Fittest loser

Daily Archive : Wednesday August 21, 2013

News

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    This is just one of the 10 or so stops 14-year-old William Walker and his mom Kristine made recently during freshman orientation at Geneva High School, where they also paid $135 for registration.

    Registration fees on top of taxes? Schools vary in suburbs

    Registration fees at public school districts can costs parents hundreds of dollars on top of the property tax revenue they're already paying. They run the gamut from $28 for Glen Ellyn first-graders to $435 for Maine Twp. high school students. “Then there are fees for band and sports. They pass everything on to parents,” Susie Johannesen said of Cary Elementary District 26.

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    Police are searching for this 5-month-old boy who went missing Wednesday morning in Zion.

    Police continue search for missing Zion baby

    The search for a missing Zion baby will continue early Thursday morning, police said. The 5-month-old was reported missing from an apartment on the 2300 block of Galilee Avenue around 8 a.m. Wednesday. A caller indicated the “unknown persons” had abducted the boy, according to police.

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    A view across the Fox River at Otto Engineering, Carpentersville's biggest employer and a key proponent of river enhancements.

    Carpentersville's Fox River efforts a “work in progress”

    You can't talk about the Fox River in Carpentersville without mentioning Tom Roeser, president and CEO of Otto Engineering. Roeser's move to spend millions renovating and beautifying his company headquarters, which hugs the banks of the Fox River, was the inspiration behind the village's move to beautify other parts of the river, such as a renovation of the Main Street Bridge. “It's fair to...

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    The American Eagle and Viper, not pictured, may receive competition on the wooden roller coaster front at Six Flags Great America in Gurnee. Village officials say the park has a plan for a new wooden coaster.

    Great America wooden roller coaster plan rolls on in Gurnee

    An advisory panel in Gurnee has given its support to a wooden roller coaster proposed for Six Flags Great America. If built, the ride would be in the theme park’s County Fair area where the Iron Wolf roller coaster once stood. Iron Wolf operated from 1990 to 2011. “It’s maintaining a competitive advantage for the business that is housed there,” Planning and zoning board...

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    Mary Kay Mace, whose daughter, Ryanne Mace, 18, was the youngest victim of five students killed in a shooting five years ago at Northern Illinois University.

    NIU shooting victim's mom pushes for background checks

    The mother of a suburban Northern Illinois University student who was killed at the mass shooting there five years ago is pushing Congress to approve universal background checks for gun buyers. “I never set out to be a public face. I didn't really want to,” Mary Kay Mace said. “I'm not very comfortable speaking publicly. The only reason I do is because it (shootings) keeps...

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    Julie Rothenfluh is now executive director of the Naperville Public Library, a role she has held in the interim since former Executive Director John Spears left July 5. Rothenfluh had been with the Naperville library system 15 years before being named executive director Wednesday night.

    Naperville library names interim director Rothenfluh as new permanent leader

    When the Naperville Public Library board named its new executive director Wednesday night, she already was in the room responding to board questions and leading the meeting. Interim Director Julie Rothenfluh now is officially the library’s executive director, and she jumped right into the role Wednesday night discussing strategic planning, the library’s strengths and weaknesses and early ideas...

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    The structure of the McKee House in the Churchill Woods Forest Preserve near Glen Ellyn is in overall good condition, an architect said Wednesday. Preservationists have been trying to save the 78-year-old building from the wrecking ball.

    Architect: Mckee House needs fixes before it’s habitable

    The structure of a historic building located in the Churchill Woods Forest Preserve on the Lombard-Glen Ellyn border and owned by the DuPage County Forest Preserve District is in overall good condition, a district-hired architect said Wednesday. But the fate of the 78-year-old McKee House — which has been threatened before with the wrecking ball — is still unknown.

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    Fire departments work the scene of a fire at 1045 Westgate St. in Addison.

    One injured in Addison fire

    Firefighters spent hours on the scene of an Addison fire that injured one person Wednesday afternoon. Battalion Chief Roy Charvat of the Addison Fire Protection District said crews responded to reports of a fire at 1045 Westgate St. around 4:30 p.m.

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    San Sandberg of Geneva sings.

    Images: Suburban Chicago’s Got Talent Performances at Randhurst Village
    Five finalists from the Daily Herald Suburban Chicago's Got Talent contest performed Wednesday at Randhurst Village in Mount Prospect, including the winner Gabriela Francesca of Palatine.

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    This citizen journalism image, Syrians mourn over the dead bodies, victims of an alleged poisonous gas attack fired by regime forces, according to activists Wednesday.

    Deadly attack in Syria renews chemical arms claim

    The Syrian government adamantly denied using chemical weapons in an artillery barrage targeting suburbs east of Damascus, calling the allegations “absolutely baseless.” The U.S., Britain and France demanded that a team of U.N. experts already in the country be granted immediate access to investigate the claims.

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    An Egyptian court has ordered the release of ex-President Hosni Mubarak, but it’s not immediately clear whether the prosecutors will appeal the order.

    Egypt to put ex-leader Mubarak under house arrest

    Egypt’s prime minister ordered Wednesday that deposed autocrat Hosni Mubarak be placed under house arrest after he’s released from prison following more than two years in detention. The announcement came hours after a court ordered Mubarak be released for the first time since he was first detained in April 2011, a move threatening to further stoke tension in a deeply divided Egypt.

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    The city of Naperville will be working to move this stretch of sidewalk, on the east side of Washington Street just north of Bauer Road, further from traffic after a resident voiced concerns at Tuesday’s city council meeting. The 200-foot section would cost an estimated $15,000 to move further from the road if Naperville Unit District 203, which owns the land, grants an easement.

    Naperville to move sidewalk segment away from traffic

    Kids on the way to school, along with runners, bikers and countless others who walk on the east side of Washington Street just north of Bauer Road in Naperville, have to traverse a 200-foot section of sidewalk immediately next to the street. It can be a little dicey navigating so close to all those cars, so city officials say they’ll now take a look at moving the path away from traffic.

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    Prospective students and their parents tour Georgetown University’s campus in Washington. Just a quarter of this year’s high school graduates who took the ACT tests have the reading, math, English and science skills they need to succeed in college or a career, according to data the testing company released Wednesday.

    ACT: Third of high school grads not college ready

    Almost a third of this year’s high school graduates who took the ACT tests are not prepared for college-level writing, biology, algebra or social science classes, according to data the testing company released Wednesday. The company’s annual report also found a gap between students’ interests now and projected job opportunities when they graduate, adding to the dire outlook for the class of 2013.

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    In this courtroom sketch, Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan sits Tuesday in court for his court-martial in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan told the judge he wouldn’t be calling any witnesses in his defense.

    Hasan: ‘Illegal war’ provoked Fort Hood rampage

    Maj. Nidal Hasan could face the death penalty if convicted for the Fort Hood attack that killed 13 people and wounded more than 30 others. But when given the chance to rebut prosecutors’ lengthy case — which included nearly 90 witnesses and hundreds of pieces of evidence — the Army psychiatrist declined.

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    Army Pfc. Bradley Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison for giving military secrets to the website WikiLeaks.

    For leak, Bradley Manning gets stiffest punishment

    Army Pfc. Bradley Manning stood at attention in his crisp dress uniform Wednesday and learned the price he will pay for spilling an unprecedented trove of government secrets: up to 35 years in prison, the stiffest punishment ever handed out in the U.S. for leaking to the media.

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    House Republican Leader Tom Cross told fellow GOP lawmakers Wednesday that he’s considering running for statewide office.

    Cross considers statewide office, could leave leadership

    Illinois House Republican Leader Tom Cross of Oswego is considering running for a statewide office, a move that would spark competition to take over his leadership role.

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    Bill Coulson

    Coulson: Ex-Metra CEO Clifford had a good case

    RTA Board Director Bill Coulson, a former assistant U.S. attorney, thinks Metra's ex-CEO Alex Clifford had a decent whistleblower case against his former bosses. Coulson's analysis has some interesting differences from an official RTA audit of Clifford's separation agreement.

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    Brian Hill/bhill@dailyherald.com Roger and Allyson Brewer walk hand in hand with their daughter Anya, 7, who was on her way to her first day of second grade at Davis Primary School in St. Charles Wednesday.

    New principals, new starts in Fox Valley

    The leadership lineup was shuffled a bit for St. Charles schools, which opened Wednesday. Five schools got new principals. They are St. Charles North, with Audra Christenson; Haines Middle School, with Pam Jensen; Thompson Middle School, with Tim Loversky; Wredling Middle School, with Stephen Morrill; and Anderson Elementary, with Patricia Gonzalez.

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    Judy Mascolino of Fox River Grove demonstrated outside Cress Creek Country Club in Naperville Wednesday, where U.S. Rep. Peter Roskam was speaking about the tax code.

    Protesters greet Roskam during Naperville visit

    Congressman Peter Roskam came to Naperville Wednesday to meet with chamber of commerce members about reforming the country’s tax code. Outside the doors of Cress Creek Country Club, where the $35-a-plate luncheon was taking place, more than a dozen protesters urged him to talk about something else.

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    Alia Bernard

    No new sentence for Aurora woman who killed couple

    A judge Wednesday rejected a move by an Aurora woman - who had marijuana in her system when she caused a May 2009 crash that killed two St. Charles motorcyclists - for lesser charges or a new sentence. Alia Bernard, 29. who is serving a six-year sentence for the deaths of Wade and Denise Thomas, argued that her right to a speedy trial was violated.

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    McHenry County woman first human West Nile virus case

    The Illinois Department of Public Health confirmed Wednesday a McHenry County woman in her 50s is the first human West Nile virus case in the state this year. According to a news release, the McHenry County Health Department reported that the woman became ill from the virus earlier this month.

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    St. Charles reaches new deal with fire union

    St. Charles firefighters will get 2.25 percent raises for the next three years under a new deal inked by aldermen this week.

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    Elgin will appeal ruling allowing mobile pregnancy testing facility

    Elgin will appeal a federal judge’s order banning the use of zoning laws to keep The Life Center from offering women free ultrasounds and pregnancy tests from its mobile facility, the city’s lawyers said Wednesday.

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    Mayor: All of Chicago to help with ‘safe passage’

    Mayor Rahm Emanuel says workers hired to help kids get to and from school safely will be “on the front lines” when Chicago Public Schools begin classes. But he says they won’t be alone.

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    Talent finalists open for suburban music show

    Photos of five Suburban Chicago's Got Talent finalists performing at Randhurst Village in Mount Prospect before the headliner Maggie Speaks.

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    Wauconda addiction vigil:

    A candlelight vigil to remember people who died of drug overdose and those struggling with addiction will be held Sunday, Aug. 25, in Wauconda.

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    Cook to seek reelection:

    Robert Cook, chairman of the Lake County Republican Central Committee, announced he plans to seek re-election to that post in 2014.

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    Reading tutors sought:

    United Way of Lake County is seeking volunteers as reading tutors in Waukegan classrooms. Training will be provided for all volunteers.

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    Alzheimer’s information:

    The Alzheimer’s Association, Greater Illinois Chapter’s educational program, Learning to Connect: Relating to the Person with Alzheimer’s, is set for 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 29, at Radford Green at Sedgebrook, 960 Audubon Way in Lincolnshire.

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    Kenneth Conley

    Chicago prison escapee plans to plead guilty

    A bank robber intends to plead guilty to a federal escape charge after he and a cellmate broke out of a high-rise Chicago lockup. Kenneth Conley’s attorney said at a status hearing Wednesday that his client is negotiating a plea agreement with prosecutors.

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    The Rev. Carl Markelz, Order of the Carmelites, and Sister Sheila O’Brien, Sisters of Charity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, perform the blessing of the spaces Wednesday at Carmel Catholic High School as part of the dedication of the new performing arts center and library expansion.

    New performing arts center, expanded library dedicated at Carmel High School

    A $6.2 million capital project was dedicated Wednesday at Carmel Catholic High School in Mundelein. A new performing arts center and expanded library is considered a boost to for student instruction. “I’m so honored for the whole community, the faculty, the staff, parents, students and donors,” said Judith Mucheck, president of Carmel Catholic High School. “Everybody has a piece in the...

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Concepcion Galvan, 21, of St. Charles, was charged with retail theft at 2:37 p.m. Monday, according to a police report. She is accused of taking two necklaces from Kohl’s, 251 N. Randall Road.

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    Firefighters head along the perimeter after a gas leak forced more than 540 students from Abbott Middle School to be relocated to Larkin High School for a few hours Wednesday. The leak was located near the southeast corner of the school grounds.

    Elgin middle school safely evacuated after gas leak

    About 540 students were safely evacuated from Abbott Middle School in Elgin after a road construction crew caused a gas leak, Elgin police said. There were no injuries. The students were transported to Larkin High School and returned by 2 p.m. or so.

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    Kirk, Quigley push for visa-free travel for Poles

    Two Illinois lawmakers urged Congress on Wednesday to pass pending legislation that would allow Polish citizens to visit the U.S. for up to 90 days without a visa, saying including the staunch U.S. ally in the visa-waiver program is long overdue.

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    Delilah Nelson, manager of one of Illinois’ in-person counselor programs, talks about health insurance outside her office at the Family Guidance Center in Springfield.

    Jobs available under Obama health law in Illinois

    Working on a tight time frame, Illinois is building an 800-person army of temporary workers to help people sign up for health insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act. The “in-person counselor” jobs, located in every corner of the state, range from a $9-an-hour part-time evening job in Clinton County to a $45,000-a-year project coordinator position in Chicago for someone with experience...

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    2 hit by blowgun darts at U of I

    Champaign police say two people have been shot with blowgun darts as they walked at the University of Illinois campus this week. Police said Wednesday that both victims were shot Tuesday night in the same area in the central part of the campus.

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    No device found after ISU bomb threat

    Illinois State University President Timothy J. Flanagan says nothing suspicious has been found a day after a handwritten bomb threat was discovered in a bathroom.

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    Blake Hansen, 7, waves to his parents Natalie and John as he arrives via bus at Kaneland Blackberry Creek Elementary School for the first day on Wednesday. Blake's parents met him as he got off the bus and saw him off to school.

    Images: Suburban students head back to class
    A gallery of images from suburban schools over the past week as kids head back to the classroom for the 2013-2014 school year.

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    Long-vacant Hanover Park building being demolished

    The long-vacant, former Menards building at 900 Irving Park Road in Hanover Park is being demolished, village officials said. Work was scheduled to begin Wednesday at the privately owned property, located just west of Olde Salem Road.

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    District 59 adopts $100.8 million budget

    The Elk Grove Township Elementary District 59 school board this week adopted a $100.8 million spending budget for the 2013-14 academic year, which reflects an estimated $6.1 million deficit across all funds, officials said in a news release.

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    PAUL VALADE/pvalade@dailyherald.com Jeff and K.C. Faetz’s home in Lake Zurich’s Cedar Creek subdivision flooded after heavy rain June 26. Village public works manager Mike Brown said officials have met with residents affected by the flooding and K.C. Faetz now has Brown’s wireless telephone number.

    Lake Zurich officials: Overall, June flood response was good

    Lake Zurich officials have identified areas where they succeeded and need improvement in a review of the handling of a June 26 flood that resulted after a heavy rain quickly pounded the village. “Overall, we believe that all of our staff members rose to the occasion and provided the best services possible,” Golubski said. “The public works department responded to multiple areas, began pumping...

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    The Naperville Wine Festival offers chances for visitors to taste and judge wine as well as wine seminars and opportunities to pair wine with food.

    Naperville Wine Festival celebrates the grape

    More than 300 wines will be available when the 11th annual Naperville Wine Festival opens its two-day run Friday. In addition to all that wine, the fest will feature the Belgian Beer Café featuring Stella Artois, Leffe and Hoegaarden, all in addition to a selection of Goose Island products.

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    In this courtroom sketch, Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, left, appears Tuesday before Judge Col. Jeffery Nance in a courtroom at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., during a sentencing hearing in the slayings of 16 civilians killed during pre-dawn raids on two villages on March 11, 2012.

    U.S. soldier faces villagers at massacre sentencing

    Two Afghan villagers who traveled about 7,000 miles to testify against a U.S. soldier who massacred their relatives didn’t get to say everything they wanted to in court Wednesday.

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    Eric Stallworth Jr.

    Judge upholds arrest in Aurora gang rape case

    A judge refused this week to disallow a warrantless arrest of one of three men accused of a gang rape of drunken woman near Aurora University in August 2012. Eric Stallworth Jr., who faces charges of sexual assault, argued police did not have probable cause to arrest him in October 2012.

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    Jeffrey J. Dixon

    Glen Ellyn man faces sex abuse, child porn charges

    A Glen Ellyn man has been charged with possessing child pornography and sexually abusing a 9-year-old girl, authorities said Wednesday. Jeffrey Dixon, 55, of the 500 block of Geneva Road, was indicted Tuesday on six counts of child pornography and two counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse.

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    Lee R. Patterson III

    Aurora man gets 7 years for fatal DUI hit-and-run

    An Aurora man was sentenced Wednesday to seven years in prison for a drunken hit and run in October 2010 in North Aurora that killed a 22-year-old Cicero woman and injured her boyfriend. Lee R. Patterson III, 33, could have received anywhere from probation to 29 years in prison for the death of Doreen Cardenas.

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    Students crowd the hallway during the first day at Buffalo Grove High School.

    Pep rallies, music welcome students back to BGHS

    Buffalo Grove High School welcomed students this morning with band music, pep rallies and teachers in buffalo heads.

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    Rolling Meadows leaders have postponed for two months a decision on the proposed expansion of Meacham Road between Algonquin Road and Emerson Avenue. Officials say the delay will give them more time to study traffic patterns and coordinate plans with the Illinois Department of Transportation.

    Rolling Meadows postpones Meacham Road expansion discussion

    Rolling Meadows leaders have postponed for two months a decision on the proposed expansion of Meacham Road between Algonquin Road and Emerson Avenue. Officials say the delay will give them more time to study traffic patterns and coordinate plans with the Illinois Department of Transportation.

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    Kurtis Worley

    Addison man indicted in wife's slaying, stepson's stabbing

    An Addison man charged with murdering his wife and stabbing his teenage stepson has been formally indicted, authorities said Wednesday. Kurtis Worley, 33, faces five counts of first-degree murder, two counts of aggravated battery and one count each of attempted first-degree murder, armed violence and aggravated domestic battery.

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    President Richard M. Nixon points to the transcripts of the White House tapes after he announced during a nationally-televised speech that he would turn over the transcripts to House impeachment investigators, in Washington. The last 340 hours of tapes from Nixon’s White House were released Wednesday, along with more than 140,000 pages of text materials.

    Reagan supports Nixon after Watergate speech, tape shows

    The final installment of secret recordings from President Richard Nixon’s White House captures future president Ronald Reagan calling to offer support after Nixon delivered a public address on Watergate.The April 30, 1973, phone conversation was released Wednesday along with 340 hours of tape and more than 140,000 pages of documents.

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    Arlington Heights named “Green Power Community”

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has designated Arlington Heights as a Green Power Community for its use of solar power at the downtown bike shelter and use of wind-generated power at its sanitary sewer lift stations and smaller facilities.

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    No new contract yet for District 25 teachers

    Classes resume Thursday in Arlington Heights Elementary District 25, but the district's teachers will start the year without a contract. The district and the Arlington Teacher's Association, which represents more than 400 teachers and support staff in the district, have yet to reach an agreement on a new deal. The teachers' previous contract expired Aug. 15.

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    Rolling Meadows studies moving downtown fire station

    Rolling Meadows downtown fire station could be moved to provide better service to residents in the south and southeast parts of the city, the city council said Tuesday night.

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    More ACT tests reported this year resulted in a drop in average scores statewide.

    ACT scores dip in Illinois as more tests are counted

    Illinois is one of only nine states that require 11th-graders to take the ACT exam, and in 2013, Illinois students' average score ranked near the top. Utah had the highest score out of the smaller group – 20.7 out of 36 – with Illinois students just one-tenth of a point behind. The national average is slightly higher.

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    ACLU: Muslims face more scrutiny for citizenship

    The American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California said in a report that federal immigration officers are instructed to find ways to deny applications that have been deemed a national security concern. For example, they’ll flag discrepancies in a petition or claim they failed to receive sufficient information from the immigrant.

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    Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood cleric Safwat Hegazy, a fiery preacher from the ultraconservative Salafi movement and a top Brotherhood ally, was captured Wednesday at a checkpoint near the Siwa Oasis in eastern Egypt, according to the state-run MENA news agency. The cleric is wanted on charges of instigating violence.

    Egyptian authorities arrest 2 Islamist figures

    Egyptian authorities on Wednesday continued their crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood and its allies by arresting two more high-profile Islamist figures. The arrested Islamists include a preacher known for his fiery sermons who was reportedly caught as he tried to flee to neighboring Libya in disguise, and a spokesman for the Brotherhood said to be on his way to catch a flight out of the country.

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    Tom Roeser, president and chief executive officer of Otto Engineering, discusses his displeasure with Carpentersville officials, who fined his contractor $150 for installing a driveway of concrete pavers on a Washington Street retail property Roeser owns. Though these sorts of driveways violate village codes, there are two other elsewhere that the village has not fined.

    Otto Engineering CEO Roeser upset with Carpentersville officials

    Tom Roeser, who says he's repeatedly received miscommunication and misinformation from Carpentersville Community Development Director Jim Hock, implored village trustees to “deal with these issues” and stopped short of asking them to fire Hock. “Your community development department continues to be a mess of inaccurate information, inconsistent code enforcement, abysmal...

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    Study: Low river costs corn farmers money

    BLOOMINGTON — An agricultural economics research company says last summer’s low water on the Mississippi River cut the cash price farmers received for their corn by an average of 45 cents a bushel.

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    Federation says school sports participation is up

    A group of high school sports associations say student sports participation is up for the 24th consecutive year. The National Federation of State High School Associations conducts a survey each year of all states and the District of Columbia. According to the results, more than 7.7 million students participated in sports during the 2012-2013 school year. That’s more than ever before.

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    Northwestern has new scholarships for Chicago students

    A Northwestern University trustee and his wife have endowed a scholarship program for low-income Chicago Public Schools students to attend the college in Evanston.The gift comes from Michael Sacks, CEO of Grosvenor Capital Management and a Northwestern trustee, and Cari Sacks, a civic and community leader.

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    Indiana group to oppose gay marriage amendment

    INDIANAPOLIS — An alliance of businesses and human rights groups is launching an effort to defeat passage of an amendment that would write Indiana’s ban on same-sex marriage into the state constitution.

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    Park official: Merlins in northeastern Indiana “significant”

    LAKE JAMES, Ind. — A pair of small falcons known as merlins nesting at a state park in northeastern Indiana is believed to be a first for the state.

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    Indianapolis Motor Speedway getting roundabout

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana’s most famous 2½-mile oval is getting a traffic circle.The Speedway Redevelopment Commission says it will turn the intersection in front of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway into a roundabout next summer.

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    Sunday deadline for Indiana state park deer hunts

    INDIANAPOLIS — Sunday’s the deadline for Indiana hunters to apply for this year’s state park deer reduction hunts.Hunters can apply online by visiting www.in.gov/dnr/ and going to the Division of Fish and Wildlife page. Paper applications aren’t available.

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    Judge backs Indiana school’s ‘boobies’ bracelets ban

    FORT WAYNE, Ind. (AP) — A federal judge has sided with a Fort Wayne school district’s ban on students wearing “I (heart) Boobies!” bracelets.The ACLU of Indiana filed a lawsuit last year for a then-sophomore girl at Fort Wayne’s North Side High School after administrators took away her rubber bracelet designed to promote breast cancer awareness.

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    Survivor of central Indiana plane crash out of hospital

    COLUMBUS, Ind. — The passenger who survived a plane crashing into a central Indiana house has returned home after being hospitalized for more than three weeks.

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    Jefferson County relaxes courthouse dress code

    MOUNT VERNON, Ill. — A southern Illinois courthouse is relaxing its dress code to allow visitors to wear to shorts — if they’re long enough. Jefferson County officials began enforcing a new dress code this week. The rules also banned pajamas, house slippers, hats, tank tops, muscle shirts and halter tops along with inappropriate or offensive logos.

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    Review: Indiana cities have worst gas price spikes

    INDIANAPOLIS — Turns out the gasoline price hikes in Indiana’s two largest cities have been pretty bad after all.A review by the website GasBuddy.com found Fort Wayne with the country’s highest one-day average price hikes this year and Indianapolis coming in second. GasBuddy says Fort Wayne’s spikes averaged 34 cents a gallon and Indianapolis averaged 32 cents.

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    Wisconsin milk production rises 3 percent in July

    MADISON, Wis. — July was another good month for Wisconsin’s dairy farmers.The latest federal statistics say the state produced 2.3 billion pounds of milk in July. That’s 3 percent better than its production in July 2012.National production rose 1 percent, to 15.7 billion pounds.

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    Wisconsin ACT scores unchanged in 2013

    MADISON, Wis. — Wisconsin students’ average ACT scores were unchanged this year compared with 2012, and they remain above the national average.The average composite score for Wisconsin students who graduated this spring was 22.1 out of 36. That’s the same as last year and above the national average of 20.9.

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    Milwaukee bar owner tried saving man he had shot

    MILWAUKEE — The owner of a Milwaukee tavern who fatally shot one of three men trying to rob the bar tried to save the man after shooting him.

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    Simon urges testimony at budget hearings

    SPRINGFIELD — Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon is urging taxpayers to comment at public hearings about funding for state-run programs and services.

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    Illinois regulators OK major transmission line

    SPRINGFIELD — Regulators have signed off on a new transmission line that’d cut through central Illinois.The (Springfield) State Journal-Register reports the Illinois Commerce Commission approved all but 30 miles of Ameren’s Illinois Rivers Project during a meeting Tuesday.

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    Newborn giraffe dies at Niabi Zoo

    COAL VALLEY, Ill. — A newborn calf at the Niabi Zoo has died.Officials at the western Illinois zoo released a statement Tuesday saying the 124-pound female calf was born last week, but only survived for several hours after she began to have trouble breathing.

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    Amtrak boosters hold summit on threatened line

    LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Supporters of an Amtrak passenger line that runs between Indianapolis and Chicago are putting a spotlight on Indiana’s looming decision on whether to keep that line moving.State lawmakers and local mayors whose cities are stops along the Hoosier State line are hosting an “Amtrak Summit” Wednesday in Lafayette.

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    Josh Pierce and twin daughters, Maddie, left, and Chloe, with his wife, Jessica. Behind the happy faces were difficulties in the family that may have been caused by Josh’s illness that had not yet been diagnosed, Jessica said.

    Family struggles with pain as early dementia claims husband, father

    Josh Pierce was a regular guy who could enjoy a ballgame, a couple of beers and a round of golf with his buddies before he started acting strangely a few years ago. After 18 frustrating months, the married father of twin daughters and owner of a health insurance brokerage business was diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia.

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    Emily Weyers and Nick Blaise, obscured, both 18, served plates of warm food last year at a pancake breakfast to benefit the Allegiance Youth Color Guard of Dundee. Weyers was struck and killed by a car as she walked along Algonquin Road.

    Dawn Patrol: RTA blasts Metra, ex-CEO; Mt. Prospect’s ‘Extreme Cougar’

    RTA: Metra board could have avoided ‘golden parachute.’ LITH teen hit by car remembered. Three accused of attacking man after South Elgin Riverfest. Mt. Prospect native to appear on ‘Extreme Cougar Wives.’ Lisle-area woman falls victim to scam. Cutler says he’s keeping options open.

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    Marijuana is shown at the Cannabis Cafe Tuesday Nov. 17, 2009, in Portland, Ore. The patrons of the Cannabis Cafe are people with Oregon medical marijuana cards. The Cannabis Cafe is the latest step forward for medical marijuana patients in Oregon, where voters authorized its use in 1998.(AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

    Kane County officials starting to plan for medical marijuana

    With medical marijuana on the horizon for Illinois, Kane County officials are beginning to turn their thoughts to what role they may have in regulating the new industry. “Counties can weigh in on the zoning of cultivation or distribution of medical marijuana,” Health Department Executive Director Barb Jeffers said. “But our county has not taken that position yet."

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    Frank Bart

    Wauconda wants more time for water deal

    With a deadline expiring today, Wauconda officials want more time to discuss fees they want to collect from other municipalities if they agree to hook the village up to a Lake County drinking water system.

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    Medical marijuana facilities could be in Bartlett business park

    If a medical marijuana cultivation or dispensing center comes to Bartlett next year it will likely be located in the Brewster Creek Business Park, away from homes, schools and day care centers. During a committee of the whole meeting Tuesday, the village board discussed changes to the current zoning ordinance that would designate a zoning district, and set a regulation, for medical marijuana...

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    Chris Collins

    Northwestern basketball coach among Glenbard guests on dangers of drugs

    It’s common for high school athletes and their parents to attend meetings before the start of every sports season when their coaches and school administrators warn about the use of alcohol and drugs. This year in Glenbard High School District 87, officials are bringing in some big names to spread that message — and they say it comes at a time as important as ever.

Sports

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    So long summer, hello fall

    It may be opening week for area high school, middle school and elementary school students and staff but there’s still a little time left to enjoy summerlike temperatures before thoughts of Halloween come creeping upon us.

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    Associated Press Chicago Sky leading scorer Elena Delle Donne (11) will play Friday against the New York Liberty as the Sky strives to claim its first WNBA playoff berth in team history.

    Sky scouting report vs. Liberty

    Chicago Sky Scouting report against the New York Liberty at Allstate Arena on Friday.

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    Illinois No. 2 quarterback Reilly O’Toole, a former star at Wheaton Warrenville South, says he needs to cut down on turnovers this season to help his team.

    O’Toole stays positive as Illini backup QB

    Looking from the outside, it’s tough to generate many positive feelings about Reilly O’Toole’s spot as a backup on the Illinois football team. The former Wheaton Warrenville South quarterback sees things a little differently, though. “There’s more than just the football aspect of being happy,” he said in a phone interview. “I like being around everybody. I like the school. I’m just real happy with my teammates."

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    Chicago White Sox's Dayan Viciedo hits a grand slam during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals, Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013, in Kansas City, Mo. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

    Viciedo’s slam powers White Sox past Royals, 5-2

    Dayan Viciedo hit his second career grand slam to highlight a five-run inning for the White Sox, and Andre Rienzo picked up his first career win for the White Sox by shutting down the punchless Kansas City Royals in a 5-2 victory Wednesday night.

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    Chicago Bears Jonathan Bostic on defense against the Chargers in the first preseason home game in Chicago at Soldier Field.

    NFL hits back hard on Bears’ Bostic

    Jon Bostic wasn’t even penalized for the de-cleating he administered to the Chargers’ Mike Willie last week that broke up a short pass intended for the wide receiver and fired up the Bears’ defense. But the rookie linebacker was notified Wednesday morning that the NFL had fined him $21,000 for his hit. Bob LeGere has the reaction (and confusion) stemming from the action.

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    Wednesday’s girls golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's girls golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Wednesday’s boys golf scoreboard
    High school varsity results from Wednesday's boys golf meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Cougars rally only to fall in 10

    Kane Count Cougars game report:

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    Harper aims to continue winning tradition

    With succesful programs, tradition emerges over time. The Harper College women’s volleyball program certainly has one, and it involves winning. Coming off of last season’s 36-15 overall and 10-2 North Central Community College Conference season, the Hawks enter today’s South Suburban Invitational ranked No. 6 in the NJCAA Division III preseason poll.

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    Barrington wins own invite at Bonnie-Dundee

    Hosting its own invite at Bonnie-Dundee Golf Club in Carpentersville, Barrington’s girls golf team shot a 333 to defeat Highland Park by 4 strokes in the nine-team event on Wednesday.The Fillies’ freshman Reena Sulkar and Highland Park’s Kelli Ono shared medalist honors by shooting 78s while Barrington’s junior Bailee McDonald was sixth with an 81. The Fillies Shivani Majmudra, also a freshman, made the top ten with an 84.

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    Murphy powers his way into Cubs’ picture

    Since he came up from the minor leagues early this month, infielder Donnie Murphy has been a pleasant surprise for the Cubs. He also has slugged about as well as anybody in baseball, with 7 home runs over his first 14 games since the call-up.

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    Mark Welsh/mwelsh@dailyherald.com ¬ Bears Kyle Long and Jordan Mills take a rest break in the 4th quarter in the preseason matchup against the Chargers at Soldier Field. ¬ ¬

    Time ticking for O-line to gel

    Offensive coordinator/offensive line coach Aaron Kromer admits Bears rookie starters Kyle Long and Jordan Mills have a lot of work to do, but there is time to get it done. “They have to continue their development, as well as the offensive line in general,” Kromer said. “There’s a lot of development that needs to be done yet. Luckily, we have two or three weeks left before we play Cincinnati (in the season opener Sept. 8).” Bob LeGere has more on the line's play and a look ahead to Friday's third preseason game in Oakland.

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    Report: More Americans turning to fishing

    There’s clear evidence of a resurgence in one of America’s favorite pastimes — fishing. According to a new report, the number of Americans who fish is up, with more than 47 million people participating in 2012. Mike Jackson has some more surprising numbers and some hunting numbers in this week's Outdoors Notebook.

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    Tiger Woods speaks to reporters after playing in the pro-am of The Barclays golf tournament at Liberty National Golf Club in Jersey City, N.J., on Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013. Woods did not play the back nine of his pro-am round on because his neck and back were stiff in the morning and he attributed it to a soft bed in his hotel. (AP Photo/The Jersey Journal, Reena Rose Sibayan)

    Woods has stiff neck and back from hotel bed

    Another week, another nagging injury for Tiger Woods — this from a soft bed in his hotel.Woods did not play the back nine of his pro-am Wednesday at The Barclays. He still walked with his amateur partners, but only chipped and putted at Liberty National.

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    New England Patriots quarterback Tim Tebow (5) tosses a ball next to quarterback Tom Brady (12) during NFL football practice in Foxborough, Mass., Monday, Aug. 19, 2013. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

    Tebow’s chances of staying with Patriots uncertain

    Tim Tebow walked off the practice field with no reporters blocking his path to the locker room. Finally, a few strolled up for a 90-second interview then moved on to longer chats with other Patriots.The media circus that surrounded him last season is gone.His uncertain future remains.

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    Blackhawks winger Patrick Sharp doesn’t back down from any challenge, and now he’s in good position to finally earn a spot in the Olympics with Team Canada.

    Hawks’ Sharp dreams of joining Team Canada

    With two Stanley Cups and big goals in the biggest of games, Patrick Sharp’s resume speaks for itself. The only thing Sharp hasn’t done, however, is represent his native Canada in the Olympics, but that might be about to change as he heads to Team Canada’s three-day Olympic orientation camp.

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    Chicago Fire captain Logan Pause is healthy again, but it may be difficult to find playing time with the Fire's new lineup.

    Fire’s Pause ready and waiting for chance

    Logan Pause is healthy, fit and ready to play for the Chicago Fire, but barring injury or suspension to a teammate, it will be a struggle for the Fire captain to see the field. Orrin Schwarz talks with the Fire's leader about his role.

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    Robby Binder’s 49¾-inch muskie from the Fox Chain came on a recent trip guided by Chris Taurisano.

    Fish wish: Guided trip lands legal Chain muskie

    It's sometimes hard for a guide to produce fish for his client, but it sure worked out well for Robby Binder as Chris Taurisano put him on a Fox Chain muskie that taped out at nearly 50 inches.

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    Bears linebacker Jonathan Bostic has been fined $21,000 for a hit during last week’s preseason game against San Diego, a source familiar with the situation says.

    Bears’ Bostic fined $21,000, source says

    A person familiar with the situation says Bears linebacker Jonathan Bostic has been fined $21,000 for a hit during last week’s preseason game against San Diego.

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    Mike North video: Sandberg or Sveum? You make the call, Cubs fans
    Cub fans wanted Ryne Sandberg when he was managing a minor league team instead they got Mike Quade. Now they have Dale Sveum. Wouldn’t Sandberg have generated more excitement for either the Cubs or the White Sox?For more, see www.northtonorth.com. Listen to Mike on Foxsportsradio.com, XM channel 169, or your iHeart application Sat 6 p.m.-9 p.m. and Sun 9 p.m. to midnight. Look for Mike on WIND on Tuesday at 7:45 a.m. and on Fridays at 5:50 p.m. Listen to Mike’s podcasts at foxsportsradio.com/podcast/mikenorth.xml

Business

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    Schaumburg officials are launching plans to create a new tax increment financing district in the area surrounding the Renaissance Schaumburg Hotel and Convention Center. Officials hope the TIF will spur development of an entertainment district near the convention center.

    Schaumburg hopes TIF creates new entertainment district

    Schaumburg officials are preparing to start a new tax increment financing district they hope will attract entertainment-oriented businesses around the village’s convention center and pay for tollway interchange ramps at Meacham and Roselle roads. “The properties we’re talking about are just begging for economic redevelopment, and it’ll help our convention center,” Mayor Al Larson said.

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    Google has been holding talks with the National Football League, raising speculation the internet monolith is seeking new inroads into television.

    Google and NFL meet; Sunday Ticket up for grabs?

    Google has been holding talks with the National Football League, raising speculation that the internet monolith is seeking new inroads into television.

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    Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wants to get more of the world’s more than 7 billion people online through a partnership with some of the world’s largest mobile technology companies. Facebook Inc. announced a partnership called Internet.org on Wednesday.

    Facebook aims to get more people online

    Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wants to get all of the world’s 7 billion people online through a partnership with some of the largest mobile technology companies. He says the Web is an essential part of life, and everyone deserves to be connected, whether they live in Norway, Nicaragua or Namibia.

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    U.S. stocks fell, giving the Dow Jones Industrial Average its longest slump in 13 months, as minutes of the Federal Reserve’s July meeting showed officials support stimulus cuts this year if the economy improves.

    Dow sinks for sixth day as traders ponder Fed exit

    Stocks fell sharply Wednesday after the Federal Reserve disclosed that its top officials were mostly in agreement that the central bank should end its massive bond-buying program. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 105 points. It was the index’s sixth straight decline, the longest losing streak since July 2012.

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    Mount Prospect attaches strings to Menards expansion

    Mount Prospect trustees gave Menards the go-ahead Tuesday to expand into the former Aldi property along Rand Road, but village officials told the hardware store it first has to clean up its act. Specifically, officials said the store has to do a better job maintaining the easement separating its property at 740 E. Rand Road from the Harvest Heights subdivision that sits behind it.

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    The National Association of Realtors said Wednesday that existing home sales jumped 6.5 percent last month from a 5.06 million pace in June. They have risen 17.2 percent over the past 12 months.

    U.S. home sales hit 5.39 million in July

    U.S. sales of previously occupied homes surged in July to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.39 million, approaching a healthy level for the first time since November 2009. The spike in home sales shows housing remains a driving force for the economy even as mortgage rates rise. The National Association of Realtors said Wednesday that sales jumped 6.5 percent last month from a 5.06 million pace in June. They have risen 17.2 percent over the past 12 months ago.

Life & Entertainment

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    Comedian Loni Love performs this weekend at the Improv Comedy Showcase in Schaumburg.

    Weekend picks: Loni's lovin' the Improv

    If you love comedian Loni Love for her TV appearances on “Chelsea Lately,” then don't miss her live at the Improv Comedy Showcase in Schaumburg. The “Happy Together Tour” at Aurora's Paramount includes members of the Turtles, Gary Puckett & Union Gap, Three Dog Night and Paul Revere & the Raiders. The Second City serves up the last laughs of summer courtesy of “Happily Ever Laughter” at the Metropolis. Don't miss Loni Love live at the Improv Comedy Showcase in Schaumburg this weekend.

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    Whirring wine in a blender aerates it in a fraction of the time as traditional decanting and can produce a better tasting wine.

    The Cooking Lab: Improve that red wine with just a push of a button

    Whatever the science behind decanting wine, the traditional ritual makes for a fine show. But when you’re at home pouring wine for yourself or guests, you can save time and generate entertainment of a different kind by taking a shortcut: dump the bottle in a blender, and frappe it into a froth.

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    Waffle Browns
    Waffle Browns

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    Study finds movies lag behind TV in LGBT roles

    We may be seeing more prominent gay and lesbian characters on TV shows, but the movie industry lags well behind the small screen, an advocacy group reports. In its first study of LGBT roles in major studio releases, the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation found that compared with TV, where there has been a significant shift over the past decade, “Major studios appear reluctant to include LGBT characters in significant roles or franchises.”

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    Batavia's Julie Bayer is both a classically trained singer and a comic actress.

    Batavia actress does double duty at Fringe Festival

    Batavia-based singer/actress Julie Bayer embraces two very different sides of performing. A classically trained singer, she has sung opera at Ravinia, among other places. But she also has a bawdy side — one that comes out in her work with Batavia’s comic Troupe Strozzi, making its debut with the edgy, boundary-pushing Chicago Fringe Festival.

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    Digital era threatens tenuous future of drive-ins

    Through 80 summers, drive-in theaters have managed to remain a part of the American fabric, surviving technological advances and changing tastes that put thousands out of business. Now the industry says a good chunk of the 350 or so left could be forced to turn out the lights because they can’t afford to adapt to the digital age. Movie studios are phasing out 35 mm film prints, and the switch to an eventually all-digital distribution system is pushing the outdoor theaters to make the expensive change to digital projectors.

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    Actor-designer Kellan Lutz is promoting his clothing line Abbot + Main’s pre-spring 2014 collection.

    Kellan Lutz of ‘Twilight’ unveils new fashion line

    What’s a hulking vampire to do without moody mortals in distress and with no more computer-enhanced battles to wage in the forest? For 28-year-old “Twilight” actor Kellan Lutz — better known as Emmett Cullen, the heartthrob brother of leading man Edward — it’s still about looking as good as superhumanly possible.

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    David Cassidy is free on $2,500 bail after being charged with felony driving while intoxicated in upstate New York.

    ‘Partridge Family’ star Cassidy charged with DWI

    Authorities say former teen heartthrob David Cassidy was pulled over for failing to dim his headlights in upstate New York and charged with DWI after tests showed his blood alcohol content at .10, higher than the state’s legal limit of .08.

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    Chocolate souffle is a signature dessert at Palo restaurant aboard Disney Magic and it's not that difficult to re-create at home.

    Culinary adventures: Souffle recipe treasured souvenir from Mediterranean cruise

    A recent cruise fed Penny Kazmier's culinary curiosity and she left the ship with a unique souvenir: the recipe for the ship's signature chocolate souffle.

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    Marian McPartland, legendary jazz pianist and host of the National Public Radio show “Piano Jazz,” died of natural causes Tuesday at her Port Washington home on Long Island.

    Jazz legend Marian McPartland dies at age 95

    Marian McPartland, a renowned jazz pianist and host of the National Public Radio show “Piano Jazz,” has died, NPR said Wednesday. She was 95. McPartland died of natural causes Tuesday night at her Port Washington home on Long Island, said Anna Christopher Bross, an NPR spokeswoman.

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    Sandy Schmidt, who owns a portable chicken coop, rounds up her chickens at her home in Silver Spring, Md.

    Back yard chickens? A hard-boiled assessment

    “Eat local” is the foodie mantra, and nothing is more local than an egg from your own back yard. That enticement has led many city dwellers and suburbanites to consider putting up a coop and keeping chickens. The online community BackYardChickens.com, for example, has more than 200,000 members, about half of whom have joined in the last two years. But what’s the cost in time and money — and what will the neighbors think?

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    “The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones”

    ‘Mortal Instruments’ album intoxicating

    Successful film soundtracks have to complete a pair of difficult tasks. They must creatively echo the film they enhance and also stand up on their own. “The Mortal Instruments” soundtrack manages to encapsulate the spirit of the story’s adventure into the violent world of shadowhunting (demon killing), the teenage protagonists’ restless spirit and the fragile love story that weaves itself into the narrative.

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    Dining events: Specials on tap daily at John and Tony’s

    There’s something shaking every night of the week at John and Tony’s in West Chicago starting with $2.50 Stella Artois 16-ounce drafts and $5 Bloody Marys on Sundays.

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    Heirloom Tomato Aspic
    Heirloom Tomato Aspic

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    The juices of ripe tomatoes are transformed into a refreshing palate-cleansing aspic for a Mediterranean chicken salad.

    Italian Chicken Salad With Fennel and White Beans Heirloom Tomato Aspic
    Italian Chicken Salad With Fennel, White Beans and Heirloom Tomato Aspic

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    The soothing richness of Chilled Avocado and Melon Soup is perked up by the heat and acidity of the marinated crab and corn salad.

    Chilled Avocado and Melon Soup With Spicy Crab-Corn Salad
    Chilled Avocado and Melon Soup With Spicy Crab-Corn Salad

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    Smoked Trout Pate with Creme Fraiche and Dill Cucumber Strips is a refreshing and elegant appetizer that's perfect for hot, steamy weather.

    Smoked Trout Pate With Creme Fraiche and Dill Cucumber Strips
    Smoked Trout Pate With Creme Fraiche and Dill Cucumber Strips

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    Blueberry and Lemon-Cream Icebox Cake contains fruity, creamy layers and is prepared sans oven.

    Blueberry and Lemon-Cream Icebox Cake
    Blueberry Lemon Icebox Cake

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    The soothing richness of Chilled Avocado and Melon Soup is perked up by the heat and acidity of the marinated crab and corn salad.

    Four courses, no sweat

    You don't need to break a sweat this summer when entertaining. Food writer Tony Rosenfeld shares recipes for a four-course meal prepared without a stove or oven.

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    Perk up weeknight dinner with a variety of chicken preparations including, from left, a sticky orange-cilantro smothered chicken recipe, a spiced-rubbed chicken breast recipe or a recipe for miso-lime marinated chicken strips.

    Sticky Orange-Cilantro Smothered Chicken
    Sticky Orange-Cilantro Smothered Chicken

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    Halal Food Festivals announces its first Chicago fest

    Halal Food Festivals, headquartered in Chicago, will hold its inaugural Halal Food Festival 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sept. 14 at UIC Forum in Chicago. More than 5,000 participants are expected to attend.

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    Chocolate souffle is a signature dessert at Palo restaurant aboard Disney Magic and it’s not that difficult to recreate at home.

    Palo’s Chocolate Soufflé
    Chocolate Souffle

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    Perk up weeknight chicken breasts with a variety of preparations including, from left, a sticky orange-cilantro smothered chicken recipe, a spiced-rubbed chicken breast recipe and a recipe for miso-lime marinated chicken strips.

    Miso-Lime Marinated Chicken Strips
    Miso-Lime Marinated Chicken Strips

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    A slightly sweet spice rub perks up humble chicken breasts.

    The Humble Chicken Breast: 3 fresh takes on a basic

    Boneless, skinless chicken breasts are literally the white meat of the meat world. They are a great lean protein, quick and easy to prepare, freeze well, and take to just about any flavor or cuisine you care for. But they also can be rather dull. So we've come up with three ways to jazz up this weeknight staple.

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    Turn a humble chicken breast into an interesting dinner with a spicy rub.

    Spice-Rubbed Chicken Breasts
    Spice-Ribbed Chicken Breasts

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    Back-to-school shopping 101

    The back-to-school shopping season is kicking into high gear, but stores have been pushing it for a month. They’re working hard to get parents to spend, spend, spend on notebooks, computers, clothes and other student needs. The National Retail Federation trade group predicts that families with school-age children will spend an average of $634.78 on shoes, clothes, supplies and electronics, with total back-to-school spending expected to reach $72.5 billion. But how do you spend wisely and find the best deals? Here are a few tips from the experts.

  •  
    Pergolas have been popular in Europe for generations, and now are commonly seen in the Midwest.

    Pergola kits cut the project down to size

    Pergolas are found all over Europe, dating from the 1600s. They have long been popular here in the South and West, and now are a growing trend in the Midwest, said Don McSwain, owner of Quality Built Backyards.

Discuss

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    Police crackdowns have helped in the past to stem violators who drive through the stop arm of school buses.

    Editorial: Drivers need back-to-school reminders, too

    Drivers need to be reminded about safety rules near schools and school buses, a Daily Herald editorial says.

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    Coalition of NRA, ACLU assures more deaths

    Columnist Richard Cohen: Question: What do the National Rifle Association and the American Civil Liberties Union have in common? Answer: The determination to stop New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg from having his way with guns.

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    Move forward on malaria vaccine

    Columnist Michael Gerson: When approached with the concept for producing the PfSPZ malaria vaccine, Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, thought it technically unfeasible. Actually, he called it “crazy.” His skepticism was overcome in a stunning feat of biomedical engineering, offering the prospect of life and health for millions.

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    Will construction project ever end?
    A Libertyville letter to the editor: Re: construction on Route 137 and Route 21 intersection, a question.

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    American people just want answers
    American people just want answersIn reference to Tom Joyce’s comment on Aug. 17, “Too much jumping to conclusions,” I would like to make my point of view. For the sake of political correctness let’s call Fast and Furious, Benghazi, the IRS and the NSA surveillance “incidents,” instead of “phony scandals.” Mr. Joyce stated that he wanted facts.I’ll give you a fact. It took the Warren Commission 10 months to deliver a final report of 888 pages on the assassination of President Kennedy. We are now 11-plus months since the Benghazi incident, and what have the American people really heard from the White House or State Department. We’re not saying the president did something wrong, just what is he doing to circumvent what went on that fateful night of Sept. 11, 2012.Here’s one more fact. It took the members of the Senate Watergate Committee 13 months to issue a 1,250 page report in June 1974 on the findings of the Watergate Break-in which led to the resignation of President Nixon.The people of America would like to have answers as to what went on in Benghazi as well as the other incidents mentioned and this is not jumping to conclusions.Gary EganHuntley

  •  

    Students deserve same deal as banks
    Students deserve same deal as banksStudents should be aware that even though House Republicans passed a bill that would prevent loan rates from doubling to 6.8 percent, from the current 3.4 percent, the bill will tie the rates to the 10-year treasury note and will also allow lending rates to reset each year.This is not the best plan offered. The president’s plan would also tie the rates to the treasury note, but it would keep the rates fixed at a single rate throughout the loan’s lifetime. This would have been a much better plan for students so no kudos to Roskam because he did not support the president’s better plan.The very best plan, however, would have been Elizabeth Warren’s plan that students be given the same great deal that banks get — a rate of 0.75 percent. If Roskam would have supported that, then he would deserve kudos. We know, however that a Republican House would never give students the same rate that banks receive.Marge HustedSleepy Hollow

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    Appreciate Colin Powell’s optimism
    A Roselle letter to the editor: Appreciate Colin Powell’s optimism

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