aug. 3 editorial highlighting the importance of restoring faith in Illinois government. This is in the hands of concerned citizens, but we’ll do better if we have a process that we can align around to help us move forward. If you choose, the Daily Herald can play a key role in this by taking your investigative reporting up a notch and by providing a communications platform to help us organize what needs to be done.

  •  

    Attack ads do the voters no good
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: The Illinois campaign style is for candidates to describe each other as the south end of a northbound donkey. One of the demonized individuals wins and proves the description to be accurate — just witness the state of our state. Normally the campaign is devoid of plans and heavy on insults, none of which is helpful to a voter’s decision-making process.

  •  

    Israel not the worst of Mideast violence
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: For readers who are too naive or prejudiced to think that all Middle East violence stems from Israeli’s action in Gaza, allow me to remind them that the more than 160,000 people have died in the ongoing Syrian civil war, and the 1980s war between Iran and Iraq cost more than a million lives (source: June 30 Newsweek article by Michael Crowley).

  •  

    Catholic Church was here first
    A Glen Ellyn letter to the editor: Marty Klemenz’s negative letter on Aug. 6 about the Catholic Church is typical of those who do not take time to read history and receive most of their information from the secular media or movies.

  •  

    Solve gang violence first, Sen. Durbin
    A St. Charles letter to the editor: In an Aug. 4 letter headlined “Not a border crisis, a humanity one” in the Aug. 4 Daily Herald, the writer is standing up for Senator Durbin. It seems that the good senator has been catching some flack for spending time in support of the youngsters coming over our southern border.

  •  

    Sox can’t catch, can’t throw, etc.
    A Naperville letter to the editor: Congratulations to Ken Williams and Rich Hahn. They have taken the 2005 World Champion White Sox to the worst team I can remember, including one starting pitcher, a left fielder who can’t catch fly balls, many errors and a bullpen that can’t get anyone out.

  •  

    Why change Bible to fit our world?
    A Roselle letter to the editor: Puleeze! Engagement of gays leads to firing makes the front page? Did this director of music ever listen to what was taught in his church? Has he read the Bible concerning same sex marriage or liaisons?

  •  

    Opinion that doesn’t belong on edit page
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: C’mon! Really? You imply that the Catholic Church should change its 2,000-year-old-plus belief regarding gay activities because the world has changed?

  •  

    Fair view of church, gay marriage
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Thank you for finally (in my opinion) expressing a balanced view on church (Catholic Church) and gay marriage.

  •  

    Got a problem with First Amendment?
    An Elburn letter tothe editor: Again, and with all do respect to Theodore M. Utchen, we will pray where we want when we want. Who’s we, you might ask? The American People.

«Jul

Aug 2014

Sep»
S M T W T F S
27 28 29 30 31 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 1 2 3 4 5 6