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Daily Archive : Wednesday August 28, 2013

News

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    Glen Ellyn officials have proposed a license fee for two hotels located in town, including the America’s Best Inn/Budgetel Inn & Suites at 675 Roosevelt Road.

    Glen Ellyn considers hotel licensing rules

    Glen Ellyn may regulate its two hotels in the same manner that it does other businesses, by imposing a licensing fee to cover annual inspections. Such a move, officials say, would enable the village to crack down on any code violations and occasional crime. “What we’re looking for is to provide high quality properties in the village of Glen Ellyn,” said Staci Hulseberg, the village’s director of...

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    Tanya Childs of Elgin is organizing a rally Saturday in Elgin for International Drug Overdose Awareness Day. Childs lost her 23-year-old daughter, Liana, to what she is sure was a heroin overdose in April. Her front yard now has a garden in Liana’s memory, to which people continually add flowers, plants and decorations.

    Elgin woman organizes heroin awareness rally

    Tanya Childs can’t look back, she can only look forward after her daughter, Liana, died from what she is sure was a heroin overdose in April. To celebrate International Drug Overdose Awareness Day, Childs organized a rally from 2 to 6 p.m. Saturday at the corner of Shales Parkway and Chicago Street in Elgin. Afterward, people will gather at 8 p.m. at Diamond Jim’s in East Dundee, where Liana’s...

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    Democratic state Sen. Julie Morrison of Deerfield leads a committee hearing Thursday on proposed tougher boating laws in Libertyville. Her 10-year-old nephew, Tony Borcia, died in a 2012 boating accident.

    State Senate committee hears opinions on tougher boating regulations

    Proposed tougher watercraft regulations that would include the loss of driving privileges on land for operating a boat under the influence elicited differing opinions at a state Senate committee hearing Thursday in Libertyville. Lumping vehicle and boating DUIs together are among the proposals spurred by the 2012 death of a 10-year-old boy who was struck by an impaired boater on the Chain O’...

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    DuPage Metropolitan Enforcement Group Director Mark Piccoli, left, DEA Special Agent Jack Riley and DuPage County State’s Attorney Bob Berlin announce charges Wednesday against 31 suspects accused in a massive heroin-dealing network in Cook and DuPage counties.

    31 charged in DuPage County heroin bust

    Calling heroin deaths a regional “epidemic,” authorities announced charges Wednesday against 31 suspects accused of peddling the drug for a massive distribution network in Cook and DuPage counties. Prosecutors said the charges stem from an extensive investigation that began in February and involved more than 17 court-authorized wiretaps. The case comes as fatal heroin overdoses have skyrocketed...

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    Wheeling resident Rick Rosen sang recently at a fundraiser with Chicago the Band. Left to right: Rosen, Walter Parazaider and Robert Lamm.

    Wheeling resident sings at fundraiser

    Wheeling resident Rick Rosen sang recently with Chicago The Band at Ravinia in Highland Park as part of the first fundraiser for the Ron and Vicki Santo Diabetic Alert Dog Foundation. The foundation provides trained canine companions to diabetics who do not get symptoms of dropping sugar levels in their bloodstream or those who are too young to recognize the symptoms.

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    Rosemont to host first Battle of the Bags tournament

    Rosemont will host it’s first bean bag toss tournament on Saturday, Sept. 7 at the village’s MB Financial Park at Rosemont entertainment district, 5501 Park Place. The two-division Battle of the Bags competition will offer participants a chance to win cash, gift certificates and other prizes.

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    Bolingbrook quarry drowning victim identified

    A teenager drowned in a Bolingbrook quarry Wednesday evening, according to police. Lt. Mike Rompa of the Bolingbrook Police Department said that three 17-year-old boys from Bolingbrook entered a water-filled section of a quarry at 1421 W. 135th St. around 7:30 p.m.

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    Michigan City Mayor Ron Meer, far right, and Jack Elia of Blue Chip Casino, second from right, welcome 6-year-old Nathan Woessner, center, and his parents, Faith, left, and Greg, behind Nathan, of Sterling, Ill., to the Blue Chip Casino in Michigan City, Ind. Tuesday afternoon. Michigan City is hosting a pair of events Wednesday to recognize those involved in rescuing Nathan, who was trapped beneath 11 feet of sand for more than three hours at Mount Baldy on July 12.

    Northern Indiana city to honor rescuers of 6-year-old boy

    A 6-year-old Illinois boy who was rescued after being trapped beneath 11 feet of sand for more than three hours is expected to return to northern Indiana along with his parents to thank those who freed him. Michigan City is hosting a pair of events Wednesday to recognize those involved.

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    Indiana trooper formally charged in gun-waving case

    NOBLESVILLE, Ind. — An Indiana State Police officer who allegedly waved a gun inside a central Indiana restaurant has been formally charged with criminal recklessness and disorderly conduct.

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    Illinois road work to be suspended for Labor Day weekend

    SPRINGFIELD — Construction work on Illinois highways will be suspended for the Labor Day weekend to improve the flow of traffic and increase safety.

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    Enbridge gets OK for 1st Indiana oil pipeline segment

    GRIFFITH, Ind. — Federal regulators have given Enbridge Energy approval to begin installing the first segment of the company’s planned replacement of 60 miles of crude oil pipeline in northern Indiana.

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    Dr. Reinhold Illerna, from left, administrative director of case management, Mary Schumann, director of care management, Sue Wickey and Jolene Grabowski, social work manager, work on a computer at a nurses station at the Alexian Brothers Medical Center in Elk Grove Village.

    Doctors search patient data for unneeded costs

    Hospitals and doctors serving tens of thousands of Illinois patients are taking part in an ambitious program under President Barack Obama's health law that's designed to save Medicare money and improve patient health. “This isn't rocket science. This is about getting to know your patients,” said Don Franke of Alexian Brothers Health System, which has agreed to manage the care of...

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    Chicago-area shooting victim charged with bribery

    A Chicago-area shooting victim is charged with seeking a $1,000 bribe from a man who allegedly shot him in exchange for a pledge not to testify against him. Cook County prosecutors say 29-year-old Larry Dennis of Markham appeared in court Tuesday. His bond was set at $30,000.

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    Chicago turning old rail line into elevated park

    Chicago is transforming an unused section of elevated railway into a tree-lined recreational trail linking five neighborhood parks.The nearly three-mile Bloomingdale Trail is being created out of a stretch of elevated track built a century ago. It runs west to east along Bloomingdale Avenue through West Side neighborhoods like Bucktown, Wicker Park, Logan Square and Humboldt Park.

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    18-year-old charged in Navy veteran's death

    Chicago police say first-degree murder charges have been filed against a teenager in the death of a Navy veteran during a robbery.Telkai Burns was fatally shot in the head as he resisted a man who pulled a gun on him Sunday and demanded his belongings. Police say the 33-year-old Burns, the father of two children, was declared dead an hour after being taken to Stroger Hospital.

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    Tears roll down the cheek of Zion resident Kisha Summeries, mother of deceased 5-month-old Joshua Summeries, as family spokesman Clyde McLemore tells media the family wants authorities to continue searching for the baby's body.

    Zion mother wants search for dead son to continue

    The mother of deceased 5-month-old Joshua Summeries wants police to continue the search for her son's body in a Zion landfill, a family spokesman said during a news conference Wednesday. “We understand there's a lot of trash, but we ask they continue to search. (Kisha) can't have closure,” family spokesman Clyde McLemore said.

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    Joseph Cantore

    DuPage forest commissioner announces board president bid

    When voters elect the next president of the DuPage County Forest Preserve District in November 2014, it will be the first time in 20 years longtime incumbent D. “Dewey” Pierotti Jr. has not been on the ballot. As the first candidate to announce his desire to replace Pierotti, forest preserve Commissioner Joseph Cantore hopes voters will want to select another familiar face.

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    Dennis Clark

    Second man charged in Naperville cellphone store robbery

    A DuPage County judge set bail Wednesday for one of two men charged with robbing a Naperville store of more than $40,000 in cellphones. Dennis Clark, 23, of Chicago, confessed to the Aug. 12 holdup during an interview with detectives late Tuesday, according to prosecutors.

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    U.S. 10th District congressman Brad Schneider talks with North Chicago Police Chief James Jackson and other area police chiefs about ways to combat gun violence on local, federal and state levels in North Chicago on Wednesday.

    Suburban police chiefs say they want national checks for gun buyers

    The small group of suburban police chiefs that gathered Wednesday in Lake County to discuss gun violence called for universal background checks for prospective gun owners and more funding for regional anti-gang units. “If you want to stop the violence, this is where things point,” Mundelein Police Chief Eric Guenther said during the hourlong meeting in North Chicago.

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    Lake County retired teachers:

    The Lake County Retired Teachers Association will meet at noon on Tuesday, Sept. 10, at Lambs Farm restaurant, at Route 176 and I-94, near Libertyville.

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    Libertyville to consider chicken keeping:

    Libertyville officials will consider the issue of having chickens in town.

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    Friends of HE Parks hosting beer and wine tasting fundraiser

    The Friends of the Hoffman Estates Park District Foundation will host a beer and wine tasting event called Uncorked & Untapped from 7 to 9:30 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 6 at the Bridges of Poplar Creek Country Club, 1400 Poplar Creek Drive in Hoffman Estates. Tickets are $25 in advance, $30 at the door.

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    Half days at two Grayslake schools:

    Grayslake Elementary District 46 plans to run half-days Thursday and Friday for two buildings without air conditioning. "Extreme heat" was cited for the decision.

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    A smoky haze from a huge California wildfire burning more than 150 miles away Tuesday hangs over Virginia Street in Reno, Nev. Most of the Sierra’s eastern front from south of Carson City to north of Lake Tahoe has been under an air quality alert for nearly a week.

    Calif. launches drone to aid wildfire battle

    Firefighters battling the giant wildfire burning in the Sierra Nevada added a California National Guard Predator drone to their arsenal Wednesday to give them almost immediate views of any portion of the flames chewing through rugged forests in and around Yosemite National Park.

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    This image provided by the United Media Office of Arbeen shows a member of UN investigation team taking samples of sands near a part of a missile that could be one of the chemical rockets used in last week’s suspected poison gas attack on Syrian civilians.

    Obama: Syrian gov’t carried out chemical attack

    President Barack Obama on Wednesday declared unequivocally that the United States has “concluded” that the Syrian government carried out a deadly chemical weapons attack on civilians last week. Obama did not present any direct evidence to back up his assertions.

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    18-year-old murder suspect held without bond

    An 18-year-old Chicago man is being held without bond in the death of a 33-year-old Iraq War veteran in a weekend robbery. Devon Brunt is accused of shooting to death Telkia Burns during a robbery Sunday at his apartment in the South Chicago neighborhood.

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    Maryville denies psychiatric hospital is unsafe for nurses

    Maryville Academy has issued a statement denying a nurses union’s claims about unsafe working conditions at the academy’s Behavioral Health Hospital in Des Plaines. The Illinois Nurses Association has filed an unfair labor practice complaint with the National Labor Relations Board claiming hospital management won’t negotiate on mandatory bargaining issues such as staffing.

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    Geneva streamlining special-events procedures

    Geneva is looking to streamline the approval process for special events, by allowing city workers to handle low-impact ones and limiting most walks and runs to four routes.

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    A military court on Wednesday sentenced Maj. Nidal Hasan to death for the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood, giving the Army psychiatrist a path to the martyrdom he appeared to crave in the attack on unarmed fellow soldiers.

    Soldier sentenced to death for Fort Hood shooting

    A military court on Wednesday sentenced Maj. Nidal Hasan to death for the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood, giving the Army psychiatrist a path to the martyrdom he appeared to crave in the attack on unarmed fellow soldiers.

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    President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama, former President Jimmy Carter and former President Bill Clinton wave as they leave.

    Images: March on Washington 50th Anniversary Ceremonies
    Images from Wednesday and the Let Freedom Ring ceremony at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. It was 50 years ago today when Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech from the steps of the memorial.

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    Kane County drug court employee wants slander lawsuit dismissed

    A Kane County Probation Department supervisor, who is being sued for slander by another employee who served as president of the Burlington-based Central 301 School Board, wants a judge to dismiss the lawsuit. Laurel Kling, who served on the school board from 1999 to 2011, filed the lawsuit in May arguing that Drug Court Supervisor Carrie Thomas admitted that she told co-workers that Kling was...

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    Kane erases projected deficit in budget talks

    The newest version of Kane County's 2014 budget is balanced, but includes a smaller cushion for contingencies and does not include money for raises. With several union contracts currently being negotiated, that means the board will go back to the drawing board at least once more. While there, they will likely see a fight from Coroner Rob Russell. The new budget gives him two new positions, but...

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    President Barack Obama speaks at the Let Freedom Ring ceremony at the Lincoln Memorial Wednesday to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. It was 50 years ago today when Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech from the steps of the memorial.

    MLK’s dream inspires a new march, and a president

    Standing on hallowed ground of the civil rights movement, President Barack Obama challenged new generations Wednesday to seize the cause of racial equality and honor the “glorious patriots” who marched a half century ago to the very steps from which Rev. Martin Luther King spoke during the March on Washington.

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    Cook County looking for Metra board replacement

    A member of the Cook County Board is asking for applications to be on the Metra board of directors. County Commissioner Jeff Tobolski put out a news release Wednesday asking applicants to send resumes and cover letters.

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    Carla Oglesby

    Ex-Stroger aide guilty of theft, money laundering

    A former top aide to Cook County’s former board president has been found guilty of stealing more than $300,000 in taxpayer money and money laundering. In a bench trial, Carla Oglesby on Wednesday was acquitted of organizing financial crimes and official misconduct charges.

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    U of I student taken for an expensive ride

    Police say someone took more than $4,000 from a new University of Illinois student who had just arrived in Chicago from China.

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    New PAC formed to support Republicans

    A new political action committee has been formed to try to elect more Republicans to the Democrat-controlled Illinois House.

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    No injuries in Long Grove school bus accident

    A school bus was involved in a two-vehicle accident Wednesday afternoon in Long Grove, but no students were injured, according to officials. Long Grove Fire Chief Robert Turpel said the accident occurred around 4 p.m. near the intersection of Route 22 and Tall Oaks Lane.

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    Mundelein’s John Lynn, founder of the Kirk Players community theater group, died Tuesday. He was 83.

    Kirk Players community theater founder John Lynn dies

    Longtime Mundelein resident and local theater founder John Lynn was remembered as a kind, family man who believed in giving back to the community. The Kirk Players founder died Tuesday at Advocate Condell Medical Center in Libertyville. Lynn was 83.

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    Jack Schaffer

    Metra board member says he’s done at end of term

    The lone Metra board member who voted against the controversial severance package for the agency’s former CEO has no plans to resign like five counterparts have done, but says he’s leaving the board once his term expires in June. “Eight years is more than enough for any rational human being to serve on a board like this,” McHenry County appointee Jack Schaffer said.

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    An Illinois Department of Transportation truck runs a red light on eastbound Lake Street at Barrington Road in Hanover Park three months ago. The citation was dismissed, but police did not say why.

    How IDOT truck escaped red-light ticket

    Hanover Park police have only dismissed one red light camera ticket in two years. That ticket was issued to the driver of an Illinois Department of Transportation truck but cancelled after an IDOT worker sent police a note on agency letterhead saying the truck was on state business at the time. Now, IDOT and others are investigating. “To me, it's highly unusual,” Hanover Park Mayor...

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    Illinois eyeing new day care nutrition regulations

    State authorities are considering a series of proposals that would remove fatty and sugary snacks along with chocolate milk from day care centers in Illinois, while also banning the youngest children from watching television, officials said.

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    NIU hires new police chief

    Northern Illinois University announced Wednesday it hired a new police chief to replace longtime former chief Donald Grady, who was fired amid accusations that he mishandled evidence in an alleged sexual assault case involving an officer.

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    Suspect charged with rape of 6th woman

    A Woodstock man already accused of multiple sexual assaults has been charged in the rape of a sixth woman he met online.

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    Man charged in baseball attack on Chicago officer

    Police say Tythia Thigpen hit an officer in the head with a bat early Saturday while the officer was trying to break up a street fight on the city’s South Side.

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    Accountable care groups serving Medicare patients
    More than 200,000 Illinois Medicare patients will have their health care needs coordinated by federally designated accountable care organizations. Here is a list of the seven ACOs based in Illinois.

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    Shubhra Govind

    Hanover Park taps new community and economic development director

    Hanover Park’s understaffed community development department finally has a new leader. Village Manager Juliana Maller on Wednesday announced the appointment of Shubhra Govind as community and economic development director, a position that’s been vacant for more than 18 months.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Joshua M. Stadie, 31, of Algonquin, was charged with battery and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon at 10:58 p.m. Monday, according to a sheriff’s report. He is accused of threatening a person with a knife in the 33W0-99 block of Richardson Road near East Dundee.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    A six-month old German shepherd, valued at $1,500, along with $400, were stolen between 1:30 and 3:30 p.m. Saturday from a home on the 500 block of Sherman Avenue near Aurora, according to a sheriff’s report.

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    Cliff McIlvaine, who was sued by the city of St. Charles in an effort to get him to finish a project that he first pulled a permit for in 1975, stands on a landing between his original home to the left and new, super-insulated addition on the right, which he hopes to turn into a museum.

    Languishing St. Charles project could be nearing end

    The light can been seen at the end of the tunnel on a St. Charles man's home improvement project that was started in 1975. Attorneys expect remaining tasks from a judge's order to be completed well before Cliff McIlvaine is due in court again Oct. 10. McIlvaine also seeks $15,000 in damages from a roofing contractor for leak during a July storm.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Thieves stole a designer watch valued at $18,000 between from a desk in a business at 1201 Tonne Road, Elk Grove Village.

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    Buffalo Grove Fire Lt. William “Kent” Brecht thanks the department after receiving the station flag on the occasion of his retirement after 25 years with the department.

    Buffalo Grove firefighter retires after 25 years

    The Village of Buffalo Grove honored retiring fire Lt. William “Kent” Brecht Wednesday morning with a walk out ceremony celebrating his 25 years with the department. Village officials, including the town’s mayor and manager, fire and police personnel, and retirees all showed up for the event. “He’s a good guy,” said fire department spokesman John Gilleran, adding that for a number of years one of...

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    Tony Scarimbolo of Harwood Heights plays the banjo while Cyndy Richardson of Wilmette plays the fiddle in the shade by the Fox River at the 36th annual Fox Valley Folk Music and Storytelling Festival at Island Park in Geneva. This year’s festival takes place Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 1-2, with additional shows added in downtown Geneva Saturday, Aug. 31.

    Fox Valley Folk fest adds Saturday shows

    Illinois’ largest folk festival is about to get larger. This year, the Fox Valley Folk Music and Storytelling Festival will expand its offerings with concert stages in downtown Geneva on Saturday, Aug. 31.

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    Pat Carey

    Carey won't seek re-election to Lake County Board in 2014

    Lake County Board member Pat Carey has announced she will not seek re-election in 2014. Carey, a Democrat from Grayslake, said in a news release early Wednesday that she is stepping aside in order to pursue other interests.

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    DuPage County Board loosens cap on campaign contributions

    The DuPage County Board has repealed its self-imposed cap on campaign contributions after the state’s attorney’s office told members the restrictions can’t be enforced. Instead, DuPage now will mirror state law when it comes to limiting the amount of campaign money county board members and the board chairman can accept from donors doing or seeking county government work.

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    Naperville police probing home burglaries

    Naperville police are cautioning residents to lock their doors after a series of burglaries to homes on the city’s southeast and northwest sides. Police are investigating as many as eight burglaries in which intruders targeted cash and electronic devices, Sgt. Louis Cammiso said Wednesday.

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    A 9-year-old Round Lake girl drowned near a boat launch at Stormy Monday bar in Ingleside Tuesday evening.

    Autopsy scheduled on 9-year-old who drowned in Fox Lake

    McHenry County coroner officials say an autopsy is scheduled for today on the 9-year-old Round Lake girl who drowned while swimming Tuesday evening in Fox Lake. Officials have not yet released the identity of the girl. McHenry County Coroner Anne Majewski said the girl was wading in water with family and friends but went under the surface after walking farther out from the shore.

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    Embracing engagment at Waubonsee Community College

    Education has embraced the three “Rs” since at least the late 1700s. While Waubonsee Community College remains committed to teaching students to excel in reading, writing and arithmetic (along with other vital academic skills), this year we’re focusing on the three “Cs”: connect, collaborate and cultivate.

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    Robin Hewitt of Batavia, who has Duchenne muscular dystrophy, recently turned 50. Many people with his disease don’t live much past 20. “My days are pretty full, and I enjoy the time I get to spend with my friends,” Hewitt says.

    Batavia man with muscular dystrophy celebrates 50th birthday

    If someone turns 90, it’s awesome. Ninety-five is even better. One hundred is big news. Fifty? Not so much. Yet Robin Hewitt of Batavia, who has Duchenne muscular dystrophy and recently celebrated his 50th birthday, has long surpassed the average life expectancy for the disease. “Robin is amazing,” says his friend Dan Sladek, a former director of the Muscular Dystrophy Assocation in Aurora. “I...

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    Overdoes Awareness Day Saturday in Lake in the Hills

    Overdose Awareness Day starts at 6 p.m. Saturday in Lake in the Hills.

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    Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel. As the Obama administration insists the Syrian government must be punished, U.S. officials are still grappling with what type of military strike might deter future chemical weapons attacks and trying to assess how President Bashar Assad would respond, two senior administration officials said Wednesday.

    U.S. mulls objectives, outcomes of a strike on Syria

    U.S. officials are still grappling with how to design a military strike to deter future chemical weapons attacks in Syria and assessing how President Bashar Assad might respond, two senior officials said Wednesday, as the Obama administration insisted the Syrian government must be punished.

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    On Tuesday night, Janet Shaw of Wheaton and more than 30 other residents stood in front of DuPage County's administration building along County Farm Road to protest a new state law that gives DuPage the power to impose a stormwater fee on every land owner in the county.

    Residents protest DuPage stormwater fee proposal

    It could take years for DuPage County officials to decide whether to impose a stormwater utility fee on every land owner in the county. But some residents already are organizing to oppose the idea. More than 30 people staged a protest Tuesday night in front of the county administration building.

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    Libertyville is planning a binding referendum to determine the future of the Brainerd building. Voters will have to decide whether renovating the former school is worth paying more in property taxes.

    Voters could decide fate of former Libertyville High

    Libertyville voters next March will decide whether the former Libertyville Township High School will be renovated as a performing arts and community center. "That would be funded with a tax increase, which is the hard part," said John Snow, a member of the Brainerd Community Center Inc. "However, we need an answer."

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    Kara Fitzgerald stands at her new farm location in Shrewsbury, Vt. Two years after Irene washed away 10 acres of summer crops and topsoil, Evening Song Farm is back selling produce — thanks in part to borrowed money and borrowed land. Today she grows crops on a hillside about a mile away.

    Vermont marks 2 years since Irene’s flooding, damage

    Two years ago, Dot’s diner was practically wiped out when Tropical Storm Irene poured down on interior New England, causing massive flooding, killing dozens of people and forever altering the landscape. The Wilmington eatery was to be held up as an example of Vermont’s resilience and spirit on Wednesday as the state marks the second anniversary of the deadly storm and celebrates milestones in its...

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    Mundelein High School’s commencement ceremony will move to the Sears Centre in Hoffman Estates in 2014.

    Mundelein High School moving graduation to Sears Centre

    Members of Mundelein High School’s Class of 2014 will collect their diplomas at the Sears Centre in Hoffman Estates, a first for the school. Commencement ceremonies were held at the Libertyville Sports Complex this spring and in 2012.

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    Zein Rimawi, 59, second from right, a leader and founder of the Islamic Society of Bay Ridge and mosque, meet with members in his office before a Jumu’ah prayer service at the mosque on Friday, Aug. 16, 2013 in Brooklyn, N.Y. The NYPD targeted his mosque as a part of a terrorism enterprise investigation beginning in 2003, spying on it for years. The mosque has never been charged as part of a terrorism conspiracy.

    NYPD designates mosques as terrorism organizations

    The New York Police Department has secretly labeled entire mosques as terrorism organizations, a designation that allows police to use informants to record sermons and spy on imams, often without specific evidence of criminal wrongdoing. Designating an entire mosque as a terrorism enterprise means that anyone who attends services there is a potential subject of an investigation and fair game for...

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    Sometimes God closes a door to set us on a new path

    Are doors slamming in your face, no matter how hard you try to open them? Maybe God is trying to direct you down a different path, says columnist Annettee Budzban

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    Woman who gouged out eyes of Chinese boy sought

    Police in northern China launched a massive search Wednesday for a woman accused of gouging out the eyes of a 6-year-old boy. Authorities in the city of Linfen in Shanxi province offered a $16,000 reward for the woman’s capture.

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    Rev. Al Sharpton, left, and Martin Luther King III stand together during an event to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial, Saturday, Aug. 24, 2013, in Washington. The eldest son of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. says blacks can rightfully celebrate his father’s life and work with pride, but much more must be accomplished.

    King bemoans ‘staggering’ joblessness among blacks

    The eldest son of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. says blacks can rightfully celebrate his father’s life and work with pride, but much more must be accomplished. Martin Luther King III, preparing to join ceremonies Wednesday commemorating the 50th anniversary of his father’s “I Have a Dream” speech, says the country should confront “staggering unemployment” among black males 18 to 30 years old.

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    A coordinated wave of bombings tore through Shiite Muslim areas in and around the Iraqi capital early Wednesday, killing scores and wounding many more, officials said. The blasts, which came in quick succession, targeted residents out shopping and on their way to work.

    Attacks kill at least 66 in Iraq, many more hurt

    A coordinated wave of bombings tore through Shiite Muslim areas in and around the Iraqi capital early Wednesday, part of a wave of bloodshed that killed at least 66 people and wounded many more, officials said. The blasts, which came in quick succession, mainly targeted residents out shopping and on their way to work.

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    Fisherman Fumio Suzuki stands on his boat Ebisu Maru Monday before the start of fishing in the waters off Iwaki, about 25 miles south of the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Japan. Suzuki’s trawler is one of 14 at his port helping to conduct once-a-week fishing expeditions in rotation to measure radiation levels of fish they catch in the waters off Fukushima. Fishermen in the area hope to resume test catches following favorable sampling results more than two years after the disaster, though for now fishing is suspended due to leaks of radiation-contaminated water from storage tanks at the nuclear power plant.

    Japan: Nuke plant operator found leak too slowly

    Japan’s nuclear regulator on Wednesday upgraded the rating of a leak of radiation-contaminated water from a tank at its tsunami-wrecked nuclear plant to a “serious incident” on an international scale, and it castigated the plant operator for failing to catch the problem earlier. The Nuclear Regulation Authority’s latest criticism of Tokyo Electric Power Co. came a day after the operator of the...

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    Chairs, metal risers and video screens are set up Tuesday at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, in preparation for the 50th anniversary of the March On Washington celebrations that will be held Wednesday. Barack Obama, who is going to speak, was 2 years old and growing up in Hawaii when King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. Fifty years later, the nation’s first black president will stand as the most high-profile example of the racial progress King espoused, delivering remarks at a nationwide commemoration of the 1963 demonstration for jobs, economic justice and racial equality.

    More than 300 sites to ring bells for MLK speech

    The final refrain of Martin Luther King Jr.’s most famous speech will echo around the world as bells from churches, schools and historical monuments “let freedom ring” in celebration of a powerful moment in civil rights history. Organizers said people at more than 300 sites in nearly every state will ring their bells at 3 p.m. their time Wednesday or at 3 p.m. EDT, the hour when King delivered...

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    Britain Foreign Secretary William Hague walks to Downing Street Wednesday ahead of a national security meeting to be held at the Cabinet office with Prime Minister David Cameron on the situation in Syria. The U.S. and international partners were unlikely to undertake military action before Thursday. That’s when Cameron will convene an emergency meeting of Parliament, where lawmakers were expected to vote on a motion clearing the way for a British response.

    Britain to give U.N. resolution condemning Syria

    Britain says it will put forward a resolution Wednesday to the U.N. Security Council condemning the Syrian government for the alleged chemical attack that has killed hundreds of civilians. A statement from Prime Minister David Cameron’s office said Britain would seek a measure "authorizing necessary measures to protect civilians” in Syria under Chapter 7 of the U.N. charter.

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    Vandals topple headstones in southern Indiana cemetery

    HARRODSBURG, Ind. — Southern Indiana residents with loved ones buried in a cemetery where vandals toppled headstones are collecting reward money seeking tips on who might have committed the crime.More than 20 headstones were topped overnight Saturday at Clover Hill Cemetery in the Monroe County community of Harrodsburg just south of Bloomington.

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    Ritz says education ‘vision’ needs cooperation

    INDIANAPOLIS — State School Superintendent Glenda Ritz says Indiana residents and political leaders need to work together to “transform” education for all students.

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    Illinois crew battles Oregon wildfire

    SPRINGFIELD — Nearly 20 Illinoisans were members of a crew that spent two weeks battling a wildfire in southwestern Oregon.

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    White Hall man again accused in deadly DUI wreck

    CARROLTON, Ill. — A southern Illinois man again is facing charges that he drunkenly caused a vehicle wreck that killed a female passenger.

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    State spends $23 million on SIUE construction

    EDWARDSVILLE, Ill. — The state of Illinois is providing $23 million to finish a construction project at the Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville.Gov. Pat Quinn joined university officials on campus Tuesday to announce the funding.

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    Expanding Illinois tire plant gets new rail spur

    MOUNT VERNON, Ill. — One of southern Illinois’ biggest employers now has a new railroad spur as it presses ahead with a $129-million expansion it says will add 100 jobs by mid-2015.The $1.1 million spur paid for by Illinois taxpayers was unveiled Tuesday at the 3,000-worker Continental Tire the Americas site that produces more than 14 million tires a year in Mount Vernon.

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    Waupun police officer accused of burglary resigns

    WAUPUN, Wis. — A Wisconsin police officer accused of burglary, stealing two vehicles and leading other officers on a high-speed chase has submitted his resignation. The Waupun Police and Fire Commission was expected to accept Lt. Bradley Young’s resignation on Thursday. Waupun Police Department Deputy Chief Scott Louden told The Reporter Media that Young handed it in last week.

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    Consecutive records for Wisconsin lottery sales

    MADISON, Wis. — The Wisconsin lottery has had another record year in sales. State officials say the lottery reached about $565 million in sales for the fiscal year ending June 30. That’s $18 million more than the previous fiscal year and another record breaker.

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    Wisconsin Labor Day traffic looks especially hairy

    MADISON, Wis. — State transportation officials say getting around southern Wisconsin this Labor Day weekend is going to be tough.In addition to drivers heading out to vacation spots, thousands of motorcyclists will be traveling around southeastern Wisconsin for Harley-Davidson’s 110th anniversary events from Thursday through Sunday.

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    Wisconsin man says he smoked crack cocaine before chase

    LA CROSSE, Wis. — Authorities say a Sparta man told sheriff’s deputies he was high on crack cocaine when he led them on a chase with speeds exceeding 100 mph.

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    Indiana surveys residents on emergency preparedness

    INDIANAPOLIS — The Indiana Department of Homeland Security wants to gauge how prepared state residents are for emergencies and disasters through an online survey.

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    Illinois State Police seek public help in hunt for murder suspect

    EAST ST. LOUIS, Ill. — Illinois State Police are asking for the public’s help in tracking down a teenager accused in an East St. Louis shooting death months ago.Prosecutors in St. Clair County last week charged 17-year-old Shaun Henderson of Washington Park with first-degree murder.Authorities allege Henderson chased down and repeatedly shot Jordan Anderson on Jan. 12.

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    Chemical plant executive apologizes for June fire

    ROCKFORD — The head of a northern Illinois chemical plant is apologizing to residents for a fire this summer and says cleanup efforts are under way. Nova-Kem CEO and President Reno Novak spoke during a community meeting Tuesday evening in Seward, telling residents he’s “really sorry.”

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    Afghan National Army soldiers stand guard on the outskirts of in Kabul, Afghanistan. Ghazni and neighboring Wardak province have become a hotbed of insurgent activity in the past year, mainly along the main highway which links Kabul to Kandahar in the south and runs through Gulistaniís hometown. Dozens of abductions and killings are reported weekly on the highway, and Afghans are beginning to worry that the nascent Afghan National Security Forces taking over the defense of Afghanistan won’t be up to the job.

    Afghan army seen improving, but public fears mount

    Ghazni and neighboring Wardak province have become a hotbed of insurgent activity in the past year, mainly along the main highway which links Kabul to Kandahar in the south and runs through Gulistani’s home town. Dozens of abductions and killings are reported weekly on the highway, and Afghans are beginning to worry that the nascent Afghan National Security Forces taking over the defense of...

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    Teams get creative with the design and themes of their “beds” during the annual Last Fling Bed Races in Naperville. The races are set to begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 31.

    ‘Fast and fun’ time in store at Naperville bed races

    Of all the things that can be raced — cars, boats, bikes, swimmers, runners, even rubber duckies — beds seem an unlikely candidate. But beds will be the front-runners, the last-place finishers and all the middle-of-the-pack competitors in between as the annual Bed Races take the street during the Naperville Jaycees’ Last Fling.

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    The Naperville Jaycees’ Last Fling celebration opens Friday in downtown Naperville and runs through Sunday.

    Music, rides, games highlight Naperville’s Last Fling celebration

    The first days of school, the final days of August and the Last Fling in Naperville all signal one thing: The end of summer. It can be a bittersweet time for anyone who loves warm weather or hates homework, but the Naperville Jaycees make it a time to celebrate with their annual festival, this year spanning four days from Friday, Aug. 30 to Monday, Sept. 2.

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    A blimp masquerading as a minion from the “Despicable Me” movies toured the air space above the Tri-Cities and DuPage County on Tuesday during a short stop at the DuPage Airport in West Chicago. Allan Patrick Judd, who has been flying since he was 16 and before he could drive a car, is the pilot that has been steering the Minion Balloon on its cross-country tour promoting the movie.

    Dawn Patrol: Girl drowns in Fox Lake; Bears’ Marshall not happy with hip progress

    Girl drowns in Fox Lake. Zaruba opposes cuts to DuPage patrols. Arlington Heights launches superintendent search. Pihos plans to run for re-election. Lauzen talks jobs with area business leaders. Dist. 300 sees positive college readiness data. Marshall not happy with hip progress. Sox down Astros.

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    Teacher Lisa Lally, left, shows Nichole Palumbo of Carol Stream a classroom at the new District 93 Early Childhood Center Tuesday night. The first day of school is Thursday.

    Dist. 93 unveils preschool center in Bloomingdale

    Thursday marks the first day of school for 3- and 4-year-old preschoolers who reside within the attendance boundaries of Carol Stream District 93, which includes portions of Carol Stream, Bloomingdale and Hanover Park. But for the first time, preschoolers throughout the district will be attending classes at a centralized location — and in a classroom environment their older peers never...

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    The Rev. Clyde Brooks discusses his experiences at the March on Washington 50 years ago and how he was moved by the Rev. Martin Luther King's “I Have a Dream” speech.

    King's speech a turning point, black ministers say

    As an African American growing up in Georgetown, Ill., in the 1940s, the Rev. Clyde Brooks couldn't use the gas station in town, or eat in restaurants unless it was the kitchen. One momentous speech 50 years ago changed the course of the then-27-year-old's life forever. “When Dr. King spoke those words, and to see the momentum of the moment, black and white, all denominations coming...

Sports

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    Mike North video: Waivers Needed in NFL
    If a football player doesn't want to sign a waiver that he won't sue the league if he gets hurt, then Mike North thinks he shouldn't be allowed to play. There are dangers in every job in life, the NFL is no different.

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    Iowa fullback Mark Weisman (45) is among 127 college football players from area suburbs on FBS rosters to open the 2013-14 season. Northern Illinois, which is loaded with Chicago area talent, visits Iowa on Saturday.

    Follow these FBS players from the suburbs

    They’re spread from Hawaii to Boston, Houston to Wyoming, but reside mostly in the Midwest. We went looking for players from the Daily Herald coverage area on active FBS rosters and found 127 of them. College football season kicks off Thursday, while the local teams open on Saturday. Illinois hosts Southern Illinois (11 a.m., BTN), Northern Illinois visits Iowa to exact some revenge from last year’s last-minute loss at Soldier Field (2:30 p.m., BTN), and Northwestern heads west for a rematch of the 1949 Rose Bowl against California (9:30 p.m., ESPN2).

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    White Sox starting pitcher Chris Sale celebrates with third baseman Jeff Keppinger after their victory over the Astros on Wednesday night.

    Sale continues to get job done for Sox

    Chris Sale limited the Astros to 1 run over 8 innings and the White Sox' ace had 12 strikeouts in Wednesday night's 6-1 win. Avisail Garcia and Leury Garcia sparked the Sox' offense.

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    Wednesday’s girls volleyball scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's girls volleyball matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s girls tennis scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's girls tennis meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s girls swimming scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's girls swimming meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s girls golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's girls golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s girls cross country scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's girls cross country meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s boys soccer scoreboard
    High school varsity results of Wednesday's boys soccer matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s boys golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's boys golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Marquardt paces Stevenson win

    Girls golfStevenson d. Mundelein: At Countryside, Nikki Marquardt fired a 2-under 34 to lead the visiting Patriots (169) past the Mustangs (175).Cristina Loverde’s 37 and Courteney Fabbri’s 39 led Mundelein.Warren d. Libertyville: At Bittersweet, the host Blue Devils (177) edged the Wildcats (180).Warren’s Erica Price and Libertyville’s Jessica Lovinger shared medalist honors, as each golfer shot a 41.Lake Forest d. Grant: At Antioch Golf Club, the Scouts (174) were led by Emily Young’s 39.Grant (232) received a 55 from Kirsten Bank.

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    Comeback triumph for Libertyville

    Libertyville’s girls volleyball team overcame some adversity and rallied for a road victory Wednesday night. Freshman libero Morgan O’Brien led the way with 14 digs, as the Wildcats defeated Evanston 19-25, 25-13, 25-22.

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    White Sox’s Konerko understands frustration, anger

    Chris Sale kept his cool during Wednesday night's standout start vs. the Astros, but he has lost his temper several times this season. White Sox captain Paul Konerko used to be in the same boat, and he recalled smashing 17 bats during one game earlier in his career.

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    Baker sharp in rehab start for Cougars

    Kane Count Cougars game report:A pair of home runs backed Scott Baker’s best rehab start as the Kane County Cougars defeated the Cedar Rapids Kernels 9-1 to snap a three-game losing streak Wednesday at Veterans Memorial Stadium.After Trevor Gretzky and Gioskar Amaya singled, Jeimer Candelario ripped a 3-run homer with two outs in the third inning for the Cougars (23-41, 53-77). In the fourth, Carlos Escobar hit a 2-run shot.Baker (1-2) retired the first 13 Kernels he faced and allowed 1 hit over 5 shutout innings with 2 strikeouts and no walks.

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    Moran, Hinsdale Central deliver a loss to Hersey

    When Hersey girls volleyball coach Nancy Lill heard her former player Kelly Moran was named the Hinsdale Central coach in May of 2012, she was not all that surprised. Lill knew Moran would one day be a coach. Lill said Moran, a member of Hersey’s 2004 state qualifier, played like a coach on the floor. Wednesday, Moran coached on the same floor where she played for Lill. This time, she was on the other side of the court and her Red Devils made her feel right at home by capturing a 25-13, 25-16 victory over the defending Mid-Suburban League champs in the Carter Gymnasium in Arlington Heights.

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    The White Sox’s Avisail Garcia watches his three-run home run off Houston Astros starting pitcher Lucas Harrell Wednesday night at U.S. Cellular Field. Garcia’s seventh-inning homer also scored Paul Konerko and Adam Dunn.

    Sale strikes out 12 as White Sox beat Astros 6-1

    Chris Sale struck out 12 over eight-plus dominant innings and Avisail Garcia hit a three-run homer to lead the Chicago White Sox to a 6-1 win over the Houston Astros on Wednesday night. Garcia finished with three hits for the White Sox, who have won 10 of their last 12 games.

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    Grayslake North notches win No. 1

    Grayslake North’s boys soccer team earned its first win of the season Wednesday. Senior Andreas Thedorf converted a game-tying penalty kick and the Knights prevailed in a penalty-kick shootout to edge Woodstock North 2-1 in Vernon Hills’ Cougar Classic.

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    Libertyville’s Jack Lipp watches his tee shot on the third hole during boys golf action Wednesday at Pine Meadow Golf Course in Libertyville.

    Big shot: Libertyville’s Lipp does it again

    A smaller ball didn’t provide the same larger-than-life thrill that Jack Lipp experienced on a basketball court three months ago. But the Libertyville senior wasn’t about to downplay his excitement after his spectacular golf shot Wednesday. Lipp’s 150-yard shot from the fairway landed near the front of the green and trickled in for an eagle-2 on the par-4 ninth hole at Pine Meadow Golf Club, helping Libertyville shoot a season-best 151 in defeating Carmel Catholic (160).

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    Burlington Central’s Caiti Seibert, left, and Makenna Jensen block a spike by Hampshire’s Erin Foss Wednesday at Hampshire.

    Burlington Central dominates Hampshire

    The saying goes: It’s not how you start, it’s how you finish. In Burlington Central’s case during its nonconference volleyball opener against rival Hampshire Wednesday night, it was not only how the Rockets started, but how they finished. The Rockets set the tempo early by jumping out to a commanding 13-2 lead in Game 1 and on the final point of the match, senior middle Makenna Jensen lost her shoe, sent it flying to the Rocket bench and was still able to get the game-winning kill for a 25-11, 25-18 win in both teams’ first action of the season in Hampshire.

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    Girls volleyball/Fox Valley roundup

    Dundee-Crown d. Streamwood: Kailey Moll had 7 kills and 7 blocks and Frankie Cavallaro added 5 kills and 14 assists as the Chargers won their season opener 25-16, 25-18. Emily Michalski added 5 kills for D-C, while Kaylee Sommers had 6 digs and 3 aces.Larkin falls twice: The Royals had a rough start in pool play at the Wheaton North tournament, falling to Montini 25-19, 25-12 and to Stagg 17-25, 25-20, 25-22. Olivia Kofie led Larkin (1-2) with 19 kills, 6 digs and 3 aces while Brianna Siewert added 20 kills, 5 digs and 2 aces. Alyssa McGhee added 40 assists and 7 digs in the two matches for the Royals, and Amelia Gill had 10 digs.

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    Cloe combo works wonders for Carmel

    Scott Cloe is considered one of the newcomers on Carmel’s boys soccer team. That designation might not last long, from the looks of things. Though he’s only a sophomore, Cloe is fitting in rather quickly after having scored his first two varsity goals in just a couple of games. It only helps that Scott’s senior brother Adam is leading by example.

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    Boys soccer/Fox Valley roundup

    Dundee-Crown 4, Highland Park 1: William Campos, Ben Stone, Salvidore Rodriguez and Gerardo Escorza scored goals for the Chargers as they opened their season with a win at the Lake Forest tournament. Jesse Gonzalez had 6 saves in goal for D-C.Larkin 3, Juarez 0: Chris Vilalobos, Tita Valezquez and Hector Mendoza found the back of the net and Leo Perez made 4 saves in goal to lead the Royals (2-0) to a nonconference win.Hampshire 3, Marian Central 1: Jose Hernandez had 2 goals and Paul Novacovici added a score as the Whip-Purs (2-0) won in nonconference action. Andy Pederson had 15 saves in goal for Hampshire.DeKalb 4, Burlington Central 1: Jose Uribe scored the lone goal for the Rockets (2-1) in this loss at the DeKalb tournament. Brett Rau made 8 saves in goal for BC.Boylan 3, Cary-Grove 2: Dale Oppasser and Danny Kimmerich scored goals and Ethan Csoka made 4 saves in goal for Cary-Grove in this season-opening loss.

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    Progress, even after loss, for Christian Liberty

    After taking several steps backward during its season-opening loss, the boys soccer team from Christian Liberty Academy took a few giant steps forward Wednesday afternoon, even in defeat. The Chargers’ effort impressed coach Jed Bennett and captain Aaron Karr, who shined brightly in goal in a 4-0 loss in Arlington Heights against Chicago Latin in an annual nonconference match.

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    Los Angeles Galaxy forward Landon Donovan speaks at news conference Wednesday in Carson, Calif. Donovan signed a multiyear contract extension with the Galaxy, keeping the high-scoring U.S. national team star with his MLS club.

    Landon Donovan re-signs with Los Angeles Galaxy

    Just a few months after Landon Donovan thought he might be finished with soccer, he re-signed with the Los Angeles Galaxy on Wednesday with his passion rekindled. Donovan agreed to a multiyear contract extension that could make him the highest-paid player in MLS if he reaches incentives within the deal. His decision to stick with the Galaxy is another turn in an eventful year for the fleet-footed midfielder widely considered the best player in American history.

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    Glenbard North football varsity football player Justin Jackson.

    Change doesn’t diminish DVC

    The DuPage Valley Conference is in the midst of a major overhaul, but some things never change. The DVC remains among the state’s top football leagues.

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    Nick Surges lines up a catch during Saturdays practice at Benet in Lisle.

    Benet likes its place in ESCC

    As tough as the East Suburban Catholic traditionally has been, it became an even tougher football conference a year ago. You can blame Benet for that.

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    Stevenson, Loyola top-ranked in Class 8A
    The Stevenson Patriots have been voted the No. 1 team in Class 8A by an Associated Press statewide panel of sports writers and broadcasters who cast votes in the first poll of the season. Loyola Academy earned the same number of points to tie for first place.

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    Bears offensive coordinator Aaron Kromer says the No. 1 thing for quarterback hopefuls Trent Edwards and Jordan Palmer will be the understanding of the offense.

    Bears QB hopefuls need to understand offense

    Recently signed Bears quarterbacks Trent Edwards and Jordan Palmer haven't had enough time to master the playbook or learn all of their teammates' names. But in Thursday night's final preseason game against the Browns at Soldier Field, both will be trying to make enough of an impression on their coaches to earn a spot on the 53-man roster.

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    A.J. Fisher runs the ball at a Burlington Central football practice.

    Burlington C. has tough competition in Big Northern East

    Opportunities abound for the Burlington Central football team. Third-year coach Rich Crabel has plenty of options at his disposal, particularly on offense where he said between 6-10 running backs and receivers, six different tight ends and four different fullbacks could play on any given night. That’s just on offense. Crabel added six to eight defensive linemen and between eight and 10 cornerbacks could see action. Central is coming off a 2012 season where it went 5-4 and 4-2 in Big Northern Conference East Division play. The Rockets were playoff-eligible, but missed on points.

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    Northwestern coach Pat Fitzgerald, celebrating the team’s Gator Bowl victory over Mississippi State on New Year’s Day, expects a tough game when his Wildcats visit the Cal Bears on Saturday night.

    Northwestern braces for Cal’s uptempo attack

    The biggest fear for Northwestern heading into Saturday's opener against Cal is the unknown. The Bears have a young, inexperienced team, but new coach Sonny Dykes is trying to install the same fast-paced scheme he used at Louisiana Tech to lead the nation in scoring and total offense last fall.

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    Boomers get bashed by Greys

    Game coverage of the Schaumburg Boomers of the Frontier League:The Frontier Greys pounded out 17 hits and scored in seven different innings en rouye to a 12-3 victory over the host Schaumburg Boomers on Wednesday.The Boomers (54-35) still have a magic number of three to clinch the Frontier League’s West Division title with seven games left.

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    Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall is not expected to return to practice until Monday. “It’s all good,” said Bears coach Marc Trestman. “I let him go for personal reasons,”

    Marshall’s weekend off ‘part of the plan’

    A day after complaining about his frustration in coming back from off-season hip surgery, Brandon Marshall was missing from the Bears' Wednesday practice. But the Pro Bowl wide receiver's absence was excused for a follow-up doctor's appointment.

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    The Dodgers’ Skip Schumaker, left, is forced out at second as Chicago Cubs second baseman Darwin Barney attempts to throw out Hanley Ramirez at first during Wednesday’s game in Los Angeles. The Cubs lost 4-0.

    Dodgers beat Cubs 4-0 with Nolasco, 2 homers

    Edwin Jackson’s pitching was good enough. His fielding, not so much. His throwing error cost the Chicago Cubs two runs in a 4-0 loss to the Los Angeles Dodgers on Wednesday. Jackson (7-14) gave up four runs — two earned — and six hits against his old team. He struck out five and walked two on a season-high 124 pitches in dropping his third straight decision.

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    bears_1sp091706sl STEVE LUNDY PHOTO Photo0538139 Former Bears tight end Desmond Clark is helping coach at Vernon Hills.

    Vernon Hills’ coaching staff bears watching

    Former Chicago Bears Philip Daniels and Desmond Clark have taken roles on the coaching staff under first-year coach Bill Bellecomo.

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    Quarterback Adam O’Malley brings a wealth of experience to the starting lineup for Elk Grove.

    O’Malley, Elk Grove target MSL East title

    Last season, Rolling Meadows quarterback Jack Milas and Prospect quarterback Devin O’Hara led their teams to the top of the Mid-Suburban East football race. It will be quarterbacks again taking the spotlight in determining the top contenders in the 2013 conference race. Adam O’Malley, who is a three-year starter at Elk Grove, should have the Grenadiers on track this season.

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    Finally, a remedy for buggin’ out

    We've all had our share of biting insects, but there are new weapons in the war against summertime mosquitoes.

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    Sore spots over big-lake perch fishing

    The fishing community still hasn't completely adjusted to restrictions and obstacles to perch angling on Lake Michigan.

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    Football Focus: Northwest, Lake, and Fox Valley Previews
    In this preview video for Week One of Football Focus, host Joe Aguilar and sportswriters Jerry Fitzpatrick and Dick Quagliano preview the 2013 season in the Northwest suburbs, Lake County, and the Fox Valley.

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    David Wilder

    Ex-White Sox exec gets 2-year sentence in kickback case

    Former Chicago White Sox executive David Wilder was sentenced to two years in prison for his role in a scheme to take more than $440,000 in kickbacks from Latin American baseball players as they were signed.

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    Mike North video: Is Johnny Manziel innocent or guilty?
    It took the NCAA 6 hours to interview Johnny Manziel about his “autograph session.” Why couldn’t they just ask one question — did he get money for signing autographs? Mike North thinks he’s too smart to be guilty of this infraction.For more, see www.northtonorth.com. Listen to Mike on Foxsportsradio.com, XM channel 169, or your iHeart application Sat 6 p.m.-9 p.m. and Sun 9 p.m. to midnight. Look for Mike on WIND on Tuesday at 7:45 a.m. and on Fridays at 5:50 p.m. Listen to Mike’s podcasts at foxsportsradio.com/podcast/mikenorth.xml

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    Chicago Cubs starting pitcher Travis Wood throws to the plate during the first inning of their baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

    Wood solid, and Cubs beat Kershaw
    Cubs lefty Travis Wood has drawn some tough mound opponents this year. Last week at Wrigley Field, it was Washington's Stephen Strasburg. In Los Angeles Tuesday night, Wood found himself up against Dodgers lefty Clayton Kershaw. Cubs manager Dale Sveum made some lineup changes against Kershaw, including giving first baseman Anthony Rizzo a rest.

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    The Cubs’ starting pitcher Travis Wood outpitched Clayton Kershaw Tuesday night as the Cubs beat the Dodgers 3-2 in Los Angeles.

    Cubs defeat Dodgers 3-2 behind Wood

    Travis Wood outpitched Clayton Kershaw in a matchup of All-Star lefties, and Dioner Navarro and Starlin Castro had run-scoring singles to help the Chicago Cubs beat the Dodgers 3-2 Tuesday night, snapping an eight-game skid against first-place Los Angeles.

Business

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    Residents of Hoffman Estates' Devonshire Woods Estates subdivision are unhappy with a developer's proposal to build smaller, less expensive homes on vacant lots in the neighborhood. The developer gave an informal presentation of the plan to village leaders this week.

    Upscale Hoffman Estates neighborhood plan draws laughs, objections

    Residents of an upscale Hoffman Estates neighborhood are objecting to a developer's plans to builder smaller homes on vacant lots in their subdivision, saying the lesser properties would diminish their community's value and character. “If we go ahead with this plan, we'll lose the neighborhood's value,” Devonshire Woods resident Dennis Barot said.

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    Hyatt to buy Peabody Orlando hotel for $717M

    Chicago-based Hyatt Hotels Corp. said Wednesday that its Hyatt Regency subsidiary plans to buy the Peabody Orlando hotel for $717 million, expanding its presence in a market popular with tourists and conventions.

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    Palatine shopping center sold for $20 million

    The Deer Grove Centre shopping center in Palatine was acquired Wednesday by a Michigan-based real estate investment trust for $20 million in cash.The 236,000-square-foot shopping center. at the corner of Rand and Dundee roads, is the second purchase of a suburban retail center by Ramco-Gershenson Properties Trust of Farmington Hills, Mich. The company earlier this year acquired Mount Prospect Plaza in Mount Prospect.

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    U.S. stocks rose, with the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index rebounding from an eight-week low, as energy shares rallied and investors watched developments on Syria.

    Stocks edge higher as Syria, oil worries linger

    The stock market edged higher Wednesday as investors continued to focus on the likelihood of a U.S.-led attack on Syria. Energy stocks rose sharply as the price of oil increased to the highest in more than two years.

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    A research firm says Motorola’s new Moto X phone doesn’t cost more to make simply because it’s assembled in Texas.

    1st US-made smartphone just as cheap to produce

    A research firm says the new Moto X phone, made by Libertyville-based Motorola Mobility, doesn’t cost more to make simply because it’s assembled in Texas. The Moto X is the first smartphone to carry the “Made in the U.S.A.” designation.

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    Mike Morrison, manager of the Batavia Walmart Supercenter, says of the revamped store: “I don’t know why anybody would want to go anywhere else. You can get everything you want here.”

    Batavia Walmart officially a Supercenter

    Shoppers are welcoming the conversion of Batavia’s Walmart store to a Supercenter. They didn’t wait for Wednesday’s grand opening to cruise the grocery aisles; that began Saturday, when the temporary walls separating it from the rest of the store came down. Over the next few days, the produce, deli and meat sections opened up, although they were not fully stocked until Wednesday.

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    The South Elgin village board approved plans for Water’s Edge of South Elgin with a 4-3 vote last week.

    Water’s Edge of South Elgin generates interest

    A building planned in South Elgin with 50 apartments for low-income residents and residents with disabilities has already generated interest from prospective tenants. Water’s Edge of South Elgin, is a joint project between The Burton Foundation, of Sterling, Ill., and the Association for Individual Development, based in Aurora.

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    Grainger modifies operations structure

    W.W. Grainger said it has modified its operating structure to provide greater focus and a more consistent integrated approach to pursue growth opportunities.

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    Franchise Dynamics named to ist of fastest growing companies

    Franchise Dynamics, a full-service franchise outsourcing firm, has been named one of the country’s fastest growing companies by Inc. Magazine.

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    Libya’s deputy oil minister told reporters late Tuesday, Aug, 27, 2013, that the country’s oil exports are five times less than what they were prior to the 2011 war that toppled longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi.

    Libya oil exports at 20 percent of pre-war level

    Protests by the security guards who protect Libya’s oil industry and infrastructure shutdowns have sent petroleum exports plunging to levels far below those prior to the 2011 war that toppled dictator Moammar Gadhafi, and the country itself risks a domestic fuel shortage, according to a high-ranking government oil official.

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    Labor Secretary Thomas Perez called the new policy requiring most government contractors to hire veterans and disabled workers a “win-win” that will benefit workers “who belong in the economic mainstream and deserve a chance to work and opportunity to succeed.”

    Labor rules to boost employment for vets, disabled

    Veterans and disabled workers who often struggle to find work could have an easier time landing a job under new federal regulations. The rules, announced Tuesday by the Labor Department, will require most government contractors to set a goal of having disabled workers make up at least 7 percent of their employees. The benchmark for veterans would be 8 percent.

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    Fewer Americans signed contracts to buy U.S. homes in July, but the level stayed close to a 6½-year high. The modest decline suggests higher mortgage rates have yet to sharply slow sales.

    Pending sales of U.S. homes slip but remain solid

    Fewer Americans signed contracts to buy U.S. homes in July, but the level stayed close to a 6½-year high. The modest decline suggests higher mortgage rates have yet to sharply slow sales. The small decline suggests sales of previously owned homes should remain healthy in the coming months. There is generally a one- to two-month lag between a signed contract and a completed sale.

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    Nintendo cuts price of Wii U game console by $50

    WASHINGTON — Nintendo is cutting the price of its Wii U video-game system as it braces for the fall release of new, competing consoles from Sony and Microsoft.Nintendo announced Wednesday that it will reduce the price of the Wii U deluxe set from $349.99 to $299.99, effective Sept. 20.The Wii U has struggled to find an audience. Nintendo sold 3.61 million of the consoles between the Wii U’s launch last November and the end of June. The company aims to sell 9 million Wii U units over the fiscal year through March 2014. Sony’s new console, the PlayStation 4, is due Nov. 15 with a $399 price tag. Microsoft has not announced an exact launch date for its Xbox One, which will cost $499.

Life & Entertainment

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    Kid Rock plays the First Midwest Bank Amphitheatre on Friday, Aug. 30.

    Weekend picks: Rock out with Kid Rock, ZZ Top

    Kid Rock, who has shifted to a more restrained rocker exploring country and classic soul, brings his live show, along with ZZ Top and Uncle Kracker, to the First Midwest Bank Amphitheatre in Tinley Park Friday. Cram in as much summer fun as you can at Naperville's Last Fling, which features concerts by Jerrod Niemann (Friday), Goo Goo Dolls (Saturday) and Collective Soul (Sunday). “American Idol” season 10 finalist Haley Reinhart is one of the headliners at the annual Buffalo Grove Days festival. Funny man Jon Lovitz performs at the Improv Comedy Showcase in Schaumburg this weekend.

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    Dr. Karen Grobman of Buffalo Grove hold some of her favorite cook books. Grobman is one of 16 contestants in the Cook of the Week Challenge.

    Meet our 16 Cook of the Week Challenge contestants
    Meet the 16 contestants who will compete in the Daily Herald's third annual Cook of the Week Challenge.

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    Luis Macias of Elgin directed “Embracing Dyslexia,” a documentary about dyslexia that will premiere Saturday in Elgin. His son Alejandro, 11, has dyslexia. In this photo, Alejandra poses with his father and mother Magdalena.

    Elgin man’s documentary on dyslexia debuts Saturday

    An Elgin resident was inspired by his son’s struggles due to undiagnosed dyslexia to make a documentary film aiming to raise awareness about dyslexia and push for policy changes.“Embracing Dyslexia,” which filmmaker Luis Macias largely funded through a Kickstarter campaign, will premiere Saturday in Elgin.

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    A giant hourglass structure, the set for NBC’s “The Million Second Quiz,” a prime-time competition with Ryan Seacrest as host, is constructed on the rooftop of an abandoned Manhattan car dealership in New York.

    NBC trying to create big event with ‘Quiz’

    A giant hourglass structure being built on the rooftop of an abandoned Manhattan car dealership may look like Godzilla’s futuristic toy but instead represents NBC’s hope for the television event of the season. It’s the set for “The Million Second Quiz,” a prime-time competition with Ryan Seacrest as host that will play out over two weeks starting Monday, Sept. 9. Someone adept at trivia will win a $2 million prize on the Sept. 19 finale.

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    Cook of the Week Challenge: Meet the 2013 contestants

    After reading through the dozens of applications, we selected these 16 to be part of our third annual Cook of the Week Challenge. They hail from Lindenhurst to Glen Ellyn, Buffalo Grove to Batavia and range in age from 28 to 69. In the group you’ll find a doctor, a legal assistant, educators and retirees and, of course, people who are passionate about cooking.

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    Union Ale House owner Jim Sellis of Prospect Heights with Traci Johnson of Schaumburg, Jessica Manning of Schaumburg and Roumi Atanasova are ready to serve patrons a cold drink.

    Union Ale House keeps it simple with hearty food, local brews

    Sandwiched between a gas station and a car lot, Union Ale House in Prospect Heights is easy to miss if you're driving by. But this family-owned spot, which took over Runway's' former location in June, is worth seeking out. The chef calls on his Southern roots to prepare fresh, high-quality food, and the extensive beer selection includes many local brews. And with 20 50-inch TVs, the bar should be a draw for sports fans, too.

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    Lean and lovin’ it: Where did our love of lean and tasty lamb go?

    By the numbers, few folks like lamb, let alone love it, and over the last 40 years concumption has dropped to a mere 13 ounces per person annually. Don Mauer says it's time to give this lean meat another try.

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    Tourists look at the Inca citadel of Machu Picchu in Peru. The government is looking to shift some of the tourist burden from Machu Picchu, to Choquequirao, with a plan to build the first aerial tramway that will make Choquequirao reachable in just 15 minutes from the nearest highway.

    Tramway planned for Machu Picchu’s ‘sister city’

    The ruined city known as the “cradle of gold” was once a mountaintop refuge of Incan royalty, with elegant halls and plazas much like those of fabled Machu Picchu just 30 miles away. Yet only a handful of tourists visit each day, those willing to make a two-day hike to reach its majestic solitude. That is about to change: The national government has approved what will be Peru’s first aerial tramway. Bridging the deep canyon of the Apurimac River, it will make Choquequirao reachable in just 15 minutes from the nearest highway.

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    Granola wedges are a chewy, crunchy and gluten-free snack made with all whole foods.

    A bounty of ideas for healthful breakfasts

    According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, two-thirds of teenage girls and half of teenage boys don’t eat breakfast, even though it has proven to be essential to help them focus and maintain energy levels in school. Let’s move our kids, no matter what age, into the habit of beginning their days healthfully.

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    “Manana Means Heaven” by Tim Z. Hernandez

    Kerouac’s ‘Mexican Girl’ brought to life

    As Jack Kerouac described her, she was “the cutest little Mexican girl” who happened across his path at a bus stop in Bakersfield, Calif., and became “Terry” in his classic novel, “On the Road.” In reality, Kerouac scholars knew she was a woman named Bea Franco, but despite many efforts over the fog of years, none could find her. Until now. Tim Z. Hernandez, an award-winning author and poet, spent years building and sifting through a list of nearly 200 Bea Francos across the United States, searching for the one whose brief romance with a young, wandering writer was immortalized in the book that defined the Beat Generation.

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    Publicist Cece Yorke, a spokeswoman for Catherine Zeta-Jones, left, says the actress and her husband, Michael Douglas, “are taking some time apart to evaluate and work on their marriage.”

    Zeta-Jones and Douglas ‘taking some time apart’

    A spokeswoman for Catherine Zeta-Jones says the actress and her husband, Michael Douglas, “are taking some time apart to evaluate and work on their marriage.”

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    Frugal living: Tips for washing fruit and vegetables

    Sara Noel shares tips for frugal living. Today she shares ways to use household ingredients to create your own, low-cost fruit and vegetable wash.

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    “Right Thoughts, Right Words, Right Action” by Franz Ferdinand

    Franz Ferdinand make loud comeback

    It’s been four years since Franz Ferdinand’s last album “Tonight: Franz Ferdinand,” and in that time the band nearly managed to split up, but thankfully they did not. Instead they’ve recharged their batteries and made a fourth album, “Right Thoughts, Right Words, Right Action.” It’s a 10-track experience of clever songwriting, catchy riffs and pure indie punk passion.

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    Miners pan for gold in Chile in Discovery's “Gold Rush: South America.”

    Discovery Channel reality show a hit with male viewers

    The quest for Southern Hemisphere riches ends — at least for now — on Friday, Aug. 30, with the finale of the summer series “Gold Rush: South America.” The spinoff of Discovery Channel's hit reality series “Gold Rush” continued its predecessor's habit of finding viewers, becoming the day's No. 1 cable show among adults ages 25-54 and men ages 25-54. The regular “Gold Rush” series has its fourth season premiere in October.

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    Tzatziki — Cucumber-Yogurt Sauce
    Tzatziki — Cucumber-Yogurt Sauce: Don Mauer

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    Don Mauer’s Grilled Gyros Sandwiches
    Don Mauer’s Grilled Gyros Sandwiches

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    A a coffee table with a lift top designed to accommodate working at a computer or eating.

    Multitasking homeowners demand more of their space

    Washing clothes in the bedroom. Sending email from the laundry room. Busy Americans are demanding more from each room in the house, and spaces designed for multiple functions are popping up all over floor plans, design blogs and magazine spreads. “People multi-task all the time. There is a definite correlation and carry-over in the home,” said Wendy Danziger, owner of Danziger Design in Bethesda, Md. She has helped clients create rooms for eating and watching television; housing guests and working from home; sleeping and doing laundry. Some homebuilders have added space for seating, desks and charging stations in the laundry room.

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    Vinca minor (periwinkle or creeping myrtle), a commonly used groundcover, prefers rich, moist soil but can tolerate poor, dry conditions and sunny exposures.

    Choose groundcovers for their function

    Turf grass is the groundcover of choice for many property owners, mainly for its rich, carpet-like appearance. But grass is thirsty, demands frequent maintenance and provides little wildlife appeal. That’s where other groundcovers come into play. How do you choose which cover-up is right for your yard? First, determine the role it must play.

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    Lonely Planet co-founder Tony Wheeler at the crash site of Admiral Isoroku Yamamotoís Mitsubishi G4M bomber on the island of Bougainville, Papua New Guinea. Yamamoto was the mastermind behind the attack on Pearl Harbor.

    Lonely Planet founder recounts trips to ‘Dark Lands’

    Tony Wheeler wrote his first travel book with his wife Maureen in 1973 after driving across Europe and Asia. It sold 1,500 copies in a week and launched a guidebook empire called Lonely Planet. The Wheelers made a fortune when the BBC bought the company in 2007 before the recession, but the BBC sold the company earlier this year at a huge loss. Meanwhile Wheeler, 66, is still doing what he built the brand on: traveling the world and writing about it. His newest book, “Dark Lands,” recounts his recent adventures in countries troubled by ethnic strife, drug wars, colonial history and fiscal ruin.

Discuss

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    Editorial: 50 years after King’s speech, competing calls on race

    On the anniversary of the watershed 1963 March on Washington, a Daily Herald editorial says we should keep in mind both how much has changed and how much still needs to change.

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    Feeling powerless all around

    Columnist Richard Cohen: The late Katharine Graham was often called one of the most powerful women in the world. You can see why. She controlled The Washington Post, Newsweek, a bevy of television stations and was Washington’s pre-eminent hostess, gathering the influential or the merely interesting in her Georgetown home. Yet she knew her power was severely limited.

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    The wrong conversation about race

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: "If I had a son, he’d look like Trayvon.” In so saying, President Obama essentially gave permission for all to identify themselves by race with the victim or the accused. How sad as we approach the 50th anniversary of the march Martin Luther King Jr. led on Washington that even the president resorts to judging not by the content of one’s character but by the color of his skin — the antithesis of the great dream King articulated with those words.

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    Beware of fund requests disguised as policy polls
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Political parties are now gleaning campaign funds for the forthcoming national elections. This is normal for the PACs, who provide the bulk of the financing, but the rank-and-file voter is not being overlooked. He receives requests for funds disguised as policy polls from Washington’s party headquarters. The amazing thing is that the requests don’t even offer candidates for the offices. Apparently there really are voters who vote straight-party tickets, whoever runs!

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    Durbin’s intimidation a typical problem
    A Grayslake letter to the editor: Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin is worried that members of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) may not be in full accordance with policies set forth by the group as a whole.

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    Keep money at home for our infrastructure
    An Elk Grove Village letter to the editor: We give about $1.5 billion dollars a year to Egypt in economic and military aid. We’ve been doing that for many years. What do we get in return? Absolutely nothing.

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    Changes needed in county elections
    A letter to the editor: I recommend that the law be changed to allow Cook County voters to elect precinct committeeman. Imagine if Madigan had to ask precinct committeemen what they wanted him to do instead of telling precinct captains what they must do? That would be the end of the Chicago machine.

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    Why single out cell-phones, governor?
    A Wheaton leter to the editor: In order to make Illinois roads safe, Gov. Pat Quinn recently signed legislation making it illegal for motorists to use a hand-held telephone while driving.

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    Don’t rush to judge Charlestowne plan
    A Batavia letter to the editor: Recently an announcement was made that Charlestowne Mall in St. Charles was being sold. The new owners have not presented any concept for the mall but the negative attitude of the Tri-City residents have spoken. In comments and letters to the editor, people state that they will never or have never purchased anything at the mall and will continue not to support the merchants in the mall.

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    Can’t take Dems seriously anymore
    Can’t take Demsseriously anymoreWatch them long enough and it’s hard to take Democrats seriously anymore. Take Oprah for example, it just so happens that her new movie is coming out and lo and behold she puts her name on the front pages claiming racial discrimination, then backs down as the truth of the story begins to come out. All about the publicity and money. They rail against bullies now more than ever but they support an administration that does nothing but bully their way to what they want, and when they don’t get it they stomp their feet and riot in the streets.They elect the infamous Rahm Emanuel one of the nation’s and this state’s biggest bullies. They claim they’re here for the poor and downtrodden, need I mention how that group has grown over the liberal Democrats control? They screamed about Bush’s Homeland Security but are eerily silent on Obama’s administrations use of the IRS, and security agencies spying on Americans.Eric Holder just complained about the war on drugs and its failure, need I mention that the War on Poverty has been going on just as long and is a worse failure?Just can’t take them seriously anymore.Martin J. UttichCarol Stream

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