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Daily Archive : Sunday March 2, 2014

News

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    Lake Zurich High School performs in the Varsity Flag Open Flag category during the TEAMDance Illinois 2014 Grand Championship in Peoria, Sunday March 2nd.

    Images: Team Dance Illinois’ Grand Championship
    Team Dance Illinois' Grand Championship was held Sunday, March 2 at the Peoria Civic Center. The event showcases Illinois’ best dance, pom, drill and guard teams competing throughout the event.

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    Raymond Benson of Buffalo Grove, left, and the Daily Herald's Dann Gire host Sunday's Oscar party for Daily Herald subscribers at Studio Movie Grill in Wheaton.

    Gire, suburbanites celebrate Oscar in Wheaton

    Though Daily Herald Film Critic Dann Gire called this year's Academy Award nominee field one of the “tightest, toughest” he's ever seen, it turned out pretty much the way he thought it would. That includes his prediction that “12 Years a Slave” would win Best Picture over eight other films. “Each one could have won during a regular year,” Gire said at an Oscar...

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    Complete list of Sunday’s Oscar winners
    Complete list of winners from Sunday's Academy Awards

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    Raymond Benson of Buffalo Grove and the Daily Herald’s Dann Gire chat as Jared Leto accepts the Best Supporting Actor Oscar (which they correctly predicted) as they host the 86th Academy Awards party for Daily Herald subscribers at Studio Movie Grill in Wheaton on Sunday, March 2.

    Images: Oscar Night with Dann Gire
    The Daily Herald's Dann Gire hosts the 86th Academy Awards party at Studio Movie Grill on Sunday, March 2 in Wheaton.

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    Lake Zurich High School performs in the Varsity Flag Open Flag category during the Team Dance Illinois 2014 Grand Championship in Peoria Sunday.

    Suburban teams dance their way to wins at big competition

    The northwest suburbs were well represented among the winners at the Team Dance Illinois Championships Sunday in Peoria. Eight area dance teams left the Peoria Civic Center with at least one Illinois-shaped 1st place trophy. Teams were grouped together based on the size of their high school and could choose to perform in one of six dance categories: open dance, hip-hop, poms, open poms, lyrical...

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    17-year-old trapped in machinery at Algonquin snowboarding park

    A 17 year-old male employee was injured Sunday afternoon when he became tangled up in the machinery that operates a ski lift at the Raging Buffalo Snowboard and Ski Park in Algonquin. Algonquin-Lake in the Hills Fire Protection District responded to the park at 19N475 Route 31 at 1:46 p.m. after a co-worker discovered the teen entrapped in the conveyor lift, officials said.

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    Dan Mikos of Wood Dale won first place in our February Photo Finish contest for this image he captured in his own back yard.

    Wood Dale photographer captures great image, contest prize

    Wood Dale's Dan Mikos won our DuPage Photo Finish contest with a haunting picture of the night sky. But while the $50 gift certificate is nice, he also won something even more important: bragging rights with his girlfriend.

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    Jaroslav Sydorenko of Hoffman Estates, left, and Taras Konowal of St. Charles discussing the current situation in Ukraine on Sunday morning inside a conference room at St. Andrew Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Bloomingdale.

    Suburban Ukrainians worried about Russia’s actions

    Suburban Ukrainians say they are sad, angry and fearful about the escalating political and military tensions between the Ukraine and Russia. “I cry,” said Mary Jaresko, a Ukrainian immigrant who attends St. Andrew Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Bloomingdale. “For days I have cried about this. Americans need to know what’s going on there.”

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    Freddie Lee Hall is a Florida death row inmate who claims he is protected from execution because he is mentally disabled.

    High court looks at inmate with low IQ

    A Floridian with an IQ as high as 75 may be diagnosed as mentally disabled and be eligible for help getting a job. But on death row, the state says having an IQ higher than 70 categorically means an inmate is not mentally disabled and may be executed. The Supreme Court barred states from executing mentally disabled inmates in 2002, but until now has left the determination of who is mentally...

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    Mila Olias, 10, and her dog Momo take a sled run down a sidewalk Sunday in Richmond Heights, Mo. A winter storm packing high winds, ice and heavy snow threatened to create hazardous driving conditions across Kansas and Missouri, accompanied by wind chills approaching 25 below zero in some areas.

    Wide range of wintry conditions affects half of US

    Tourists flocked to the monuments in the nation’s capital Sunday to enjoy 50-degree temperatures before yet another winter storm was expected to dump up to a foot of snow on parts of the East Coast. In the latest blast of a harsh winter, forecasters said a layer of ice and 8 to 12 inches of snow was possible by the end of Monday in Washington and the Mid-Atlantic region, while 6 to 8...

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    The Palatine Fire Department Dive Rescue Team watches Sunday as Danny Solovastru of Morton Grove, dressed as a Minion from the “Despicable Me” movies, falls into the cold water during the Polar Plunge at Twin Lakes Recreation Area in Palatine. The event raised more than $100,000 for Special Olympics.

    Palatine plungers endure icy “needles” for a good cause

    Dozens of brave swimmers — many of them decked out as superheroes and movie characters — dove into the icy waters of the Twin Lakes Recreation Area in Palatine on Sunday in the name of charity. The annual Palatine Polar Plunge raised more than $100,000 for Special Olympics.

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    Naturalist Stephanie Touzalin takes Andre, a Great Horned owl, out to show to visitors Sunday during the “Big, Bad and Beautiful: Your Backyard Birds of Prey” presentation at Willowbrook Wildlife Center in Glen Ellyn. Andre and a Red Tailed hawk named Henna were shown to 30 people who gathered to learn about the similarities and differences of the large birds of prey.

    Bird lovers flock to Willowbrook predator program

    Thirty people of all ages gathered Sunday to learn about Red Tailed hawks and Great Horned owls during the presentation “Big, Bad and Beautiful, Your Backyard Birds of Prey” at Willowbrook Wildlife Center in Glen Ellyn. Naturalist Stephanie Touzalin kicked off the 90-minute program with images of the two species of birds commonly seen in the area, followed by a guest appearance by...

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    Unidentified armed men patrol around a Ukraine infantry base in Perevalne, Ukraine, Sunday. Hundreds of armed men in trucks and armored vehicles surrounded the Ukrainian military base Sunday in Crimea, blocking its soldiers from leaving. The outnumbered Ukrainians placed a tank at the base’s gate, leaving the two sides in a tense standoff.

    World scrambles as Russia tightens grip on Crimea

    Warning that it was “on the brink of disaster,” Ukraine put its military on high alert Sunday and appealed for international help to avoid what it feared was the possibility of an invasion by Russia. Outrage over Russia’s tactics mounted in world capitals, with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry calling on President Vladimir Putin to pull back from “an incredible act...

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    U-46 makes plan for minority hiring

    Elgin Area School District U-46 officials have developed a recruitment plan emphasizing the hiring of minorities and cultural competency training for employees. Among the ideas proposed is using social media to connect to a larger, more diverse talent pool of qualified candidates, and offering coaching for administrators involved in hiring on diversity recruitment, interviewing techniques, and...

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    “The Tonight Show” host Jimmy Fallon exits the water Sunday during the Chicago Polar Plunge in Chicago. Fallon joined Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel in the event.

    Jimmy Fallon, Chicago mayor take a chilly dip

    Comedian Jimmy Fallon took a quick but icy dip in Lake Michigan — dressed in a full suit and tie — eyes bulging as he darted out of the slushy water and headed straight for a pile of dry towels. “The Tonight Show” host made good on his promise to make Sunday morning's “Polar Plunge” with Mayor Rahm Emanuel as a condition for the mayor appearing on Fallon's...

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    Sheryl Ringel shows Jack Menzies, 6, of Wauconda a collectible toy at the Tri-County Pregnancy & Parenting Thrift Store booth during the “Winter Blues Getaway” Community Expo & Craft Show Sunday at Wauconda High School. The event featured over 70 exhibitors, craft show vendors and entertainment

    Beating the winter blues at Wauconda expo

    With the help of live music, a champion canine and a few snakes and lizards, families managed to beat the winter blues this weekend, if only for a while, at the 11th Annual Wauconda Area Chamber Community Expo and Craft Show. The event at Wauconda High School featured more than 70 area businesses, organization and clubs, along with the American Legion Post 911 Craft Show.

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    District 50 dual language meeting

    Woodland Elementary District 50 hosts an informational meeting about the district’s Dual Language Program at 6 p.m., Tuesday, March 4, at Woodland Primary School, 17366 W. Gages Lake Road, Gages Lake.

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    Good Shepherd to host blood drive March 5

    Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital will hold a blood drive, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesday, March 5 in the Prairie Room at the hospital, 450 W. Route 22 in Barrington.

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    Early voting opens Monday, March 3

    Early voting for the March 18, 2014 gubernatorial primary election begins Monday, March 3. Nearly 500 candidates are on the ballot for 369 races in Cook County, which include primaries for U.S. Senator and Illinois governor, countywide offices, judges, township committeemen and referendums.

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    Police in Elgin, Aurora honored for stellar work in 2013

    The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences isn’t the only organization handing out awards to its best and brightest lately. Police officers and civilians recently were honored in Kane County’s two largest cities — Elgin and Aurora.

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    Fish dying in Island Lake

    Island Lake residents should expect to see dead fish on the surface of the village’s namesake once spring weather arrives, officials have announced.

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    Parking talk planned

    The Cook Memorial Public Library District board’s building and grounds committee will meet Monday to discuss a possible expansion of the parking lot at the Aspen Drive Library in Vernon Hills.

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    Fitness center proposed in Lincolnshire

    Lincolnshire officials are seeking public opinions about a proposal for a fitness center at the former Flatlander’s Restaurant and Brewery on Milwaukee Avenue.

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    Palatine Rural Fire Dist. holds info session on referendum

    The Palatine Rural Fire Protection District is hosting a public meeting March 5 to discuss the tax hike they are asking voters to approve.

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    Oscar Pistorius, seen here on Aug. 19, 2013, goes on trial Monday over the shooting death of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp. Prosecutors are pressing the murder charge have listed 107 witnesses they’re able to call and some will say that the world-famous athlete had a fight with Steenkamp and then intentionally killed her.

    Murder trial of Pistorius to start in South Africa

    It could all hinge on the toilet door. Oscar Pistorius goes on trial for murder on Monday, but some experts not involved in the case say the double-amputee runner could still be vulnerable to a homicide conviction even if he is acquitted of murdering his girlfriend. That’s because, they say, he violated the most basic tenets of gun-handling by shooting into a closed door without knowing...

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    This March 1 photo shows part of the website for HealthCare.gov as photographed in Washington. Sick of hearing about the health care law? Plenty of people have tuned out after all the political jabber and website woes. Now is the time to tune back in, before it’s too late. The big deadline is coming March 31.

    What you need to know about March health deadline

    Sick of hearing about the health care law? Plenty of people have tuned out after all the political jabber and website woes. But now is the time to tune back in, before it’s too late. The big deadline is coming March 31. By that day, for the first time, nearly everyone in the United States is required to be signed up for health insurance or risk paying a fine. Here’s what you need to...

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    Clockwise from top left, Bill Brady, Kirk Dillard, Dan Rutherford and Bruce Rauner are seeking the Republican nomination for governor in 2014

    Dillard wins backing of second teachers union

    State Sen. Kirk Dillard picked up the backing of another group of educators Sunday as the 100,000-member Illinois Federation of Teachers announced it is endorsing the Hinsdale Republican in his bid for governor. The IFT joins the Illinois Retired Teachers Association and Illinois Education Association in supporting Dillard, who faces state Sen. Bill Brady of Bloomington, Winnetka businessman...

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    Lead can have long-lasting health effects when it is inhaled or ingested in large quantities. Removing the toxin from homes requires respirators, protective clothing and numerous safety precautions to ensure no ill effects occur for removers.

    35 years later, suburban homes still have lead paint

    Federal law banned lead in paint 35 years ago, but the toxin still threatens children today.Illinois has one of the highest rates of lead poisoning in the nation. And the Kane County Health Department lists childhood lead poisoning among its six biggest health threats to residents. “Over the years, a lot of property owners have just simply painted over the lead,” said Sarosh Saher, a...

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    Teen shot dead at Illinois State trooper’s home

    teenage boy has been killed in what officials called an “accidental shooting” at the home of Illinois State Police trooper.

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    U of I student group pledges $1M to arena project
    A student cheering group at the University of Illinois has pledged $1 million to help renovate the school’s sports arena.

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    Heavy snow, wintry mix heads toward Indiana

    Indiana residents who’ve already endured a record-breaking and punishing winter are bracing for yet another big winter storm.

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    Western Illinois counties hold off on gay marriage

    County clerks in western Illinois say they’ll wait until June 1 to start issuing same-sex marriage licenses, even though two other Illinois counties have started issuing them.

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    Police detain a protester demonstrating against the Russian military’s actions in Crimea and developments in Russian-Ukrainian relations during an unsanctioned rally in St.Petersburg, Russia, Sunday, March 2, 2014. Russian President Vladimir Putin has defied calls from the West to pull back his troops, insisting that Russia has a right to protect its interests and the Russian-speaking population in Crimea and elsewhere in Ukraine.

    Hundreds of gunmen surround Ukraine military base

    Hundreds of armed men in trucks and armored vehicles surrounded a Ukrainian military base Sunday in Crimea, blocking its soldiers from leaving. The outnumbered Ukrainians placed a tank at the base’s gate, leaving the two sides in a tense standoff. In Kiev, Ukraine’s new prime minister urged Russian President Vladimir Putin to pull back his military, warning that “we are on...

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    Two men light up candles and before a group prayer for the victims on a square outside the Kunming Railway Station where more than 10 assailants slashed scores of people with knives the night before in Kunming, in western China’s Yunnan province, Sunday, March 2, 2014. Officials said the attack was a terrorist assault by ethnic separatists from the far west.

    China blames separatists for knife attack; 33 dead

    uthorities blamed a slashing rampage that killed 29 people and wounded 143 at a train station in southern China on separatists from the country’s far west and vowed a harsh crackdown Sunday, while residents wondered why their laid-back city was targeted. Police fatally shot four of the assailants and were searching for at least five more of the black-clad attackers.

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    This image released by the Egyptian Presidency on Saturday, March 1, 2014, shows interim President Adly Mansour, center, Field Marshal Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, fifth right, and new interim Prime Minister Ibrahim Mehlib, fifth left, with the new cabinet ministers at the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt. Egypt’s new interim government was sworn in Saturday, a lightly reshuffled Cabinet with familiar faces that keeps powerful ministers in charge of the country’s security services in place ahead of an anticipated presidential election.

    Egypt: New premier urges end to protests

    Egypt’s new prime minister on Sunday urged a halt to protests and strikes to give the nation a breather to rebuild after more than three years of deadly turmoil, a call made by his predecessors to no avail. Ibrahim Mehlib made his appeal in an address televised live on his first full day on the job after he and members of his Cabinet were sworn in on the previous day by Interim President...

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    A group of armed unidentified gunmen cut electric power to General Headquarters of the Ukrainian Naval forces in Sevastopol,Ukraine Sunday, March 2, 2014. Russian President Vladimir Putin has defied calls from the West to pull back his troops, insisting that Russia has a right to protect its interests and the Russian-speaking population in Crimea and elsewhere in Ukraine.

    NATO says Russian action threatens peace in Europe

    ATO’s top official says Russia’s military intervention in Ukraine is in violation of the U.N. charter and threatens peace and security in Europe. “What Russia is doing now in Ukraine violates the principles of the United Nations charter. It threatens peace and security in Europe. Russia must stop its military activities and threats,” he said.

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    In this Feb. 12, 2014 photo, Cam Russo, 8, shovels a driveway in his neighborhood in Rockford, Ill. Russo’s class was given shovels and gloves and are trying to collectively shovel 100 driveways by the end of Feb. This makes for Russo’s 11th.

    Snow angel students shoveling neighborhoods

    Eight-year-old Campbell Russo knows a thing or two about shoveling snow and helping people after this winter. Russo and his 24 third-grade classmates at Brookview Elementary School are getting lessons in both this winter after setting a goal to shovel 100 driveways for other people.

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    In this Jan. 28, 2014 photo, Jeff Noyd is seen in the living room of his home in Cropsey, Ill. Noyd has Guillain-Barre syndrome, a rare disorder in which the body’s immune system attacks the nerves. What results is weakness and tingling in the extremities. But the sensations can grow and may paralyze much of the body.

    Man humbled by rare flu complication

    Jeff Noyd was a retired police and fire officer who did just about everything on the farm. “Now, Rose (his wife Rosemarie) has to help me with toileting needs,” a frustrated Jeff said. Jeff has Guillain-Barre syndrome, a rare disorder in which the body’s immune system attacks the nerves.

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    Elgin gives preliminary OK to charter school lease

    Members of the Elgin City Council gave preliminary approval to leasing property to a proposed new charter school over the objection of a councilman who claimed there is a conflict of interest. Councilman John Prigge cast the only dissenting vote at Saturday’s special committee of the whole meeting to leasing the former Fox River Country Day school at 1600 Dundee Ave. to Elgin Academy and...

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    This May 13, 2013 file photo shows a Mi-17 helicopter used by the Afghan Air Force at Bagram Air Field in Afghanistan. Yuri Borisov’s performance on a lucrative U.S. military contract was dismal. Cost overruns. Blown deadlines. Forged paperwork. Yet that didn’t keep the Russian entrepreneur from winning more business with the Department of Defense, according to interviews and documents obtained Associated Press. Borisov, who specializes in refurbishing Russian Mi-17 helicopters, had an ally in Bert Vergez, an Army colonel who ran an obscure DOD acquisition office in Huntsville, Ala.

    Odd couple at center of Russian helicopter inquiry

    Cost overruns. Blown deadlines. Forged paperwork. Yet that didn’t keep Russian entrepreneur Yuri Borisov from winning more business with the Department of Defense. Borisov, who specializes in refurbishing Russian Mi-17 helicopters, had an ally an Army colonel who ran an obscure DOD acquisition office in Huntsville, Ala.

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    In this Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014 photo, Trail Life member Adrian McCade, 7, second from left, gets direction on hand placement for the salute from his older brother Jack McCade, 8, during a group meeting in North Richland Hills, Texas. John Stemberger, an Orlando, Fla. lawyer who led the opposition to the Boy Scouts of America’s May 2013 vote to accept openly gay youth, went on to found Trail Life.

    No longer loyal to Scouts, boys join Trail Life

    Disillusioned with the Boy Scouts of America for admitting gays, some parents set off to form their own group: Trail Life USA. Trail Life promotes itself as the “premier national character development organization for young men which produces Godly and responsible husbands, fathers and citizens.” The oath calls on the boys in part “to serve God and my country, to respect...

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    In this Feb. 22, 2014, file photo, Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, in handcuffs, is escorted to a helicopter by Mexican navy marines in Mexico City, Mexico. At least seven U.S. courts have indictments pending against him, and several are pressing for extradition. In Mexico, he faces organized-crime charges in four Mexican states and in Mexico City. He could, barring another escape, spend the rest of his life behind bars.

    El Chapo’s Rise: From poor, abused to cartel kingpin

    Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, the one they called “shorty” because of his 5’6” frame, rose from a small-time Mexican marijuana producer to lead the world’s most powerful drug cartel and be named Chicago’s Public Enemy No. 1. El Chapo employed high-tech gadgetry and sophisticated counterespionage practices to elude an international manhunt for...

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    Shift in unions raises questions about future

    Once a mighty labor union town, Muncie now has more police officers and office workers in organized labor than welders and auto workers. With the closing of Muncie’s last two big auto industry plants — and union strongholds — now several years back in the rear view mirror, can Muncie ever recover its footing as a labor-friendly town?

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    ’Swatters’ take false police reports to extreme

    CARMEL, Ind. — It was like a bad dream for Hannah Chiasson.The 22-year-old nursing student stood outside her family’s Carmel home, staring in shock at an army of police officers in black vests pointing “big guns” at her, her father and her friend. A spotlight shone on her family’s house.

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    Employees from the Lombard public works fill in potholes along Grace Street in Lombard Monday afternoon. The crew said they had been filling holes all weekend with the worst of them along St. Charles Road.

    Municipal budgets in deep over potholes

    About three-fourths of U.S. states and many cities have outspent their maintenance budgets dealing with the extreme weather, said Greta Smith, an associate program director with the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials in Washington. She said this pothole season is “one of the worst in memory.”

Sports

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    Wolves roar past Wild

    Center Adam Cracknell netted a pair of goals and added an assist to lead the Chicago Wolves to a 4-0 victory over the Iowa Wild on Sunday afternoon at Allstate Arena. The Wolves set a franchise record by running their home point streak to 17 games.Keith Aucoin scored a goal and assisted on Cracknell’s tallies, while Ty Rattie added his team-leading 22nd goal.

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    In his second full year in the rotation, Chris Sale’s 11-14 record in 2013 was a harsh reflection of the Sox’ 63-99 season. But he tied for the American League lead with 4 complete games, was third in strikeouts (226) and WHIP (1.07), fourth in quality starts (23), fifth in innings pitched (214.1) and seventh in ERA (3.07).

    Sox’ Sale undisputed ace of strong staff

    The White Sox would have had one of the top starting rotations in baseball had they signed Masahiro Tanaka, but the unit is still a strength with Chris Sale at the top.

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    The Cubs’ Jeff Samardzija has yet to sign a multiyear contract. He cannot become a free agent until after the 2015 season, but he may be at his peak trade value now.

    Cubs starters should be respectable, but for how long?

    In the past two seasons, the Cubs have traded away starting pitchers Ryan Dempster, Paul Maholm, Scott Feldman and Matt Garza. Will Jeff Samardzija be the next to go? Until then, the team has to trot out a rotation, and it's one whose numbers suggest that rotation is better than it looks.

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    Hawks’ penalty killers shut down NHL’s top power play

    Things are starting to look up for the Blackhawks and their penalty killers. After struggling for most of the season, the Hawks are on a roll and on Saturday went 6-for-6 in kills in their 5-1 win over Pittsburgh at Soldier Field. Hawks coach Joel Quenneville was pleasantly surprised with the success against the NHL’s best power play.

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    The Hawks continue to tinker with their second line, trying to maximize the scoring talents of linchpin Patrick Kane.

    Hawks’ No. 2 line work in progress again

    The Blackhawks continue to search for a second line down the stretch, as Patrick Kane finds a way to make it work with whomever he draws.

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    Jonathan Toews celebrates after Patrick Sharp scores in the first period Saturday’ in the Hawks’ 5-1 victory over the Penguins in the NHL Stadium Series game at Soldier Field.

    Hawks’ Toews: We had a blast out there

    All that’s left for the Blackhawks to do now is to play outdoors at U.S. Cellular Field. And don’t think Hawks president and CEO John McDonough wasn’t trying to plant that seed with NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman over the weekend. Saturday’s Stadium Series game at Soldier Field was a rousing success on every level, starting with the fact that the Hawks won 5-1 behind 2 goals and an assist from Jonathan Toews.

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    Defense, not shooting, a key concern about Fredette

    Jimmer Fredette is probably on the right track with this line of thinking: NBA teams have been utilizing the 3-point shot with greater frequency, so there’s bound to be a spot in the league for a quality long-range shooter.News: The Bulls officially signed Fredette for the remainder of the season Sunday morning and he played the final 3:06 against New York. There is not an option for next year in his deal.

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    The Bulls’ Joakim Noah recorded his fifth career triple-double, setting a franchise record for assists by a center with 14 and adding 13 points and 12 rebounds. The Bulls pounded the Knicks 109-90 at the United Center on Sunday.

    No stopping Bulls’ Joakim Noah

    Joakim Noah recorded his fifth career triple-double, including the most assists ever by a Bulls center as they rolled past the hapless New York Knicks 109-90 on Sunday afternoon. Among the other highlights was D.J. Augustin snapping out of a shooting slump and Jimmer Fredette making his Bulls debut.

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    Moustakas hits 2 homers, Royals down Cubs

    MESA, Ariz. — Mike Moustakas homered twice, Eric Hosmer added three hits and the Kansas City Royals beat the Chicago Cubs 5-3 on Sunday.Cubs shortstop Starlin Castro left after the first inning with a slight strain of his right hamstring. He hurt himself trying to steal a base.Moustakas hit a drive off Cubs starter Edwin Jackson to lead off the second inning. He hit a two-run shot off Carlos Villanueva in the third.Hosmer doubled twice, and all of his hits went to the opposite field. Lorenzo Cain had two hits for the Royals.Kansas City starter Wade Davis gave up one hit in two scoreless innings.The game at Cubs Park drew a crowd of 14,680.

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    White Sox top Texas

    SURPRISE, Ariz. — Neftali Feliz and Joakim Soria, the leading candidates to replace Joe Nathan as the Texas closer, had contrasting results in the Rangers’ 9-7 loss to the Chicago White Sox on Sunday.Feliz and Soria are former AL All-Star closers. They both pitched sparingly last year while rebounding from elbow surgery.Feliz surrendered three hits, including a two-run homer to Tyler Flowers in the sixth. Soria worked a flawless fifth, throwing nine strikes in 16 pitches.Adrian Beltre drove in two runs with two singles as the Rangers took a 4-1 lead. Beltre, Prince Fielder, Jurickson Profar and Brent Lillibridge combined to go 8 for 8 with four RBIs in the first two innings.Adrian Nieto, a Rule 5 draft pick, and Jared Mitchell delivered two-run singles in Chicago’s five-run ninth off three relievers.

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    Iowa guard Roy Devyn Marble (4) is double-teamed by Purdue guard Rapheal Davis, right, and guard Ronnie Johnson, behind Marble, during the first half of a Big Ten NCAA college basketball game at Carver-Hawkeye Arena on Sunday, March 2, 2014, in Iowa City, Iowa.

    No. 20 Iowa holds off Purdue

    IOWA CITY, Iowa — Roy Devyn Marble scored 21 points and No. 20 Iowa snapped a three-game losing streak by beating Purdue 83-76 on Sunday.Aaron White and Mike Gesell added 15 points each for the Hawkeyes (20-9, 9-7 Big Ten), who have recorded consecutive 20-win seasons for the first time in eight years.Iowa blew a 13-point halftime lead, but an 8-0 run put the Hawkeyes back ahead 68-64 with 5:56 left. Gesell then hit five free throws in the final 41 seconds to help the Hawkeyes narrowly avoid losing their fourth home game in five tries. Rapheal Davis scored a career-high 18 points and A.J. Hammons had 16 points with 14 rebounds for Purdue (15-14, 5-11), which is on its second four-game losing streak in conference play. The Hawkeyes closed the first half on a 15-5 run and appeared to be just a few plays away from burying the Boilermakers.Purdue responded with a spurt that threatened to send Iowa tumbling to its fourth straight loss. The Boilermakers outscored Iowa 27-10 to open the second half, as the Hawkeyes again suffered through the defensive woes that marked road losses at Minnesota and Indiana. White steadied Iowa with a rare 3-pointer and two free throws, and the Hawkeyes held Purdue without a point for over 6 minutes in building a 68-64 lead. Marble then attacked Hammons in the paint for a crucial three-point play toward the end of the shot clock that gave Iowa a 75-70 lead with 2:39 to go. Josh Oglesby had 11 points for the Hawkeyes and Marble added five assists and four steals. Sunday’s game capped a stretch of four games in eight days for the Hawkeyes, who followed a scheduled bye week with another game forced upon them by a postponement at Indiana. Iowa didn’t exactly respond well to its scheduling adversity.The Hawkeyes lost 79-74 at home to Wisconsin before the defeats against the Gophers and Hoosiers — who are both below .500 in the Big Ten. Purdue was coming off a brutal overtime loss to league-leading Michigan, as Glenn Robinson III banked in the game-winner at the buzzer in West Lafayette that denied the Boilermakers a signature win. Both teams looked like they were worn out early.Iowa missed nine of its first 11 shots, and the Boilermakers made just one of six 3-point attempts to open play. But the Hawkeyes got a boost from their bench, which scored 15 points in the first half, and Marble followed a fadeaway 3 with a layup to help put Iowa ahead 50-37. The Boilermakers needed less than 5 minutes to get the deficit down to 52-49 — a run that sandwiched a stern tongue lashing from coach Fran McCaffery to the Hawkeyes — and a 3 by Kendall Stephens tied it at 60 with 12:25 left.Stephens and Errick Peck had 12 points each for Purdue, which committed 16 turnovers.

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    Newly signed Bulls guard Jimmer Fredette dribbles past New York Knicks guard Toure’ Murry during the second half of an NBA basketball game on Sunday, March 2, 2014, in Chicago.

    Noah leads Bulls to easy win over Knicks

    The Bulls were open all over the floor, so Joakim Noah kept collecting assists. Jumpers for Jimmy Butler and Kirk Hinrich. A dunk for Taj Gibson, another jumper for Butler, and on and on it went.The All-Star center put on quite a show.Noah had 14 assists in his fifth career triple-double, leading the streaking Bulls to a 109-90 victory over the New York Knicks on Sunday at United Center.“It’s really all my teammates,” he said. “I think we’re getting better every game.”Noah also had 13 points and 12 rebounds in his second triple-double of the season, but it was his deft passing that really stood out. It was the most assists by an NBA center since at least the 1985-86 season and a franchise record for his position.“What can you say? He is playing MVP basketball,” Gibson said. “He is doing everything in all facets of the game.”Chicago had seven players score in double figures and set a franchise record by committing only three turnovers in its ninth win in the last 10 games. The Bulls also reached 100 points for the fourth consecutive game for the first time since Oct. 30-Nov. 5, 2010.D.J. Augustin had 21 of his 23 points in the fourth quarter as Chicago (33-26) improved to 21-8 since Jan. 1 and a season-high seven games above .500 overall. Butler scored 19 points and Carlos Boozer had 14.“We’ve hit a stretch where we have guys that are healthy playing that I think they know what to expect from each other,” coach Tom Thibodeau said. “I think they’re playing to their strengths.”While the Bulls are galloping through the weak Eastern Conference, the Knicks are floundering.Carmelo Anthony scored 21 points and Tyson Chandler had 22 rebounds, but New York dropped its sixth consecutive game. The Knicks (21-39) are just 6-16 since Jan. 14.“It’s embarrassing,” Anthony said. “It’s frustrating and it’s embarrassing.” Swingman Iman Shumpert had three points on 1-for-6 shooting in his return to the lineup. He missed five games after he sprained the medial collateral ligament in his left knee during New York’s 98-91 victory over New Orleans on Feb. 19.Noah rolled his right ankle at the beginning of the second half and got it re-taped before coming back in at the start of the fourth quarter. He heard more chants of “M-V-P! M-V-P!” when he went 1 for 2 at the line to make it 89-70 with 9:26 to go.There were more loud cheers when Jimmer Fredette checked in with 3:08 left after joining the Bulls earlier in the day. The sharp-shooting guard drilled a long jumper on his first shot, making it 107-83 with 2:16 remaining.Fredette, the 10th overall pick in the 2011 draft, was bought out by Sacramento on Thursday and cleared waivers on Saturday. His contract with the Bulls covers the rest of the season.“It was great. I mean, these guys did a great job the whole game and got a big lead and I was able to get into the game,” Fredette said.Led by Noah, the Bulls jumped all over the Knicks right at the start. He capped Chicago’s opening 16-1 run with a driving layup and rebound tip-in.It just kept getting worse for New York, which shot 32 percent from the field in the first quarter. Butler scored 10 points and also found Gibson for a big dunk as Chicago jumped to a 37-16 lead, setting a season high for points for the opening period.“They came out with more energy than we did, took advantage of us,” Chandler said. “On the defensive end, backdoor cuts that pretty much changed the game.”The lead grew to 25 early in the second before Anthony and Amare Stoudemire started to heat up. Anthony made a nice pass to Stoudemire for a reverse layup that got New York within nine with 3:33 to go.

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    Bulls game day
    Bulls vs. New York Knicks at the United Center, noon SundayTV: ABCRadio: ESPN 1000-AMOutlook: The Knicks (21-38) will have to turn things around soon to have any chance at making the playoffs. They’ve lost five in a row and went 2-11 in February. Carmelo Anthony has averaged 35 points and 9.4 rebounds in the last five, but New York lost them all. SG J.R. Smith is the second leading scorer at 12.9 points, but is shooting less than 40 percent for the season. PG Raymond Felton played against Golden State on Friday, despite a recent arrest. The Knicks have dropped 15 of their last 16 games at the UC.Next: Brooklyn Nets at the Barclays Center, 6:30 p.m.

Business

  •  
    Workers listen to Navy Secretary Ray Mabus speak at Marinette Marine Corporation in Marinette, Wis., Sept. 12, 2013. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel’s vision for leaner, more versatile military targeted the littoral combat ship, the marquee product of the city’s biggest employer. And that could mean lost jobs in Marinette, a city of roughly 11,000.

    Proposed cuts pack big impact for Wisconsin city

    To see the impact of strategic military decisions on local communities, look no further than Marinette, Wis. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel’s vision for leaner, more versatile military targeted the littoral combat ship, the marquee product of the city’s biggest employer. And that could mean lost jobs in Marinette, a city of roughly 11,000.

  •  
    A few months ago, LeGrand Naquasia was just another worker on the line at KFC, boxing up chicken and cole slaw in hopes of earning enough to live in New York City. But since being recruited by union organizers, the 22-year-old from south Brooklyn has become one of the most visible faces of a national movement demanding $15-an-hour wages for fast-food workers.

    Wage fight propels worker from KFC to White House

    Naquasia LeGrand was frying chicken, sweeping floors and serving customers for $7.25 an hour when she was recruited by union organizers to join a campaign for higher pay. In the 15 months since, the 22-year-old KFC employee from Brooklyn has become one of the most visible faces of a movement that has staged strikes across the country demanding a $15-an-hour wage and union representation for fast-food workers.

  •  
    Hotels like the SLS chain — designed by Philippe Starck — resemble mini-vacation communities with high concept bars, restaurants, shopping and entertainment spaces designed around the beating heart of the lobby to fulfill a guest’s every whim.

    Hotels turn lobbies into destination place

    One of the key trends in hotel design in recent years has been a sharp focus on creating a hotel lobby that is a destination, not just a pass-through. If successful, such lobbies keep paying guests happily hanging out and spending money on site while creating enough buzz to attract nonguests when occupancy is down.

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    Relative to its pay-television competitors, Netflix has certain advantages that supersede the quality of its programming. And its competitors are in important ways trapped in a business logic that prevents them from matching Netflix's strengths.

    Why Netflix is beating HBO

    Netflix Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos famously described his company's challenge as “to become HBO before HBO becomes us.” And so far he's winning because the structural nature of technological change often favors new firms over old ones, and turns in-built structural advantages into weaknesses.

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    Andrew House, president and chief executive officer of Sony Computer Entertainment Inc., holds a box containing the PlayStation 4 (PS4) video game console at the launch of the PS4 console at the Sony showroom in Tokyo, Japan, on Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014. Sony Corp., its credit rating cut to junk by Moody’s Investors Service as Japan’s biggest television maker struggles to capture consumer demand for smartphones and tablet computers, released the PS4 console in Japan.

    Beleaguered Sony counting on new game machine

    PlayStation stands out among the long list of famous Sony brands as one that hasn’t faded or succumbed to a nimbler competitor. Months after hitting global markets, the latest version of the video-game console went on sale in Tokyo, a big shift from times when Sony was ascendant enough to launch flagship products in Japan first.

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    New concealed carry laws mean some employees can bring guns to work.

    Career Coach: Guns a worry for employee; DUI a blot on record

    Q: I’ve just started a new job and I’ve recently discovered that some of my coworkers are taking advantage of my state’s lax concealed weapon laws and bring their own personal firearms to the office. As a child, I was a victim of gun violence and this makes me very uncomfortable. If I’m seeing red flags like this, is that a sign that perhaps this isn’t the work environment for me?

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    Work Advice: Elders edged out or denied entry

    Reader: My firm recently offered buyouts to administrative staff, none of whom is under 46 years old. We have heard that management would like to replace older employees with younger ones making $20,000 less. At a buyout meeting, management insisted salary was not an issue, while acknowledging our industry’s market conditions.

  •  
    Waterlogue turns photos into sketches that are filled in while you watch, giving you the option to adjust color and brush stroke size, choose a filter (natural, luminous, and rainy are some of the options), tweak brightness, and decide whether you want a border.

    App turns photos into watercolors

    Too busy to pick up a paintbrush? Waterlogue, a photo app for iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch, uses your snapshots as rough drafts for watercolor-inspired works of digital art.

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    A Sony Xperia Z2 smartphone sits on display at the Sony Corp. pavilion on the opening day of the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 24, 2014.

    Gadet Watch: Noise reduction in new Sony phone

    The noise-cancelling technology in Sony’s new Xperia Z2 smartphone shows more promise than practical use. Noise cancellation is optimized for the office, for planes and for buses or trains. The technology works, but it doesn’t filter out the external noise completely.

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    Samsung said its new Galaxy S5 smartphone will allow people to authenticate PayPal transactions with a fingerprint rather than a passcode.

    Incentives are coming for payments by phones

    A variety of mobile wallet systems store credit or debit card information on phones in encrypted form, offering more security than standard plastic cards with magnetic stripes. To make a purchase, simply tap the phone on a card reader or wave a bar code over a scanner. There’s convenience in not having to fish out your card. Yet most people still prefer plastic.

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    Whole Foods, one of the largest health-conscious grocery stores in America, maintains a list of “Unacceptable Ingredients for Food.” In fact, approximately 14 percent of food items sold at Wal-Mart could not be stocked on the shelves of Whole Foods simply because they contain high fructose corn syrup.

    Healthy food sold at Wal-Mart v. Whole Foods

    Whole Foods, one of the largest health-conscious grocery stores in America, maintains a list of “Unacceptable Ingredients for Food.” In fact, approximately 14 percent of food items sold at Wal-Mart could not be stocked on the shelves of Whole Foods simply because they contain high fructose corn syrup.

  •  

    Ford said to drop Microsoft for BlackBerry QNX in sync systems

    Ford Motor Co., struggling with in-car technology flaws, will base the next-generation Sync system on BlackBerry’s QNX and no longer use Microsoft’s Windows.

  •  
    Sales of freshly brewed coffee at major convenience stores have been brisk, as customers seem eager to get their hands on a cup of real coffee quickly and at a reasonable price. With each chain offering a different product lineup, finding the best cup of joe from among the current crop of offerings can be an interesting challenge.

    Convenience stores in Japan brewing coffee

    Sales of freshly brewed coffee at major convenience stores have been brisk, as customers seem eager to get their hands on a cup of real coffee quickly and at a reasonable price. With each chain offering a different product lineup, finding the best cup of joe from among the current crop of offerings can be an interesting challenge.

  •  

    To grow our future in technology, look to the past

    History doesn’t just happen. History starts with a vision. Today, our leaders are writing history with critical decisions that will affect the future of the mobile revolution and the transition to all-Internet-based networks.

  •  

    IBM boosts investment in cloud services

    IBM is expanding its cloud services to lure customers to its SoftLayer Technologies business that it’s counting on to help reverse seven quarters of falling sales.

  •  

    Buffett warns of liquidity curse, celebrates property wagers

    Investors should treat their equity holdings like real estate purchases, focusing on the potential for profits over time rather than short-term price fluctuations, says billionaire Warren Buffett.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    This combination of 2012 and circa 1860-1875 photos shows hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons and abolitionist Harriet Tubman. In 2013, Simmons apologized for posting a parody video of Tubman having sex with her white slave master as someone films it so the abolitionist can bribe her boss. Appearing on his All Def Digital YouTube channel, Simmons said he removed it after a call from the NAACP.

    Rap disrespect of black icons raises concerns

    Malcolm X and rap music have always fit together like a needle in the groove, connected by struggle, strength and defiance. But three recent episodes involving the use or misuse of Malcolm and other black icons have raised the question: Has rap lost touch with black history?

  •  
    This image released by Ellen DeGeneres shows actors front row from left, Jared Leto, Jennifer Lawrence, Meryl Streep, Ellen DeGeneres, Bradley Cooper, Peter Nyong'o Jr., and, second row, from left, Channing Tatum, Julia Roberts, Kevin Spacey, Brad Pitt, Lupita Nyong'o and Angelina Jolie as they pose for a “selfie” portrait on a cell phone during the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre on Sunday in Los Angeles.

    Images: Academy Awards
    The biggest stars in Hollywood managed to have a little fun and a few laughs at the Oscars on Sunday night.

  •  
    This image released by Universal Pictures shows Liam Neeson in a scene from “Non-Stop,” which came in at No. 1 at the box office breaking the streak of “The Lego Movie.”

    ‘Non-Stop’ lands at No. 1 at weekend box office

    Liam Neeson's thriller “Non-Stop” arrived in first place at the weekend box office, effectively ending the Warner Bros. animated film’s three-week blockade at the top spot. The Universal film stars Neeson as a federal air marshal on a doomed flight. “Non-Stop” ascended in its first weekend with $30 million domestically and $20 million internationally, according to studio estimates Sunday.

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    Director Steve McQueen accepts the award for best picture of the year for “12 Years a Slave” during the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre on Sunday, March 2, 2014, in Los Angeles.

    '12 Years a Slave' takes top Oscar

    Hollywood named the brutal, unshrinking historical drama “12 Years a Slave” best picture at the 86th annual Academy Awards. McQueen dedicated the honor to those who suffered slavery and “the 21 million who still endure slavery today.”

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    Actress Olivia Wilde and her fiance, actor Jason Sudekis, have a little fun on the red carpet at the Oscars on Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

    Images: Oscars red carpet
    The stars of the silver screen put on their Oscar best for Hollywood's biggest night.

  •  
    FILE - In this May 7, 2013 file photo, U.S. actor Will Smith and his son Jaden pose for the media after press conference for their film “After Earth” in Seoul, South Korea. Both actors were awarded Razzies for the film. Jaden was selected as worst actor for his role in the sci-fi flop about a father and son stranded on an untamed earth, while the elder Smith was chosen as worst supporting actor at the Golden Raspberry Awards, on Saturday, March 1, 2014, which lampoons Hollywood’s awards season on the eve of the Oscars.

    Razzies pick Will and Jaden Smith as worst actors

    ill and Jaden Smith have something they can bond over. They were both awarded Razzies for their performances in “After Earth.” Jaden was selected as worst actor for his starring role in the sci-fi flop about a father and son stranded on an untamed earth, while the elder Smith was chosen as worst supporting actor at Saturday’s Golden Raspberry Awards, which lampoons Hollywood’s awards season on the eve of the Oscars.

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    This image released by Netflix shows Kevin Spacey in a scene from the Netflix original series, “House of Cards,” an adaptation of a British classic.

    Why binge-watching old shows is more fun than binge-watching new ones

    It’s been four days, more than 100 hours, and I still haven’t finished Season 2 of “House of Cards.” Binging on “Six Feet Under,” “Borgen,” “Veronica Mars” — those shows felt like rewards, little presents I got to open whenever I felt like it. They offered a way to relax, and yes, reclaim my time. But Netflix has tarnished binge-watching’s good name.

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    IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR BARBIE — Model Petra Nemcova attends the Barbie and Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 50th anniversary celebration of the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit legends on Monday, Feb. 17, 2014, in New York. (Photo by Diane Bondareff/Invision for Barbie/AP Images)

    Barbie pursues new career as Internet troll

    LOS ANGELES — Since Barbie first entered the workforce modeling her iconic black and white swimsuit in 1959, she’s gone on to pursue meaningful employment as a police officer, yoga instructor, dolphin trainer, football coach, paleontologist, paratrooper, surgeon and Canadian Mountie. This week — after serving a brief tour of duty as a Sports Illustrated swimsuit model — Barbie set her unblinking eyes on a new career, using the misshapen discs that she calls hands to peck out an op-ed on the topic of modern feminism. “My bathing suit now hangs beside a Presidential power suit, Pastry Chef hat, and Astronaut gear in a wardrobe reflecting the more than 150 careers I’ve pursued to illustrate for girls that they can achieve anything for which they aim,” Barbie wrote in a piece that received prominent placement on the prestigious Barbie-related news outlet BarbieCollector.com. “And yet, I am still seen as just a pretty face. It’s simpler to keep me in a box — and since I am a doll — chances are that’s where I’ll stay.”Time to update your resume, Barbie! You’ve just got a new job as a Barbie I Can Be ...(TM) Internet Troll, a sadistic garbage person posting to the Internet under the fictional persona of an emaciated teenage swimsuit model made out of molded plastic. You creep.Last time we heard from Barbie, she said stuff like, “I love being a fashion model,” “Would you like to go shopping?” and “What shall I wear to the prom?” She’s since mastered the sophisticated vocabulary necessary to pontificate on why the real thing holding back women today are the women who think the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit edition is holding women back. When did Barbie learn to talk like that? (Maybe when Mattel’s 90.9 percent white male leadership team recruited her to serve as a pawn in its Machiavellian corporate strategy to profit off the ambitions and insecurities of young girls?)“Barbie dolls aren’t the problem,” wrote the cabal of old white men speaking through a diminutive facsimile of a human woman who appears never to age and storms recklessly through important jobs for which she is woefully underqualified. “Models choosing to pose in a bikini aren’t the problem. The assumption that women of any age should only be part of who they are in order to succeed is the problem ... It’s time to stop boxing in potential. Be free to launch a career in a swimsuit, lead a company while gorgeous, or wear pink to an interview at MIT.” Finally, Barbie has been freed to indulge in her psychopathic side, while also being beautiful, and an astronaut, and dainty, and a cop, and hot, and the president. And sexy and a special-education teacher and cute and a dentist and sensual and a firefighter. What a relief that some brave soul has finally given girls permission to be all these totally verboten things.“Today, truly anything is possible for a girl,” the unfeeling hulk of molded plastic continued. “The reality of today is that girls can go anywhere and be anything.” Well, anywhere except the top of Mattel.• Hess is a writer and editor in Los Angeles. She blogs for DoubleX on sex, science and health. Tweet at her amandahess.

  •  
    Chicago actor Ron Caldwell stars in the short film “The Painter,” written and directed by Wheaton filmmakers DeAnna and Kevin Cooper.

    Wheaton filmmakers show violence in Chicago through a child’s eyes

    To make a backdrop for the short film "The Painter," the producers figured they'd cut out a few newspaper stories about the gun violence in Chicago. Within weeks, the wall was plastered from top to bottom with tragic stories, creating a stunningly sad sight. "It was just overpowering to see all of these clippings," said one of the film's producers, DeAnna Cooper of Wheaton. The 14-minute film is powerful, too. Starring Chicago native Ron Caldwell, who played Denzel Washington's son in last year's Academy Award-nominated movie "Flight," "The Painter" is now making the rounds at film festivals.

  •  
    “Stirling Silliphant: The Fingers of God” by Nat Segaloff delves into successful screenwriters life and works.

    A lesson in writer’s bio: How to survive Hollywood

    The young press agent asked the famously cynical Oscar-winning actor what he thought was the key to success in Hollywood. “Survival,” replied Humphrey Bogart. “Stick around long enough and everybody else will die or retire.” That young press agent, Stirling Silliphant, became a screenwriter. Not only did he survive the ups and downs of a Hollywood career, he also had a hand in writing several of the memorable films and television shows that entertained the baby boomer generation. He ended up with his own Academy Award, for the screenplay for 1967’s “In the Heat of the Night,” which won the Best Picture Oscar.

  •  
    Charmaine Noronha, left, and two other passengers from Crystal Serenity take a bike tour during a port call in St.-Emilion in the wine region of France. Excursions like bike tours are popular among cruisers who enjoy active adventures in port, and there are a variety of similar adventures to choose from.

    Luxury cruise and biking? Surprisingly good combo

    I fancy myself a backpack-carrying, adventure-seeking traveler, at home in hostels and on hiking trails. But there I was, on a luxury cruise ship, sipping wine with silver-haired foxes, fox-trotting with male escorts in the ballroom, and escorting myself on a tapas-like tour around Europe, sampling cities for a day via ship, bus, foot and bike. It was the biking aspect that had led to my unlikely sojourn on the ship, Crystal Cruises’ Serenity.

  •  
    People from all over participate in the Courir de Mardi Gras in Eunice, La., a Mardi Gras season tradition in Louisiana’s Cajun country. The courir is a procession on foot, horseback and by trailer, rooted in a rural custom of gathering ingredients for a communal meal from area farms.

    Bayou region offers different kind of Mardi Gras

    In New Orleans, revelers ride fancy floats, wear elaborate costumes and toss trinkets and beads by the tons to eager — and often inebriated — crowds. But along south Louisiana bayous and in Cajun communities far from the Big Easy, Mardi Gras is celebrated a little differently. There, boats are gaily decorated, revelers two-step to Cajun and zydeco bands, and many partake in communal gumbos in a more family-oriented atmosphere. “It’s Mardi Gras in the country, and it’s a lot of fun,” said Celeste Gomez, a Cajun country native who also serves as director of the St. Landry Parish Tourist Commission.

  •  
    Studies have shown that listening to music that fits the cadence of what you’re doing — running, cycling, aerobics — makes you work harder.

    The science of workout music

    Studies have shown that listening to music that fits the cadence of what you’re doing — running, cycling, aerobics — makes you work harder.

  •  
    “The Wolf of Wall Street,” starring Leonardo DiCaprio, has five Oscar nominations — including best picture. But it came very close to never getting made.

    Being a Best Picture nominee isn't easy

    This year's Academy Awards nominees reflect a Hollywood truism: The margin between the dust bin and the Oscar red carpet is often razor thin. The development process of any film can be lengthy and arduous, full of challenges in obtaining financing or a studio executive's stamp of approval. The biggest obstacle on the road to the Academy Awards is, for many films, simply getting a green light.

  •  

    A geothermal heat pump make sense

    Q. I should replace my old heating/cooling system with a more efficient one. With gas prices going up, shortages of propane, etc., is installing a geothermal heat pump wise and what types are best?

  •  

    Shower panel systems have track record of reliability

    Q. What do you think of the new panel shower systems? If they’re OK, do they work in old tub/shower areas with old tile?

  •  
    See 20 running model railroads at the High Wheeler Train Show at Harper College in Palatine.

    Sunday picks: See train models up close

    See 20 running model railroads at the High Wheeler Train Show at Harper College in Palatine. "Schoolhouse Rock Live!" might just teach you a thing or two at the Marriott Theatre in Lincolnshire. And the Meltin' Blues Weekend brings all kinds of musical entertainment to downtown Long Grove.

Discuss

  •  

    Defeating Dems, not the ACA, is the point of misleading ads

    Columnist Gene Lyons: Politically speaking, here’s the thing about those melodramatic ads attacking the Affordable Care Act currently running on TV: In terms of actual policy, they’re as futile as the 40-odd votes to repeal the law that House Republicans have already cast.

  •  

    Liberals must be fair in their criticisms
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: When George W. Bush was president, liberals were right to criticize his executive orders that bypassed Congress and the checks and balances our Founders intended. Fast forward to the run-up to replace him in 2008, the current president echoed the same sentiments and promised he would not conduct his presidency in the same manner.

  •  

    Church shouldn’t pay for what it prohibits
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: The First Amendment in part states that Congress shall make no laws that establish religion nor prohibit the free exercise thereof. The government cannot stop a religion from functioning. The Catholic Church prohibits abortion and limits birth control to very precise standards, but you would like the church to pay for the very things that it prohibits.

  •  

    Kerry choosing science he wants to believe
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Secretary of State John Kerry’s vitriolic statements on climate change do a huge disservice to the many scientists worldwide who study this subject. In addition, Kerry’s statements and those of his elite statists (e.g. Al Gore, Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton) do significant harm to the public for falsely alarming them about completely unproven dangers arising from man-made carbon emissions.

  •  

    Democrat policies at odds with each other
    A Warrenville letter to the editor: The debate over the minimum wage exposes the fact that most Democrats do not understand their own ideology. Democrats advocate raising the minimum wage. They also advocate increasing the money supply to “stimulate” the economy.

  •  

    Budget deficit versus national debt
    A Lake in the Hills letter to the editor: Mr. Haugh accuses columnist Donna Brazile of deceiving him regarding deficit reduction. He deceives himself because he does not understand the terms.

  •  

    American dream and politics of futility
    An Antioch letter to the editor: The American dream. Struggle, do without, save every dime you can for a down payment on a home. You could build equity after a time and it all seemed worth it. Those days are long gone.

  •  

    Vote for experience in treasurer race
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: Please join us in supporting David Stolman for Lake County Treasurer.

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