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Daily Archive : Wednesday November 20, 2013

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    A shopper looks over berries at the Windy Acres Farm Stand booth during the Downtown Harvest Market in Elgin earlier this season. It is one of two in Kane County that accepts Link electronic benefits cards.

    Food stamp purchases at Elgin, Aurora farmers markets increases

    Kane County officials are pleased with the increased use of food vouchers at farmers markets this year in Elgin and Aurora.

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    A six-point buck crashed through a window to get into Keith Mohr’s townhouse near Sugar Grove last Friday, and caused extensive damage, including to the living room, its eventual escape route.

    Deer crashes through Sugar Grove home, owner retaliates with golf club

    Keith Mohr was in the shower last Friday morning when he heard a loud crash and his wife screaming that a deer was running through their townhouse near Sugar Grove. “I just chased him around for probably 10 minutes." Mohr said he eventually grabbed his a golf club and struck the deer, knocking off an antler and breaking the club in the process. “I do have a trophy, for whatever...

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    Amanda Littauer

    Experts: Gay marriage law will bring change — slowly

    Does society change with the signing of same-sex marriage legislation? Said sociologist Mark Eckel, an instructor at McHenry County College, "There will be gradual change." But, "I think we will find that marriage equality ... is limited in its ability to promote true social justice," NIU assistant professor of women's studies and history Amanda Littauer says.

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    Doug Maxeiner

    Wauconda still tweaking noise rules

    A plan to limit loud music and other noise in Wauconda is being revised to include what officials say are some important exemptions.

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    Kane County Judge David Akemann reads “Turkey Trouble” to a full house Wednesday during Family Reading Night at the Kane County Law Library in St. Charles. Judges Rene Cruz and John Dalton joined Akemann to read to more than 40 children and their parents at the 15th annual event.

    Kane judges read to kids at Family Reading Night

    More than 40 children, dressed in comfy pajamas while snacking on cookies and sipping on juice packets, gathered Wednesday to listen to Kane County judges David Akemann, Rene Cruz and John Dalton read stories aloud to them at the 15th annual “Family Reading Night with the Judges” at the Kane County Law Library in St. Charles.

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    Students and parents showed their support for a national anti-bullying campaign with “Don’t Let the Fire Out“ Wednesday night at Glen Crest Middle School in Glen Ellyn. Karen Parkinson of Glen Ellyn decorated a luminaria kit, and said her reason for coming was simple. “I’m here because I want to stop bullying,” she said. Parkinson was makingit for her son Jerry, who she said once was a bullying victim but now is a high school teacher.

    Students shine light against violence

    Glen Crest Middle School holds its annual "Don't Let the Fire Burn Out!" luminaria event for the anti-bullying campaign organized by Rachel's Challenge, a national organization. Glen Crest has a Friends of Rachel club. People buy a luminaria kit for a $1, dekcorate the bags and tape messages on them, then carry them into the gym where the bags burn brighly during a simple ceremony.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn signs the Religious Freedom and Marriage Fairness Act.

    Images: Signing The Religious Freedom and Marriage Fairness Act
    Images of Wednesday, when Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation making Illinois the 16th state to legalize same-sex marriages.

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    Hoffman Estates HS auto program ranked one of nation’s best

    Hoffman Estates High School recently was recognized for having one of the top automotive technology programs in the country. The school ranked in the top 20 nationwide for the O’Reilly Auto Parts Tomorrow’s Tech 2013 School of the Year contest. It was the only school in Illinois to rank in the top 20.

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    Wheeling to start mapping crime online

    The Wheeling Police Department has partnered with crimemapping.com to offer residents information on the latest crimes that have occurred in the village.

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    Amber Kraus

    Former Grant teacher charged with sexual assault of student

    A former Grant High School teacher who resigned from her job six weeks ago amid allegations of an inappropriate relationship with a student is facing criminal charges. Amber Kraus, 30, formerly of Grayslake, has been charged with criminal sexual assault of a victim between the ages of 13 and 17, Lake County Assistant State’s Attorney Stephen Scheller said Wednesday.

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    Jonathan Jimenez

    Gang members attacked, killed Wheaton man, prosecutors say

    Three gang members attacked and killed a 22-year-old Wheaton man "like a pack of hyenas" after a confrontation at a party, prosecutors said Wednesday. Jonathan Jimenez, 19, of Aurora, and West Chicago residents Alejandro Martinez, 17, and Anthony Rios, 18, each face first-degree murder charges in the death of Thomas Tecuatl, who was found beaten and stabbed early Sunday along Route 59 in West...

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    Illinois becomes 16th state to allow gay marriage

    Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation Wednesday allowing same-sex weddings starting this summer in Illinois, making President Barack Obama’s home state the 16th overall — and largest in the nation’s heartland — to legalize gay marriage.

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    Some Will County strikers ordered back on job

    As striking workers of the Will County government walked the picket lines Wednesday, a few of them were named essential and ordered back to work by the Illinois Labor Relations Board. About 1,000 members of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Local 1028 walked off the job Monday after Will County and the union failed to reach an agreement over pay and health insurance...

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    “Knight Rider” fan Dawn Kennison of Wisconsin is delighted to see and ride in KITT, the car from the 1980s television show, at the Volo Auto Museum on Wednesday.

    Disabled woman gets the gift of KITT at Volo museum

    An exhibition model of a car made famous in the 1980s TV series Knight Rider, had been up for auction. But the Volo Auto Museum reconsidered the sale and will put it on back on display in honor of a severely disabled Wisconsin woman. "Their story was very touching," said Museum Director Brian Grams.

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    Colleen L. Bagley

    Elgin woman in court in morning, in handcuffs by evening

    A 38-year-old Elgin woman was arrested in East Dundee Friday and charged with possession of more than 100 grams of hydrocodone with intent to deliver. Colleen L. Bagley was in court earlier that day on another set of drug charges and was arrested twice in a span of six days.

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    How you can help Illinois tornado victims

    Moved by the widespread damage in central Illinois caused by a series of tornadoes on Sunday, suburban groups, local governments, businesses and individuals are mobilizing to help victims by collecting donations of cleaning supplies, clothing and other needed items.

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    Mike Lyp, owner of All Around Towing & Auto, loads up a large rental truck in Huntley Wednesday with donations for the areas devastated by the recent tornadoes. The Lake in the Hills resident leaves for Washington, Ill., at 4:30 a.m. Thursday to make the first delivery.

    Facebook chat leads to donations for Washington

    A local group from the Huntley and Lake in the Hills areas are coordinating and collecting a large number of items to be donated to the people affected by last weekend's tornadoes.

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    Help yourself to some nuts this holiday season: Regular nut eaters were less likely to die of cancer or heart disease, in fact, were less likely to die of any cause during a 30-year Harvard study.

    Study ties nuts to lower cancer, heart death risk

    DALLAS — Help yourself to some nuts this holiday season: Regular nut eaters were less likely to die of cancer or heart disease — in fact, were less likely to die of any cause — during a 30-year Harvard study.Nuts have long been called heart-healthy, and the study is the largest ever done on whether eating them affects mortality.

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    Portion of Rollins Road now open

    The east leg of Rollins Road at Route 83 opened Tuesday, according to the Lake County Division of Transporation. Traffic on Route 83 has also been shifted to a temporary realignment to facilitate the construction of the Rollins Road underpass. Rollins Road between Hainesville Road and Route 83 remains closed for the construction of a temporary railroad track and crossing.

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    Gayle Smolinski

    Roselle hoping to lure more businesses in 2014

    Roselle officials have slashed expenses enough over the last four years to realize budget cuts alone aren’t enough solve the village’s financial problems. So they plan to follow a suggestion residents made during in a recent community survey: Try to attract new businesses.

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    Russell Laine

    Algonquin top cop named to Torch Run hall of fame

    Russell Laine, Algonquin’s longtime, highly decorated police chief, recently added yet another award to his collection. The International Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics has inducted Laine into its hall of fame, an honor that recognizes his devotion to the Special Olympics athletes.“I was shocked — just to be nominated is really an honor,” Laine said.

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    Illinoisans must use HealthCare.gov to shop for health insurance under Obamacare, but it can be difficult to figure out if your preferred hospital or doctors would be included in any plan you find.

    Many exchange health plans exclude top hospitals

    Chicago’s best known hospitals don’t accept many of the health plans sold on the new insurance marketplace that’s part of the nation’s health care law. For Illinois residents, the best advice is to shop carefully, making sure a preferred hospital or doctor is in the plan’s network, said Jim Duffett, of the Campaign for Better Health Care. “If it is not, and you go to that hospital, you will be...

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    Condell to host interfaith Thanksgiving celebration

    Advocate Condell Medical Center hosts its fifth annual Interfaith Thanksgiving Celebration on Sunday, Nov. 24 at Advocate Condell Centre Club, 200 W. Golf Road, Libertyville, a news release stated.

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    Michael A. Bucher

    Lisle man charged with setting playground fire

    A Lisle man has been charged with starting an August fire that destroyed playground equipment at Kingston Park in an unincorporated area near Lisle, police said Wednesday. Michael Bucher, 22, faces felony charges of criminal damage to state supported property and criminal damage to property by fire or explosives.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Jimmy D. Mcintosh, 27, who is homeless in Elgin police said, was arrested Tuesday in the 1100 block of Dundee Avenue and charged with two counts of receiving/possession/sale of a motor vehicle, according to a police report. Mcintosh told police he got into a vehicle that was left with the keys in the ignition and the motor running at a gas station on Dundee Avenue.

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    Singer Chris Brown arrives at court for a probation review hearing Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013, in Los Angeles. Brown pled guilty, earlier to assaulting his girlfriend, Rihanna after the Grammys in 2009. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge James R. Brandlin ordered Brown to serve three months in a residential treatment facility and submit to drug testing. The judge also ordered the R&B singer to perform at least 24 hours of community labor per week.

    Judge orders Chris Brown to rehab for 3 months

    LOS ANGELES — Chris Brown is going back to rehab, this time with new rules from a judge.Los Angeles Superior Court Judge James R. Brandlin on Wednesday ordered Brown to serve three months in a residential treatment facility and to submit to drug testing. The judge also ordered the R&B singer to perform at least 24 hours of community labor per week.

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    Michael R. Dawson

    Antioch Township man sentenced to periodic jail time in fatal street race

    Michael Dawson, 19, of Antioch Township, was sentenced to 18 months periodic imprisonment and 30 months of probation Wednesday by Lake County Judge Victoria Rossetti for his role in a street race that left a 16-year-old Antioch girl dead.

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    Miles Scott, dressed as Batkid, stands next to Batman as he receives the key to the city from San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, left, at a rally outside of City Hall in San Francisco, Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. Scott was called into service on Friday morning by San Francisco Police Chief Greg Suhr to help fight crime, as San Francisco turned into Gotham City as city officials helped fulfill the 5-year-old leukemia patient’s wish to be “Batkid,” The Greater Bay Area Make-A-Wish Foundation says.

    Popular ‘Batkid’ caper cost San Francisco $105K

    SAN FRANCISCO — A spokeswoman for San Francisco’s mayor says it cost the city $105,000 to honor the 5-year-old boy with leukemia who captivated the nation with his larger-than-life portrayal of a caped crusader.

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    Mount Prospect approves 9.5-percent water rate hike

    Mount Prospect may be more than 10 miles from the Chicago city limits, but as long as the village gets its water from Lake Michigan, the Windy City will always be as close as residents’ faucets – and their water bills. Village trustees this week sent residents a grim reminder of how closely tied their fortunes are to Chicago, when they passed a 9.5-percent increase to the combined water and sewer...

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    Flag football event benefits Lake Villa Twp. food pantry

    Lake Villa Township hosts its first Flag Football Turkey Bowl on Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, Nov. 28, to benefit the Lake Villa Township Food Pantry, the township said in a news release.

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    Seat belt, DUI crackdown this weekend in Lake County

    The Lake County Sheriff’s Office is partnering with IDOT, Illinois State Police and nearly 250 local law enforcement agencies to crack down on seat belt law violators now through Thanksgiving weekend, authorities said in a news release.

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    Naperville Park District crews start the process of setting up ice rinks Tuesday at Centennial Park. When the work is done, the park will offer two walled hockey rinks and one open free-skate rink, weather permitting, from Dec. 15 to Feb. 15.

    Ice rinks taking shape in Naperville

    You don’t need a calendar to know winter is almost here when ice-skating and hockey rinks start popping up in parks around the area. Naperville is no exception. On Tuesday, park district crews started the two- to three-day process of setting up rinks at Centennial Park.

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    Rosemont police and fire department crews work on the scene of an accident early Wednesday morning on the 105000 block of Lunt Street. Police said the driver of the pickup truck involved in the crash suffered non life-threatening injuries.

    One hospitalized when pickup overturns on I-90 ramp

    One person was hospitalized after a rollover crash on an I-90 ramp in Rosemont overnight. The single-vehicle crash happened about 12:40 a.m. Wednesday at the Lee Street exit ramp, according to Illinois State Police. The pickup truck involved appeared to have left the off-ramp and slid down the embankment.

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    Waubonsee readies GED students for new exam

    January 2014 will mark the implementation of a new edition of the General Educational Development exam designed to ensure that this first step toward a higher education is truly a step up. When it debuts, the 2014 GED test will have a new structure and delivery method, along with new content.

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    More Northwest suburbs join in traffic crackdown

    Four more Northwest suburbs have announced they are participating in the federally funded traffic crackdown occurring over the Thanksgiving holiday period. Elk Grove Village, Hoffman Estates, Rolling Meadows and Schaumburg are adding extra patrols to watch for DUI and seat belt violations from last Monday through Dec. 1.

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    Elaborate set designs and costumes help to make State Street Dance Studio’s production of “The Nutcracker” magical.

    Celebrating 10 years of ‘Nutcracker’ shows

    After 10 years of "Nutcracker" performances, Linda Cunningham, founder and artistic director of Geneva's State Street Dance Studio, knows what audiences want. “I always stay true to the story, true to the score but splash it up with new elements, new sets, tricks,” Cunningham said. “Our show is quick and colorful, exciting and fresh."

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    In this Nov. 18, 2013 file photo, Secretary of State John Kerry speaks at the Organization of American States (OAS) in Washington. Kerry says the U.S. and Afghanistan have reached an agreement on the final language of a bilateral security agreement. The agreement will govern the presence of U.S. forces in Afghanistan after the NATO combat mission ends next year. Kerry said Wednesday that he had spoken with Afghan President Hamid Karzai earlier in the day. The proposed agreement will be placed before a gathering of Afghan elders on Thursday.

    Kerry: U.S., Afghanistan agree to language in security proposal

    WASHINGTON — Secretary of State John Kerry said Wednesday that the U.S. and Afghanistan have agreed on the final language of a bilateral security agreement that would govern the presence of American troops in the country after the NATO combat mission ends next year.

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    Thousands of lights will greet visitors this holiday season at Oakbrook Center as the outdoor mall celebrates the completion of two years of renovations. The center is sponsoring a “Holiday Spectacular” on Friday night as a sort of coming-out party.

    Oakbrook Center preparing for ‘Holiday Spectacular’

    Brightly-lighted reindeer, twinkling trees and giant snowflakes dot the landscape this week at Oakbrook Center as it prepares to welcome the holidays. The recently renovated outdoor mall is planning to celebrate its coming-out party with a “Holiday Spectacular” from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 22, near Crate & Barrel and Macy’s at 22nd Street and Route 83 in Oak Brook,

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    President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama, former President Bill Clinton and his wife, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, pause during a wreath laying ceremony in honor of President John F. Kennedy, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013, at the JFK gravesite at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va. Friday will mark the 50th anniversary of the JFK assassination.

    Obama, Clinton families pay tribute to JFK

    WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama paid tribute Wednesday to former President John F. Kennedy’s legacy, joining former President Bill Clinton to lay a wreath at Kennedy’s grave and presenting a freedom medal that Kennedy conceived before his assassination 50 years ago this week.

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    President Barack Obama awards Baseball Hall-of-Famer Ernie Banks, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013, during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House.

    Wednesday’s Presidential Medal of Freedom recipients

    President Barack Obama honored 16 prominent Americans Wednesday with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest award the U.S. gives a civilian. The ceremony at the White House opened a day of tributes to former President John F. Kennedy, who established the modern version of the medal but was assassinated 50 years ago this week as the first award ceremony neared.

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    U-46 discrimination case back in court Friday

    An end may be in sight in the eight-year-long discrimination case against Elgin Area School District U-46 as attorneys try to hash out an amicable agreement this week, avoiding an appeal of the judge's July 11 decision. Attorneys for both sides are scheduled to appear for a conference at 10:30 a.m. Friday in federal Judge Robert Gettleman's chambers at the Dirksen Federal Building in Chicago.

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    This April 15, 1997, file photo shows an Air Force missile crew commander standing at the door of his launch capsule 100-feet under ground where he and his partner are responsible for 10 nuclear-armed ICBM’s, in north-central Colorado. Trouble inside the Air Force’s nuclear missile force runs deeper and wider than officials have let on. An unpublished study for the Air Force obtained by The Associated Press cites ìburnoutî among launch officers with their finger on the trigger of 450 weapons of mass destruction. And this: evidence of broader behavioral issues across the intercontinental ballistic missile force, including sexual assault and domestic violence.

    Air Force study: Nuclear officers “burned out”

    WASHINGTON — Trouble inside the Air Force’s nuclear missile force runs deeper and wider than officials have let on.

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    Reported troubles in the nuclear force

    In addition to RAND’s finding of “burnout” among nuclear missile launch officers and higher rates of courts martial and other disciplinary actions in the ICBM force, The Associated Press has documented other signs of trouble:

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    Wood Dale firefighter Michael Thomson displays his winning $1 million raffle ticket.

    Wood Dale firefighter wins $1 million jackpot

    A Wood Dale firefighter recently struck lottery pay dirt when he won $1 million playing Halloween Millionaire Raffle. Michael Thomson bought the winning raffle ticket on Sept. 28 at WD Tobacco, 355 Georgetown Square, in Wood Dale during a lunch break with a few co-workers, according to Illinois Lottery officials.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Burglars stole tools between 8 p.m. Nov. 8 and 8 a.m. Nov. 9 out of an unlocked 2006 Dodge van and unlocked garage at a home on the 700 block of North Pine Street in Mount Prospect. Value was estimated at $3,000.

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    Gov. Quinn to use Lincoln desk to sign gay marriage bill

    When Gov. Pat Quinn signs a landmark law allowing same-sex marriage in the state, he’ll be incorporating a piece of Illinois history. Quinn will sign the legislation at a desk once used by President Abraham Lincoln. According to the event’s program, the desk was where Lincoln penned his 1861 inaugural address.

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    The exhibit “Carl Sandburg in Elmhurst” opened this month and will remain up through April 20, 2014, at the Elmhurst Historical Museum.

    New museum exhibit explores Sandburg’s life and times in Elmhurst

    Prairie poet and newspaperman, folk song collector and movie critic, political activitist and family man, Lincoln biograher and children's book author, Carl Sandburg spent some of his most productive years in Elmhurst, where he lived with his wife and three children from 1919-30. Elmhurst Historical Society's new exhibit, "Carl Sandburg in Elmhurst," tells Sandburg's story through rare photos,...

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    More Sandburg events
    The exhibit “Carl Sandburg in Elmhurst” remains up through April 20 in the Elmhurst Historical Museum, 120 E. Park Ave., Elmhurst. Museum hours are 1 to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday; admission is free. The museum also is working with other organizations on a variety of programs related to the exhibit.

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    Kevin Chenais sits in his mobility scooter in front of an ambulance at St Pancras in London, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013. Chenais, who suffers from a genetic illness, will travel by ambulance and ferry back to France.

    500-pound stranded Frenchman’s ordeal ending

    LONDON — He’s been turned down by planes, trains and even a cruise ship in his quest to return home — and his family says it’s because of he has been deemed too fat to travel. Now Frenchman Kevin Chenais’ long and fitful journey is coming to an end.

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    Algonquin to vote on electric aggregation again

    Algonquin voters will again weigh in on a referendum question that asks whether they want the village to negotiate lower electricity rates on their behalf. Tuesday night, the Algonquin village board unanimously approved adding the electric aggregation question to the ballot for the March election. Voters last saw the question in 2012 and the measure failed by 11 votes.

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    Evangelist Billy Graham, 95, has been admitted for respiratory issues at Mission Hospital in Asheville, N.C. DeMoss says he expected Graham would be able to go home in a day or so.

    Evangelist Billy Graham hospitalized again in North Carolina

    The Rev. Billy Graham has been admitted to a hospital for the second time in a month for respiratory issues. Mark DeMoss of the Atlanta-based DeMoss Group said Wednesday the 95-year-old evangelist had been admitted for observation at Mission Hospital in Asheville, N.C. DeMoss says he expected Graham would be able to go home in a day or so.

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    Lindenhurst Early Childhood Center launches annual Gift of Giving

    The Lindenhurst Early Childhood Center hosts its 22nd annual Gift of Giving through Dec. 17.

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    Kennedy cousin Michael Skakel is expected to be released from prison this week while prosecutors appeal a ruling granting him a new trial in the 1975 slaying of neighbor Martha Moxley, the latest dramatic development in a case with an extraordinary history.

    Kennedy cousin poised for freedom in 1975 killing

    Kennedy cousin Michael Skakel is expected to be released from prison this week while prosecutors appeal a ruling granting him a new trial in the 1975 slaying of neighbor Martha Moxley, the latest dramatic development in a case with an extraordinary history. Skakel, the 53-year-old nephew of Robert F. Kennedy’s widow, Ethel Kennedy, has spent more than 11 years in prison.

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    Nidia Tannous, owner of the Carrollwood Market in suburban Tampa Florida that sold the winning $16 million Powerball ticket Saturday, May 25. Those lottery winnings expire Thursday, Nov. 21, if someone doesn’t claim the ticket.

    $16 million lottery ticket unclaimed in Florida

    Hitting a $16 million Powerball jackpot is a dream for most people. But losing a fortune by letting those lottery winnings expire is a nightmare — and that’s what will happen Thursday if someone doesn’t claim the ticket bought in May at a suburban Tampa, Fla., convenience store.

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    Gus Deeds, left, attends an election results event with his father, Democratic gubernatorial candidate and Virginia State Sen. Creigh Deeds, after his loss in the Virginia governor’s race against Republican Bob McDonnell. Virginia State Police confirmed Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013, that Creigh Deeds was stabbed multiple times and his son Gus, 24, was shot and killed at Deeds’ Home in Bath County, Va., during a Tuesday morning assault.

    Va. senator who was stabbed was close to son

    As Virginia state Sen. Creigh Deeds lay in a hospital with stab wounds apparently inflicted by his son, police investigated their relationship, which by most accounts was a particularly close one. On Tuesday morning, though, the pair got into some sort of altercation at Deeds’ home in rural western Virginia and the senator was stabbed multiple times in the head and chest, police said. Gus Deeds...

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    George Zimmerman, acquitted in the high-profile killing of unarmed black teenager Trayvon Martin, listens in court Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013, in Sanford, Fla., during his hearing on charges including aggravated assault stemming from a fight with his girlfriend.

    George Zimmerman released from jail

    George Zimmerman is once again a free manpending arraignment on the latest charges against him: aggravated assault, battery and criminal mischief. He was released on the condition that he wear an electronic monitor, keep his distance from guns, and stay away from the girlfriend who accused him of trying to choke her and then a week later pointing a shotgun at her. His bond was set at $9,000.

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    The Rev. Frank Schaefer, left, of Lebanon Pa., celebrates communion with supporters after a jury of his pastoral peers convicted him of breaking his vows by officiating his gay sons’ Massachusetts wedding in 2007. He was suspended late Tuesday, and ordered by a jury of his fellow pastors to surrender his credentials in a month if he can’t bring himself to adhere to the laws of the church’s Book of Discipline.

    Pa. pastor expects to be defrocked for gay wedding

    Frank Schaefer gets to keep calling himself a Methodist pastor — at least for the next 30 days. The United Methodist clergyman convicted of breaking church law for officiating at his son’s same-sex wedding was suspended late Tuesday, and ordered by a jury of his fellow pastors to surrender his credentials in a month if he can’t bring himself to adhere to the laws of the church’s Book of...

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    Are you taking someone for granted?

    This Thanksgiving, we need to look at whom in our lives we take for granted, says columnist Annettee Budzban.

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    DuPage forest district taxes to increase about $1 for homeowners

    Typical homeowners will see a roughly $1 increase in the DuPage County Forest Preserve District portion of their June real estate tax. District officials Tuesday approved an approximately $54 million tax levy for fiscal 2013-2014.

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    People view SeaWorld’s A Sea of Surprises float during a preview of new Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade floats in Moonachie, N.J., Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013.

    Macy’s Thanksgiving parade awash in float flaps

    Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is awash in animal-related protests over its floats, with controversies involving the unlikely pairing of rocker Joan Jett and Shamu the killer whale. The float flaps threaten to shake Macy’s traditional position of staying out of politics and soaring silently above the fray, like the massive balloons of Snoopy, Kermit the Frog and SpongeBob SquarePants.

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    This combination of photos shows areas affected by the earthquake-triggered tsunami which hit Indonesia, on Dec 25, 2004. The top photo shows a devastated area on Dec 31, 2004, six days after the tsunami. The bottom photo shows an area with rebuilt housing on Nov. 19, 2013.

    From ’04 tsunami recovery, lessons for Philippines

    The man who steered Indonesia to recovery after the 2004 tsunami has some cautionary words for the Philippines as it begins planning reconstruction after Typhoon Haiyan: Survivors will get angry about living in tents well before permanent houses are ready, and inflation will soon make those houses much more expensive to build. His advice? Start working now and get survivors involved in the...

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    Remnants of a suicide car bomb attack on the road between the border town of Rafah and the coastal city of el-Arish, Egypt, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013.

    Suicide car bomber kills 11 soldiers in Egypt

    A suicide bomber rammed his explosive-laden car into one of two buses carrying off-duty soldiers in Egypt’s turbulent region of northern Sinai on Wednesday, killing 11 and wounding 37, security and military officials said.

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    People inspect the site of a car-bomb attack in Baghdad’s Karrada neighborhood, Iraq, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013. A wave of attacks, mostly by car bombs, hit mainly Shiite and commercial areas of Baghdad on Wednesday morning, killing and wounding civilians officials said.

    Wave of attacks in Iraqi capital kills at least 29

    A wave of bombings hit mainly Shiite and busy commercial areas in and outside Baghdad on Wednesday morning, killing at least 29 people and wounding 104, Iraqi officials said. The attacks, mostly by car bombs, were part of a surge in violence that has rocked Iraq over the past months as insurgents seek to thwart the Shiite-led government’s efforts to stabilize the country.

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    ABQ Trolley Co. partnered up with the nonprofit Progress Now New Mexico to provide University of New Mexico students transportation to voting sites due to a prior vote by the Albuquerque City Council that excluded the university as a voting site for a special ballot.

    Albuquerque voters reject late-term abortion ban

    Voters in New Mexico’s largest city soundly defeated a ban on late-term abortions Tuesday in a municipal election that was being closely watched as a possible new front in the national abortion fight. Voters rejected the measure 55 percent to 45 percent following an emotional and graphic campaign that brought in national groups and hundreds of thousands of dollars in advertising.

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    Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei says pressure from economic sanctions will never force the country into unwelcome concessions as nuclear negotiators resumed talks with world powers. Khamenei also blasted U.S. government policies, including threats of military action, but said Iran has “no animosity’” toward the American people and seeks “friendly” relations.

    Iran’s leader backs nuke talks, with conditions

    Iran’s supreme leader voiced support Wednesday for the negotiations over his country’s nuclear program, but insisted there are limits to the concessions Iran will make in exchange for an easing of the sanctions choking its economy. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei also blasted Israel as being “the rabid dog” of the region, bent on besmirching Iran’s reputation.

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    Opponents and supporters of an abortion bill hold signs near a news conference outside the Texas Capitol, in Austin, Texas. A sharply divided Supreme Court on Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013, allowed Texas to continue enforcing abortion restrictions that opponents say have led more than a third of the state’s clinics to stop providing abortions.

    Supreme Court lets Texas abortion law stay for now

    A third of Texas’ abortion clinics will stay closed after the U.S. Supreme Court declined to intervene in an ongoing legal dispute over a tough new law that Planned Parenthood claims unconstitutionally restricts women’s rights. At least 12 Texas abortion clinics have been closed since October, after a three-judge panel of the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals allowed the law requiring doctors who...

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    Bartlett says no to video gambling in Town Center

    After multiple discussions, the Bartlett village board unanimously rejected a proposal Tuesday for a new video gambling bar in the Bartlett Town Center. The owners of Elsie's Place wanted to open a location with 11 seats and five video gambling stations. “Bartlett is not going to be a little Las Vegas as long as I'm here,” one trustee said.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn is expected to sign a bill Wednesday making Illinois the 16th state to legalize gay marriage. The event will be held at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

    Governor Quinn to sign gay marriage into law

    Illinois is about to join the ranks of states allowing same-sex marriage. Gov. Pat Quinn is expected to sign a bill Wednesday making Illinois the 16th state to legalize gay marriage. The event will be held at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

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    Dawn Patrol: 3 charged in W. Chicago death; Delays on I-90

    Three suspects charged in West Chicago stabbing death. A 3-story addition is proposed as part of expanding Mundelein High School. Five students arrested after fight at Grayslake Central. A woman is hit by a bus at O'Hare. Arlington Heights launches smoke detector program. Batavia proposes $1.14 million in aid for new Walgreens.

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    Lisa Madigan warns of repair scams by ‘storm chasers’

    Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan is urging residents with damaged homes and businesses to be wary of scam artists looking to profit from Sunday’s severe weather.

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    This photo, provided by Russian Emergency Situations Ministry, shows the crash site of the Russian passenger airliner near Kazan, the capital of the Tatarstan republic, about 450 miles east of Moscow. A Russian passenger airliner crashed Sunday night while trying to land at the airport in the city of Kazan, killing everyone aboard, officials said. The Boeing 737, belonging to Tatarstan Airlines, crashed an hour after taking off from Moscow.

    Russian crash investigators find voice recorder

    The last word the pilot of the Boeing 737 uttered was “circle.” Moments later the jetliner slammed into the ground, investigators said Wednesday, killing all 50 people on board. The Moscow-based Interstate Aviation Committee, which investigates plane crashes across the former Soviet Union, concluded a day earlier that the crew failed to land at first attempt, began to stall in a steep climb, then...

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    Senegal judge finds accused lesbians not guilty

    A judge in Senegal says there is insufficient evidence to convict four women accused of violating the country’s law banning homosexual acts. Adama Traore announced the verdict and freed the women Wednesday morning.

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    A woman in a green dress symbolizing ecology and a man in a coal miner’s uniform act out a wedding Wednesday to show that both can coexist during a Solidarity trade unionists protest in front of the National Stadium hosting the UN Climate Change Conference in Warsaw, Poland.

    Turmoil at climate talks as blame game heats up

    An old rift between rich and poor has reopened in U.N. climate talks as developing countries look for ways to make developed countries accept responsibility for global warming — and pay for it.

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    South Africa: Officials investigate mall collapse

    JOHANNESBURG — South African investigators on Wednesday combed the rubble of a shopping mall under construction that partially collapsed, killing one person and injuring 29. Police said a case of culpable homicide, or negligent killing, would be opened as authorities determine who was responsible for the accident.

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    India: Gold bars worth $1 million found in plane lavatory

    Cleaners found a stash of 24 gold bars worth more than $1.1 million hidden in an airplane lavatory after a flight from Bangkok arrived in eastern India, officials said Wednesday.

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    Syrian men stand in line waiting Monday to collect some aid from relief agencies helping Syrian refugees who fled to the eastern Lebanese border town of Arsal. Thousands of Syrians have fled to Lebanon over the past days as government forces attack the western town of Qarah near the border with Lebanon.

    Suicide bombs hit Syria troops north of Damascus

    Suicide bombers targeted Syrian troops and a hospital on Wednesday in the rugged Qalamoun hills north of Damascus, where rebels are struggling to reverse government gains that threaten to cut one of their chief supply lines, activists and officials said. There was no immediate word on casualties from the attacks in Nabak and Deir Attiyeh.

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    Joseph Paul Franklin sits in Hamilton County Common Pleas Court where jury selection was set to begin in his murder trial in Cincinnati. White supremacist serial killer Joseph Paul Franklin has been put to death in Missouri early Wednesday Nov. 20, 2013. It was the state’s first execution in nearly three years.

    Missouri executes racist serial killer Franklin

    Joseph Paul Franklin, a white supremacist who targeted blacks and Jews in a cross-country killing spree from 1977 to 1980, was put to death Wednesday in Missouri, the state’s first execution in nearly three years. Mike O’Connell, of the Missouri Department of Corrections, said Franklin was pronounced dead at 6:17 a.m.

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    Polandís Prime Minister Donald Tusk arrives Wednesday at a news conference to presents his new ministers in Warsaw, Poland. Tusk on Wednesday fired Finance Minister Jacek Rostowski in a major government reshuffle aimed at breathing new energy into Poland’s longest-serving team under democracy. Tusk said he appointed “very gifted economist” Mateusz Szczurek to be the new head of state finance.

    Polish finance chief fired in Cabinet reshuffle

    Poland’s prime minister on Wednesday fired Finance Minister Jacek Rostowski in a major government reshuffle aimed at breathing new energy into Poland’s longest-serving team under democracy. The pro-market government of Donald Tusk has guaranteed stability in Poland’s politics in recent years and has boasted of preserving economic growth at a time when European Union nations plunged into recession.

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    In a shift of attitude, most young people now say it’s wrong to use racist or sexist slurs online, even if you’re just kidding. They’re still pretty chill about it, though. A majority of teens and young adults who use the Internet or text on their cellphones say they see derogatory words and images. They often dismiss that stuff as just joking around, not meant to be hurtful, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and MTV.

    Poll: ‘Just kidding’ doesn’t make online slurs OK

    In a shift in attitude, most young people now say it’s wrong to use racist or sexist slurs online, even if you’re just kidding. But when they see them, they don’t take much personal offense. Americans ages 14 to 24 say people who are overweight are the most frequent target, followed by gay people. Next in line for online abuse: blacks and women.

  •  
    Jonathan Crabtree plays Proteus, whose affection for Julia, played by Julie Soroko, cools the further he gets from home in Janus Theatre’s “The Two Gentlemen of Verona.” Janus actors will be among the performers at “Whatever Happens ... Happens: a Celebration of Arts in Elgin,” set for Saturday, Nov. 23.

    Celebrating Elgin’s arts scene and planning for fringe fest

    The Elgin Cultural Arts Commission in cooperation with Janus Theater Company and Side Street Studio Arts will host Whatever Happens...Happens: a Celebration of Arts in Elgin on Saturday, Nov. 23, starting at 7:30 p.m. at the Elgin Art Showcase, 164 Division Street, downtown Elgin.

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    Milwaukee’s 2013 homicide count exceeds last year’s

    MILWAUKEE — Milwaukee already has exceeded the total number of homicides recorded in the city last year.Fifty-nine-year-old Gloria Zuniga was killed about 8:40 p.m. Monday when bullets sprayed her Milwaukee home in what police say was a gang-related homicide.

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    Wisconsin DNR hires 18 new biologists

    MADISON, Wis. — Wisconsin wildlife officials have hired 18 new biologists.Department of Natural Resources officials say the new hires are filling positions that have been vacant in some cases for as long as two years.

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    Free pesticide registry accepting sign-ups

    MADISON, Wis. — Homeowners and renters wishing to be notified when professional pesticide applications are going to be made in their neighborhood can now sign up online for a registry to get a heads up. Free registration is now open through the website run by the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection.

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    More charges filed after Prophetstown fire

    PROPHETSTOWN, Ill. — Two half-brothers who are accused of setting a fire that destroyed eight buildings in a small northern Illinois community are facing more charges in juvenile court.

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    Peoria man held on $5 million bond for death of his wife

    PEKIN, Ill. (AP) — A central Illinois man who’s accused of kidnapping and killing his estranged wife is being held on $5 million bond in the Tazewell County Jail.

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    Indianapolis committee advances panhandling proposal

    INDIANAPOLIS — An Indianapolis City-County Council committee has advanced a proposal that would ban panhandling and other forms of begging near bank entrances, ATMs and other specified areas.

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    Indiana House newcomers begin on Organization Day

    INDIANAPOLIS — Two new members of the Indiana House of Representatives have joined their colleagues in Indianapolis.Republican Reps. Greg Beumer of Modoc and Casey Cox of Fort Wayne joined other lawmakers Tuesday for the Organization Day for the 2014 legislative session.

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    $17 million match funds OK’d for East Chicago waterfront

    CROWN POINT, Ind. — The Northwest Indiana Regional Development Authority has approved spending $17 million in matching funds to revitalize the East Chicago waterfront.The Times of Munster reports the money will be used for improvements at Jeorse Park Beach and the East Chicago Marina, street and overpass work, and demolition of vacant properties.

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    Indiana gets $100K federal farm-to-school grant

    INDIANAPOLIS — The U.S. Department of Agriculture has awarded Indiana a $100,000 grant as part of a program to connect school cafeterias with local farmers.

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    Enbridge oil pipeline project in Ind. delayed

    GRIFFITH, Ind. — Enbridge Energy says the company’s project to replace 60 miles of oil pipeline across northern Indiana won’t be completed until at least February due to delays in obtaining needed permits.

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    Would-be Kankakee bank robber gets prison time

    URBANA — A Kankakee man who planned to rob two banks in the city has been sentenced to more than 15 ½ years in federal prison.Twenty-six-year-old Nevin L. Lenton was sentenced last week. The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Urbana announced the sentencing Tuesday.Lenton pleaded guilty to attempted bank robbery, attempted aggravated bank robbery and possession of a firearm by a felon.

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    Southwest Indiana county OKs moving Evansville war memorials

    EVANSVILLE, Ind. — A southwestern Indiana county has approved plans to move several war memorials scattered around Evansville’s downtown area to a single site on the city’s riverfront.The Vanderburgh County commissioners agreed Tuesday to allow the local Veterans Council to move the memorials, many of which it says are largely overlooked.

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    High state court to hold memorial for ex-justices

    The Illinois Supreme Court is remembering two former justices who died this year. Members of the state’s highest court are scheduled to gather for a memorial service in Chicago on Wednesday for Mary Ann McMorrow and John Nickels. Chief Justice Rita Garman will deliver opening and closing remarks.

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    Quincy mayor proposes privatizing garbage pickup

    QUINCY, Ill. — The mayor of Quincy is suggesting that the western Illinois city privatize its garbage and recycling collection in an effort to save money.

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    Filing to begin with Illinois elections board

    SPRINGFIELD — Candidates running in the March 18 primary are set to file candidacy paperwork next week.Candidates for state office will file nominating petitions with the State Board of Elections in Springfield. County candidates will file with county clerk’s offices that week as well.

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    Man charged in October death U of Illinois student

    URBANA — An Urbana man is facing a reckless homicide charge for last month’s death of a University of Illinois student who died when she was hit by a truck as she walked on campus.The (Champaign) News-Gazette reports Willie Craft Sr. is also charged with aggravated driving under the influence for the Oct. 9 crash that killed Mimi Liu of Chicago.

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    Sewer grate thefts reported in several suburbs

    Carol Stream police are on the lookout for a sewer grate thief victimizing several communities. Seventeen grates were stolen during the weekend from an industrial park east of Gary Avenue between North Avenue and Lies Road. Several other towns have reported such thefts, including Winfield, Addison and, most notably, West Chicago, which is missing more than 70 of the grates.

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    Carpentersville resolving issues with fire union

    Carpentersville and the union that represents its 32 full-time firefighters are in the midst of resolving issues that came up after both sides signed off on a three-year contract, officials confirmed Tuesday. At the same time, village officials reiterated that the recent staffing changes they implemented within the fire department do not jeopardize residents’ safety. “I’m totally confident in the...

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    Naperville OKs five-year strategic plan for city

    The city of Naperville’s top priorities for the next five years will be adding more egovernment services, improving traffic and making sure residents are educated and informed. Council members on Tuesday night approved a five-year strategic plan with those three areas as goals. “The results of the plan are all good things that will make the city operate effectively,” Council member Joseph McElroy...

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    Craig Johnson

    Elk Grove imposes new electric utility tax

    Starting next year, Elk Grove Village residents and businesses will begin seeing a new electric utility tax on their bills, but how much they pay all depends on how much they use. The village board voted unanimously Tuesday night to impose the new municipal electric use tax — the proceeds of which will be earmarked to fill the village’s growing pension obligation for its employees.

Sports

  •  
    Coach Marc Trestman said the Bears wanted to “do something as an organization” to show support for tornado victims in Washington, Ill.

    Bears show support for tornado victims

    Bears players helped Illinois victims of Sunday's tornados by delivering food and water Tuesday, and the team and its charitable arm, Bears Care, has established a website to accept donations and bids on game-worn equipment, the proceeds of which will go to those who have suffered financial and personal losses and will be matched dollar-for-dollar by the team.

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    Football Focus: Week 13 Preview
    In this edition of football focus, Joe Aguilar visits Lake Zurich High School. The Bears will take on Glenbard West in the Class 7A state semifinal football game Saturday.

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    Bears guard Kyle Long will be on the opposite side of the line from his brother Chris on Sunday in St. Louis.

    Bears’ Kyle Long ready to face off with brother

    Bears rookie right guard Kyle Long will be looking across the line of scrimmage Sunday at his older brother Chris, the Rams' standout defensive end, and someone he's looked up to his whole life.

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    Carmel’s Cassidy Kloss, left, drives on Prairie Ridge’s Maddie Drain on Wednesday at Mundelein.

    Carmel Catholic weathers Prairie Ridge

    Kathleen Felicelli scored a game-high 20 points, and Carmel Catholic’s girls basketball team survived a fourth-quarter flurry from Prairie Ridge to win 63-62 in the Mundelein Turkey Tournament on Wednesday night.

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    Northern Illinois quarterback Jordan Lynch passes against Toledo during Wednesday night’s game in Ohio.

    Lynch’s 3 TDs lead NIU over Toledo 35-17

    Backed up against the end zone on third down, Northern Illinois' Jordan Lynch had the defense right where he wanted. He dropped back, waited until he spotted an opening and scrambled up the middle for a first down that sparked a 99-yard drive, clinching a 35-17 victory over Toledo on Wednesday night. "That's a momentum killer," he said. "It's a real dagger to the defense."

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    Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville reacts to the Colorado Avalanche scoring a third goal during the first period of Tuesday night’s 5-1 loss.

    Some glitches, but Blackhawks still in a good place

    While a bit of adversity has crept into the picture for the Blackhawks, they still have reached a quarter of the season tied with Anaheim for first place in the Western Conference with 32 points. Tim Sassone takes a closer look at the season so far, and what's ahead, in today's report.

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    Wednesday’s girls basketball scoreboard
    Here are the results from Wednesday's varsity girls basketball results as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Palatine nets first win for Johnson

    Mark Johnson recorded the first win of his varsity coaching career on Wednesday night when the Pirates posted a 59-43 triumph over Jacobs in the opening round of the Dundee-Crown Thanksgiving Tournament.

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    St. Viator runs past Dundee-Crown

    St. Viator’s girls basketball team scored early and often Wednesday night as the Lions won their first game of the season, 60-38, over host Dundee-Crown at the Chargers’ Thanksgiving Tournament.

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    Fremd fares well in spite of fouls

    Fremd's girls basketball team surpassed 60 points for the second straight game, this time posting a 70-40 triumph over visiting Lake Zurich on Wednesday night in a second-round game of the Bears’ own Turkey Thriller Tournament. Fremd shot 28 free throws and made 19 while the Bears attempted 15 and converted 10.

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    Mahar helps Mundelein past Munzer-less Giants

    For the first time in four seasons, the Highland Park Giants didn’t travel with a star named Lena Munzer. Perhaps the best girls basketball player in Highland Park history, Munzer graduated last spring. So you’d figure host Mundelein would handl this Munzer-less club with no problem on Wednesday night in the the third contest of the day in Mundelein’s tournament. Well, not quite. It was still anyone’s game midway through the third quarter. Mundelein’s lead was 28-24. And then the veteran in Mundelein’s lineup, junior Maggie Mahar, took matters into her own hands.

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    The secret’s out — sort of — with Lake Michigan smallmouth

    No one dares talking about the big smallmouth that wait around daily for a fresh piece of Chicago-style meat (chub) on the big lake’s shore.Sure, the old-timers know, and even some of the newer, egomaniacal expert angling wannabees will share a secret or two about locations. Some of the younger element take pride in telling others they have the “keys to the smallie kingdom.”And if I told you jumbo smallmouth are there along the lakefront in droves, responding with violent strikes when an angler’s guard is relaxed for a microsecond, you’d probably scoff and move on to the column describing the new Cubs manager and the wonderful dreams, false promises, and follies yet to come.There are cliques of fishermen who hold the secrets to their bosoms, and God help us if one of us infidels stumbles upon sections of the forbidden territories.Like the muskie columns I have written pertaining to Lake Catherine and Channel Lake, those tomes have evoked threats and scads of nasties from various readers. The same pattern emerges when I mention Lake Michigan smallmouth bass.There are 5- and 6-pound fish, and maybe some heavier, along the shoreline of our immediate territory. Yet because of slovenly behavior of some of the big lake anglers, the fishery itself is in constant danger of being crippled.Even on my Sunday morning outdoors radio talk show (6-7 a.m. at 1240-AM) I am constantly getting emails from listeners and some readers as well, asking me where they can find smallmouth bass “everyone” talks about.I would be a very wealthy person if I got a buck for every inquiry I receive.To tell you the truth, there are a number of super-large guys who act like enforcers regarding this issue. So I must be careful.Smallmouth bass fishing for many in this area is nothing more than a novelty, a lark, if you will. For most, Lake Michigan angling means yellow perch, coho salmon and its jumbo cousin, the mighty Chinook.But if you should stumble upon some good smallmouth fishing, state regs require that you release them so they may grow to even larger sizes to fight another day.Again, if you happen to locate a school of smallmouth, say near the Great Lakes Naval Training Center, you may, and I am explicit by saying may, first encounter a gunboat or inflatable, high-speed rubber watercraft loaded with big-time weaponry and a sailor equipped with a government-issue loudspeaker demanding you immediately leave the area. I advise that you hit the throttle and skedaddle. It’s a Homeland Security thing.And during your stumbling about, please keep in mind Lake Michigan smallmouth bass have a royal-like lineage, based on ancient writings found in a pocket of clay, unearthed by workers digging out the never-ending big tunnel project in the city and burbs.And because of fragments in those parchments, you do not need formal wear while on the water — just a fishing license.ŸContact Mike Jackson at angler88@comcast.net.Catch his radio show 6-7 a.m. Sundays on WSBC 1240-AM and live-streamed at www.mikejacksonoutdoors.com.

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    Girls basketball/Fox Valley roundup

    Maggie Powers scored 12 points and Alisha Panthier had 10 Wednesday as the Elgin girls basketball team rolled to a 65-30 win over Woodlands Academy in the opening round of the Elgin Academy Thanksgiving Tournament. The Maroons (1-1) will play in the semifinals at 7:30 p.m. today.

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    Crystal Lake South dumps Streamwood

    Jumping out to a 17-point lead at the half, Crystal Lake South’s girls basketball team looked strong throughout and cruised to a 51-31 win over Streamwood at the Dundee-Crown Thanksgiving Tournament Wednesday night.

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    South Elgin's Savanah Uveges backs into Huntley's Ali Andrews Wednesday in Huntley.

    Huntley comes back to top South Elgin

    With Huntley leading South Elgin 21-4, it looked like a blowout win for the Red Raiders. Then the Storm came to life, outscoring the Red Raiders 30-6 during a 10-minute stretch. But back came the Red Raiders, posting a 15-0 run of their own to regain the lead. When the dust settled, Huntley held on for a 52-46 victory in Huntley. The game was part of the Dundee-Crown Thanksgiving tournament and helped get things off to a wild start.

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    Defense leads Aurora Central to 3rd straight win

    Aurora Central Catholic turned to its defense for its third straight win at the Tim Hume Breakout Tournament in Somonauk on Wednesday, holding Plano to 28 points in a 35-28 victory.

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    Brian Hill/bhill@dailyherald.com Abby Ponte of St. Charles North, during the IHSA Sectional girls swimming meet at St. Charles East Saturday.

    St. Charles East, Rosary aim for Top 10 at state

    A year ago, Illinois high school girls swimming had a true star in the water in Glenbrook South’s Olivia Smoliga, currently a freshman at Georgia. While that individual star power may not be in the water this year, there are an abundance of excellent swimmers who look likely to combine for one of the fastest state meets ever — which is saying something given the incredible speed shown in recent years by the state’s best. At the epicenter of this potential speedfest are a number of local athletes. St. Charles East, Rosary and St. Charles each have reasons to be excited about the swimming portion of the meet, hosted this weekend by New Trier. And not only do both St. Charles schools have divers in action in Friday’s prelims, but Geneva and West Aurora qualified divers as well.

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    Northwestern guard Dave Sobolewski (3) drives to the basket past UIC forward Ahman Fells (33) during Wednesday’s game in Chicago.

    Sobolewski’s 25 leads Northwestern past UIC 93-58

    Dave Sobolewski scored 17 of his career-high 25 points in the first half and Drew Crawford added 18 as Northwestern routed Illinois-Chicago 93-58 on Wednesday night. Northwestern (2-2) opened the game with a 17-4 lead on Sanjay Lumpkin’s layup and JerShon Cobb’s 3-pointer extended the lead to 20-6 as the Wildcats led wire to wire.

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    ‘Helmet Pardy’ won’t be permitted Thursday

    The Winnipeg Jets on Wednesday distanced themselves from a local disc jockey’s suggestion for fans to wear hockey helmets to Thursday’s game against the Blackhawks. It was called a “Helmet Pardy” by the DJ in response to the incident at the United Center during a game Nov. 6 where Jets defenseman Adam Pardy had his helmet ripped off his head by a fan after he was sent crashing through the glass by a check from Brandon Bollig.

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    Cubs add 2 players to roster

    The Cubs on Wednesday added shortstop Arismendy Alcantara and pitcher Dallas Beeler to their 40-man roster, protecting them from being taken by another team in next month's Rule 5 draft. The organization's 40-man roster stands at 39.

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    Through the first nine games of the season, Derrick Rose has reached 20 points only once, in Saturday’s rout of the Pacers.

    Rose happy to see Bulls’ balanced scoring

    There are 37 NBA players averaging at least 17 points per game and, as of Wednesday, none played for the Bulls. Derrick Rose has not dominated the scoring and he's OK with that scenario, with one condition.

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    John Treiber

    Treiber leaving thriving Glenbard South program

    A good thing about the pension and benefits system in Illinois public education is it allows men and women to retire while still in the prime of their lives, able and eager to pursue their interests and, if desired, contribute professionally.

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    Wheaton has something to prove

    The Wheaton women’s soccer team is out to prove a point. Despite a dominating regular season statistically, the Thunder players feel they are just now hitting stride and now that they are in the NCAA Division III sectionals they can show how good they are all while getting a little payback.

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    The Bulls will play their entire six-game road schedule without Jimmy Butler, who has been diagnosed with turf toe on his right foot. He could be out 2-3 weeks.

    Bulls’ Butler out at least 6 games with turf toe

    Jimmy Butler is expected to miss the entire six-game circus road trip because of an injury to his right big toe. An MRI exam confirmed a turf toe diagnosis, according to team officials. Butler did not travel with the team to Denver and will likely miss two to three weeks.

  •  
    Wisconsin’s Frank Kaminsky, second from right, sits on the bench with his teammates Traevon Jackson, left, Sam Dekker and former Mundelein star Ben Brust, right, after Kaminsky, a Benet Academy grad, set school single-game record of 43 points on Tuesday night. Wisconsin won 103-85.

    Benet’s Kaminsky makes history for Wisconsin

    The Wisconsin bio for Frank Kaminsky describes the 7-footer as a “soft-shooting big man.” Few Badgers backers expected anything quite like the 43-point outing he had Tuesday. Kaminsky, who was a standout at Benet Academy in Lisle, is now the new owner of the single-game scoring record for the 12th-ranked Badgers (4-0). “I just went out there, started shooting the ball and it started going in,” Kaminsky said after his outburst in the 103-85 win over North Dakota.

  •  
    Washington Community High School football players finish practice Tuesday at Illinois State University’s Hancock Stadium in Normal with instructions from head coach Darrell Crouch. The team has a state semifinal playoff game Saturday in Springfield but their hometown is just digging out from a powerful tornado that destroyed a number of players’ homes.

    While Washington cleans up, team prepares for game

    The home where Colton Marshall and his family lived is gone. But Tuesday in Illinois State University’s Hancock Stadium, Marshall and his teammates from Washington Community High School didn’t let the disruption from the storm keep them from a routine they’ve had for years. They put on their helmets and pads, and started preparing for a football game. This one’s a big deal: a state semifinal Saturday in Springfield.

  •  
    The White Sox picked up Houston Astros infielder Jake Elmore, left, on waivers. Elmore, 26, played all nine positions last season for Houston.

    White Sox claim Elmore off waives

    In a move that potentially provides them with more versatility on the bench, the White Sox claimed infielder Jake Elmore off waivers from the Houston Astros, team officials announced Wednesday. The club also purchased the contracts of infielder Carlos Sanchez and outfielder Trayce Thompson from Class AAA Charlott, adding them to the 40-man roster for next season.

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    Bulls guard Jimmy Butler is week-to-week because of a sprained right big toe.

    Bulls’ Butler to miss circus trip with sprained big toe

    The Bulls say guard Jimmy Butler is week to week because of a sprained right big toe and will not accompany them on their six-game road trip. They open the trip at Denver on Thursday, followed by games at Portland, the Los Angeles Clippers, Utah, Detroit and Cleveland before hosting New Orleans on Dec. 2.

  •  

    Mike North video: Northwestern playing scared
    Northwestern coach Pat Fitzgerald is coaching not to lose. The Wildcats need to play more aggressively, and change their attitude and tactics if they want to succeed.

  •  

    DePaul beats Milwaukee 80-71

    Playing its fourth game in five days proved to be too much for Milwaukee, even coming off a four-game winning streak. The Panthers, who finished in last place last season in the Horizon League, stayed with DePaul most of the way in their home opener Tuesday. But fatigue, plus superior play from a Big East foe in the Blue Demons, conspired against them.

Business

  •  
    Central DuPage Hospital in Winfield is part of Cadence Health, which announced Wednesday it plans to merge with Rockford Health System. CDH formed Cadence in a 2011 merger with Delnor Community Health System in Geneva.

    DuPage-based Cadence Health preparing to merge with Rockford

    Less than three years after it was formed, Cadence Health — which includes Central DuPage and Delnor hospitals — is expanding to include Rockford Health System.

  •  

    Worries of a Fed pullback sends stocks lower

    NEW YORK — The latest news from the Federal Reserve spooked investors Wednesday. Stock and bond prices fell after minutes from the Fed’s latest meeting showed that the U.S. economy was improving steadily enough to warrant a reduction in stimulus in “coming months.” The Fed has been buying $85 billion every month in Treasury and mortgage-backed bonds, which keeps long-term interest rates artificially low and makes stocks seem inexpensive in comparison to bonds. “Investors need to be prepared to see the Fed wind down its program in the long term,” said Kristina Hooper, head of U.S. investment strategies for Allianz Global Investors. The Fed’s economic stimulus has been a key driver of the stock market’s 25 percent surge this year, along with rising corporate profits and a recovering U.S. economy.The Dow Jones industrial average lost 66.21 points, or 0.4 percent, to 15,900.82. It was up 20 points shortly before the minutes were released at 2 p.m. Eastern time.The Standard & Poor’s 500 index lost 6.50 points, or 0.4 percent, to 1,781.37. The Nasdaq lost 10.28 points, or 0.3 percent, to 3,921.27.The market began the day higher after an encouraging report on retail sales and better news from long-struggling J.C. Penney. Investors already know the Fed will reduce its economic stimulus eventually, yet they remain highly sensitive to concrete signals that a pullback is imminent and worry that the Fed might withdraw its support before the economy is ready. Bond prices also declined. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note rose sharply, to 2.80 percent from 2.71 percent just before the minutes were released. That’s the highest since Sept. 17. Bond yields rise when demand for them falls.The Fed’s next policy meeting is scheduled for Dec. 17-18. Investors are split on whether the bank will vote to pull back its bond purchases, or “taper” them, as it is sometimes called on Wall Street. The Fed surprised investors at its Sept. 17-18 meeting by keeping the bond purchases in place, despite widespread predictions that it would start to wind the program down. With Wednesday’s decline, the S&P 500 is down roughly 1 percent for the week. The index hasn’t had a weekly loss since the week ending Oct. 4. Hooper and other market watchers said they would not be surprised if the market continued to fall. “It would not be unreasonable for investors to step back here,” said Ron Florance, deputy chief investment officer for Wells Fargo Private Bank.J.C. Penney led the S&P 500 index higher with an 8 percent gain. Despite reporting a loss in the third quarter, there were hopeful signs for the long-struggling store chain heading into the holiday shopping season. The company said its sales increased in October for the first time since December 2011. The stock rose 73 cents to $9.44. It’s still down 52 percent this year.Lowe’s, the home improvement store chain, fell $3.11, or 6 percent, to $47.33. Lowe’s earned 47 cents per share in the latest quarter, a penny short of what analysts were looking for. Lowe’s was outshone by competitor Home Depot, which reported a 26 percent surge in net income the day before. The holiday shopping season is a make-or-break time for U.S. retailers, and more broadly the U.S. economy. Sales during November and December can account for up to 40 percent of the annual revenue for store operators. So far, there’s reason to be hopeful. The National Retail Federation, the nation’s largest retail trade group, expects holiday sales to increase 3.9 percent to $602.1 billion this year.Separately, the U.S. Commerce Department said Wednesday that U.S. retail sales rose 0.4 percent in October. That was much better than the 0.1 percent increase economists had predicted, according to FactSet, a financial information provider.“Consumers seem to be in a better mood, which will be good for the overall economy,” Florance said.

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    This product image of McDonald’s shows their McRib sandwich. McDonald’s Corp. said Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013, that the McRib won’t be available nationally in 2014. The fast-food chain says itís leaving it up to local franchises to decide whether to offer the pork sandwich, which comes with pickles, onions and barbecue sauce. Thatís a change from the past three years, when McDonald’s had put the McRib on the national menu as a way to boost sales in the second half of the year.

    No national launch for McRib amid menu changes

    NEW YORK — McDonald’s, which has been struggling to keep up with a raft of new menu items, says the McRib won’t be available nationally this year.The fast-food chain says it’s leaving it up to local franchise groups to decide whether to offer the pork sandwich, which comes with pickles, onions and barbecue sauce. That’s a change from the past three years, when McDonald’s had put the McRib on the national menu as a way to boost sales in the back half of the year.Now the company is going back to the days when the sandwich was a regional offering. The lack of widespread availability in years past in some regions helped give the sandwich a fabled status, with one fan even creating a McRib Locator to help people find the sandwich. The sandwich’s place in pop culture is also in part due to its unusual patty, which is shaped to look as though there are bones inside. Tyler Litchenberger, a McDonald’s spokeswoman, said the company had “other national priorities” this year, such as its new Mighty Wings. She said franchises that decided to sell the McRib have had it for the past couple of weeks.Litchenberger did not have details on how widely it would be available, but said Chicago, Dallas and New York were among the major markets that are offering it.McDonald’s Corp., based in Oak Brook, has been stepping up its pace of limited-time offers and new menu introductions over the past year. The strategy is seen as a way to keep customers interested amid intensifying competition. But Jeff Stratton, head of McDonald’s U.S. business, conceded last week that the pace has been too fast and created operational issues for restaurants.In its latest quarter, McDonald’s said sales edged up just 0.7 percent at U.S. restaurants open at least a year. The company has been struggling to boost sales since late last year, when a key monthly sales figure fell for the first time in nearly a decade.

  •  

    Solid October retail sales lift hopes for economy

    WASHINGTON — An increase in shopping last month during the partial government shutdown suggests that the U.S. economy may be more resilient than some have feared. Retail sales increased 0.4 percent in October, the Commerce Department said Wednesday, after being flat the previous month. That jump shows that many consumers remain willing to spend as the all-important holiday shopping season nears. At the same time, other data released Wednesday point to an economy that’s still struggling to reach full health.Ÿ Sales of existing homes fell 3.2 percent last month from September, the National Association of Realtors said. Higher mortgage rates and a shortage of homes on the market contributed to the drop-off. So did delays by potential homebuyers during the government shutdown. Ÿ Businesses’ inventories increased by 0.6 percent in September, the Commerce Department said. This caused several economists to bump up their growth forecasts for the previous June-September quarter but to downgrade their expectations for the current quarter. JPMorgan Chase economist Daniel Silver called the possible upcoming decline in business stockpiles a “significant drag on growth.”Analysts had speculated that retail sales would be unchanged in October, slowed by the 16-day partial government shutdown and by cheaper gasoline that would mean less money spent at the pump.But what many consumers saved on gas they spent on other items. Excluding sales at service stations, retail spending rose 0.5 percent last month. Sales of furniture, electronics, appliances and clothing all showed solid gains.Congress likely blunted some of the impact of the shutdown by guaranteeing back pay for 800,000 furloughed federal workers.“There could be the possibility that all those furloughed workers knew they were going to be paid, so they may have taken the opportunity to take a mini-vacation and go shopping,” said Jennifer Lee, senior economist at BMO Capital Markets.Because consumers fuel about 70 percent of U.S. economic activity, expectations have arisen that the better-than-expected retail sales last month could build momentum for November and December.Before October’s retail sales report, most analysts predicted that the overall economy would grow at a weak annual rate below 2 percent in the current quarter. But after the report was issued Wednesday, Paul Dales, senior U.S. economist at Capital Economics, boosted his forecast: He thinks additional consumer spending will cause the overall economy to grow at an annual rate between 2 percent and 2.5 percent this quarter.Coupled with the retail sales was a slight decline last month in consumer prices.The consumer price index fell 0.1 percent in October, the Labor Department said. A sharp 2.9 percent drop in gasoline prices largely caused inflation to be held in check. Over the past 12 months, inflation has averaged 1 percent, well below the Federal Reserve’s 2 percent target.U.S. gasoline prices began falling in the spring and reached two-year lows earlier this month. The average price of a gallon of gas was $3.21, according to AAA’s Daily Fuel Gauge Report.And just as clothing purchases rose in October, consumers benefited from declining apparel prices. They fell 0.5 percent for the second consecutive month.But inflation rates this low are a double-edged sword: Lower prices tend to signal an economy struggling to grow at a healthy pace.Inflation has been modest over the past four years, with prices held down by the weak recovery from the Great Recession. Unemployment remains high at 7.3 percent. And many Americans who do have jobs are not receiving pay increases. That’s made it difficult for consumers to spend more and for retailers to charge more.

  •  
    The Tribune Co. is cutting 700 jobs, including some at the Chicago Tribune, as it consolidates advertising, marketing, manufacturing, digital media and other functions across its eight daily newspapers.

    Tribune Co. announces plan to cut 700 jobs

    The Tribune Co. is cutting 700 jobs, including some at the Chicago Tribune, as it consolidates advertising, marketing, manufacturing, digital media and other functions across its eight daily newspapers.

  •  
    The Fountain Blue banquet hall has reapplied for a permit to continue to operate its 6,000-square-foot outdoor tent on its property at 2300 Mannheim Road. Its first request was rejected last June.

    Fountain Blue reapplies for tent permit in Des Plaines

    The owners of the Fountain Blue banquet hall in Des Plaines hope they can still host weddings and other events in their outdoor tent — so long as there’s not a DJ involved. In a new permit application filed with the city, the restaurant’s owners agree not to have amplified music in the 6,000-square-foot tent, a major concession following the city council’s previous rejection of a permit extension.

  •  

    Gallagher Bassett Services receives Buyers Choice award
    Gallagher Bassett Services Inc., the risk and claims management subsidiary of Arthur J. Gallagher & Co., has been recognized by readers of Business Insurance magazine with its Buyers Choice Award for Commercial TPA — Overall.

  •  

    Context 4 Healthcare to partner with DataGenix

    Health care industry software provider Context 4 Healthcare Inc. announced a partnership with DataGenix Corp., a provider of enterprise-class software systems for health care payers.

  •  

    McHenry County EDC names new board, officers

    The McHenry County Economic Development Corp. elected officers and directors of the governing board during its annual meeting recently.

  •  

    Allstate declares 25 cent quarterly dividend
    Northbrook-based Allstate Corp. announced a quarterly dividend of 25 cents on each outstanding share of the corporation’s common stock, payable in cash on Jan. 2 to stockholders of record at the close of business on Nov. 29.

  •  

    CastleBank donations support Illinois SBDC at Waubonsee

    Entrepreneurs and owners of small businesses in the region will receive some extra benefits from the Illinois Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at Waubonsee Community College, thanks to continued support from Castle Bank.

  •  

    Advocate Good Shepherd receives 2013 Doyle Award

    Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital was recently recognized with the 2013 Richard L. Doyle Award by MCG, formerly Milliman Care Guidelines.

  •  
    Cheaper gasoline lowered overall U.S. consumer prices slightly in October. But outside the steep drop at the pump, inflation stayed mild.

    U.S. consumer prices drop 0.1 percent on cheaper gas

    Cheaper gasoline lowered overall U.S. consumer prices slightly in October. But outside the steep drop at the pump, inflation stayed mild. The Labor Department says the consumer price index fell 0.1 percent last month, down from a 0.2 percent gain in September.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Annie Overboe gave traditional pecan pie a makeover with walnuts as the starring nut and a more savory spiced crust.

    Baking secrets: Walnut tarts steals spotlight from ooh-too-sweet pecan pie

    Annie Overboe is not alone in thinking that most pecan pies are just too sweet to enjoy following Thanksgiving dinner. So she created a Spiced Walnut Tart that brings savory balance to the holiday dessert table.

  •  
    Annie Overboe gave traditional pecan pie a makeover with walnuts as the starring nut and a more savory spiced crust.

    Spiced Walnut Tart
    Spiced Walnut Tart

  •  
    The thoughtfully crafted “The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds” really should be experienced in 3-D.

    'Link Between Worlds' a 'Zelda' with depth

    For nearly three decades, spikey-eared hero Link has captained a boat, mastered a magic flute and flown a giant bird in the name of rescuing Princess Zelda from dastardly foes. In his latest quest, "The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds," he's morphing into walls. That may sound like a flat development for the wholly untarnished franchise, but it's as “aha!”-inspiring as previous installments.

  •  
    Eddie Money will play the Arcada Theatre in St. Charles in March.

    New Arcada shows a blast from the past

    The Arcada Theatre in St. Charles announces upcoming shows for its 2014 season.

  •  
    The sixth annual Elk Grove Mid-Summer Classics Concert Series kicks off July 1 at the Village Green.

    Survivor, Pat Benatar part of Elk Grove summer concert lineup

    Elk Grove Village officials say the sixth annual Mid-Summer Classics Concert Series next July is their biggest lineup yet. And it's likely they were able to secure the likes of 70s and 80s classic rock superstars like America, Survivor, Kenny Loggins, Pat Benatar and country artist John Michael Montgomery due to extra funding that became available with the discontinuation of the Tour of Elk Grove. The village is tripling its funding for the concerts.

  •  
    The soundtrack for “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” features various performers.

    All-star lineup lights up ‘Catching Fire’

    Choosing the tracks for “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” soundtrack must have been a mini-Hunger Games in itself after the wild success of the first film. The victors offer a mix of indie and mainstream, adding a rounded, energetic and emotional dimension to the film. The 12 tributes (15 on the deluxe edition) of album No. 2 battle it out to discover who puts out the edgiest, yet accessible, song in homage to the story.

  •  
    Ginnifer Goodwin, left, and Josh Dallas in a scene from “Once Upon a Time.” The actors, who play Snow White and Prince Charming on the show, are expecting their first child together.

    Ginnifer Goodwin is expecting her first child

    The fairy tale continues for Ginnifer Goodwin and Josh Dallas of ABC’s “Once Upon a Time.” The actors, who play Snow White and Prince Charming on the TV drama, are expecting their first child together.

  •  
    Chris Brown is due back in a Los Angeles courtroom on Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013, to update a judge on his progress on completing community service ordered in an assault case filed after his 2009 attack on Rihanna. It will be Brown’s first court appearance in LA since his arrest for misdemeanor assault in Washington, D.C.

    Chris Brown due back in LA court to update judge

    Chris Brown is scheduled to appear in a Los Angeles courtroom to update a judge on his probation for his 2009 attack on Rihanna.

  •  
    MSNBC was not saying Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013, whether disciplinary action is planned against Martin Bashir, who has apologized for what he called deeply offensive comments he made about Sarah Palin. Bashir made his original commentary on Friday and apologized on Monday.

    MSNBC not saying whether Bashir apology is enough

    MSNBC was not saying Tuesday whether disciplinary action is planned against show host Martin Bashir, who has apologized for “deeply offensive” comments he made about Sarah Palin.

  •  
    Kelly Clarkson says she’s expecting her first child. The 31-year-old singer said Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013, on Twitter that she and husband Brandon Blackstock are expecting their first child together.

    Kelly Clarkson announces pregnancy on Twitter

    Kelly Clarkson says she’s expecting her first child. The 31-year-old singer said Tuesday on Twitter that she and husband Brandon Blackstock are expecting their first child together. The original “American Idol” champion says the baby is the “best early Christmas present ever” in her tweet.

  •  
    Recording artist Adam Levine has been named Sexiest Man Alive 2013 by People magazine announced Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013. He is a coach on the NBC’s hit series, “The Voice.”

    Adam Levine named People’s ‘sexiest man alive’

    People has spoken and its named Adam Levine the “sexiest man alive” of 2013, the magazine announced Tuesday. The 34-year-old is the lead singer of the group Maroon 5 and a judge on NBC’s “The Voice.”

  •  
    President George W. Bush showed off his painting and poked fun of his post-White House years on the “The Tonight Show” with Jay Leno on Tuesday.

    George W. Bush shows off paintings with Jay Leno

    Former President George W. Bush showed off his painting and his granddaughter and poked fun of his post-White House years on the “The Tonight Show” with Jay Leno on Tuesday. The 43rd president said that he was inspired to take up painting after reading a Winston Churchill essay. When he hired an instructor for weekly lessons, he said he told her “There’s a Rembrandt trapped in this body. Your job is to find it.”

  •  

    15 million Americans will eat Thanksgiving dinner at a restaurant, survey finds

    A recent survey by the National Restaurant Association found that 33 million Americans will rely on restaurants for all or parts of their Thanksgiving meals this year. In addition, 46 million Americans are expected to dine out while shopping on Thanksgiving Day or Black Friday.

  •  

    Chicago chefs rule list of 2013 Jean Banchet culinary awards nominees

    Forty-four exceptional chefs, sommeliers, mixologists, and restaurants were nominated for the annual Jean Banchet Awards for Culinary Excellence. The winners will be announced on Friday, Jan. 31 at the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation’s Grand Chefs Gala presented by Fairmont Hotels and Resorts.

  •  
    The Xbox One will be in stores Friday, Nov. 22.

    Xbox One a great game player — and more

    What is the Xbox One? If you’re a video-game aficionado, you know the answer: It’s Microsoft’s latest game console, and it arrives in North America and Europe on Friday. But Microsoft wants you to think of Xbox One as more than a game machine. You can use it to watch movies on Netflix and Hulu Plus. You can hook it up to your cable box to watch live TV. You can Skype your grandma and share family photos through the SkyDrive storage service. Still, if you’re considering buying an Xbox One this week, you probably have one thing in mind: games.

  •  
    Selena Gomez will make a stop in the suburbs this weekend at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont.

    Weekend picks: Selena Gomez, Gilbert Gottfried come to Rosemont

    Selena Gomez wil make a stop this weekend at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont. Gilbert Gottfried pulls out his edgier comedy for a weekend run at Zanies Comedy Club. And holiday theater heats up with Theater Wit's production of "The Santaland Diaries."

  •  
    “Double Down: Game Change 2012” is the latest release from Mark Halperin and John Heilemann.

    Book looks behind the scenes of 2012 race

    For political junkies missing the drama of presidential election years, a new book on the 2012 race — exhaustive and replete with juicy details — may tide you over. “Double Down” by journalists Mark Halperin and John Heilemann is a follow-up to “Game Change.” “Double Down” follows the same formula: sharp writing and intriguing behind-the-scenes nuggets that are sure to get tongues wagging. Because their sources spoke on deep background, it's difficult to assess how accurate the anecdotes are, but overall they generally seem consistent.

  •  

    Homemade Egg Noodles
    Homemade Egg Noodles

  •  
    Forget turkey sandwiches. Turn Thanksgiving leftovers into a hot, filling soup.

    Pat’s Turkey Noodle Soup
    Pat's Turkey Noodle Soup

  •  
    Forget turkey sandwiches. Turn Thanksgiving leftovers into a hot, filling soup.

    Culinary adventures: Thanksgiving leftovers get new life in soup

    Don't want a turkey and cranberry sandwich again? Penny Kazmier pulls together a hot and tasty soup that starts with remnants of your Thanksgiving feast.

  •  

    Simply Pie Crusts
    Simply Piecrusts

  •  
    Thanksgiving is the holiday of sanctioned indulgence, but that doesn’t mean the meal has to break the bank. Strategic splurging like going with an all-butter crust can keep your budget, and your time, under control.

    Thanksgiving: When to save, where to splurge

    “The elements of Thanksgiving in general are relatively inexpensive,” says Melissa D’Arabian, cookbook author and host of the FoodNetwork.com web series “The Picky Eaters Project.” Items like potatoes, bread for stuffing, and even the turkey are pennies per pound.

  •  
    Ruth’s Chris Steak House’s vintage cocktail menu includes the $12 Pomegranate Martini.

    Night life events: Ruth’s Chris goes cocktail classic

    Ruth’s Chris keeps it classic this holiday season with a $12 vintage-inspired cocktail menu that includes the Classic Cosmo, Pomegranate Martini, Ruth’s Manhattan, Moscow Mule and the Rocks Rita. Plus, a happy hour takes place from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Monday through Friday with $7 eats.

  •  
    Lori Motyka plated Chicken with Harvest Vegetables and Sweet Potato Mash during the Daily Herald Cook of the Week Cookoff finals.

    Chicken with Harvest Vegetables and Sweet Potato Mash
    Harvest Chicken and Vegatables: Lori Motyka

  •  
    Lori Wiktorek plated Lemon Chicken Scallopini over Mushroom-Pea Pasta and Micro Green Salad during the Daily Herald Cook of the Week Cookoff finals.

    Lemon Chicken Scallopini over Mushroom-Pea Pasta and Micro Green Salad with Apples, Onions, Bacon and Honey Vinaigrette
    Lori Wiktorek: Lemon Chicken Scallopini

  •  
    Selena Gomez plays the Allstate Arena on Friday, Nov. 22.

    Music notes: Selena dances into Allstate

    Actor/singer Selena Gomes brings her contemporary pop to Rosemont this weekend, and fans of 1970s/1980s favorites KC and the Sunshine Band should try to catch the band in Naperville.

  •  
    The Clash's “Sound System” box set mirrors the look of a boom box.

    'Sound System' box set revisits the Clash

    Ah, the boom box. The portable stereo brings back memories of a specific time in music, when some of the sounds blaring from the speakers included the stew of punk rock, reggae and early hip-hop cooked up by the Clash. Bass player Paul Simonon designed the group's new box set to look like a boom box. Lift up the cover and you'll find the complete recorded output of the classic Clash lineup with outtakes, videos, fanzines, stickers, a poster and more.

  •  
    The Philip Treacy “Shocking Pink Roswell Hat” is on display in the “Isabella Blow: Fashion Galore!” exhibition in London. The exhibition, which runs from November 20 to March 2, celebrates the life and wardrobe of the late British patron of fashion and art who discovered many young fashion design talents.

    London exhibit features fashionista Isabella Blow

    She wore everything from a crystal-studded lobster to a tall ship made of feathers on her head, and chose a purple medieval robe for her wedding dress. Long before Lady Gaga rose to fame, British fashion editor and stylist Isabella Blow made theatrical clothes and outlandish headgear her personal trademark. A major exhibition opens in London Wednesday to celebrate the life and style of Blow, who is best known for discovering British designers Alexander McQueen and Philip Treacy.

  •  
    Autumn olive has been used to reclothe ground trashed by extensive construction projects or mine spoils. The roots even harbor microorganisms that convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that plants can use, thus building soil fertility.

    Enjoy this olive that’s not an olive

    Outside my window is a large, rounded shrub with leafless branches suffused in a golden haze. That haze is actually hundreds if not thousands of golden berries clustered tightly along the thin stems. This shrub asked nothing more from me than planting and care — in the form of water and mulch — for only its first year in the ground. Although not considered so years ago when I planted it, the shrub — known as autumn olive — is now considered dangerous, an invasive species.

  •  
    Thanksgiving is the holiday of sanctioned indulgence, but that doesn’t mean the meal has to break the bank. Strategic splurging like going with an all-butter crust can keep your budget, and your time, under control.

    Thanksgiving: When to save, where to splurge

    “The elements of Thanksgiving in general are relatively inexpensive,” says Melissa D’Arabian, cookbook author and host of the FoodNetwork.com web series “The Picky Eaters Project.” Items like potatoes, bread for stuffing, and even the turkey are pennies per pound.

  •  

    Cook of the Week Challenge: Recipes deserve a spot at your table

    Just for the record Twizzlers weren’t my idea. Months ago, even before we knew which 16 cooks would battle in the third annual Cook of the Week Challenge, I was told we had a sponsor who wanted Twizzlers to be in a mystery basket.

  •  
    Twizzlers flavor vodka for a twisted cocktail and also garnish lemony appetizer bites.

    Creamy Almond Phyllo Crisps
    Creamy Almond Phyllo Crisps

  •  
    Twizzlers flavor vodka for a twisted cocktail and also garnish lemony appetizer bites.

    Twisted Lemon Bites
    Twisted Lemon Bites

  •  
    Twisted Margatini

    Twisted Margatini
    Twisted Margatini

  •  
    Christine Murphy plated Bountiful Harvest Dinner with Mushroom Leek Saute and Micro Green Salad during the Daily Herald Cook of the Week Cookoff finals.

    Bountiful Harvest Dinner with Mushroom Leek Saute and Micro Green Salad
    Bountiful Harvest Dinner: Christine Murphy

  •  

    Fluffy Sweet Potato Bourbon Pie with Gingered Whipped Cream and Toasted Pecans
    Fluffy Sweet Potato Pie

  •  
    Donnalyn Vojta’s pecan pie that she baked in her store Crust’em Sweets store in Palatine.

    Donnalyn’s Pecan Pie
    Donnalyn's Pecan Pie

  •  
    Donnalyn Vojta shows off the pecan pies she baked in her shop, Crust’em Sweets in Palatine.

    Adding a personal touch to pies

    What is it about pie that stops me in my tracks? Because I'm unsure of how to add my own culinary twist to my favorite Thanksgiving desserts. But, according to expert bakers, a little creativity and a few easy techniques can help you add your own personal touch to your pies. For instance, try a gingersnap crust or a cranberry slab pie.

  •  

    Pumpkin Meringue Pie
    Pumpkin Meringue Pie

  •  
    Donnalyn Vojta’s pecan pie that she baked in her store Crust’em Sweets store in Palatine.

    Donnalyn’s Pecan Pie
    Donnalyn's Pecan Pie

  •  
    Apple cider and tapicoa work together to create a tangy filling Sweet Cider Apple Pie.

    Sweet Cider Apple Pie
    Sweet Cider Apple Pie

  •  
    Fresh and dried cranberries bring a double dose of flavor to this pear slab pie.

    Cranberry-Pear Slab Pie
    Cranberry Pear Slab Pie

  •  
    JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.com Dan Rich of Elgin hugs Daily Herald Food Editor Deb Pankey after being announced the winner of the Daily Herald Cook of the Week Cookoff finals, held at the Hyatt Regency Schaumburg Wednesday.

    Elgin superintendent creates winning recipes for all seasons

    Canned salmon couldn't stop him. Twizzlers couldn't twist him. And he wasn't chicken of chicken so Dan Rich of Elgin came out on top at the Daily Herald Cook of the Week Challenge Cook-off. His dish, created in an hour in front of a crowd of 400-plus food enthusiasts, pleased the judges and won Rich the title 2013 Cook of the Year.

  •  
    Green Tea-Rosemary Pork Chops with Cranberry-Apricot Stuffing and Cheddar Bacon Cauliflower Casserole

    FINAL FOUR: Lori Wiktorek of Aurora
    FINAL FOUR: Lori Wiktorek of Aurora

  •  
    Mediterranean Cod Portabella and Currant Caponata

    FINAL FOUR: Lori Motyka of West Chicago
    Final Four: Lori Motyka of West Chicago

  •  
    Jim Belushi, center, and the Chicago Board of Comedy

    The McAninch Arts Center sets grand opening, 2014 season

    The McAninch Arts Center on the College of DuPage campus announced it will reopen in February after a 14-month, $35 million renovation. Grammy Award-winner Kep Mo performs at the official reopening on Feb. 8, 2014. The grand opening celebration takes place on March 8, 2014 with headliner Jim Belushi and The Chicago Board of Comedy

Discuss

  •  
    Bev Horne/bhorne@dailyherald.com Adam Belmont, 23, of Northlake, leaves the courtroom at the DuPage County Courthouse in Wheaton. Belmont was arraigned on first-degree murder and sex assault charges in 2012 death of his ex-girlfriend, Alyssa Van Meter. It is the third time members of the news media were allowed to photograph and video record an arraignment in DuPage since the Illinois Supreme Court launched a pilot program offering extended courtroom access.

    Editorial: Cameras in court working despite fears

    Illinois is in the midst of a pilot program allowing cameras in the courtroom, but judges who decline to take part are being shortsighted, a Daily Herald editorial says.

  •  

    A rescuer for American conservatism

    Columnist Michael Gerson: For those who expect and fear an irrepressible conflict between the Tea Party and the Republican establishment, Sen. Mike Lee of Utah is a hopeful anomaly. Should this anomaly become a trend, the GOP’s future would be considerably brighter.

  •  

    The JFK in my mirror

    Columnist Richard Cohen: So much did not get done. But there remains — there will always remain — the undocumented journey of those who set out for Washington (or for some Godforsaken Peace Corps hut) because John Fitzgerald Kennedy beckoned.

  •  

    Law passed, my marriage still intact
    A Glendale Heights letter to the editor: On Nov. 5, the Illinois legislature passed a law making it legal for same sex couples to marry in the state. On Nov. 6, I woke up still married to my wife. She got up and got our grandson ready for school.

  •  

    If ACA online’s not working, enroll by phone
    A Rolling Meadows letter to the editor: I am astonished that, with respect to Obamacare, neither the newspapers nor the television news nor the radio news is doing anything but reporting the difficulties in accessing Obamacare through the Internet. All you have to do is use the telephone.

  •  

    I’ll take back all that money now
    An Elgin letter to the editor: I normally just ignore people I don’t agree with, but I’ll make an exception this time, regarding the letter that appeared Nov. 15. I was under the impression that we still had freedom to choose, including who we support, what we believe, etc., as the Constitution states. Guess not. Guess we all have to be in lock-step with the president, the Democrats or whomever this gentleman supports.

  •  

    Stronger policies to help bicyclists needed
    A Bartlett letter to the editor: The problem of America’s congested roads has long been answered with more concrete — billions of dollars of concrete. The bicycling community has been asking for only a fraction of that for shoulders, lanes and side paths to be completed at the same time as new and bigger roads. Not only is a bike facility low cost, it has better payback.

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