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Daily Archive : Wednesday July 9, 2014

News

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    Lija Hyssong, 16, of Lombard, died while vacationing in Pennsylvania. The family of the Glenbard East cheerleader said they are still searching for answers regarding a brief illness that led to her passing.

    Family, friends mourn death of Glenbard East cheerleader

    Lija Angela Yu Yin Hyssong's friends have a simple, new phrase they're adding to their Facebook posts. LLL — Love Like Lija. The 16-year-old is being remembered as a fun and happy girl whose compassion and kindness were present to everyone, from jocks to social outcasts she met at school and church. Lija died last Thursday at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital while vacationing in...

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    Round Lake Beach police officer faces gas theft charge

    A Round Lake Beach officer has been charged with theft and official misconduct for purchasing $3,700 in gasoline with department money. Kenneth Rydz, 41, is placed on administrative leave pending the outcome of the charges.

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    Brad Schneider

    Democrats offer pushback against Hobby Lobby ruling

    U.S. Reps. Brad Schneider of Deerfield and Tammy Duckworth of Hoffman Estates are among the Democrats nationally behind legislation that could undo the U.S. Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby contraception decision, but the plan might face a tough path forward.

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    Illinois hospital fees to pay for error reports

    A new annual licensing fee for Illinois hospitals that takes effect this month will finally fund a system for reporting medical errors that was established by state law back in 2005. The new fee, which will raise about $1.7 million annually, was part of legislation signed by Gov. Pat Quinn last week. Hospitals had been the only licensed health care organizations in Illinois not paying a state...

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    Illinois Department of Natural Resources Director Marc Miller says it has taken time to write job descriptions, develop interview questions and obtain approval to begin hiring fracking regulators.

    State lags in hiring to oversee 'fracking'

    More than a year after a much-lauded compromise paved the way for high-volume oil and gas extraction in Illinois, the agency in charge of overseeing the practice has hired just four of 53 new employees it says it needs as it continues working to complete rules that drillers must follow. The Department of Natural Resources has come under criticism from industry groups, lawmakers and other...

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    D’Andre Howard

    Three life sentences for Hoffman Estates murders

    D’Andre Howard will spend the rest of his life in jail for murdering three members of the Engelhardt family in Hoffman Estates in 2009, and for attempting to murder a fourth. “The wounds and pain that you inflicted on us have not weakened our family and will not define our future," Shelly Engelhardt said in court to the man who stabbed her and killed her husband, daughter and mother.

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    A semitrailer truck, loaded with paper, caught fire Wednesday afternoon as it traveled south on I-355 near Roosevelt Road in DuPage County.

    Southbound I-355 expected to reopen after truck fire near Roosevelt Road

    A semitrailer truck fire caused officials to close all southbound lanes of I-355 Wednesday afternoon near Roosevelt Road in DuPage County. State police said the truck was loaded with paper products when it caught fire about 1:10 p.m. as it traveled south on I-355.

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    Glen Ellyn woman upset with roped-off parkways at parade

    A Glen Ellyn woman says the selfishness of some residents who staked out large areas in their parkways to watch the village’s Fourth of July parade — to the exclusion of others — left her disappointed and disillusioned. But village officials say they think the issues the woman and her parents had in trying to find a comfortable spot to watch the parade resulted more from a...

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    Law enforcement officers surround a shooting suspect in his car Wednesday in Spring, Texas. Deputies cornered the suspect after he is believed to have shot six people, four of them children, at another location.

    Suspect in mass shooting surrenders after standoff

    A suspect in the slayings of six people, including four children, at a suburban Houston home has surrendered after a three-hour standoff with deputies. After hours of waiting and negotiations, the man emerged from his car, raised his hands and sank to his knees as deputies placed him under arrest.

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    Eleven-month-old Sarai Hernandez, and her mom, Martha Medina of Hanover Park, visit with Coop, the Schaumburg Boomers mascot, on Wednesday in Hanover Park.

    Hanover Park police show fun side at picnic

    Hanover Park police dressed down in jeans and polos for their annual picnic for residents Wednesday afternoon. The two-hour event -- designed to connect residents with officers in an informal setting -- featured an appearance by the department's K-9 and the White Sox mascot.

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    Jerry Zimmerman of Fermilab in Batavia, aka Mr. Freeze, removes balloons from liquid nitrogen during a presentation on cryogenics at Geneva Public Library’s annual ice cream social on Wednesday. The balloons reinflated to full size as they warmed up. Spectators enjoyed free Dippin’ Dots ice cream during the demonstration, a treat made by cryogenics.

    Geneva Public Library event pretty cool

    The Geneva Public Library’s annual ice cream social featured a double dose of cryogenics. Dippin' Dots ice cream (a cryogenic treat) and Mr. Freeze of Fermilab, who demonstrated the science of cryogenics using liquid nitrogen.

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    Barrington Hills teen pleads guilty in fatal DUI case

    A Barrington Hills 19-year-old pleaded guilty to two counts of aggravated DUI in a crash that claimed the life of a 61-year-old Elgin man and injured a 44-year-old woman last year. Karsten Eilertsen, a 2013 Barrington High School graduate, appeared in Cook County court with his attorneys and members of his family Wednesday afternoon.

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    Legislative panel might halt anti-violence probe temporarily

    An Illinois legislative panel is considering temporarily suspending a key part of its investigation into Gov. Pat Quinn’s troubled anti-violence program after it received a request to do so from the U.S. Department of Justice.

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    Jolene Mewing, left, and her spouse, Collen Mewing, gather with about 300 people gathered in a downtown park in Salt Lake City, to celebrate the gay marriage ruling on June 25. Same-sex marriage advocates planned to deliver a petition with thousands of signatures to the Utah governor’s mansion in Salt Lake City on Wednesday to push for recognition of gay couples.

    Utah to appeal gay marriage ruling to high court

    Utah is going directly to the nation’s highest court to challenge an appellate ruling that gay couples have a constitutional right to marry, the state attorney general’s office announced Wednesday. If the U.S. Supreme court decides to take the case, it will be the first time the top court considers gay marriage since justices last year struck down part of the federal Defense of...

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    President Barack Obama, seen greeting Texas Gov. Rick Perry as he arrives at Dallas/Fort Worth Wednesday, pleaded with Congress to immediately pass an emergency funding request to deal with a flood of migrant children at the U.S. border and urged Perry to pressure fellow Republicans to get it done.

    Obama presses Congress to consent on border money

    Top Obama administration officials told senators Wednesday they’re struggling to keep up with the surge of immigrants at the Southern border, acknowledging they’ve been overwhelmed as children show up by the tens of thousands from violence-torn Central America.

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    Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn, left, is running for re-election against Republican Bruce Rauner.

    Report: Rauner firm gave contribution after deal

    A company once partially owned by Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner’s investment firm started making campaign contributions to Illinois Democrats after it won a multimillion-dollar Cook County contract, according to a report published Wednesday in Crain’s Chicago Business.

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    Eric “Rick” Brunson

    Documents: Ex-Bull Brunson tried to assault therapist

    Details contained in court and police documents allege former Chicago Bull Eric “Rick” Brunson placed his mouth on the breast of a massage therapist and tried to force her to perform oral sex during an unwanted sexual advance at Lifetime Fitness in Vernon Hills.

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    The boards show where a car struck an Elk Grove village apartment building Wednesday.

    Car plows into Elk Grove Village apartments

    A car plowed into an Elk Grove Village apartment building early Wednesday, not injuring anyone but temporarily displacing residents in three damaged units, police said. The driver has a medical conditiion and will not be charged, they added.

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    Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin was sentenced to 10 years in prison for bribery, money laundering and other corruption that spanned his two terms as mayor, including the chaotic years after Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005.

    10-year sentence for ex-New Orleans Mayor Nagin

    Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin was sentenced Wednesday to 10 years in prison for bribery, money laundering and other corruption that spanned his two terms as mayor — including the chaotic years after Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005.

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    “Nobody knows exactly how much taxpayer money is wasted through improper payments, but the federal government’s own astounding estimate is more than half a trillion dollars over the past five years,” said Rep. John Mica, a Florida Republican. “The fact is, improper payments are staggeringly high in programs designed to help those most in need — children, seniors and low-income families.”

    Improper payments by U.S. top $100 billion

    Tax credits for families that don’t qualify. Medicare payments for treatments that might not be necessary. Unemployment benefits for people who are secretly working. Federal agencies reported making $100 billion in payments last year to people who may not have been entitled to receive them. Congressional investigators say the figure could be even higher.

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    Jose Ramirez-Alcantar

    Aurora woman testifies in criminal sexual assault trial

    A woman prosecutors say is the victim of a criminal sexual assault in West Chicago testified Wednesday that an enjoyable night of drinking and dancing at her favorite bar took a tragic turn after she left her drink unattended for several minutes.

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    An investigator walks near a Metra train stopped on the Milwaukee District West Line tracks in Elgin Tuesday afternoon after hitting a pedestrian. Authorities identified the victim of Tuesday’s crash as a 56-year-old Elgin man.

    Elgin man killed by Metra train

    Authorities said a 56-year-old Elgin man was struck and killed Tuesday afternoon by a Metra train on the Milwaukee District West Line in Elgin. The man apparently was walking in the middle of the tracks, with his back to the approaching train that had just left the Big Timber Road station in Elgin, Metra spokeswoman Meg Reile said.

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    Goebbert’s Pumpkin Patch grower Dan Lindeman explains how his team seeds and works with produce to a group of Lake County educators Wednesday, as they tour the Pingree Grove farm as part of the Lake County Farm Bureau’s annual Educator Field Trip. The teachers have been touring since Monday to get a personal experience to better understand local agriculture

    Lake County educators tour Goebbert’s Pumpkin Patch as part of educator field trip

    A group 20 Lake County teachers journeyed to Goebbert's Pumpkin Patch in Pingree Grove on Wednesday as part of the weeklong Lake County Farm Bureau annual Educator Field Trip. “This is really interesting. It’s great,” said Barb Chan, a third-grade teacher at St. Gilbert Catholic School in Grayslake. “I grew up in the city, so this is pretty neat.”

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    ItascaFest preparing for opening night

    More than 50,000 people are expected to attend the 25th annual ItascaFest celebration that begins its four-day run on Thursday. The festival in Washington Park at 350 E. Irving Park Road will feature bands, food and a 3-on-3 basketball tournament. Started in 1990, the party now includes nearly a dozen food vendors, a carnival, a tent for musical acts and children’s entertainment.

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    Renovations continue at Rosemont convention center

    A renovation project at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont could cost as much as $5.6 million, officials said Wednesday. But it’s possible that number could be negotiated down, said Mayor Brad Stephens.

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    A draft of Kane County’s 2015 budget shows $1 million earmarked for the actual construction of a new cross country course at the old Settler’s Hill landfill in Geneva. The money is a little less than the original overall cost projection for the project. The track has been redesigned to make it less expensive to build.

    Kane Co. earmarks $1 million for planned cross-country facility

    A draft of Kane County's 2015 budget shows $1 million earmarked for the actual construction of a new cross country course at the old Settler's Hill landfill in Geneva. The money is a little less than the original overall cost projection for the project. The track has been redesigned to make it a little cheaper to build. The whole operation still sits on the formation of a cleanfill operation,...

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    Bartlett ties blood drive to National Night Out

    Bartlett will hold a blood driving during its National Night Out celebration. Donors are encouraged to schedule an appointment but walk-ins are welcome at the drive, set for Monday, Aug. 4.

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    Benjamin D. Niskanen

    Gurnee man charged with child porn possession

    Benjamin D. Niskanen, 21, of the 7400 block of Korbel Drive in Gurnee, was arrested at his home after an investigation by the Lake County state’s attorney’s office and the sheriff’s office cybercrimes unit.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Dalila L. Murillo, 44, of Geneva, was charged with retail theft at 1:15 p.m. Sunday at Menards, 300 N. Randall Road, according to a Batavia police report.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Somsanouk Manikham, 32, of Elgin, was charged July 1 with no valid driver's license, according to a West Dundee Police Department news release. He was stopped by police while traveling west on Main Street. At the time, he had two active warrants charging him with traffic offenses in Kane County. Manikham was released on recognizance for the no driver’s license charge, but he was unable to...

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    A Naperville resident is suggesting a group of volunteers be formed to join Naperville Park District police in educating the public about the hazards of feeding ducks and geese along the Riverwalk. Park district police officers have been handing out River Wildlife Cards with facts about the harmful effects of human food on waterfowl for almost a year.

    Naperville man proposes Riverwalk wildlife volunteers

    In the struggle to stop people from feeding animals along the Riverwalk, one Naperville resident thinks volunteers could be the answer. “If we could educate people and get folks who could have an elevator speech, a 1- to 2-minute ‘here’s why this is not good for the wildlife’ speech,” John Nepywoda said, “it might be a little more meaningful to...

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    Angelo M. Parra

    Aurora man guilty of burglarizing ex-girlfriend’s home

    An Aurora man who wore a bandana only over the lower half of his face while breaking into an ex-girlfriend’s home was found guilty by a Kane County judge.

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    Car show in Lincolnshire:

    The Lincolnshire Police Department will host a cruise night Aug. 1.

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    Wauconda car show:

    Wauconda will host Motors on Main cruise nights on July 15, Aug. 19 and Sept. 16.

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    Gurnee receives highest credit rating:

    Gurnee has achieved the highest credit rating possibile, village officials announced Wednesday.

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    Gurnee Park District fishing derby:

    The Gurnee Park District invites area youths to the 12th annual fishing derby on Saturday, July 12.

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    Men get 100 years in prison for girl’s murder

    Two Chicago men convicted of first-degree murder in the June 2009 death of a 9-year-old girl have been sentenced to 100 years in prison. Ronald Henderson and Kevin Stanley were convicted in March for the shooting death of Chastity Turner, who was bathing her dogs outside her home when she was shot in the back.

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    Robert Murray, chief executive of Ohio-based Murray Energy Corp., alleges that rival Williamson Energy LLC violated an agreement and used proprietary information to thwart tMurrary’s expansion plans in southern Illinois.

    Coal company says Illinois rival breached deal

    A leading U.S. coal company is suing a rival with which it shared confidential business plans during a deal that later fizzled, saying the competitor used the proprietary details to buy up land in southern Illinois to thwart the accuser’s expansion plans.

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    Illinois State Board of Education Superintendent Christopher Koch

    Illinois manages to send schools’ checks on time

    Illinois schools have received promised grant payments from the state on time for the first time since 2007 — but in another sign of the state’s precarious financial situation, a top education official has warned schools not to expect the pleasant surprise to become a permanent habit.

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    Judge Roszkowski dies at 91

    A long-serving judge whom a federal courthouse in northern Illinois is named for has died. The clerk for the Northern District of Illinois announced the death of Stanley J. Roszkowski Wednesday. He was 91.

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    Investigation clears Carpentersville official of discrimation claims

    An independent investigator looking into allegations of gender discrimination, retaliation and harassment made by a former Carpentersville village employee against Village Manager J. Mark Rooney determined there was no validity to the claims. The allegations were made by the village’s former human resources director, Linda Mogren, who resigned in May under a separation agreement with the...

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    Mother of 5 shot dead on Chicago expressway

    A 24-year-old mother of five was shot to death while driving on the Dan Ryan Expressway on Chicago’s South Side, less than a year after her 17-year-old brother was gunned down while sitting in a car on a nearby roadway.

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    Judy Baar Topinka

    Topinka: Income tax rollback means ‘$2 billion collapse’

    State Comptroller Judy Baar Topinka is warning of “a $2 billion collapse” next year when the state’s temporary income tax increase begins to roll back. Lawmakers approved a temporary income tax hike in 2011. But it’s set to decrease from 5 percent to 3.75 percent in January.

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    Michael Duebner has shifted into a new role as Lake Zurich’s innovation director. He had been technology director until the village board approved the move to the innovation post Monday.

    ‘It’s not the same old Lake Zurich,’ says employee who shifts to innovation director

    Lake Zurich government has new logos, a fresh village slogan, and it wants to innovate. Michael Duebner has become Lake Zurich’s innovation director. He had the conventional title of technology director until the village board approved the shift Monday. “It’s not the same old Lake Zurich it used to be,” Duebner told the Daily Herald.

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    New law furthers Illinois adoptees’ rights

    Gov. Pat Quinn has signed legislation aimed at allowing adoptees and birth family members to learn more about their family histories.

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    U-46 seeks bilingual, special education teachers

    Bilingual and special education teachers are in demand at Elgin Area School District U-46. The state’s second-largest school district with more than 40,000 students is hosting a job fair from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. The district specifically is seeking English Language Learner-certified bilingual teachers for prekindergarten and kindergarten through 12th grades, as well as bilingual...

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    KAI Summer Theatre presents ‘Once Upon a Mattress’

    Page 2The Kaneland Arts Initiative will conclude its 2013-14 season with the fifth annual summer theater production of “Once Upon a Mattress.” It will be presented July 11-13 and 18-20 in the auditorium of Kaneland High School.

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    AP PHOTO Described as a smart, funny young man from a wonderful family in Glen Ellyn, Matthew Tassio, 22, graduated from the University of Illinois and was looking forward to a job in Libertyville as an electrical engineer when he was killed on July 13, 1995, while running with the bulls in Pamplona, Spain.

    Running with bulls annual reminder of suburban tragedy

    Every time I see news coverage of the bulls running through the streets of Pamplona, or see the annual spectacle mined for entertainment or comedy in a TV commercial, I think of Matthew Tassio. The Glen Ellyn native remains the only American to be killed during the running with the bulls.

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    Geneva Library seeks to fill board vacancy

    Applications are due July 31 for people who want to fill a vacancy on the Geneva Library board.

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    Jenkins could get full term on Island Lake fire and police commission

    A politically connected Island Lake woman who was named to fill a vacancy on the village’s fire and police commission in April could be appointed to a full, three-year term Thursday.

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    The FBI and Aurora police are hunting for this man in connection with a bank robbery Wednesday morning on the city’s far west side.

    Cops, FBI hunting for Aurora bank robber

    The FBI and Aurora police were hunting Wednesday for a man who robbed the TCF Bank in a Jewel store on the 1900 block of West Galena Boulevard on the city’s far west side. Authorities said the man entered the bank about 11:40 a.m. and handed a teller a note announcing the robbery and demanding money. He walked out of the store with an undisclosed amount of money. Police said they...

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    Lake Finley, of Lake Forest, looks at a necklace made from old keys and clock parts at last year’s festival.

    Artists with special needs find spot in Buffalo Grove show

    One of the best-loved art festivals of the summer is back in Buffalo Grove this weekend. The Buffalo Grove Arts Festival is Saturday and Sunday at the Buffalo Grove Town Center.

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    Addison bicyclist struck by truck in Glendale Heights

    A 60-year-old Addison man was treated at an area hospital Wednesday morning after he was struck by a truck while riding his bicycle along Army Trail Road near Gladstone Drive in Glendale Heights. Police said the victim, who they did not identify by name, was taken to Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital in Downers Grove for treatment of injuries that were not life-threatening.

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    Israeli soldiers patrol along the beach front near the Israel-Gaza Border Wednesday. Israel stepped up its offensive on the Hamas-run Gaza Strip on Wednesday, pummeling scores of targets and killing more than a dozen people as Israeli leaders signaled a weekslong ground invasion could be quickly approaching.

    Israel hits key Hamas targets in Gaza offensive

    Israel stepped up its offensive on the Hamas-run Gaza Strip on Wednesday, pummeling scores of targets and killing at least 22 people as Israeli leaders signaled a weeks-long ground invasion could be quickly approaching.

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    Members of a conservative group pray outside the Miami courthouse during the court hearing on gay marriage earlier this month. Many religious leaders and conservative groups want President Obama to exempt religious organizations from an executive order barring federal contractors from discriminating against gays in hiring.

    Rift over religious exemption in anti-bias order

    In the intensifying debate over religious liberty, President Barack Obama faces pressure from opposite flanks as he prepares to issue an executive order barring federal contractors from discriminating against gay and transgender people in hiring. Many religious leaders and conservative groups want him to exempt religious organizations from the order. Liberal clergy and groups advocating on behalf...

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    President Barack Obama speaks at the commencement address to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point’s Class of 2014, in West Point, N.Y. Tackling what he has called a humanitarian crisis, Obama on Tuesday asked Congress for $3.7 billion to cope with a tide of minors from Central America who are illegally crossing the U.S. border, straining immigration resources and causing a political firestorm in Washington.

    Obama heads to Texas with no plans to visit border
    For President Barack Obama, the humanitarian crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border is increasingly becoming a political liability, giving Republicans a fresh opportunity to question his administration’s competence and complicating the debate over the nation’s fractured immigration laws. Still, Obama is resisting calls to visit the border during his two-day fundraising trip to Texas,...

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    Artwork in glass, photography, painting, drawing and many more media will be available for viewing and sale Saturday and Sunday during the Naperville Woman’s Club’s 55th annual Juried Art Fair at Naper Settlement.

    Long-running fair bringing art to Naper Settlement

    More than 100 artists will display their works this weekend when the 55th annual Naperville Woman’s Club Juried Art Fair returns to Naper Settlement. The fair will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday on the settlement’s 12-acre grounds at 523 S. Webster St. “A lot of people like that they can walk around downtown and they also get to walk around and see the...

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    Batavia seeks new assistant administrator

    Batavia is looking for a new assistant city administrator. Jason Bajor quit last month for personal reasons, Mayor Jeff Schielke said.

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    Aspen, a Jack Russell Terrier puppy, rolls over for owner Jenny Bradley of Batavia at a previous Windmill City Festival. The festival’s pet parade is one of its most popular events, organizers say.

    Batavia festival to feature pet parade, night run

    For lifelong Batavia resident Craig Foltos, making people laugh has always been a priority in the 16 years he has volunteered at the Batavia Windmill City Festival. At this year's four-day fest, which takes place starting at 6 p.m. Thursday, July 10, he will emcee the pet parade and help with the ice cream eating contest, long-standing festival traditions. "There are enough hardships in life,"...

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    Dorothy Wisniewski

    Des Plaines finance director also named assistant city manager

    Des Plaines’ finance director is taking on the additional role of assistant city manager, and will become the second-highest paid employee on the city payroll. Dorothy Wisniewski, the finance director since March 2009, will get a salary bump from $125,013 to $151,525.

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    Pressure continues to mount on the federal government to treat as refugees the thousands of children traveling alone from Central America and crossing the border into the United States.

    &A on push to treat young immigrants as refugees

    Pressure continues to mount on the federal government to treat as refugees the thousands of children traveling alone from Central America and crossing the border into the U.S. Many of the 50,000 young people who have arrived unaccompanied since last fall fled violence in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. Would-be refugees and asylum seekers must navigate a complex system. Here are some answers...

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    German supporters celebrate after the World Cup semifinal soccer match between Brazil and Germany at the Mineirao Stadium in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, Tuesday, July 8, 2014. Germany won the match 7-1.

    Germany’s WCup victory sets Twitter sports record

    It won’t be what Brazil’s fans will remember, but the first World Cup semifinal is the most tweeted-about sports event in Twitter history.

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    50 bodies found in Iraq, raising sectarian worries

    Iraqi officials discovered 50 bodies, many of them blindfolded and with their hands bound, in an agricultural area outside a city south of Baghdad on Wednesday, raising concerns over a possible sectarian killing amid the battle against a Sunni insurgency.

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    Germans probe 2nd spy case reportedly involving U.S.

    German authorities are investigating a second spy case reportedly involving the U.S., a week after the arrest of a German intelligence employee cast a new shadow over relations between the two countries.

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    The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is Cleveland’s biggest international tourist attraction.

    5 things about Cleveland, likely GOP host in 2016

    CLEVELAND — Good or bad, Cleveland — all but certain to host the Republican Party’s presidential nominating convention in 2016 — is hard to ignore. It’s a city with a rich history and bragging rights to things both quirky and considerable. Here are five things to know about Cleveland:Biggest Employer

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    Geneva will get a third level on its parking garage, which it has wanted since it started planning the garage in 2001. The city council approved a construction contract Monday.

    3rd level for Geneva parking deck is a go

    Downtown Geneva will get more parking, as the third deck of the parking garage in Third Street will finally be built.

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    U.S. runner Bill Hillmann, 35, from Chicago, is carried on a stretcher after being gored on his right leg by a Victoriano del Rio ranch fighting bull during the running of the bulls of the San Fermin festival, in Pamplona, Spain, Wednesday, July 9, 2014. Journalist and author Hillmann is a veteran San Fermin runner and has written many pieces about the festival.

    Chicago man gored at running of the bulls in Spain

    A Chicago man who co-authored the book “Fiesta: How to Survive the Bulls of Pamplona” became one of their victims Wednesday when he was one of two men gored at the festival. Bill Hillmann, 32, and a longtime participant in the nine-day Pamplona street party, was gored twice in the right thigh during one of the daily bull runs, organizers said. The injury was serious but not...

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    Chris Fitchett and Anne Marie Bufford pass sandbagged homes and businesses as they kayak down a flooded Front Street in Clarksville, Mo., Tuesday, July 8, 2014.

    Mississippi River peaking at trouble spots

    The Mississippi River is starting to go down in most places, but flood problems persist for a few unprotected communities. The river was at crest Wednesday in hard-hit Missouri towns like Louisiana and Clarksville. It is still rising toward an expected crest on Friday in Grafton, Ill., a small but popular tourist town.

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    In central New York, four people died after storms hit the rural town of Smithfield, between Syracuse and Utica, the Madison County Sheriff’s Office said. At least four homes were completely destroyed and numerous others were damaged.

    Storms leave 5 dead, 200K without power in East

    Severe thunderstorms packing strong winds swept through a number of Eastern states, killing five people, destroying or damaging numerous houses and leaving nearly 200,000 without power Wednesday, officials said.

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    Krishna Bansal, left, and Bill Liu, right, have been named volunteer outreach managers in Naperville Mayor George Pradel’s office to coordinate educational efforts targeted at their respective Indian and Chinese communities.

    Naperville, Aurora increasing outreach to Indian residents, businesses

    Efforts by local governments to reach out to Indian-American communities are ramping up in Naperville and Aurora. Elected officials in both cities have taken steps to recognize the Indian populations within their borders, with Naperville Mayor George Pradel creating a volunteer Indian Community Outreach Manager position last fall and the Aurora City Council under Mayor Tom Weisner taking steps to...

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    Steve Weigand of Bartlett sends flames into the air as he prepares saganaki during a previous Greek Fest at St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Church in Elgin.

    Get a taste of Greek culture at Elgin festival

    To those who attend the St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Church Greek Festival each year, the event appears seamless, says parishioner Polly Gorski. In reality, she said, church members work for months on end to put together a festival that emphasizes and embraces Greek culture.

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    The Bangor Police Department’s stuffed “duck of justice” sits on a fencepost at Bangor Raceway in Bangor, Maine. The mascot, a wood duck that had been stuffed by a taxidermist and rescued from a trash compactor, has attracted more than 20,000 likes on its departmental Facebook page, and is being used as a new way of engaging with the public.

    Maine police get Facebook boost with stuffed duck

    Police here believe they have quacked the code for finding followers on social media. The 80-officer Bangor Police Department, which serves a city of about 33,000, has attracted more than 20,000 likes on its Facebook page after humorous pictures of a stuffed duck were added. The duck, dubbed “Duck of Justice” or “DOJ,” appears in pictures of police cars, department...

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    The acknowledged role of Delilah Williams in the abuse of her stepdaughter, Talia Williams, pictured, helped keep her husband Naeem Williams from receiving the death penalty after he was convicted of murdering his daughter. He is scheduled to be sentenced in October.

    Judge fulfills 20-year sentencing deal for ‘evil’ stepmom

    An “evil” stepmother derived pleasure from severely beating her husband’s 5-year-old daughter while they lived in Army housing in Hawaii, a federal judge said Tuesday as he upheld a plea deal the woman made with prosecutors to receive a 20-year sentence for the murder of the child.

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    Solomon Johnson wipes his face Tuesday on the steps of his fire-damaged row house in Philadelphia, as a neighbor recounts details from the weekend fire where four young children died in a fast-moving blaze that engulfed at least 10 residences. Johnson lived next door to the children.

    Philadelphia defends response to fatal row house fire

    Members of a tight-knit West African community in Philadelphia want to know why four young children died in a porch fire that spread across half a city block — just steps from a fire station. Fire officials, a day after angry protests erupted over the fire, defended the response time on Tuesday and called firefighters human beings, not “superheroes.”

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    People hold umbrellas through heavy rain caused by a typhoon Wednesday in Naha, Okinawa. A powerful storm slammed through the southwestern Japanese island of Okinawa, leaving at least 28 people injured and 63,000 homes without power before swerving toward the bigger island of Kyushu on Wednesday.

    Typhoon nears central Japan after slamming Okinawa

    A strong typhoon swerved toward Japan’s heavily populated central islands on Wednesday after it slammed through Okinawa, dumping heavy rain, knocking out power and injuring at least 30 people. Typhoon Neoguri left toppled trees, flooded cars and bent railings on the southern island, which experienced its heaviest rainfall in a half century, according to the Okinawan government.

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    Megan Huntsman, accused of killing six of her babies and storing their bodies in her garage, appears in court, in Provo, Utah. On Tuesday, authorities said DNA results confirm that the biological father of Huntsman’s seven dead babies is her estranged husband. The 39-year-old Huntsman is charged with six counts of first-degree murder.

    Police give motive in dead newborns case

    Utah mother told authorities that she killed six of her newborns and stored their bodies in a garage because she was addicted to drugs and didn’t want to deal with the responsibility of raising them, police said Tuesday, revealing a suspected motive for the first time.

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    A government investigation has found that four U.S. DEA employees saw or heard a handcuffed Daniel Chong while he was held in a San Diego cell for five days without food or water. The U.S. Justice Department’s inspector general’s office said Tuesday that the employees told investigators they assumed whoever placed Chong in the cell would soon return for him and that they found nothing unusual.

    U.S. workers encountered man left in cell for days

    Four U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration employees saw or heard a handcuffed San Diego student locked in a cell for five days without food or water, but did nothing because they assumed someone else was responsible, investigators said Tuesday.

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    Quincy Park District gets behind pickleball courts

    QUINCY — A game that combines elements of pingpong and tennis is getting a boost in the western Illinois city of Quincy. The game is called pickleball. The Quincy Herald-Whig reports the park district is converting little-used tennis courts at one of its parks into pickleball courts.

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    Wisconsin Supreme Court to rule on hearsay law

    MADISON, Wis. — The Wisconsin Supreme Court is set to rule on whether judges can allow hearsay evidence during preliminary hearings.Hearsay is testimony that quotes someone who isn’t available to testify. Such testimony was generally barred at preliminary hearings, the step where a judge decides whether a case is strong enough to continue, until 2012.

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    Milwaukee man to be sentenced for dogfighting

    MILWAUKEE — A Milwaukee man convicted of participating in a dogfighting ring is scheduled to be sentenced.Thomas S. Zollicoffer pleaded guilty Monday to training pit bulls to fight and arranging their bouts. The 25-year-old faces a maximum penalty of 4½ years in prison and a $20,000 fine when he’s sentenced Wednesday morning.

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    Scott air base finalist for agency relocation

    MASCOUTAH, Ill. — Scott Air Force Base in southwestern Illinois is among six finalist sites for a relocation-minded secret government agency that helped coordinate the hunt for Osama bin Laden.

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    Some Starved Rock trails remain closed

    UTICA, Ill. — Illinois Conservation Police officers issued 23 citations to hikers who ventured into restricted areas at Starved Rock State Park during the holiday weekend.

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    Motor vehicle, other services at Taste of Chicago

    People heading to this year’s Taste of Chicago can renew their driver’s license or register to be an organ donor while they devour giant turkey legs and other treats.Secretary of State Jesse White announced Tuesday his office will have a booth at the event, which starts Wednesday in Grant Park.

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    Judge hearing lawsuit wants info about Daley heath

    A Cook County judge wants lawyers for Richard M. Daley to explain the medical reason the former Chicago mayor shouldn’t testify at the trial of the city’s lawsuit seeking to break the agreement for a Millennium Park restaurant. Judge Moshe Jacobius also questioned the attorneys’ request to have a closed-door hearing to discuss Daley’s medical condition.

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    Cannon stolen from Fort Wayne’s replica fort

    FORT WAYNE, Ind. — An antique cannon has been stolen from the replica of an early 1800s military fort in downtown Fort Wayne.A volunteer at the Historic Old Fort found the cannon was gone on Tuesday and reported the theft to police.

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    I&M proposes 5 solar facilities in 2 states

    FORT WAYNE, Ind. — Indiana Michigan Power plans to seek permission to build five solar generating facilities in the two states it serves.

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    Indiana education board faces contentious meeting

    INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana’s State Board of Education is gearing up for another showdown between Democratic schools Superintendent Glenda Ritz and Republican Gov. Mike Pence’s appointees and staff.The board is set to consider a pair of resolutions dealing with control of the board during a meeting Wednesday.

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    Indiana getting $849,000 for outdoor projects

    INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana is receiving $849,000 to use toward outdoor recreation and conservation projects. The money is Indiana’s share of about $43 million that is being distributed nationwide by the Land and Water Conservation Fund. The federal program has helped fund more than 40,000 local projects over 50 years. Revenue comes from offshore oil and gas leases.

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    Gary to rename portion of road for late Mayor Clay

    GARY, Ind. — The city of Gary is planning a ceremony to rename a portion of U.S. Route 20 the Mayor Rudolph “Rudy” Clay Memorial Highway.

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    Dawn Patrol: Cop testifies in rape case; Geneva doctor accused

    Officer: Woman 'unresponsive' when found with man in W. Chicago. Geneva doctor accused of 2012 sexual assault. Harper College budget adjusts spending with enrollment dip. Former Larkin Center shutting down July 31. Life sentence stands in Nellessen slaying. Motorcyclist killed in Libertyville crash. Pedestrian hit by Metra train dies in Elgin. Is Cubs' plan really that hard to understand?

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    Price tag for new Lake County court building more than expected

    Lake County Board members will decide in coming weeks how to address a new, higher price tag on a planned project featuring construction of a nine-story court building in downtown Waukegan. The project is now $12 million higher than original estimates, officials said.

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    DuPage County Board approves heroin programming for schools

    This fall, students at a dozen schools in DuPage County will learn about the dangers of heroin through a program started by the Robert Crown Centers for Health Education. DuPage County board members unanimously approved a nearly $68,000 contract Tuesday morning with Robert Crown to provide the opioid prevention education. The money to pay for the programming is coming from the $100,000 the board...

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    Inverness Mayor Jack Tatooles, center, speaks during the board meeting Tuesday night while Village Administrator Sam Trakas and Village Clerk Laurie White listen.

    Inverness more than doubles its road budget

    The Inverness village board more than doubled the amount of money committed to street maintenance, from $80,000 to $179,000, Tuesday night as it completed its annual budget process.

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    Members of the Elgin Police Department's crime-free housing unit and resident officer program, including officer Shelley Mendiola, are in charge of conducting checks on registered sex offenders. Elgin police conduct at-home checks of sex offenders twice a year and also monitor social networking sites, such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

    Elgin police want new sex offender registration law

    Members of the Elgin Police Department have asked local state officials to craft legislation that would supersede a court decision they say makes it more difficult to enforce the Sex Offender Registration Act. Officers from the department's resident officer program and crime-free housing unit are in charge of keeping track of Elgin's 120 or so currently registered sex offenders, Elgin Police Lt.

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    Allison Kramer of Carpentersville acknowledges having a “meltdown” with police and attacking an officer. Her case, though, underscores the challenge for police in questioning people such as Kramer, who has autism.

    How should police handle people with autism?

    Allison Kramer readily admits she had “a meltdown” when she threw a framed photo at a police officer and kneed him in the groin. But she also described the officer as “antagonistic” and, five months later, remains steadfast that Carpentersville police handled poorly their visit to her house. This is the account of an autistic woman and her encounter.

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    The site of the former Dominick's store in Wauconda has been empty since 2004.

    Wauconda Dominick's site primed for new tenant

    A long-vacant supermarket building on Wauconda's west side could be a great location for an independent grocery store, a village-hired consultant said Tuesday. A store selling arts-and-crafts supplies, books, electronics or home-improvement stuff also could be a good fit for the former Dominick's Finer Foods at 600 W. Liberty St., Mike Mallon told Wauconda's economic development committee.

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    Because legislators didn't take into account future growth and the changing business landscape of the state, a tax on businesses provides minimal return to most suburbs.

    Archaic tax formula leaves most suburbs wanting more

    Suburban Chicago would be almost unrecognizable to someone who hasn't been here in 35 years. But what's the same is the distribution of funds from a lesser-known state tax that is based on how the suburbs looked in 1979. “If you're allocating dollars based on how Illinois looked 40 years ago, we're overdue for a change,” Naperville City Manager Doug Krieger said.

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    Kane County Board members have handed out a series of raises in recent months that will have a long-term impact on the budget and the ability to keep its share of the property tax flat in coming years.

    Latest Kane Co. raises draw long-term budget concerns

    A vote to provide salary increases to union and non-union employees who work at Kane County's juvenile justice center sparked some concerns Tuesday. Some officials said it's unclear how the county can keep swallowing the added costs of all the new raises, union contracts and hires in the county this year and keep the tax levy flat. But Chairman Chris Lauzen pledged to do exactly that.

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    NCH to have bigger presence at Arlington Hts. senior center

    Northwest Community Hospital will have a bigger presence at the Arlington Heights Senior Center, thanks to a new agreement approved by the village board on Monday. “We’ve been exploring avenues of how we can get increased health programs at the senior center," said Karen Hansen, senior center manager.

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    North Aurora prepares fee break to get hotel

    North Aurora will cut its development-impact fees by about $90,000 to get a hotel to build west of Orchard Road.

Sports

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    Patrick Kane celebrates with Jonathan Toews after a goal in the playoffs this spring.

    Who’s more valuable to Blackhawks? Toews or Kane?

    The question could be asked for decades: Who was more valuable, Stan Mikita or Bobby Hull. Now it can be asked of Jonathan Toews and Patrick Kane after they signed equal contracts.

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    New York Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony, left, is expected to announce Thursday that he will stay in New York to help Phil Jackson rebuild the Knicks, according to the New York Daily News.

    Report: Anthony to stay with Knicks

    Carmelo Anthony will stay with the New York Knicks, according to a reported posted Wednesday by the New York Daily News. The Knicks were considered the favorite all along because they can pay him the most money, but the Bulls thought they were in the running during the eight days that passed since Anthony visited Chicago.

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    Fire advances in Open Cup

    The Chicago Fire defeated the Atlanta Silverbacks 3-1 Wednesday night at Silverbacks Park in the quarterfinal round of the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup.

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    Surviving the outdoor bites of the season

    Like so many others in the Northwest suburbs, we who have trudged through the jungles of the world and cityscapes, and wound up as the main course for flying bugs, I for one have finally fought back with great vigor.When I lived in Minnesota the state bird there (mosquito) took liberties with human flesh, my flesh and that of my two small children.I tried educating my wife then not to wear perfume if we were going to sit in our backyard. The neighborhood mavens knew the sweet-smelling fragrances would be like a radio beacon calling in the hordes of divebombing mosquitoes. And they came, flying in every direction.This was back in 1971, and anti-mosquito technology was questionable, to say the least, so every trip into the outdoors was another lesson in survival techniques and lots of repeated scratching while inventing new expletives.Over the course of time chemical companies that were busy manufacturing gooey, pasty-like, anti-mosquito liquids for the military, primarily in the World War II, South Pacific campaigns, saw their markets expanding to the consumer. Their liquids still smelled like something left over from high school science-lab experiments gone bad.And with decades of personal experience, I am honestly telling you I have tried almost kind of modern-day sprays, with and without DEET.Of course, now the “keepers of safe and clean bodies” decry the use of DEET because of claims of harmful reactions to both body and psyches alike.I don’t have to remind you we here in the flatlands have gone through a very wet spring and early summer.Perhaps you have seen those small, yellow trucks with rear-mounted nozzles in your neighborhood, spewing supposed nontoxic to human sprays of mosquito killer in between homes.The trucks are part of a very small army of mosquito hunters, but I question their actions and results, only because I honestly don’t know what’s worse for my household, the mosquito bites or the actual chemical spray. Could the result worth the risk? So now I’m trying something that seems to be working like a champ.I have two ThermaCELL® products, and even under these very tough 2014 mosquito conditions, the break in the prior pattern of mosquito attacks has made a marked difference.On most trips to a lake or river I take a portable, clip-on ThermaCELL unit that has come through for me every single time. The other device is the stay-at-home, backyard deck ThermaCELL lantern that allows my wife and me to sit and enjoy our beautiful backyard and landscaping at dusk as well as beyond.The sunset time period used to be air-raid time for us with swarms of biters invading our space.ThermaCEL mosquito repellent appliances are powered by a single butane cartridge. Butane provides the cordless, portable heat that activates the patented devices.The heat generated by the butane cartridge is directed to a metal grill that is part of the design of the unit. A small mat, saturated with repellent, sits on top of the metal grill. Heat vaporizes the repellent, allowing it to rise into the air.The latest test run occurred when my wife and I went to one of the fireworks displays during the July Fourth celebration. We sat on damp grass, sometimes a killer spot for prospecting mosquitoes. I used the portable, belt-clip unit, and nary a bite was encountered. My wife was thrilled and bite-free.• Contact Mike Jackson at angler88@comcast.net, and catch his radio show 6-7 a.m. Sundays on WSBC 1240-AM and podcast at www.mikejacksonoutdoors.com.

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    In his final chance to impress the fans voting for the last spot on the AL All-Star team, Chris Sale pitched 7 2-3 innings of four-hit ball. Then the White Sox bullpen gave the game away. Jake Petricka failed to record an out, helping Boston turn a four-run deficit into a one-run game, then Javy Guerra gave up consecutive run-scoring hits in the bottom of the ninth and the Red Sox rallied to beat the White Sox 5-4 on Wednesday night.

    Sox bullpen fails Sale, gives Boston 5-4 win

    In his final chance to impress the fans voting for the last spot on the AL All-Star team, Chris Sale pitched 7 2-3 innings of four-hit ball. Then the White Sox bullpen gave the game away. Jake Petricka failed to record an out, helping Boston turn a four-run deficit into a one-run game, then Javy Guerra gave up consecutive run-scoring hits in the bottom of the ninth and the Red Sox rallied to beat the White Sox 5-4 on Wednesday night.

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    Boomers’ winning streak ends

    The visiting Schaumburg Boomers saw a five-game winning streak come to a close with a 14-3 loss at the hands of the River City Rascals on Wednesday night.

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    Red Stars tie Portland 1-1

    Penalty kicks would determine the night for the Red Stars and Thorns, who were meeting for the second time in six days Wednesday. It also would be the second tie, this time 1-1, between the two teams after a 2-2 result Friday in Portland

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    Cougars fall short 3-1

    Despite connecting on 11 hits, the victory Kane County Cougars (13-5, 58-30) fell 3-1 to the Quad Cities River Bandits at Modern Woodmen Park.

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    A.J. Pierzynski was designated for assignment by the Red Sox on Wednesday. Don’t expect him to end up re-signing with the White Sox.

    Sox making some interesting moves

    Beat writer Scot Gregor takes a look at three interesting developments from Wednesday - the rumored signing of first-round draft pick Carlos Rodon, A.J. Pierzynski's release from the Red Sox and the potential impact of Yankees ace Masahiro Tanaka's elbow issue.

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    It's been a tough week for the Cubs, who have lost all six games — their deepest slump of the season — since they dealt starters Jeff Samardzija and Jason Hammel to Oakland for a package of prospects.

    Cubs lose season-high 6th straight, 4-1 to Reds

    The Cubs got to take a look at their future Wednesday night, starting a pair of newcomers. The result was just like the recent past. The losing goes on. Alfredo Simon became the NL's first 12-game winner and Billy Hamilton added to his sensational series with a tiebreaking triple, leading the Cincinnati Reds to a 4-1 victory over the trade-depleted Cubs.

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    FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2010, file photo, Shelly Sterling sits with her husband, Donald Sterling, right, during the Los Angeles Clippers' NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons in Los Angeles. With a $2 billion sale of the Clippers hanging in the balance, a judge is set to determine Monday, June 30, 2014, if the terms of a family trust alone are enough to confirm Donald Sterling was properly removed as trustee and allow his estranged wife to sell the team without his consent. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)

    Sterling says he won't sell team, calls wife pig

    Donald Sterling, battling to stop the sale of his beloved Los Angeles Clippers, turned a courtroom into his personal stage, railing at a lawyer questioning him, denouncing doctors who deemed him incompetent and insisting he can get far more than the $2 billion price offered for the team.

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    New York Yankees starting pitcher Masahiro Tanaka watches from the dugout after leaving the game in the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Cleveland Indians Tuesday, July 8, 2014, in Cleveland. Tanaka pitched 6 2/3 innings and gave up 10 hits and five runs. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

    Yankees’ Tanaka on DL due to elbow inflammation

    The New York Yankees’ battered rotation may have suffered the most crucial loss of all.Rookie sensation Masahiro Tanaka, who leads the majors with 12 wins, has been placed on the 15-day disabled list due to right elbow inflammation. He had an MRI in New York on Tuesday.Yankees manager Joe Girardi admitted he’s concerned about Tanaka’s prognosis

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    Center Jonathan Toews (19) and right wing Patrick Kane have agreed to eight-year contract extensions with the Blackhawks, reportedly worth $10.5 million per season.

    Toews, Kane agree to 8-year extensions with Blackhawks

    In the midst of the Carmelo and LeBron uncertainty, the Blackhawks quietly and efficiently went about the process of signing their two biggest stars — Patrick Kane and Jonathan Toews — to eight-year contract extensions, a huge step in securing that the organization’s future may be as bright as the past few years have been.x

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    Argentina players celebrate after a shootout at the end of the World Cup semifinal soccer match between the Netherlands and Argentina at the Itaquerao Stadium in Sao Paulo Brazil, Wednesday, July 9, 2014. Argentina won 4-2 on penalties after the match ended 0-0 after extra time. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)

    Argentina reaches World Cup final after penalties

    Goalkeeper Sergio Romero saved two penalties Wednesday to send Argentina into the World Cup final with a 4-2 shootout win over the Netherlands after the game finished in a 0-0 stalemate. A day after Germany lit up the World Cup with its clinical 7-1 destruction of host Brazil, the Netherlands and Argentina could not manage a goal between them in 120 minutes before the shootout.

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    Kristufek’s Arlington selections for July 10

    Joe Kristufek's selections for July 10 racing at Arlington International.

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    Former New England Patriots football player Aaron Hernandez, right, speaks with his lawyer Michael Fee during a hearing in Bristol County Superior Court in Fall River, Mass., Wednesday. The New England Patriots will turn over hundreds of pages of personnel records to lawyers for Hernandez but object to producing scouting reports and a psychological assessment, a team lawyer said Wednesday.

    Hernandez’s lawyers, Patriots fight over records

    The New England Patriots will turn over hundreds of pages of personnel records to lawyers for former tight end Aaron Hernandez but object to producing scouting reports and a psychological assessment, a team lawyer said Wednesday.

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    In this June 5, 2004 file photo, Oscar De La Hoya celebrates his unanimous decision victory over Germany’s Felix Sturm following their WBO world middleweight title fight in Las Vegas. De La Hoya got drunk the night he won the only boxing gold for the U.S. in the 1992 Olympics, and was still drinking when he lost his last fight to Manny Pacquiao. Now sober after a second stint in rehab he’s in a fight of another kind for control of his boxing company.

    Boxer De La Hoya reflects on his career

    He was the Golden Boy, a fighter who brought in fans for decades after winning a gold medal at the 1992 Olympics. Oscar De La Hoya fought 45 times in 16 years as a pro, winning 39 of them along his way to titles in six different weight classes.He made millions, and his huge fan base made other fighters who beat him stars in their own right. But success came at a price, including two stints in rehab for alcohol abuse, which De La Hoya says plagued him since his youth in East Los Angeles

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    Source: Cavs agree to multiplayer, 3-team trade

    The Cavaliers made moves to clear a path for LeBron James to return.The team created salary-cap space on Thursday with a three-way trade, ensuring they have enough to offer the superstar free agent a maximum contract.A person familiar with the deals says the Cavs have agreed to trade guard Jarrett Jack, swingman Sergey Karasev and center Tyler Zeller in a three-team deal. The moves are designed to open room under the salary cap so they can land James, the four-time league MVP and most sought after player on the market.

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    Chicago Sky guard Epiphanny Prince (10), right, scored 14 points against the Washington Mystics on Wednesday but it wasn't enough as the Sky fell to 8-11 in the WNBA with its 10th loss in its last 13 games.

    Record crowd watches Sky lose to Washington

    The Chicago Sky’s struggles continued on Wednesday afternoon with a 72-65 loss to the Washington Mystics before a record crowd at Allstate Arena. But at 8-11, the Sky, which has lost its last three games and 10 of its last 13, would make the playoffs in the Eastern Conference if the postseason started today.

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    Athletes like NBA star LeBron James live in a completely different world from the rest of us.

    Disconnect between athletes, real world gets stronger

    Money! Money! Money! The pursuit of Carmelo Anthony makes it difficult to ignore how disconnected sports is from the real world. USA Today ran a story this week on the estimated annual cost of the American dream for a family of four. Categories were essential expenses, extras and taxes/savings: The total came to $130,357. Any prominent sports figure worth his weight in gold nuggets spends that amount of money on wine … weekly.

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    Mike North Video: Johnny Football needs a receiver to succeed
    With the Cleveland Browns wide receiver Josh Gordon suspended, Mike North wonders what the team will do to replace him to give Johnny Manziel a chance to succeed as a new quarterback.

Business

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    Car club calendar
    The Chicago suburbs are home to many car lovers and clubs devoted to models ranging from the Alfa Romeo to Volkswagen. The Daily Herald has compiled a list of monthly meetings for area car clubs, as well as several local motorcycling groups.

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    Corporate earnings season got off to a good start Wednesday, helping lift the stock market after two days of declines. The market opened higher and remained modestly higher throughout the day.

    Alcoa helps lift market after 2 days of declines

    Corporate earnings season got off to a positive start Wednesday, helping lift the stock market after two days of declines. The market opened higher and remained modestly higher throughout the day. Stocks climbed further after the Federal Reserve released minutes from its latest policy meeting in June.

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    This image released by 20th Century Fox shows Ansel Elgort, left, and Shailene Woodley in a scene from “The Fault In Our Stars.” The film was a niche-based hit that appealed to the ardent fans of John Green’s young adult book. A whopping 82 percent of its $48 million opening weekend was female.

    A summer without swagger for Hollywood

    Hollywood’s summer at the box office isn’t just missing nearly 20 percent of last summer’s revenue. It’s lacking swagger. Summer is the season for mega-budget, chest-thumping, globe-trotting monstrosities — films so big they lure droves of Americans with heavily promoted promises of shock and awe. But this season’s blockbuster output has been curiously low on the summer’s stock in trade: bigness.

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    U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin

    Everest College in suburbs to be sold, Durbin warns students to stay away

    California-based Corinthian Colleges Inc., parent of Everest College, plans to sell 85 campuses, including six in the suburbs. U.S. Sen Dick Durbin also warns students to stay away from such for-profit colleges, especially since Corinthian is under investigation.

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    Crumbs Bake Shop said it is shuttering all its stores, a week after the struggling cupcake shop operator was delisted from the Nasdaq.

    Crumbs shows dangers of focusing on single product

    Turns out, being a one-hit wonder is risky. When Crumbs, the New York City-based chain that built its business around cupcakes, shuttered several dozen of its remaining locations on Monday, it seemed like an abrupt ending. But Crumbs’ rise and fall isn’t surprising when considering the company’s dependence on a fad. In fact, it’s the latest cautionary tale for businesses that devote their entire menus to variations of a single product.

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    The Vatican has chosen French financier Jean-Baptiste de Franssu as the new president of its bank, which is overhauling operations after a series of financial scandals.

    French financier to head Vatican bank

    The Vatican has chosen a French financier to become the new president of its bank, which is overhauling the way it operates after a series of financial scandals.

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    Chinese hostesses prepare tea for U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Chinese President Xi Jinping before the opening ceremony of the sixth U.S.-China. Strategic and Economic Dialogue and the fifth round of the China-U.S. High Level Consultation on People-to-People Exchange.

    China says it’s up to U.S. to drive global economy

    China’s finance minister said Wednesday that the country is not planning any new stimulus measures and it is up to the United States to drive the global economy. Lou Jiwei said that leaders are satisfied with the country’s economic performance so far this year and that in the first five months China had created up to 6 million jobs, 60 percent of this year’s target.

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    U.S. students in middle of pack on financial know-how

    The United States runs in the middle of the pack when it comes to the financial knowledge and skills of 15-year-old boys and girls, according to an international study released Wednesday. China’s financial hub of Shanghai had the highest average score for teens who participated in the testing for the Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

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    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry addresses the joint opening session of the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue known as the “S&ED” at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, China Wednesday, July 9, 2014.

    U.S., China vow to improve cooperation

    The United States and China vowed Wednesday to improve their economic and security cooperation, saying they wouldn’t let persistent differences over maritime claims, cyberhacking and currency hamper a relationship critical to global peace and prosperity. Chinese President Xi Jinping stressed the need to avoid confrontation between nations accounting for a quarter of the world’s people and a third of the global economy. His theme was largely echoed by Secretary of State John Kerry and Treasury Secretary Jack Lew.

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    Russian arrested in hacking case filed in Seattle

    The U.S. Secret Service has arrested a Russian man who is accused of hacking store computers to steal thousands of credit card numbers.The agency didn’t say where the 30-year-old Moscow man, Roman Valerevich Seleznev, was arrested Saturday, but he was transported to Guam for an initial court appearance and detained for a July 22 hearing.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Members of the production crew for 'American Grilled' stand by a truck outside Wrigley Field in Chicago earlier this spring. The show airs Wednesdays on Travel Channel.

    TV's 'American Grilled': Competition plus cooking with local products

    "American Grilled" recently wound tight through 11 hours of a changeable Chicago spring day, outside the main entrance to Wrigley Field. The host of Travel Channel's newest competition show is no buttoned-down big shot. Anchoring the judge's table is David Guas, all sideburns and denim and muy macho voice, and chef at Bayou Bakery in Arlington, Va.

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    Chicken fajitas come sizzling hot at El Puerto in Fox Lake. Ask for additional tortillas right away, as the meat and vegetable portion is generous.

    El Puerto's menu as stunning as its setting

    Fox Lake may be full of lakeside restaurants calling your name, but for fresh, flavorful food, great drinks and a dining room full of bold colors, El Puerto is the must-visit dining spot. With a full bar (try the margaritas), a lakefront patio and a wide selection of seafood, steak and traditional Mexican dishes, El Puerto has something for everyone — and it's exceptional.

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    Tommy Albright (Kevin Earley) and Fiona MacLaren (Jennie Sophia) fall in love across the centuries in Goodman Theatre's revival of the Lerner & Loewe musical “Brigadoon,” directed and choreographed by Rachel Rockwell.

    A-list creative team, top-notch performers make for stellar 'Brigadoon'

    It took about a decade for director/choreographer Rachel Rockwell to make her Goodman Theatre directorial debut. I don't expect she'll have to wait long for another invitation, not if her gorgeously sung and exquisitely danced revival of “Brigadoon” is any indication.

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    Sean Hayes

    Sean Hayes joins cast of CBS sitcom ‘The Millers’

    CBS says popular sitcom star Sean Hayes is joining the cast of its comedy “The Millers” as a series regular. Hayes, who is from Glen Ellyn, will play the new best friend of the character played by Margo Martindale and a new source of friction for her son, played by Will Arnett, CBS said on Tuesday. Hayes is best-known from eight seasons on the sitcom “Will & Grace.” Last season he starred in the comedy series “Sean Saves the World.”

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    Jenny Youngwith of Carol Stream and her service dog “Bode” participate in a service dog class from the MidAmerica Service Dogs' Foundation training class in Hinsdale.

    Service dogs open a new world for their owners

    Dogs may be man's best friend, but for a number of Chicago-area children, teens, tweens and young adults, that special bond between human and a four-legged friend is more. For those with mobility challenges, that bond and its benefits is a lifeline to independence.

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    Nickel Creek — Chris Thile, left, Sara Watkins and Sean Watkins — grew up performing together, but ultimately it was the nearly seven years spent concentrating on their own separate musical interests that made returning to the stage together all the more exciting.

    Reunited, revived Nickel Creek plays Taste of Chicago Friday

    The trio of musicians in Nickel Creek grew up performing together, but it was the nearly seven years spent apart that made them stronger as a band. Fiddler Sara Watkins, her brother and guitarist Sean Watkins and mandolin player Chris Thile reunited last year with the goal of a 25-city tour. The reunion resulted in a full-length album, sold-out shows and an expanded tour, which includes a stop at the Petrillo Music Shell at the Taste of Chicago Friday, July 11.

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    Gwyneth Paltrow and Joel Gallen are returning to produce “Stand Up to Cancer” for a second time and other stars from TV, film and music will encourage and accept donations from the public. The money raised supports cross-disciplinary research toward new cancer treatments.

    ‘Stand Up to Cancer’ telecast to return Sept. 5

    How often do your favorite TV outlets all carry the same show at the same time — and in prime time, without ads? Tune in to just about any channel at 7 p.m. Sept. 5 to see for yourself. Dozens of broadcast and cable networks will again donate a simultaneous hour of commercial-free airtime to carry the fundraiser “Stand Up to Cancer.”

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    George Clooney has chastised a British newspaper over an article claiming his fiancee’s mother disapproves of the impending marriage for religious reasons. Clooney said that the claims about his future mother-in-law Baria Alamuddin were untrue and irresponsible.

    Newspaper says sorry after Clooney slams story

    Britain’s Daily Mail newspaper apologized to George Clooney on Wednesday for alleging his fiancee’s mother opposed the marriage on religious grounds — a story Clooney called both wrong and irresponsible. Clooney is engaged to Beirut-born London lawyer Amal Alamuddin, whose father Ramzi belongs to a prominent Druse family. The Druse are adherents of a monotheistic religion based mainly in Lebanon, Syria and Israel. Clooney called the story “completely fabricated.”

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    “The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food” by Dan Barber (The Penguin Press)

    Chef Dan Barber urges a reboot of our food system

    Many know chef Dan Barber as a key champion of the farm-to-table movement, favoring locally sourced and produced food. But in his new book “The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food,” he argues that the farm-to-table philosophy, while wildly and increasingly popular, is fundamentally flawed. What we need instead, Barber says, is a cuisine based on what the land can provide — nothing more, nothing less.

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    Bleu, a French bulldog owned by Maria Catania, watches DogTV in her apartment in San Diego, Calif. DogTV asked Grammy-winning musician Andrew Dost of indie rock band fun. to write some psychoacoustic music for the network.

    Pop-rocker scores song to soothe anxious canines

    DogTV, the 2-year-old television network for dogs, asked Grammy-winning musician Andrew Dost of the pop-rock band fun. to write some psychoacoustic music for the network. The unnamed result, nearly four minutes of harp, piano and repetitive electronic undertones, debuted Monday during a relaxation segment. “I approached this composition project differently than I would for human ears. I made sure the range of frequencies and instrumentation were tailored to a dog’s unique sense of hearing,” Dost said.

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    Adam Levine, left, and Stevie Nicks in Los Angeles. Stevie Nicks has come on board NBC’s “The Voice” this season as Adam Levine’s adviser to his team. She and Levine have been filming with his team of 12, working with each of his artists as they assign songs and rehearse with them, preparing for the Battle Rounds. Season 7 premieres Sept. 22.

    Stevie Nicks joining ‘The Voice’ as adviser

    Stevie Nicks is joining “The Voice” as an adviser to Adam Levine’s team for the upcoming season. Filming is currently underway on the show’s seventh season. Nicks, the 66-year-old Fleetwood Mac singer, has been working with Levine and his 12 team members as they assign songs and rehearse with the contestants in preparation for the show’s battle rounds.

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    A Dijon-orange vinaigrette dresses a veggie-filled Shades of Green Salad.

    Shades of Green Salad a lettuce-less bowl of goodness

    Alison Ladman created a green salad that will keep you coming back for more. And not a single leafy green is harmed in the making of this meal. She combines fresh green beans, asparagus, snow peas and zucchini for a fresh and delicious take on a not-so-basic green salad. Dill and avocado slices are added for good measure.

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    Associated Press Shades of Green Salad

    Shades of Green Salad
    Who says you need lettuce for a salad? This Shades of Green Salad features asparagus, snow peas and other verdant veggies.

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    Caramel Pork Ribs
    Chef and cookbook author David Lebovitz says the French love to eat ribs as much as Texans do. This rendition starts with a homemade caramel that offsets the slight heat in the sauce. The ribs are one-pot, easy and delicious.

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    Lemon Pistachio Couscous
    Bits of preserved lemon add a special touch to David Lebovitz's lemon pistachio couscous. Serve with lamb shanks and other kinds of braised meat.

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    While living in Paris, chef and cookbook author David Lebovitz has perfected fattoush, a Middle Eastern salad with pita crumbles.

    Fattoush
    While living in Paris, chef and cookbook author David Lebovitz perfected his recipe for fattoush, a Middle Eastern salad with pita crumbles.

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    In his new book “My Paris Kitchen,” chef David Lebovitz writes “...one of the most interesting salads is fattoush, a Middle Eastern dish that’s sprinkled with ground sumac, a powder that’s both a little fruity and a little tart, and tossed with fatteh, the Arabic word for shards of toasted pita bread, which gives the salad its name.”

    American’s Paris kitchen becomes a way of life

    David Lebovitz snaps a photo of a practically perfect croissant before taking a bite, then smiling slightly. He’ll probably be asked for the recipe later, though he did not bake the croissant, nor was it made in his kitchen. But after six cookbooks, more than 27,000 tweets and a food website dating to the early years of html, readers expect recipes to go with the photos of Parisian food most can only crave from a distance.

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    Wine of the Week: Pinot Noir Rose Van Duzer Willamette Valley, Oregon 2013

    Good wine: Get comfortable with buying wine online

    Wine is just a click away, as wineries, auction houses and e-tailers grab for America’s enthusiasm for shopping online. Illinois's unique liquor regulations support spirited trade with discounts for quantity purchase, in-store tastings and wine in sold in groceries.

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    Judas Priest is definitely not done, as evidenced by the band’s powerful, fierce new album, “Redeemer of Souls.”

    Judas Priest has redeeming metal value

    It takes a lot for a band to make up for a “farewell tour” that ended up not being a farewell after all. But on its new studio album, Judas Priest has redeemed itself nicely. Simply put, “Redeemer of Souls” is the best album this band has done in more than 20 years.

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    Halle Berry plays an astronaut who returns home from a yearlong solo mission only to discover that, while in flight, she was somehow impregnated on CBS’ “Extant.”

    Halle Berry a draw for smart, engrossing ‘Extant’

    Halle Berry is certainly a welcome TV presence this summer as the star of “Extant,” a 13-episode thriller on CBS where she plays Molly Woods, an unexpectedly expectant astronaut. It premieres at 8 p.m. Wednesday. The premise of the show — that Molly was somehow impregnated while on a solo yearlong outer-space mission — seems on its face outrageous. But “Extant” turns out to be smart and engrossing, with a meditative, gently futuristic touch that draws the viewer in.

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    A wedding dress from a 1993 wedding is displayed with a dress made in 1878 at the “American Brides: Inspiration and Ingenuity” exhibition in Denton, Texas. Wedding dresses from the 19th century to now are featured in a new exhibit showcasing the evolving styles of American brides with more than 40 wedding gowns worn over a span from 1844 to last year.

    Exhibit features wedding fashions from 1800s to today

    Wedding dresses from the 19th century to the present day are featured in a new exhibit in Denton, Texas, showcasing the changing styles of American brides. That includes a 1900s dress featuring a lace choker collar, a beaded flapper dress from the 1920s and a 1980s satin confection with an explosion of organdy ruffles.

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    Hop flowers can be both ornamental and edible. Hops are an easy-to-grow perennial that greatly enhance a beer’s flavor when picked fresh.

    Hop to it: Plant what you need to brew beer

    You don’t need a garden to succeed as a home brewer, but growing your own ingredients is a flavorful step up. Much of the creativity involved in crafting a custom-made beer starts with the plants you select. “The modern palate pretty much demands some hops in beer, but beyond that, there’s a lot of choices available,” says Dennis Fisher, an organic farmer from Winterport, Maine.

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    Minestrone morphs into pasta salads for a light, summer supper.

    Pasta salad inspired by Italian soup

    This recipe turns the elements of a winter favorite -- vegetables, beans and pasta -- into a side dish fit for a summertime lunch or light supper. Salami replaces the flavor of sausage typically found in the soup; prosciutto or any smoked ham would work as well. For a vegetarian version, omit the meat and double the amount of chopped basil.

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    The flavors of your favorite cold-weather soup come together in a summer Minestrone Pasta Salad.

    Minestrone Pasta Salad
    Everything you love about minestrone tossed into a summery pasta salad.

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    Rick Springfield will take the stage in Waukegan this weekend.

    Music notes: '80s heartthrob Rick Springfield returns to Genesee

    Rick Springfield, the 1980s pop star behind such enduring hits as "Jessie's Girl," returns to the Chicago area Friday for a show at the Genesee Theatre in Waukegan. Fans of classic punk, meanwhile, should check out Saturday's show featuring Tutu & the Pirates, often referred to as "Chicago's first punk band," when they play the Empty Bottle in Chicago.

Discuss

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    Daily Herald photo/Joe Lewnard Wickes Furniture in Wheeling has been closed for six years.

    Editorial: Be careful about redesigning TIFs

    A Daily Herald editorial says it's great that Wheeling is moving ahead with its Town Center plan, but less exciting is the precedent it is setting -- the potential never-ending tax increment financing district.

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    Cold and calculating on immigration

    Columnist Ruben Navarrette: Whenever President Obama acts unilaterally on immigration reform — and it’s not often enough — the reactions on both the right and the left are so predictable.

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    Those behind the scandals untouchable
    An Inverness letter to the editor: I think I have finally figured out why no one in the Obama administration is held accountable for the egregious scandals — at least those to date — which have come about during his tenure. Obama apparently has promised them total loyalty in return for their total loyalty to him and his directives.

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    Let’s limit how long politicians stay in office
    A Bartlett letter to the editor: The Illinois General Assembly has 59 senators and 118 representatives. With partisan bickering, is it any wonder little gets done? A smaller state government with 15 to 20 politicians representing larger regions would make more sense, get more done, and cost a lot less.

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    Hobby Lobby ruling an attack on rights
    A Waukegan letter to the editor: When the Republican majority in the Supreme Court decreed that it was all right for employers to deny certain benefits to their employees' families, even though these benefits were mandated by an American law, it set the stage for an attack on families' rights which is unprecedented in our country's history.

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    Wage-hike supporters don’t know hard work
    A Bensenville letter to the editor: I know Governor Quinn and the Democrats need to buy votes to get re-elected, but he thinks taking my order at McDonald’s or scanning my groceries is hard work

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    How will companies publish beliefs?
    An Elgin letter to the editor: So as I understand the Supreme Court’s ruling, women who wish to receive birth control coverage need to choose a company whose religion permits them to have it covered under their health plan.

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