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Daily Archive : Thursday August 22, 2013

News

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    Becky Goetzke holds a robotic hand she made during one of her mentoring sessions with a NASA scientist this summer. The hand is made of cardboard, rubber bands, tape and string.

    Bartlett girl gets mentorship from NASA engineer

    Becky Goetzke had five mentoring sessions with a NASA engineer this past summer. Not bad for an 11-year-old. Becky just started fourth grade at Sycamore Trails Elementary School in Elgin Area School District U-46’s gifted program. She likes science, but was still skeptical of the mentoring arrangement when her mom told her she was chosen from a lottery early in July. Now Becky, of Bartlett,...

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    Buffalo Grove residents enjoy the Cliff Hanger ride during the residents with disabilities event at 2007 Buffalo Grove Days at Emmerich Park.

    Buffalo Grove Days kicks off Thursday

    Buffalo Grove’s biggest annual event is about to commence. Buffalo Grove Days starts Thursday, Aug. 30, and runs through Labor Day in the area around Lake-Cook Road, Raupp Boulevard and Church Road.

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    Terri Dudar of Carpentersville made a 100-square quilt, each square memorializing a suburban person who died of a heroin overdose including her son.

    Quilt memorializes suburban overdose victims

    Each of the 100 squares on Terri Dudar's quilt memorializes a young person from the suburbs who died of a heroin overdose. One of them is her son, Jason, who died in 2008. Dudar, of Carpentersville, will bring her newly finished quilt to Saturday's Overdose Awareness Day rally in Schaumburg. She'll also have it at Carpenter Park in Carpentersville Aug. 31, the site of her own yearly awareness...

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    Residents of the Fox Point mobile home complex assemble outside of Wheeling’s village hall Thursday to protest possible loss of use of their mobile homes. Mark Janeck is the village’s community development director.

    Wheeling mobile home park residents say village forcing them to move

    Roughly two dozen residents of Fox Point mobile home park in Wheeling assmbled Thursday afternoon at village hall protesting their potential displacement. Fox Point residents claim that for several months they have been harassed for damage to their homes from a severe April storm. “There is nothing wrong with my mobile home,” resident Javier Barrera said Thursday.

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    State Sen. Terry Link, a Waukegan Democrat, is the lone suburban county Democratic leader who hasn’t backed Gov. Pat Quinn’s re-election.

    Quinn or Daley? Link isn’t saying

    Missing from the suburban list of Gov. Pat Quinn backers is state Sen. Terry Link, a Waukegan Democrat and head of the Lake County party. Is he backing Bill Daley? He isn’t. But he’s not backing Quinn, either.

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    Power outage in Streamwood

    The Streamwood Fire Department reported a power outage that forced several businesses to close Thursday evening. Firefighters said they were automatically dispatched to the area of Barrington Road and Buttitta Drive at around 6:30 p.m.

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    Ben Affleck, who won the Academy Award earlier this year for best picture as producer of “Argo,” will play Batman in a film that pairs him with Henry Cavill’s Superman.

    Affleck to play Batman

    Ben Affleck will don Batman’s cape and cowl. Warner Bros. announced Thursday that the 41-year-old actor-director will star as a new incarnation of the Dark Knight in a film bringing Batman and Superman together. The studio says Affleck will star opposite Henry Cavill, reprising his role as Superman from “Man of Steel.” The movie will also reunite “Man of Steel” stars Amy Adams, Laurence Fishburne...

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    Grafton Township Supervisor James Kearns says the township’s shuttle bus service can no longer afford to accommodate Rutland Township residents living in Sun City without a financial contribution from Rutland officials.

    Grafton, Rutland at odds over bus service

    A showdown is looming between a pair of neighboring townships over a shuttle bus service Grafton Township extended to the Sun City seniors living in Rutland Township. Although 58 percent of the rides within the past year were made to Rutland Township residents, its officials have not offered to compensate Grafton Township for picking them up. And Grafton Township Supervisor James Kearns says the...

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    Egyptian medics escort former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, 85, into an ambulance after he was flown by a helicopter ambulance to a military hospital from Torah prison in Cairo Thursday.

    Egypt’s ousted leader Mubarak under house arrest

    Wearing a white T-shirt and flashing a smile, Hosni Mubarak was transferred from prison Thursday to a Nile-side military hospital where he will be under house arrest, a reversal of fortune for the former president who was ousted by a popular uprising and is on trial for complicity in the killing of protesters in 2011.

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    The District 15 Educational Foundation created a Palatine-opoly game as a fundraiser. The game features Palatine business, landmarks and organizations.

    Dist. 15 Foundation unveiling Palatine-opoly game

    This weekend’s Downtown Palatine Street Fest will feature plenty of live music, local cuisine and family entertainment. It’s also where the District 15 Educational Foundation will unveil its very own Palatine-opoly board game.

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    Syrian refugees gather for food aid Wednesday at a refugee camp 217 miles north of Baghdad. Around 34,000 Syrians, the vast majority of them Kurds, have fled over a five-day stretch and crossed the border to the self-ruled Kurdish region of northern Iraq.

    Syrian official blames rebels for deadly attack

    Syrian government forces pressed on with a military offensive in eastern Damascus on Thursday, bombing rebel-held suburbs where the opposition said the regime had killed over 100 people the day before in a chemical weapons attack. The government has denied allegations it used chemical weapons in artillery barrages on the area known as eastern Ghouta on Wednesday as “absolutely baseless.”

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    Syrian refugees gather for food aid at a camp 217 miles north of Baghdad, Iraq, Wednesday. Around 34,000 Syrians, the vast majority of them Kurds, have fled over a five-day stretch and crossed the border to the self-ruled Kurdish region of northern Iraq.

    U.S. pressed to react to violence in Syria, Egypt

    The U.S. is poised to suspend another major weapons shipment to Egypt amid sharp divisions within the Obama administration over whether to cut off aid to the military-backed government. The debate mirrors similar disagreements over intervening in Syria, where there are new reports that chemical weapons have been used by the government.

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    Medical issue causes 4-car crash in Elk Grove Village

    A sudden medical issue caused an 85-year-old Schaumburg man to lose control of his vehicle Thursday morning in Elk Grove Village, sparking a four-car crash that sent him and four others to area hospitals. The man was listed in serious condition later Thursday.

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    The Rim Fire burns in the Stanislaus National Forest this week, among 50 major uncontained fires burning across the western U.S.

    Governor declares emergency for Yosemite-area fire

    A wildfire outside Yosemite National Park more than tripled in size Thursday, shutting down businesses in surrounding communities and leading scores of tourists to leave the area during peak season. The fire is one of several blazes burning in or near the nation’s national parks, and one of 50 major uncontained fires burning across the western U.S.

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    Timbers protrude from the bottom of Lake Michigan that were discovered by Steve Libert, head of Great Lakes Exploration Group, in 2001. On Saturday, Libert’s crew will haul the massive timber to the radiology section of a Gaylord, Mich., hospital for a CT scan hoping to determining the age of the tree that produced it and when it was cut down.

    Possible shipwreck artifact to get CT scan for age

    The hunt for the Griffin, a ship commanded by legendary French explorer La Salle, has taken an unlikely detour from northern Lake Michigan to a small-town hospital, where modern technology may help determine whether a wooden slab is wreckage from the 17th century vessel.

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    Brett A. Degler

    Winthrop Harbor teen pleads guilty in day-care sex assault case

    A Winthrop Harbor teen was sentenced to six years in prison for molesting children while assisting at his mother's in-home day-care facility. Under the plea agreement Thursday, Brett Degler, now 19, must also serve 48 months on probation, and 48 months in periodic imprisonment when not working and attending counseling and court. He must also register as a sex offender for life.

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    Schaumburg among top 50 U.S. meeting destinations

    The Woodfield Chicago Northwest Convention Bureau announced Thursday that Schaumburg has been ranked in Cvent’s list of the top 50 cities for meetings and events in the U.S. for the second consecutive year.

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    Lindenhurst village board meeting canceled

    The regularly scheduled meeting of the Lindenhurst village board for Monday, Aug. 26, has been canceled due to lack of agenda.

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    St. Charles will examine ability to revoke 2 a.m. tavern licenses

    The first action of St. Charles' new liquor commission was to take no action to further distinguish between restaurants and taverns in the licensing process. Instead, the ability to revoke the 2 a.m. licenses taverns want will be the focus of future city crackdowns on taverns police officers must repeatedly visit.

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    Zion Police Officer Sabas Mercado looks through backyards on the 2300 block of Galilee Avenue for clues to the whereabouts of 5-month-old Joshua Summeries, who went missing Wednesday.

    Zion police fear the worst for missing baby

    Zion police say they are fearing the worst regarding a 5-month-old baby boy missing since Wednesday morning. “Our concern and belief is that Joshua has been harmed or worse,” Police Chief Wayne Brooks said. “We are committed to using every available resource at our disposal, as witnessed yesterday when more than 200 law enforcement personnel responded to our call for mutual aid.”

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    A statue of Naperville founder Joseph Naper is lowered by a crane Aug. 9 at the Naper Homestead site at the corner of Mill Street and Jefferson Avenue. A 4 p.m. ceremony Friday will unveil and dedicate the $185,000 sculpture.

    Naperville founder sculpture to be unveiled Friday

    Naperville will welcome Joseph Naper home Friday afternoon with a ceremony dedicating a sculpture of the city's founding father at the spot where he first settled in 1831. The 4 p.m. ceremony will celebrate the first piece of public art dedicated to Naper — a bronze-cast image of the man at age 33 arriving in the wilderness and beginning to survey the land.

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    Oronzo Mazzoccoli

    Schaumburg man charged with hospital theft

    A security guard at St. Alexius Medical Center in Hoffman Estates has been charged with theft after police say he stole $700 from a patient who has undergoing tests at the hospital at the time. A Cook County judge ordered a $10,000 I-bond for Oronzo Mazzoccoli, of Schaumburg, 31, a hospital security guard.

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    Columbia College-Lake County graduation Aug. 24

    Columbia College-Lake County will recognize graduates at a commencement ceremony Saturday, Aug. 24 at 1:30 p.m. at the Genesee Theater in Waukegan.

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    District 103 board approves tax break

    The Lincolnshire-Prairie View Elementary District 103 school board has decided to reduce its tax bills to local property owners by $350,000.

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    Police investigate robbery at Aurora bank

    Authorities were investigating a robbery Thursday at Old Second National Bank on Aurora's west side. Police said no one was hurt when a man entered the bank, 555 Redwood Drive, shortly after 2 p.m. and demanded money from a teller.

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    Shaun Horan

    Aurora man gets 4½ years for $290,000 theft from employer

    An Aurora man was sentenced Thursday to 4 ½ years in prison for stealing more than $290,000 from an Oak Brook firm where he worked as an accoutant. Shaun Horan, 32, of the 1600 block of Blackwell Lane, had pleaded guilty in June to theft over $100,000.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Rinnell Mallory, 42, of Elgin, was charged Tuesday with seven counts of delivery of a controlled substance, including delivery within 1,000 feet of Foundry Park, and felony possession of a firearm after he sold heroin on multiple occasions between July 11 and Tuesday to an undercover police officer, according to a police report.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Several AT&T and Comcast boxes were reported painted with graffiti at 11:40 a.m. Wednesday at South Raddant Road and Eckman Drive; the 2100 and 2200 block of Raddant; South Raddant Road and Stiers Court; Raddant Road and Moorehead Drive; and South Randall Road and Edwards Drive, according to a police report.

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    President Barack Obama, addressing a packed house at the University of Buffalo Thursday, outlined an ambitious new government rating system for colleges.

    Obama calls for cost-conscious college ratings

    Targeting the soaring cost of higher education, President Barack Obama on Thursday unveiled a broad new government rating system for colleges that would judge schools on their affordability and perhaps be used to allocate federal financial aid. But the proposed overhaul faced immediate skepticism from college leaders and congressional Republicans.

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    The sign outside the landmark Wellington Restaurant on Arlington Heights Road comes down Thursday, Aug. 22.

    Wellington Restaurant sign in Arlington Heights comes down

    The sign outside the iconic Wellington Restaurant in Arlington Heights was taken down Thursday, the first step in turning the property over to Elk Grove Township Elementary District 59.

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    Overheated fan prompts brief evacuation at Geneva High

    An overheated fan caused smoke to enter the gymnasium at Geneva High School, prompting a brief evacuation of students and staff at 2 p.m. Thursday. The students returned at 2:30 p.m., just in time for 2:45 p.m. dismissal. No injuries were reported and school officials said the evacuation went very smoothly.

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    Wauconda settles suit with contractor in 2007 fuel spill

    Wauconda officials have settled a financial dispute with a contractor that stemmed from a 2007 fuel leak into Bangs Lake. The village board on Tuesday unanimously agreed to pay $56,500 to Lampignano & Son Construction Co. for water main replacement work the firm was doing when the leak occurred.

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    Former Gov. George Ryan is working on a memoir as he adjusts to private life.

    Ex-Gov. Ryan says he’s adjusting to private life

    Former Gov. George Ryan said Thursday that he took advantage of his newfound freedom last weekend by going to Springfield to celebrate the birthday of his triplet daughters. Ryan, who spent 5½ years in federal prison on a 2006 corruption conviction, finished a six-month stint of home confinement on July 3 and is charting out the next chapter of his life.

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    7 minors charged with using ‘Drano bomb’ in N. Aurora

    Seven juveniles have been arrested and charged in connection to six "Drano bomb" episodes in North Aurora between May 25 and June 1, police said. No one was injured by the devices, which were homemade overpressure devices made out of plastic bottles and household chemicals.

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    Sammy Hagar’s hydrant will have a “tiki bank” theme. Organizers say he’ll show it off to fans during a concert Friday at Chicago’s Northerly Island.

    Hagar sponsoring sculpture to honor firefighters

    Rocker Sammy Hagar is the latest sponsor of a public art installation that will honor Chicago’s firefighters. The project features 101 5-foot-tall sculptures of Chicago fire hydrants — one for each of the city’s firehouses.

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    Nayembi is doing “remarkably well” with the reintroduction process, according to the Lincoln Park Zoo’s primate curator.

    Injured baby gorilla reintroduced to the public

    A baby gorilla is back on display at Chicago’s Lincoln Park Zoo, six months after she was seriously injured. Nayembi needed emergency surgery in February after she suffered serious cuts to her face, which zoo keepers believe likely were inflicted by another gorilla.

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    Farm Progress Show host farmer Marc Padrutt shows a sample from a demonstration field that has not matured enough for harvest in Decatur.

    Farm expo scraps field demonstrations

    This year’s Farm Progress Show in Decatur will be missing a key ingredient: field demonstrations. The unseasonably cool summer weather delayed the growth of corn planted for the show in mid-May.

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    An SUV rests among trees on the south side of Marengo Road after a one-car accident just west of Diekman Road Thursday morning near Huntley.

    Crash near Huntley puts Algonquin man in hospital

    A sport utility vehicle smashed into a tree in unincorporated McHenry County near Huntley Thursday morning, after it was re-ended by another vehicle, authorities said. The crash required the SUV driver’s hospitalization, but the heavy rainstorms in the area complicated the situation by preventing a rescue helicopter from getting to the scene, said Andrew Zinke, undersheriff for the McHenry County...

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    Dist. 203 students score composite 24.8 on ACT

    The 1,539 members of Naperville Unit District 203’s class of 2013 scored a composite 24.8 on the ACT college entrance exam, according to data released this week by the testing organization.

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    District 204 students score composite 24.1 on ACT

    Indian Prairie Unit District 204 juniors last year scored a composite 24.1 on the ACT college entrance exam, according to data released this week by the testing organization.

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    Elgin resident Dan Miller received a historic architectural rehabilitation grant a couple of years to build a porch for this home at 165 S. Gifford St. Miller said the grant rules should be changed to allow homeowners who are contractors to be reimbursed for their labor.

    Funds still available to fix up historic homes

    The city council’s committee of the whole awarded 12 matching grants for the rehabilitiation of historic homes in Elgin. Because another $102,000 is still available in grant funding, all in riverboat money, the city is accepting another round of grants with a Sept. 6 deadline.

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    Nearly six months after winning the NBC reality show “The Biggest Loser,” Wheeling’s Danni Allen is still traveling the country and rubbing elbows with celebrities. But she says she’s more focused on upcoming athletic challenges, including her first triathlon this weekend and her first marathon in October.

    ‘Biggest Loser’ Danni Allen ready for next set of challenges

    Nearly six months after winning the NBC reality show “The Biggest Loser,” Wheeling’s Danni Allen is still traveling the country and rubbing elbows with celebrities. But she says she’s more focused thse days on upcoming athletic challenges, including her first triathlon this weekend and her first marathon in October.

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    Attorney General Eric Holder said Thursday that the Justice Department will sue Texas over the state’s voter ID law and will seek to intervene in a lawsuit over the state’s redistricting laws.

    Govt to sue Texas over voter ID law

    The Justice Department said Thursday it will sue Texas over the state’s voter ID law and will seek to intervene in a lawsuit over the state’s redistricting laws. Attorney General Eric Holder said the action marks another step in the effort to protect voting rights of all eligible Americans.

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    The National Security Agency declassified three secret U.S. court opinions Wednesday showing how it scooped up as many as 56,000 emails and other communications by Americans with no connection to terrorism annually over three years, how it revealed the error to the court and changed how it gathered Internet communications.

    NSA reveals more secrets after court order

    The Obama administration has given up more of its surveillance secrets, acknowledging that it was ordered to stop scooping up thousands of Internet communications from Americans with no connection to terrorism — a practice it says was an unintended consequence when it gathered bundles of Internet traffic connected to terror suspects.

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    Martine Locke, left, and Jamie Locke, listen during the announcement of the new group “Freedom Indiana” on Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, in Indianapolis. An alliance of Indiana-based employers and human rights organizations is launching a statewide movement to defeat passage of an amendment that would write the state’s ban on same-sex marriage into the constitution.

    Businesses, groups target Indiana gay marriage ban

    A coalition of businesses and activist groups has begun its push to defeat an amendment that would write Indiana’s same-sex marriage ban into the state constitution. More than 200 people filled downtown Indianapolis’ Artsgarden for Wednesday’s announcement of the new Freedom Indiana group.

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    No injuries as fire strikes Naperville house

    No injuries were reported in an early morning fire Thursday that caused roughly $100,000 damage to a house on the 1000 block of Prairie View Court, Naperville firefighters said.

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    Char Ullman, Ullman, 51, left, and Carrie Hamblen, 45, get married at the Dona Ana County Courthouse in Las Cruces, N.M. on Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013, after receiving a same-sex marriage license. The couple were among the two dozen or so same-sex couples who received same-sex licenses after the county clerk announced he would issue them.

    County in N.M. issues same-sex marriage licenses

    At the end of the day, more than 40 gay couples had rushed to the Dona Ana County Clerk’s office in New Mexico to get their marriage licenses after Clerk Lynn Ellins decided to issue same-sex marriage licenses in a surprise move that came as several legal challenges on the practice make their way through the courts.

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    Protesters march to the Russian Embassy in Copenhagen, Denmark, to rally against the Russian Parliament’s law that directly criminalizes homosexual so-called ‘propaganda’ to children and adolescents.

    Russia defends anti-gay law in letter to IOC

    The Russian government assured the IOC on Thursday it will not discriminate against homosexuals during the Sochi Olympics, while defending the law against gay “propaganda” that has provoked an international backlash. The IOC received a letter from Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Kozak giving reassurances the host country will comply fully with the Olympic Charter’s provision against...

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    Greg Timms, left, signs a petition to recall San Diego Mayor Bob Filner, alongside Tana Piontek, right, at a stand set up in the parking lot of a shopping center Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, in San Diego.

    San Diego mayor’s fate unknown after settlement proposal

    A tentative deal has been reached involving the sexual harassment lawsuit against San Diego Mayor Bob Filner but it’s unclear whether the agreement includes his resignation, something demanded by a chorus of fellow Democrats and a long line of women who say Filner mistreated them.

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    Americans are significantly less worried about drunk, aggressive and drowsy driving than they were four years ago even though traffic deaths have begun to edge back up, according to a survey by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. At the same time, most Americans consider texting while driving completely unacceptable behavior, although one in four admit doing so recently.

    AAA: Public less worried about dangerous driving

    Americans are much less worried about drunken, drowsy and aggressive driving than they were four years ago even though traffic deaths have begun to edge back up, according to a national survey released by AAA. More than 80 percent of those surveyed considered texting while driving a “completely unacceptable behavior,” but 1 in 4 people admitted doing so within the previous month.

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    Family: Woman battled to recover from shark attack

    20-year-old German woman who lost her right arm in a shark attack off of Hawaii last week is being remembered by her family as beautiful and strong after fighting to stay alive in a Maui hospital. “We are sad to say that she lost her fight today,” her family said Wednesday in a statement through Maui Memorial Medical Center.

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    Ronald E. McNair Discovery Learning Academy held classes at McNair High School on Wednesday after a gunman on Tuesday held one or two staff members captive and fired into the floor of the school office.

    School employee helped avert tragedy in standoff

    The 911 tapes from a frightening standoff and shooting at an Atlanta-area school show how a school employee’s calm demeanor and kind approach helped end the ordeal without any injuries. Police said school bookkeeper Antoinette Tuff was heroic in how she responded after being taken hostage.

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    Afghan massacre suspect’s brother testifies

    Jurors have two pictures of Staff Sgt. Robert Bales to consider as they weigh whether he should ever have a shot at freedom: The indulgent dad who let his son soak his chocolate chip pancakes in ranch dressing, and the mass murderer who inexplicably slaughtered children, women and men in a mud-walled compound in Afghanistan.

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    Police take Prospect Heights youngsters to Mexican museum

    Prospect Heights police joined with fellow city employees, Indian Trails Library staff and volunteers last week to take 22 young people to the Mexican Museum of Fine Arts in Chicago. The trip was part of police outreach work in the community, said Officer Joe Whowell, the event’s coordinator.

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    Arlington Heights writer published in latest “Chicken Soup” book

    An Arlington Heights writer’s tale of a memorable family Thanksgiving has been published in the latest edition of “Chicken Soup for the Soul.” A.J. Cattapan, a writer and middle school English teacher living in Arlington Heights, has a story called “A Turkey of a Thanksgiving” in "Chicken Soup for the Soul: From Lemons to Lemondade, 101 positive, practical and powerful stories about making the...

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    A mechanical problem aboard the 965-foot Millennium forced Celebrity Cruises to cancel six Alaska sailings.

    Alaska cruise cancellations disrupt vacations

    Like so many visitors to Alaska, Phyllis McNamara was eager for a seven-day cruise along a majestic stretch of coast that is teeming with whales, bears and glaciers. But the Indianapolis woman and her friends were among hundreds of tourists who had their vacation plans scuttled when a mechanical problem aboard the 965-foot Millennium forced the cruise operator to cancel six Alaska sailings.

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    Elgin Water Director Kayla Jacobsen leads former Elgin City Manager Leo Nelson on a tour of the Riverside Drive Water Treatment Plant, which the city plans to name after Nelson. Nelson spearheaded the controversial idea of building the facility in the 1970s.

    Elgin to rename water plant in Leo Nelson's honor

    The city of Elgin is planning to rename its water treatment plant after Leo Nelson, the former city manager who led the charge for the enormously controversial project in the 1970s. “It was controversial, but it shouldn't have been,” Nelson said. Nelson, now 78, was city manager from 1972 to 1984. He lived in Elgin for 40 years before moving to Geneva last year.

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    Break free from your cocoon and learn to fly like a butterfly
    Just as the caterpillar turns into the butterfly, our spiritual transformation that takes place from unbeliever to believer in Christ is equally as wonderous, says Annettee Budzban.

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    Gurnee Boy Scout Troop 677 start their 100 year anniversary celebration this year with a flag ceremony.

    Boy Scout Troop 677 in Gurnee celebrates 100 years

    Boy Scout Troop 677 holds the distinction of being one of the oldest continuous troops in the state, staying together within the Gurnee community for 100 years. “Someone believed in a program that had just started in 1910. Someone had a vision and asked ‘where can this take us?’ said Brad Carlson, who has served as Scoutmaster since 2004.

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    Jeannette Simpson earned $18 a month as a teacher in 1864 in Rondout District 72.

    Tiny Rondout district to begin sesquicentennial activites

    Saturday's back-to-school picnic for Rondout Elementary School near Lake Forest will have a decidedly different feel, with the focus on the past rather than the future. “It's been a significant part of the community for a very, very long time,” District 72 Superintendent Jenny Wojcik said of what has remained a single-school district since the Civil War era.

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    A Mount Prospect resident warns scavengers of sewage contaminated furniture left on the curb after flooding on Emerson Street in Mount Prospect in 2011. The village since has spent millions to address flooding in various neighborhoods.

    Mount Prospect addressses Isabella area flooding

    Mount Prospect is pumping an additional $10 million into flood control projects for the Isabella area. The Mount Prospect village board passed an ordinance this week authorizing the issuance of general obligation bonds to fund capital improvements related to flood control. “Every year, for a good number of years, we have spent millions of dollars on flood control, in spite of the fact that some...

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    German Rittal Corp. to put U.S. headquarters in Schaumburg

    German manufacturing company Rittal Corporation will be moving its U.S. headquarters to Schaumburg, the company and Gov. Pat Quinn are set to announce today.

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    16-year-old Hannah Anderson clarified some details Thursday about her relationship with the family friend who authorities say killed her mother and 8-year-old brother before abducting the teen, including that her communications with him that day were about her being picked up at cheerleading practice.

    Calif. girl: I texted abductor about a ride

    A 16-year-old California girl clarified some details Thursday about her relationship with the family friend who authorities say killed her mother and 8-year-old brother before abducting the teen, including that her communications with him that day were about her being picked up at cheerleading practice. Anderson did not speak about the nature of their relationship in an interview with NBC’s...

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    The weedy trees belong to the business next door, but Illinois law says the limbs hanging over the fence and stretching into Robin Sachs’ Mundelein yard are legally her responsibility.

    Fences don’t make good neighbors when trees branch out

    The weedy trees belong to the business next door. But Illinois law says the limbs hanging over the fence and stretching into Robin Sachs' Mundelein yard are legally her responsibility.

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    In this photo released Thursday by the Jinan Intermediate People’s Court, Bo Xilai, center, stands on trial at the court in eastern China’s Shandong province. The disgraced populist politician went on trial Thursday accused of abuse of power and netting more than $4 million in bribery and embezzlement, marking the ruling Communist Party’s attempts to put to rest one of China’s most lurid political scandals in decades.

    Ousted Chinese politician denies taking bribes

    Standing trial Thursday in China’s biggest scandal in decades, ousted Chinese politician Bo Xilai defended himself against corruption allegations, saying he was pressured into making a confession and strongly denying charges he took millions of dollars in bribes. “The matter of me taking money on three occasions, as Tang Xiaolin said, does not exist,” Bo said, according to one of the Jinan court...

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    Asmatullah Muawiya, head of the Taliban’s faction of fighters from central Punjab province, welcomed the government’s recent offer to hold peace talks Thursday, raising the possibility the militant group has changed its stance after shunning negotiations earlier this year.

    Pakistani Taliban commander welcomes peace talks

    A senior Pakistani Taliban commander welcomed the government’s recent offer to hold peace talks Thursday. “If the present government takes an interest in solving matters seriously and with prudence, then there is no reason why jihadi forces active in Pakistan shouldn’t respond to it positively,” Asmatullah Muawiya said in a statement sent to reporters.

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    Fire departments work the scene of a fire at 1045 Westgate St. in Addison.

    Dawn Patrol: Traffic problems in West Dundee; Addison fires injures one

    One injured in Addison fire. Police searching for missing Zion baby. Wooden roller coaster plan rolls on in Gurnee. Attorney says hire back Clifford at Metra. Protesters greet Roskam during Naperville visit. New performing arts center, expanded library dedicated at Carmel High School. Schaumburg hopes for new entertainment district. No new sentence for Aurora woman who killed couple. Hawks’ Sharp...

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    Army Pfc. Bradley Manning said in a writtens statement provided to NBC’s “Today” show that he plans to live as a woman named Chelsea.

    Bradley Manning says he wants to live as a woman

    Bradley Manning says he plans to live as a woman and begin hormone therapy, a day after the soldier was sentenced to 35 years in prison for sending classified information to WikiLeaks. In a written statement provided to NBC’s “Today” show on Thursday morning, Manning said he planned to live as a woman named Chelsea.

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    In this courtroom sketch of court proceedings Wednesday in the court martial of U.S. Army Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, Hasan, right, and his defense attorney, Lt. Col. Kris Poppe, left, are shown in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan rested his case Wednesday without calling any witnesses or testifying in his own defense. Hasan is accused of killing 13 people and wounding more than 30 others at the Texas military base in November 2009.

    Jury in Fort Hood rampage trial set to deliberate

    Army Maj. Nidal Hasan is sending only a single piece of evidence to the jury room when deliberations likely start Thursday about whether he is guilty of the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood: an evaluation from his boss that called him a good soldier. The U.S government produced more than 700 pieces of evidence against Hasan, who hasn’t put up a fight against charges that he killed 13 people and...

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    3rd trial set to start in southern Indiana family’s deaths

    INDIANAPOLIS — Opening arguments are scheduled to begin Thursday in the third murder trial of a former Indiana state trooper charged with killing his wife and their two young children at their southern Indiana home in 2000.

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    Central Indiana city yanks some solar panel maker support

    COLUMBUS, Ind. — A central Indiana city is shutting off some of its assistance to a solar panel manufacturer because the company hasn’t hired enough workers.

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    Divers recover body of missing swimmer in Dane County

    MADISON, Wis. — Divers in Dane County have recovered the body of a missing swimmer from Lake Mendota. Dispatchers got a call about a man missing in the lake about 3:30 p.m. Wednesday. Madison Fire Department divers began a rescue effort, but after 2½ hours were unable to locate the man.

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    Kraft plans $40 million upgrade of Granite City plant

    GRANITE CITY, Ill. — The Kraft Foods Group plans to invest $40 million in its southwestern Illinois plant, creating 30 jobs over the next two years.The (Alton) Telegraph reports the upgrade of the Granite City plant involves adding new equipment, as well as construction.

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    Illinois emergency management agencies receive $4 million

    SPRINGFIELD — Cities and counties throughout Illinois are receiving financial help with their emergency management agencies.Gov. Pat Quinn announced $4 million in grants Wednesday to 121 city and county emergency agencies.

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    Livingston County coroner releases ID of motel victim

    PONTIAC — Authorities have released the name of a 22-year-old central Illinois man who was found dead in a Pontiac motel room, along with a woman and another badly-injured person.The Livingston County Coroner says Tyler R. Friant was among those found dead Tuesday in the Palamar Motel in Pontiac, about 40 miles northeast of Bloomington. He was from Pontiac.

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    Janesville adjusts emerald ash borer strategy

    JANESVILLE, Wis. — The city of Janesville is changing its strategy for fighting emerald ash borer after an inventory found far fewer ash trees on public property.The new inventory shows Janesville has only about 350 ash trees on public property — not 15,000 as earlier estimated.

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    Wisconsin officials warn of unscrupulous debt collectors

    MADISON, Wis. — Wisconsin officials are warning consumers about phone calls from unscrupulous debt collectors.According to the state Department of Financial Institutions, the caller states he is attempting to serve a summons and if the consumer does not “act immediately,” he or she will be arrested. Any threats of arrest or jail are bogus.

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    Wisconsin judge to decide on pleas in fatal fire

    DARLINGTON, Wis. — A teen from southwestern Wisconsin will soon learn whether he can withdraw his guilty pleas following a fire that killed his three nephews.

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    Wisconsin marriages increase again

    MADISON, Wis. — For the second straight year, the number of people who got married in Wisconsin went up and the number of couples who called it quits dropped.The increases in marriages in both 2011 and 2012 come after a 30-year decline.

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    New Illinois law protects renters in foreclosures

    Illinois has a new law protecting renters if their landlord’s property goes into foreclosure.Gov. Pat Quinn signed the law Wednesday saying those who buy multifamily properties out of foreclosure should either honor existing tenant leases or give the renters 90 days to move.It takes effect in three months.

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    Fatal Indianapolis bus crash reports delayed

    INDIANAPOLIS — Indianapolis police say the release of reports into a fatal Indianapolis church bus crash will be delayed until at least next week.

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    Experts: Wait-and-see could harm stuttering kids

    WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Purdue University speech experts say a wait-and-see approach for dealing with preschool children who stutter could harm youngsters who don’t grow out of it.

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    Purdue: Growers should inspect tomatoes for blight

    WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — The Purdue University experts are urging tomato growers to inspect their plants for a fungus-like organism, saying a destructive disease known as late blight has been found on tomatoes in Tippecanoe County in west-central Indiana.

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    Sue Melrose is totally blind, but has learned to weave through a class at the Fine Line Creative Arts Center in St. Charles.

    Vision loss, creative gain: Weaving by touch

    Each year, students from all over the country who have visual impairments come together to learn the art of weaving from Heather Winslow at Fine Line Creative Arts Center in St. Charles. Over the course of four days, they not only create beautiful shawls, table runners, kitchen towels, scarves and more, but also gain confidence and develop deeper feelings of pride in their abilities and...

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    Honors physics teacher Jon Heintzelman helps Daniel Hansen log into his iPad Wednesday at Hersey High School. Northwest Suburban High School District 214 is among numerous suburban districts buying tablets for students.

    Tablets learning tool of choice in suburban schools

    For some suburban districts, iPads and other tablet devices are quickly replacing computers as the learning tools of choice. Gurnee Elementary District 56, for example, is leasing iPads for all of its students. “When we went to school, pencil and paper was kind of the center of our learning experience,” Superintendent John Hutton said. “Now the iPad is the center of the learning...

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    Barrington High School senior Rosie Julian-Simoes and horse Proteus train at the Flying Dutchman Farm in Barrington Hills. She's among the country's top-ranked dressage competitors in her division.

    Barrington Hills teen flourishes in dressage

    While many people are unfamiliar with dressage (rhymes with garage), considered to be the highest expression of horse training and the most artistic of the equestrian sports, Rosie Julian-Simoes doesn't know a life without it. The Barrington Hills teen has been riding all her life, and now she and horse Proteus rank among the country's top competitors in their division.

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    David Bogenberger

    Details emerge in NIU freshman’s hazing death

    Graphic new details have emerged in the hazing death of Northern Illinois University freshman David Bogenberger in an amended civil lawsuit filed by Bogenberger's family against the Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity, and several of its members. Bogenberger, originally from Palatine, died of alcohol poisoning Nov. 2 after a hazing ritual, according to the family's attorney.

Sports

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    Eagles running back LeSean McCoy jumps over the Bears’ Lance Briggs in a game in 2011. McCoy is ranked fifth among running backs for fantasy football purposes, according to John Dietz.

    Fantasy focus: Securing two top RBs a must

    Fantasy football analyst John Dietz gets you ready for the upcoming season with a look at the running backs. Who's No. 1? No. 2? What strategy should you use for your draft? It's all included.

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    Thursday’s girls golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Thursday's girls golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Thursday’s boys golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Thursday's boys golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Boomers set record with 18 hits

    The Schaumburg Boomers set a franchise record with 18 hits in rolling past the Southern Illinois Miners 10-3 to win the series on Thursday night. Schaumburg built an early 3-0 lead with a run in the second and 2 in the third. Justin Vasquez recorded the first of 3 hits for the newcomer with an RBI single to right, bringing home Brian McConkey.

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    Cougars blanked by Beloit

    Despite 9 hits, including 4 from Trevor Gretzky, the Kane County Cougars were shut out by the Beloit Snappers 4-0 contest on Thursday night at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark.

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    Burlington Central’s Matt Weber, chips to the 11th green during the Geneva Boys Golf Invitational at Mill Creek Golf Club in Geneva Thursday.

    WW South shoots 4-under to win Geneva invite

    Wheaton Warrenville South had to alter its boys golf schedule when the annual Larkin Invitational was canceled due to a new IHSA by-law regarding school day events. The Tigers turned their attention to Geneva instead and were rewarded in grand fashion on Thursday evening as the squad, taking advantage of near-perfect conditions, fired a collective 296 to win the 21-school event at Mill Creek Golf Course.

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    The Akron Racers and the New York/New Jersey Comets opened the championship series on Thursday at the National Pro Fastpitch 2013 Championships in Rosemont. The Chicago Bandits will begin play at 5:30 p.m. today.

    Akron advances in NPF

    The Akron Racers opened the National Pro Fastpitch Championship tournament with a 4-2 victory Thursday over the NY/NJ Comets at The Ballpark at Rosemont. The Chicago Bandits will play at 5:30 p.m. Friday.

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    In the long run, Harper still feeling confident

    Defending a championship can sometimes be harder than winning your first one. That’s exactly the scenario facing the Harper men’s cross country team this season. But coach Jim Macnider is expecting big things for his team, calling it “the deepest group” in his three years at the helm.

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    A.J. Pierzynski, who was the White Sox catcher from 2005-12, returns to U.S. Cellular Field on Friday for the first time since signing as a free agent with the Rangers.

    Trio of former Sox return as Rangers

    The Rangers come to town to play the White Sox this weekend, and it will be a homecoming for three Texas players with Sox ties: A.J. Pierzynski, Alex Rios and Neal Cotts.

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    Milwaukee Brewers left fielder Ryan Braun accepted a 65-game suspension last month.

    Ryan Braun finally admits drug use in 2011

    The suspended Milwaukee slugger says in a statement released Thursday by the Brewers that he took a cream and a lozenge containing banned substances while rehabilitating an injury during his MVP season of 2011.

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    Cubs not likely to promote Baez in September

    September call-ups are coming soon, and for the second time within a week, Cubs manager Dale Sveum was asked about shortstop prospect Javier Baez. The 20-year-old Baez has torn it up in the minor leagues, with a combined 33 home runs and 100 RBI between Class A Daytona and Class AA Tennessee entering Thursday. His OPS at Tennessee was 1.025 through Wednesday, when he hit a pair of home runs and went 4-for-4. “The numbers, and guys sometimes do put you in situations where you do start thinking about it,” said Sveum, who deferred to general manager Jed Hoyer and president Theo Epstein. “Those are obviously questions that have to be dealt with by Jed and Theo, but I don’t see that happening.“It’s an incredibly impressive year, especially what he’s done at Double-A because that’s where a lot of really good prospects and a lot of good pitching is anyway.”

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    Travis Wood delivers during the first inning of a baseball game against the Washington Nationals on Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, in Chicago.

    Cubs a lost cause at Wrigley
    There were so many “go-figure” moments at Wrigley Field on Thursday that it was easy to lose track over 13 innings. One thing held to form, though: The Cubs lost again at home. The Washington Nationals dropped them 5-4 on about a 40-foot RBI groundout by pinch hitter Chad Tracy in the top of the 13th. Heading to the West Coast, the Cubs are 54-73 overall and 25-41 at Wrigley Field.

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    The Cubs’ Donnie Murphy hits a game-tying two-run homer off Washington Nationals starting pitcher Stephen Strasburg during Thursday’s game at Wrigley Field. The Nationals beat the Cubs in the 13th inning 5-4.

    Span scores in 13th, Nationals beat Cubs 5-4

    Denard Span scored the go-ahead run on pinch-hitter Chad Tracy’s grounder in the 13th inning, and the Washington Nationals beat the Chicago Cubs 5-4 on Thursday after Stephen Strasburg blew a three-run lead in the ninth. Span doubled leading off the 13th against Michael Bowden (1-3). He moved up on a sacrifice bunt by Steve Lombardozzi and came around on Tracy’s roller to the first-base side of the mound.

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    Elgin Sports Hall of Fame has a busy summer

    Remember when the teacher used to make you write a report on what you did on summer vacation? Well, I won’t go into my summer, other than to say it was healthy and fantastic, but instead today’s first report of the 2013-14 school year will catch you up on some of the happenings of the summer around the Fox Valley and take a brief look at what’s ahead. The Elgin Sports Hall of Fame Foundation has been busy this summer preparing for its annual golf outing in September and then the annual induction ceremony and awards banquet on Nov. 3 at The Centre of Elgin.

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    Real Solution owner Kenneth L. Ramsey celebrates with jockey Alan Garcia after being announced the winner of the 2013 Arlington Million.

    Track officials vow not to repeat Million TV faux pas

    Million Day had everything going for it: beautiful day, big crowd, great racing ... too bad a glitch at the end of the television broadcast of the race put a little damper on the whole day. That and a little Bears talk and much more in Spellman's Scorecard.

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    Bears tight end Martellus Bennett describes how he lets quarterback Jay Cutler know that Bennett is open. “He sees me. I wear white gloves, so he can see the white gloves when I wave them like Mickey Mouse. I’m clapping every time I’m open. I do enough of that to let him know I’m open before I have to tell him.”

    Bennett not so subtly communicates with Cutler

    Bears tight end Martellus Bennett hasn't caught a pass in the preseason, but he isn't worried about quarterback Jay Cutler finding him.

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    Chicago Bears offensive tackle Jordan Mills (67) during the Chicago Bears training camp Wednesday on the campus of Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais.

    Bears’ Mills looking to lock down starting spot

    Jordan Mills gets another opportunity to solidify his spot as the Bears' starting right tackle tonight against the Raiders in Oakland, which would be an unusual accomplishment for a fifth-round draft pick in his first season. The Louisiana Tech product will line up next to first-round draft pick Kyle Long, who has gotten more attention, which is fine with Mills.

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    Fire’s editorial on fan behavior backfires

    Thanks to an editorial by the Chicago Fire, communications professors across America added another example Wednesday night to their lecture about public relations “don’ts.” Orrin Schwarz explains the controversy, and the aftermath that followed.

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    Ryan Braun’s statement

    Here is the text of a statement by Ryan Braun released Thursday by the Milwaukee Brewers.

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    Notre Dame coach Mike Brey was an assistant under Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski from 1987-95.

    Notre Dame’s first ACC game is at home vs. Duke

    Notre Dame will play its first Atlantic Coast Conference basketball game at home against Duke on Jan. 4. The game will pit Irish coach Mike Brey against his former boss, Mike Krzyzewski, who was critical of the ACC’s decision to allow Notre Dame to join the league while staying independent in football.

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    Coordinator Bob Diaco works with the Notre Dame defense during practice Thursday in South Bend, Ind.

    Notre Dame defense counting on depth, experience

    There are seven returning starters from a Notre Dame squad that last season ranked seventh in the nation in total defense, giving up 305 yards a game. The last time the Irish put together back-to-back top 10 finishes in total defense was in 1973.

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    Hope Solo will be minding the net on Sept. 3 when the U.S. national team plays Mexico.

    Solo, Wambach highlight U.S. roster

    U.S. national team stars Abby Wambach, Alex Morgan and Hope Solo are among 18 players chosen by coach Tom Sermanni to play Mexico on Sept. 3. Due to limited training time, Sermanni did not call up any European-based players with the exception of Yael Averbuch, who already will be on the East Coast to attend a wedding.

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    Teuvo Teravainen, a winger from Finland, is a “special player,” according to Blackhawks general manager Stan Bowman. The Hawks signed the 18-year-old forward to a three-year deal.

    Hawks agree to terms with Finnish draft pick

    When the Blackhawks made forward Teuvo Teravainen the 18th pick in the 2012 NHL draft, there were quick comparisons to Patrick Kane because of his size and skill level. On Thursday, the Hawks signed the 5-foot-11, 169-pound Teravainen to a three-year, entry-level contract. Tim Sassone says it's rare for Hawks general manager Stan Bowman to gush over a player, but he does when talking about Teravainen.

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    Tejay van Garderen takes USA Pro lead

    BEAVER CREEK, Colo. — Janier Acevedo of Colombia won the hilly and rainy fourth stage of the USA Pro Challenge on Thursday, and Tejay van Garderen finished second to take the overall lead.Acevedo, riding for Jamis-Hagens Berman, completed the 102.9-mile stage from Breckenride to Beaver Creek in heavy rain in 4 hours, 9 minutes, 8 seconds.Van Garderen, the American BMC rider who began the day in fourth place, conceded the stage win to the Colombian but was given the same finishing time.Van Garden took a 4-second lead over teammate Mathias Frank of Switzerland. Frank finished third in the stage, 13 seconds behind.

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    Italy’s Vincenzo Nibali kisses the trophy after winning the Giro d’Italia in May. Nibali will be seeking his second major title of the year when the mountain-heavy Spanish Vuelta begins on Saturday.

    Spanish Vuelta is a race made for climbers

    Vincenzo Nibali of Italy goes for his second major title of the year when the mountainous Spanish Vuelta begins Saturday. Joaquim Rodriguez of Spain, the other favorite, is hoping to win a grand tour for the first time to round off a long but incomplete career.

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    Wolves announce 2013-14 AHL schedule

    The Chicago Wolves released their 2013-14 schedule, which features 44 of their 76 regular-season games against Midwest rivals as they return for their 20th season of professional hockey. The Wolves, now affiliated with the NHL’s St. Louis Blues, will celebrate their home opener on Oct. 12 against San Antonio with a pregame outdoor festival from 2 to 6 p.m. at Allstate Arena in Rosemont.

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    Chicago Fire scouting report vs. KC

    Orrin Schwarz previews Friday's MLS match between the Chicago Fire and Sporting Kansas City at Toyota Park.

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    Northwestern's football team will wear new white helmets for its Aug. 31 opener at California in a nationally televised game (9:30 p.m., ESPN2).

    Northwestern football unveils white helmets

    After breaking its bowl game losing streak while wearing all-black helmets, Northwestern will open the season on the road with a new look: white helmets with white pants and jerseys.

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    Former Northern Illinois guard Tony Nixon (25) has transferred to Loyola University to play one more season of college basketball. The 6-foot-4 guard was injured most of last season and has one year of eligibility remaining.

    NIU’s Nixon joins Loyola basketball

    Tony Nixon, who has spent the last four years at Northern Illinois University, has been added to the Loyola University men’s basketball roster, head coach Porter Moser announced Thursday.

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    Mike North video: Fox Sports 1 debuts
    The new station FOX Sports 1 is going to try and compete with the front-runner ESPN. They will provide a series of national shows as well as regional coverage. So far the FOX Sports 1 product looks good. Time will tell.

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    Jeff Keppinger has not been the answer at third base for the White Sox this season.

    Hot corner anything but for White Sox

    The White Sox have been searching for a productive third baseman since Joe Crede went down with a back injury in 2007. Conor Gillaspie has shown some positive signs this season, but his subpar power numbers suggest the Sox will keep looking for the next Crede.

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    Anthony Rizzo, batting second for the first time in his career, watches his 2-run homer in the fifth inning leave the ballpark Wednesday night. It was Rizzo’s second home run of the game and his 20th of the season.

    Sveum trying to get Castro, Rizzo back on track

    Cubs manager Dale Sveum shook up his lineup again Wednesday, and it involved Starlin Castro again. This time, Sveum moved Castro up from the eighth spot to leadoff. In an even bigger surprise move, Sveum had first baseman Anthony Rizzo batting second.

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    Boomers extend lead to 4

    The Schaumburg Boomers extended their lead in the Frontier League’s West Division to 4 games by outlasting the Southern Illinois Miners 7-6 on the road Wednesday night.

Business

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    The Chicago area’s second iFly indoor sky-diving facility will be coming to Naperville next spring after the city council unanimously approved the Texas-based company’s plans this week. A fan system blowing through a 50-foot tall flight chamber creates the conditions for indoor sky diving, in which participants can “fly like a superhero” without jumping out of a plane.

    Indoor sky diving business coming to Naperville

    A .7-acre lot in Naperville’s Freedom Commons originally set aside for a bank soon will be home to something that’s been called a lot more thrilling — an indoor sky-diving facility. “We offer a completely safe environment in which to experience the same thrill and excitement of jumping out of an airplane and free-falling,” iFly spokesman Stuart Wallock said.

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    An Elmhurst entrepreneur wants smartphone mounts to go upscale, so he designed the eleMount expected to be ready to ship to customers later this year.

    Elmhurst entrepreneur wants smartphone mounts to go upscale

    More than a year ago, Elmhurst entrepreneur Jose Sanchez was looking for a good quality mount to attach his smartphone to his car’s windshield or dashboard or even elsewhere in the house. But many such mounts were plastic and didn’t last long or just didn’t stay in place.

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    Electronic billboards are reflected in the windows of the Nasdaq in New York, where trading was halted Thursday because of a technical problem, the latest glitch to affect the stock market.

    Nasdaq trading halts; stocks up on positive data

    The stock market rose Thursday but it was a glitch on the Nasdaq exchange that became the day’s big talking point. Trading on the Nasdaq was interrupted just after midday because of problems with a quote dissemination system.

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    Sears’ second-quarter loss widened as the number of stores in operation declined and it dealt with lingering effects from its spinoff of the Hometown and Outlet brand, the company reported Thursday.

    Sears 2Q loss widens as sales weaken at stores

    It was another bad quarter for Hoffman Estates-based Sears Holdings Corp. The beleaguered retailer, which operates Kmart and Sears stores, said Thursday that its second-quarter loss widened as the company continued to struggle with weak sales and deep discounts.

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    Trading Thursday was halted in Nasdaq-listed securities because of a technical problem. The exchange sent out an alert to traders at 11:20 p.m. CDT saying that trading was being halted until further notice because of problems with a quote dissemination system.

    Nasdaq resumes stock trading after 3-hour outage

    Trading on the Nasdaq stock exchange resumed Thursday after a three-hour halt caused by a technical glitch. Other exchanges were operating normally.

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    This photo combo shows Fed Vice Chair Janet Yellen, left, and former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers. Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke is expected to step down when his second term ends in January 2014, and the contest to succeed him has turned into a public struggle between Yellen and Summers.

    Decision on next Fed chief a rare political battle

    A battle over what’s arguably the world’s most powerful economic post has turned into an unusually public struggle over two renowned economists — Fed Vice Chair Janet Yellen and former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers. Who will be the Federal Reserve's next chairman?

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    Struggling retailer J.C. Penney is adopting a plan to prevent a takeover attempt just two days after reporting its sixth straight quarter of big losses and steep revenue declines. It’s the second time in recent years that the company has put into place a so-called “poison pill” plan.

    JC Penney adopts ‘poison pill’

    Struggling retailer J.C. Penney is adopting a plan to prevent a takeover attempt just two days after reporting its sixth straight quarter of big losses and steep revenue declines. It’s the second time in recent years that the company has put into place a so-called “poison pill” plan.

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    Measure of U.S. economy’s health rose in July

    A gauge of the U.S. economy’s health rose in July, pointing to stronger growth in the second half of the year. The Conference Board said Thursday that its index of leading indicators increased 0.6 percent last month to a reading of 96.0.

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    Average U.S. rates for fixed mortgages rose this week to their highest levels in two years, driven by heightened speculation that the Federal Reserve will slow its bond purchases later this year.

    Average U.S. rate on 30-year mortgage at 4.58%

    Average U.S. rates for fixed mortgages rose this week to their highest levels in two years, driven by heightened speculation that the Federal Reserve will slow its bond purchases later this year. Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday that the average rate on the 30-year loan jumped to 4.58 percent, up from 4.40 percent last week. The average on the 15-year fixed loan rose to 3.60 percent from 3.44 percent. Both averages are the highest since July 2011.

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    The Naperville Area Chamber of Commerce is celebrating 100 years of advocating for businesses such as My Chef Catering, owned by Bill and Karen Garlough. The catering company won the U.S. Chamber’s Small Business of the Year Award in 2007 after winning the Naperville Area Chamber’s local small business award the previous year.

    Naperville chamber celebrates century of promoting business

    As Naperville Area Chamber of Commerce members and supporters gather Friday evening to mark the organization’s 100th anniversary, they’re not celebrating a century of a place or a service or an idea, but of people. “It’s the people that made the chamber,” said Emy Trotz, who served on the chamber’s staff from 1985 to 1996 and now is executive assistant to Naperville Mayor George Pradel.

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    In this undated photo released by Janine Gibson of The Guardian, Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald, right, and his partner David Miranda, are shown together at an unknown location.

    Court: UK govt can eye items taken in Snowden case

    A British court has ruled the U.K. government may look through items seized from the partner of a journalist who has written stories about documents leaked by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden. Lawyers for David Miranda said the seized items contain confidential information. The court will allow the government to view the items on the condition the material is being examined on “national security” grounds.

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    U.S. unemployment aid applications up to 336,000

    The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits rose 13,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 336,000, but the level remains consistent with solid job gains. The Labor Department says the four-week average, which smooths week to week fluctuations, fell for the sixth week in a row to 330,500. That’s the lowest for the average since November 2007.

Life & Entertainment

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    Olivia Wilde and Jake Johnson star in "Drinking Buddies."

    'Buddies,' 'Year' take a cynical view on love

    Dann looks at two pseudo-romances: "I Give It a Year" and the Chicago-shot "Drinking Buddies." Plus, Dann previews the McHenry Outdoor Theater's “Terror in the Aisles” horror marathon, which it's holding to finance its conversion to digital projection.

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    Shemekia Copeland is set to perform at the Prairie Center for the Arts in Schaumburg on Saturday, Nov. 2.

    Prairie Center announces season schedule

    The Prairie Center for the Arts in Schaumburg has announced its 2013-14 season of family-friendly performances.

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    Plan out your storage shed before you build

    If you have a back yard, then you probably have space for a small storage shed. If you build one from scratch, then you can customize it and make it look really great. If you buy a kit, then you probably can have it up in just one weekend. Here are some super tips to help you decide what you want to do and how to get started.

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    Gadgets will give your kitchen an efficiency boost

    These tools will create a more efficient kitchen while looking good, too.

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    Handmade notecards are made by spraying cardstock with chalkboard paint. Get in the back-to-school mood by making notecards that incorporate old-school elements like chalkboards, vintage maps, notebook paper and brown paper lunch sacks.

    Create old-school stationery with chalkboard paint

    My classroom days are decades behind me, but I still miss the nerdy pleasure of heading back to school each September with new notebooks and folders, color coded by subject of course. Pretty stationery, however, feels like an acceptable substitute. A stack of blank notecards holds the same promise of a fresh start as school supplies do, especially a set that incorporates old-school elements like chalkboards, vintage maps, notebook paper and brown paper lunch sacks. Chalkboard art has become a big trend in home decorating, from wall hangings that mimic vintage menu boards to entire walls covered with chalkboard paint.

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    Oklahoma City police say 2 Chainz was among more than 10 people arrested after they failed to exit a tour bus following a traffic stop.

    Rapper 2 Chainz arrested in Oklahoma City

    Rapper 2 Chainz was among more than 10 people arrested after they failed to exit a tour bus following a traffic stop in Oklahoma City early Thursday morning, police said. 2 Chainz, whose real name is Tauheed Epps, was arrested Thursday morning along with 10 other people on a charge of obstructing a police officer, said Sgt. Jennifer Wardlow.

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    Head to a salad bar that’s well stocked with whole grains and this salad comes together in a jiffy.

    Wheat berry salad starts with a stop at the salad bar

    Head to a salad bar that’s well stocked with whole grains. Cooked wheat berries will be there; chewy and protein-packed, they provide the terrain for all kinds of add-ins.

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    Head to a salad bar that’s well stocked with whole grains and this salad comes together in a jiffy.

    Add-In Wheat Berry Salad
    2 or 3 scallions2 or 3 store-bought roasted red peppersLeaves from 4 stems mint½ cup roasted salted or unsalted pumpkin seeds¼-1/3 cup pomegranate seeds2 cups cooked wheat berries2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil2 tablespoons pomegranate molasses (may substitute fig vinegar)Kosher salt (optional)1 ounce soft herbed goat cheese4-6 ounces thinly sliced Chinese roast pork (may substitute roast turkey)Trim the scallions, then cut both the white and green parts on the diagonal into ¼-inch pieces. Drain the roasted peppers on paper towels, then cut them into ½-inch-wide strips. Finely chop the mint leaves.Combine those ingredients in a mixing bowl along with the roasted pumpkin seeds, pomegranate seeds, wheat berries, oil and pomegranate molasses; toss lightly to incorporate. If you don’t plan to add meat, you might want to season the mixture at this point with salt to taste.Transfer the salad to a serving platter. Distribute pinches of the goat cheese evenly over the salad, then arrange the roast pork on top. Serve at room temperature with Belgian endive leaves for scooping.Serves two.Nutrition values per serving (without the pork): 660 calories, 21 g fat (5 g saturated), 99 g carbohydrates, 13 g fiber, 13 g sugar. 19 g protein, 10 mg cholesterol, 400 mg sodium.Based on a recipe from “Share: The Cookbook That Celebrates Our Common Humanity” by Women for Women International (Kyle, 2013)

  •  
    Police say an intruder had been living for a week on Jennifer Lopez’s property in the Hamptons while she was away.

    Police: Intruder found at Lopez’s Hamptons estate

    Police say an intruder had been living for a week on Jennifer Lopez’s property in the Hamptons while she was away. Southampton police said Wednesday she had an order of protection against 49-year-old John Dubis of Rhode Island. Information on why the order was obtained wasn’t immediately available.

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    Gary (co-writer Simon Pegg), center, and two pals get much more than they anticipated while attempting to recreate their college pub crawl in "The World's End."

    Nostalgia a killer for guys at 'World's End'

    “The World's End” could have stopped at being a very funny British “Big Chill” and still been quite good. But Edgar Wright, directing from his paranoia-steeped science-fiction-savvy screenplay cowritten with star Simon Pegg, transforms “World's End” into a delightfully shrewd valentine to classic 1950s alien movies, a sort of android redo of “The Invasion of the Body Snatchers.” Hilarious!

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    Actor Wentworth Miller is declining an invitation to be an honored guest at a film festival in Russia because he is gay.

    Wentworth Miller comes out, rejects Russian invite

    Wentworth Miller is declining an invitation to be an honored guest at a film festival in Russia because he is gay. The 41-year-old actor said in a letter Wednesday to organizers of the St. Petersburg International Film Festival that he is “deeply troubled” by the attitudes toward and treatment of gay people by the Russian government, which passed a law in June against representations of “nontraditional sexual relations.”

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    The Glen Ellyn Festival of the Arts will feature artwork from more than 70 juried artists Saturday and Sunday at Lake Ellyn Park.

    Glen Ellyn preparing for Festival of the Arts

    As the oldest service organization in DuPage County, the 90-year-old Glen Ellyn Lions Club has long been involved in charity work for those with visual and hearing disabilities. It’s fitting, then, that one of the club’s biggest fundraisers — the Glen Ellyn Festival of the Arts — is marketed as a celebration of sight and sound.

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    Merchandise created through a collaboration with four Native American artists and designers.

    Paul Frank teams up with Native American artists

    It was Fashion’s Night Out in Los Angeles. Celebrities and models packed parties and shopping extravaganzas thrown by designers and retailers. The people at Paul Frank Industries — famous for putting Julius the monkey on everything from T-shirts to bicycles — were hoping to have some fun with the latest trend of Native American inspired designs. Their offerings included feather headbands, toy tomahawks and glow-in-the-dark war paint.

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    Singer-songwriter John Mayer released his sixth album, “Paradise Valley,” Tuesday, featuring collaborations with his singer-girlfriend Katy Perry and R&B singer Frank Ocean.

    Changed man: John Mayer has new outlook on life

    Sure, John Mayer will likely debut at No. 1 next week with his latest album. But he says “Paradise Valley” marks a new chapter in his career: He's no longer obsessing about dominating the charts, though his decade-long career has included platinum-plus albums and Top 40 hits.

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    Dining events: Have dinner at Niche's farm

    Niche takes dinner to the farm with its annual farm-grown dinner at 6 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 25, at the restaurant's sustainable farm in Elburn. Chef Serena Perdue will pick the menu based on the freshest ingredients that day and prepare a three-course family-style dinner.

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    Lady Gaga will perform her new single, “Applause,” Sunday at the MTV Video Music Awards in Brooklyn.

    Going gaga for football season

    MTV’s annual train wreck known as the Video Music Awards airs at 8 p.m. Sunday. Sean is anxious to see what absurdity Lady Gaga has cooked up for MTV this year. But more importantly this week — football season is here. Oh, not real-life football. “Madden NFL 25.” Yes, the latest installment of EA Sports’ flagship comes to Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 on Tuesday, Aug. 27. And don’t worry, you didn’t wake up in 2025 — the game’s title marks the 25th anniversary of the franchise.

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    Felix (Nick Tucci) and Zee (Wendy Glenn) cower in fear when a family reunion gets interrupted by homicidal animal masks in "You're Next."

    'You're Next' improves as body count rises

    “You're Next” is a nasty little slasher film that starts poorly but gets better once most of the cast has been butchered. The irritation factor grows substantially after the first slaying at a remote Tudor mansion, when half the females appear to be competing to shriek the longest. So many of the victims behave so stupidly, they're almost asking to die in a movie that could use more humor.

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    A a female yellowfever mosquito probes a piece of Limburger cheese, one of few known mosquito attractants. Despite our size and technological advantages, we still can’t seem to win our ancient blood battle with the pesky and lethal mosquito.

    Mosquitoes worse this summer in parts of U.S.

    The tiny mosquito all too often has man on the run. And this summer, it seems even worse than usual. “You can’t get from the car to inside our house without getting attacked, it’s that bad,” high school teacher Ryan Miller said from his home in Arlington, Va. Minutes earlier, he saw a mosquito circling his 4-month-old daughter — indoors. Experts say it’s been a buggier-than-normal summer in many places around the U.S. because of a combination of drought, heavy rain and heat.

Discuss

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    Editorial: Reining in school registration fees

    The wide variation in fees, lack of uniformity in what’s included and a few questionable requirements call out for a closer look at how schools arrive at registration fees, a Daily Herald editorial says.

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    Editorial: Reining in school registration fees

    The wide variation in fees, lack of uniformity in what’s included and a few questionable requirements call out for a closer look at how schools arrive at registration fees, a Daily Herald editorial says.

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    A timely perspective on what happens in schools

    Columnist Jim Slusher:The stories in our Back to School series provide a timely reminder of what is at stake in the political tug-of-war over finances.

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    Fractured GOP still in need of a plan

    Columnist Byron York: There are indications some Republicans might be falling back into their old 2012 mindset, viewing the 2014 elections as a referendum on the president’s continuing poor economic performance. But unhappiness with Obama is just the necessary predicate for convincing voters that the Republican plan is better. When there is a plan.

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    Policies of good ol’ days wouldn’t work today
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: Progress is always relative and an equation. Just like the rest of life, small government would be good, if only we did not have to give up so much to return to it. Actually, where health insurance exchanges have been established, Obamacare has reduced health care premiums quite significantly.

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    Some lawmakers have made tough votes
    A letter to the editor: As our unemployment rate continues as the second highest in the nation, taxpayers are right to question our legislature’s ability to address the critical issues facing our state. But remember, many individual legislators have already stood up. They simply need more help.

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    There’s great pro sports value in suburbs
    A Mundelein letter to the editor: Wouldn’t it be great if you could go see a professional sports team where the players play with joy and integrity for the game, the quality of play is championship caliber, the stadium is impeccable, every seat a great view, and reasonably priced?

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    The reality outside Washington
    A Libertyville letter to the editor: This letter is in response to the by Gene Lyons editorial on August 16. He questioned the reality for the GOP.

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    Priority 1: Secure our border
    A St. Charles letter to the editor: Our border with Mexico poses a real danger. Not only for the obvious and repeated legal, societal and economic reasons, but for those who make the dangerous decision to cross it.

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