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Daily Archive : Sunday August 11, 2013

News

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    This Oct. 4, 2010 file photo shows Attorney General Eric Holder speaking during a news conference at the Justice Department in Washington. Holder is calling for major changes to the nation’s criminal justice system that would scale back the use of harsh prison sentences for certain drug-related crimes, divert people convicted of low-level offenses to drug treatment and community service programs and expand a prison program to allow for release of some elderly, non-violent offenders.

    Holder proposes changes in criminal justice system

    Attorney General Eric Holder is calling for major changes to the nation’s criminal justice system that would scale back the use of harsh prison sentences for certain drug-related crimes, divert people convicted of low-level offenses to drug treatment and community service programs and expand a prison program to allow for release of some elderly, non-violent offenders.

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    Daniel Robinson, a Cook County corrections officer has been charged with sexual abuse and unlawful restraint of a 17-year-old woman he met online.

    Officer from Cary held on sex abuse charges

    A Cook County correction's officer has been deputized and is being held on $50,000 bond after being arrested on Saturday on charges of unlawful restraint and criminal sexual abuse, officials said.

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    James Lee DiMaggio, 40, left, and Hannah Anderson, 16. A search ended Saturday for DiMaggio, suspected of abducting 16-year-old family friend Hannah. DiMaggio is suspected of killing Hannah’s mother and her 8-year-old brother.

    Teen, abductor stood out in Idaho wilderness

    The horseback riders who encountered a missing California teen and her abductor said Sunday that “red flags” went up for them because the pair seemed out of place and ill-equipped for the Idaho back country. At a news conference in Boise, the four riders — two men and two women — said they came across 16-year-old Hannah Anderson and 40-year-old James Lee DiMaggio on...

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    Report: Kidnapped RI boy found in housing project

    A 2-year-old boy kidnapped from a Rhode Island home where police found two bodies have been found wandering around a housing project in Providence. Massachusetts State Police arrested a man as a suspect in the boy’s kidnapping, but later said the man apparently wasn’t linked to the child’s disappearance. Police wouldn’t say if they released him.

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    Mike Miller draws a portrait for a customer during Wizard World Chicago Comic Con in Rosemont Sunday.

    Celebs, costumed heroes pack Rosemont convention

    Fans from around the U.S., many dressed in costumes of their favorite heroes and heroines, packed the four-day Wizard World Chicago Comic Con in Rosemont this weekend. Attendance figures have yet to be released, but the event’s CEO, John Macaluso, said they had a great turnout, dozens of celebrities, and more than 100 hours of programming. “It’s the biggest show that we have ever put on,” he said.

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    In this Aug. 5 photo, a video display showing the exterior of the shelter is seen is seen above the archeological dig at the Meadowcroft National Historic Site where native Americans stayed as they travelled through the area thousands of years ago in Avella, Pa. A fluke rainstorm has brought Mercyhurst University professor Jim Adovasio back to do new work at the site that launched a furious debate in 1973 over when the first humans came to the Americas.

    Ancient Pa. dwelling still divides archaeologists

    A fluke rainstorm at an ancient rock shelter in western Pennsylvania has brought a renowned archaeologist back to the site of where a furious debate was launched in 1973 over when the first humans came to the Americas. As a young archaeologist, Jim Adovasio found radiocarbon evidence that humans had visited the Meadowcroft site 16,000 years ago. To archaeologists it was a stunning discovery that...

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    Floods kill 36 as thousands affected in Sudan

    Sudanese authorities say flooding has killed at least 36 people and left thousands homeless. The semi-official Sudan media center said Sunday that many are without electricity as well in the northern River Nile state, just south of Egypt. The center says at least 5,000 homes have been severely destroyed, almost half beyond repair.

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    Naperville’s Century Walk Corp. is turning to the crowdfunding website, Citizinvestor, to help raise the last $27,000 it needs to install this 1920s-era sculpture of a sailor called “Spirit of the American Navy” by Oct. 13 in Burlington Square Park.

    Crowdfunding campaign begins for Naperville Navy sculpture

    Crowdfunding is part of the strategy Naperville Century Walk will use to come up with the money it needs to move its latest piece of public art to Burlington Square Park.

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    In this July 6, 2012, file photograph, former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, left, and then GreenTech Automotive chairman Terry McAuliffe take a drive through the plant after the unveiling of the company’s new electric MyCar in Horn Lake, Miss. Today, the place where the plant was to be remains mostly vacant except for a temporary construction trailer. The company is under investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission.

    Amid probe, car company’s plans haven’t panned out

    Four years ago, a startup car company announced with great fanfare big plans for the Mississippi Delta: Using money from foreign investors and other sources, it would build a massive auto plant to churn out a new line of energy-efficient cars and bring thousands of jobs to the area. Today, the place where the plant was to be remains mostly vacant except for a temporary construction trailer. The...

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    This undated photo provided by Dwayne Jones’ friend Jay via the Jamaica Forum for Lesbians All-Sexuals and Gays advocacy group, shows Dwayne Jones in an unknown location in Jamaica. Dwayne was relentlessly teased in high school for being effeminate until he dropped out. His father not only kicked him out of the house at the age of 14 but also helped jeering neighbors push the youngster from the rough Jamaican slum where he grew up. By age 16, the teenager was dead — beaten, stabbed, shot and run over by a car when he showed up at a street party dressed as a woman.

    In Jamaica, transgender teen killed by mob

    Dwayne Jones was relentlessly teased in high school for being effeminate until he dropped out. His father not only kicked him out of the house at the age of 14 but also helped jeering neighbors push the youngster from the rough Jamaican slum where he grew up. By age 16, the teenager was dead — beaten, stabbed, shot and run over by a car when he showed up at a street party dressed as a woman. His...

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    Police assemble outside the YWCA Sunday in Manchester, N.H. The state attorney general’s office said Muni Savyon, 54, of Manchester used a handgun to fatally shoot his son Joshua Savyon, 9, of Amherst, N.H., before fatally shooting himself during a supervised visitation in the YWCA office. An adult supervisor was present when the shootings happened.

    Father kills son, himself at YWCA offices in NH

    A New Hampshire man used a handgun to shoot his 9-year-old son to death before taking his own life during supervised visitation at a YWCA office in the state’s largest city, officials said Sunday. An adult supervisor was present when Muni Savyon, 54, of Manchester, produced a handgun and shot 9-year-old Joshua Savyon of Amherst before shooting himself, the attorney general’s office said.

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    Tenn. judge changes infant’s name from ‘Messiah’

    A judge in Tennessee changed a 7-month-old boy’s name to Martin from Messiah, saying the religious name was earned by one person and “that one person is Jesus Christ.” The boy’s parents were in court because they could not agree on the child’s last name, but when the judge heard the boy’s first name, she ordered it changed, too.

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    Twilight Shuffle in Libertyville

    The Libertyville Twilight Shuffle 5K run will be held at 6 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 1 with the start/finish on Newberry Avenue. More than 1,000 runners participate in the professionally chip-timed and challenging course through the picturesque east side of downtown Libertyville.

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    Gunmen kill 5 Yemeni soldiers at checkpoint

    Suspected al-Qaida gunmen killed five soldiers early Sunday in a southern province of Yemen, an official said, as U.S. embassies across the Muslim and Arab world reopened after terror threat emanating from the region. The U.S. Embassy in Yemen’s capital, Sanaa, remained closed Sunday after American officials flew its diplomatic staff out of the country over fears of attack.

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    Bombings targeting Iraq military kill 5 soldiers

    Two bombings targeting an army checkpoint and a convoy near the Iraqi capital killed five soldiers Sunday, officials said. Violence has been on the rise across Iraq since a deadly crackdown by government forces on a Sunni protest camp in April, raising fears that the country could see a new round of widespread sectarian bloodshed similar to that which brought the country to the edge of civil war...

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    This 2011 file family photo provided by Terri Chung shows Kenneth Bae. Bae, detained in North Korea for the past nine months, has been hospitalized after losing more than 50 pounds, and the need to bring him home is becoming more urgent, his sister said Sunday. Bae, a 45-year-old tour operator and Christian missionary, was arrested last November and accused of subversive activities against the government. He was sentenced in May to 15 years hard labor.

    Family: US man detained in N. Korea hospitalized

    An American man detained in North Korea for the past nine months has been hospitalized after losing more than 50 pounds, and the need to bring him home is becoming more urgent, his sister said Sunday. Kenneth Bae, a 45-year-old tour operator and Christian missionary, was arrested last November and accused of subversive activities against the government. He was sentenced in May to 15 years hard...

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    Dealers now being charged in drug overdose deaths

    With the number of heroin overdoses skyrocketing nationwide, a growing number of law enforcement agencies are dusting off strict, rarely used drug laws, changing investigatory techniques and relying on technology to prosecute drug dealers for causing overdose deaths. The aggressive change in tactics comes as more people turn to heroin because of crackdowns on powerful prescription opiate...

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    In this Jan. 5, 2011 file photo, a person operates their iPhone in New York. Experts say faster in-flight Internet access anywhere in the world — even over the oceans — are about to get their wish as satellite operators find success where Boeing failed a decade ago.Stronger, more focused signals from spacecraft lofted by providers such as Intelsat will replace cobbled-together connections meant for mobile phones and television broadcasts. Costs will fall, too, eventually making onboard broadband a free amenity to win travelers’ loyalty, industry executives say.

    Technology soon to transform connectivity while flying

    Airline passengers pining for faster in-flight Internet access anywhere in the world — even over the oceans — are about to get their wish as satellite operators find success where Boeing failed a decade ago. Stronger, more focused signals from spacecraft lofted by providers such as Intelsat will replace cobbled-together connections meant for mobile phones and television broadcasts. Costs will...

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    Cook County property tax appeal workshops coming

    A free property tax workshop for residents of Wheeling Township will be held on Monday, Aug. 12, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Chevy Chase Country Club at 1000 N. Milwaukee Ave. in Wheeling. A second workshop, this one for Elk Grove Township and conducted by Dan Patlak of the Cook County Board of Review, will be held Wednesday, Aug. 21, from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Elk Grove Township...

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    Coffee with Rep. Yingling

    House District 62 State Rep. Sam Yingling, D-Grayslake, hosts a morning coffee with constituents Friday, Aug. 16 in Wauconda.

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    WRLR hosts GEO awards

    The 4th annual Geo Awards will be held at 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 24 at the Cultural & Civic Center of Round Lake Beach, off Hook Drive west of Route 83.

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    CLC wants high achievers

    High-achieving high school and home-schooled students and their families are invited to the Academic Scholars Expo at College of Lake County from 6 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 10.

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    Tess Podraza, 18, of Huntley and her mother, Tia, talk about LIGHT, the transition program that Huntley Area School District 158 will offer to special education students.

    Huntley transition program aims to ready special ed grads for adulthood

    Huntley High School special education student Tess Podraza, 18, wants to be more independent, but to reach that level she’ll need more confidence and sharper life skills. She and her family hope a new program through Huntley Area School District 158 will give her both. Life Instruction Guiding Huntley Transition is designed to give Tess and her peers support and preparation for the adult...

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    French Connection Day at Cantigny Park in Wheaton included a 23-foot Eiffel Tower where visitors could pose for photos.

    Cantigny honors its history with French Connection Day

    Cantigny Park in Wheaton celebrated the personal history of park benefactor Robert R. McCormick on Sunday with French Connection Day. McCormick named his Cantigny estate after the French village that was the scene of the first American victory during World War I.

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    An Egyptian girl waves a national flag while supporters of Egypt’s ousted President Mohammed Morsi chant slogans against the Egyptian Army at the sit-in at Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque, which is fortified with multiple walls of bricks, tires, metal barricades and sandbags, and where protesters have installed their camp in Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Aug. 11, 2013. Egyptian security forces will besiege two sit-ins by supporters of the country’s ousted president within 24 hours, police officials said Sunday, setting up a possible confrontation between the military-backed government and the thousands gathered there.

    Egypt police say they will besiege sit-in sites

    Supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi fortified their two Cairo sit-in sites as Egyptian security officials said their forces will move against the entrenched protest camps within 24 hours — perhaps as early as daybreak Monday. The Arab world’s most populous country, where more than 250 people have been killed in clashes since Morsi was toppled July 3, braced for more violence as the...

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    This Sunday, June 9, 2013 file photo provided by The Guardian Newspaper in London shows Edward Snowden, in Hong Kong. US leaker Edward Snowden’s father is making plans to travel to Russia to visit his son. Snowden has been granted a document that allows him to leave the transit zone of a Moscow airport and enter Russia. Snowden has applied for temporary asylum in Rusia last week after his attempts to leave the airport were thwarted. The United States wants him sent home to face prosecution for espionage.

    Snowden’s father gets visa to visit son in Russia

    National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden’s father has secured documents to visit his son in Russia and plans to discuss how he could fight espionage charges, Lon Snowden and his attorney said Sunday. Neither Lon Snowden nor his attorney Bruce Fein has spoken directly with the former NSA analyst since he fled the United States and received asylum in Russia, they said.

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    Rebecca Wyatte of Ohio gets tikki from Joe Dewan of New York on Saturday during the first day of the annual Veggie Fest at Science of Spirituality Meditation Center in Naperville. More than 30,000 people are expected to attend the event, which continues today.

    Veggie Fest comes to Naperville

    Billed as one of the largest vegetarian festivals in North America, Veggie Fest kicked off two days of food, music and information about healthy eating Saturday in Naperville. Sponsored by the Science of Sprituality Meditation Center, the eighth annual event features prominent presenters from organic food company Nature’s Path, Whole Foods and Johns Hopkins University, and even a teenage...

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    “Massacre Pond,” by Paul Doiron

    ‘Massacre Pond’s a tense and clever mystery

    The story of 'Massacre Pond' was inspired by a failed attempt to create a North Woods National Park and by the unsolved 1999 “Soldiertown moose massacre,” the worst wildlife crime in Maine history. However, author Paul Doiron has fictionalized all the details, moving the location far to the southeast.

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    Retired Staff Sgt. Alonzo Lunsford describes one of his wounds from the 2009 Fort Hood shooting rampage, at his home in Lillington, N.C. Victims and others are asking why the November 2009 attack at Fort Hood is being tried as a case of workplace violence and not as an act of terror.

    Fort Hood victims want shooting designated terrorist act

    Victims and others are demanding, why is the November 2009 attack at Fort Hood being tried as a case of workplace violence and not as an act of terror? Military law expert Scott L. Silliman says the answer is simple. Because the Uniform Code of Military Justice does not have a punitive article for “terrorism.” “They really didn’t have an option,” says Silliman, director emeritus of Duke...

Sports

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    White Sox manager Robin Ventura, left, talks with team chairman Jerry Reinsdorf during batting practice earlier this season at U.S. Cellular Field.

    White Sox kind of caught in between on Ventura

    The White Sox have the choice to fire manager Robin Ventura on merit or bring him back after investing two seasons in him. All signs are that he'll return next season, but are the Sox still confident enough to once again offer him the contract extension that he turned down last winter?

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    Jason Dufner tips his cap to the crowd after winning his first major, capturing the PGA Championship by 2 strokes over Jim Furyk.

    Ryder Cup star Dufner now a major champion

    With the season’s final major championship decided Sunday, and the PGA Championship going to Jason Dufner, it’s interesting to look back now at those who succeeded and those who failed at last year’s Ryder Cup. There were plenty of clues about the 2013 major championship season.

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    Another quick pick starts Bears practice

    For the third time since training camp began, quarterback Jay Cutler started practice with an interception, this time by cornerback Zack Bowman. But oach Marc Trestman called it good practice for overcoming early adversity, as Cutler did in Friday's preseason opener, and the Bears' coach joked that he might start today's practice with the second-team offense calling three straight running plays.

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    Sky make statement with OT win over Lynx

    The term “statement game” was thrown around a lot Sunday night in the Chicago Sky locker room. And as cliché as it may have sounded, the fact is the Sky might have made its biggest statement in franchise history with a 94-86 overtime victory over the visiting Minnesota Lynx.

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    Cougars get popped by Kernels

    The Kane County Cougars fell behind early and never caught up as they fell 8-4 to the Cedar Rapids Kernels on Sunday at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark in Geneva. In the bottom of the first, Oliver Zapata of the the Cougars (47-67, 17-31) walked and scored all the way from first on a double by Giuseppe Pappacio.

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    Boomers cap best-ever road trip with victory

    The Schaumburg Boomers (45-30) capped the best road trip in team history by defeating the Evansville Otters 7-2 on Sunday. The Boomers, who are tied for first place in the Frontier League, played six games in four days and posted a 5-1 record.

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    Bears right tackle J’Marcus Webb (73) found himself behind rookie Jordan Mills on the depth chart at Sunday’s practice.

    Trestman downplays shift in Bears’ offensive line

    Bears coach Marc Trestman cautioned against reading too much into Sunday's demotion of J'Marcus Webb from the first team, but it could be a sign of things to come. Rookie Jordan Mills, a fifth-round pick, started ahead of Webb, while first-round pick Kyle Long was moved up to first team at right guard.

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    Daly defends St. Charles title

    Matt Daly was the human version of a piranha. The defending champion of the St. Charles City Golf Tournament, Daly took a commanding lead over Chris Thomas at the turn of the match-play final at Pottawatomie Golf Course and eased to a 5-and-3 victory Sunday morning at the par-35, nine-hole venue. Thomas, a St. Charles North alum, needed to win the final four holes to force sudden death, but Daly, who was a standout player for St. Charles East a decade ago, used precision off the tee and never trailed.

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    The White Sox’ Paul Konerko hits a home run off Minnesota Twins starting pitcher Kyle Gibson during the second inning of a baseball game Friday, Aug. 9, 2013, in Chicago.

    White Sox’ Konerko not in mood to talk retirement

    Paul Konerko was happy to talk about another White Sox loss Sunday, and he also analyzed the miserable season. But as for his own future, the Sox' 37-year-old captain has no comment.

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    White Sox add infielder to complete Rios deal

    The White Sox acquired infielder Leury Garcia Sunday from Texas in Friday's waiver trade that sent Alex Rios to the Rangers. Garcia is a versatile defensive player with standout speed. He'll report to Class AAA Charlotte but should join the Sox before the season ends.

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    Jason Dufner hits his tee shot Sunday on the 18th hole during the final round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at Oak Hill Country Club in Pittsford, N.Y.

    Dufner wins first major at PGA Championship

    Jason Dufner has won his first major title with a two-stroke victory over Jim Furyk at the PGA Championship. Dufner bogeyed the final two holes Sunday for a 2-under 68 that was good enough to hold off the 2003 U.S. Open champion. The winning score was 10-under 270. Henrik Stenson finished three shots back.

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    Not only has Alex Rodriguez struck out with the most recent news of PED use and suspensions. Baseball as well continues to strike out.

    Steroids' biggest cost? Our loss of belief

    With 13 baseball names added to the lists of cheaters and liars, the specter of PEDs looms larger than ever in the sport. The carnage is not just the worth of the guilty, or their isolated reputations. We’ve lost our belief in greatness, as it happens. Weekly baseball column by Matt Spiegel, who co-hosts "The McNeil & Spiegel Show" 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday on WSCR 670-AM, The Score.

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    The St. Louis Cardinals’ Matt Holliday steals second as the Cubs’ Starlin Castro, left, cannot make the tag in Sunday’s first inning at Busch Stadium.

    Cubs can’t complete sweep of Cardinals

    Pete Kozma singled home the tiebreaking run in the sixth inning and the St. Louis Cardinals ended a four-game losing streak, beating the Cubs 8-4 and avoiding a sweep. Matt Carpenter and Allen Craig each had three hits and drove in a run. Jon Jay and David Freese both drove in two runs, though they only had one hit between them.

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    The White Sox’ Avisail Garcia, left, steals second as Minnesota Twins shortstop Doug Bernier is late on the tag during Sunday’s second inning at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Twins take three of four from Sox

    Kevin Correia pitched seven shutout innings, Brian Dozier and Joe Mauer backed him with home runs and the Minnesota Twins beat the White Sox 5-2 Sunday at U.S. Cellular Field. The Twins took three of four games in the series and have won nine of 12 against the White Sox this season.

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    Northwestern running back Venric Mark could help the Wildcats win the Big Ten Legends division.

    Providing some college football answers

    To commemorate the final year of a 12-team Big Ten, here are 12 questions heading into the college football season.

Business

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    In this Jan. 22, 2010 file photo, a customer grabs lunch at a McDonald’s drive-through in Chicago. Fast-food chains such as McDonald’s, Burger King and Wendy’s are trumpeting pricier, premium offerings to shed their image as purveyors of greasy junk food and convince customers to spend a few extra bucks.

    A case for the value menu: it’s not as fattening

    Fast-food chains such as McDonald’s, Burger King and Wendy’s are trumpeting pricier, premium offerings to shed their image as purveyors of greasy junk food and convince customers to spend a few extra bucks. But the fact is that “premium” items can come with a big caloric payload. Here are a few points for when deciding what to get at a fast-food chain.

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    Mike Shoop, owner of a debt collection agency, says his company may have to cut back on coverage for employees if they can’t afford insurance under President Obama’s new health care law.

    Family insurance in jeopardy at small companies

    One casualty of the new health care law may be paid coverage for families of people who work for small businesses. Premiums have been soaring for years because of the rising cost of medical care. But the Affordable Care Act also has requirements that may drive premiums higher, including a tax on insurance companies that is expected to be passed along to employers.

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    Buying a car online can make negotiating easier.

    Buying a car online can easier for women

    I bought a car online, which made negotiating the price for this cross between a minivan and a hatchback actually fun. Indeed, given how unpleasant the car-shopping experience is for women, who find walking into a dealership to be like landing on an all-male, vaguely hostile planet, buying online is something tantamount to a feminist act. More importantly, it eliminates the land mines of Haggling While Female.

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    Wal-Mart has doubled the number of alcohol buyers to 12 and offered discounts on a range of brands, from mainstream Coors to such craft beers as Deschutes. It ditched slow-selling products to make way for beer and is even selling it in garden centers.

    Beer here: Wal-Mart’s quiet push to go big on brew

    Wal-Mart has focused as never before on beer — a U.S. category worth about $45 billion — and has moved aggressively to grab market share. The company has doubled the number of alcohol buyers to 12 and offered discounts on a range of brands, from mainstream Coors to such craft beers as Deschutes. “We’re seeing dramatic increases in sales,” said Steve Bailey.

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    A Chevrolet Volt charging next to the Renaissance Center in Detroit. Facing disappointing sales, GM said Tuesday it will cut the starting price of the plug-in hybrid sedan by $5,000.

    Automakers launch price war to spark interest in electrics

    As the auto industry struggled to recover from the recession, it swore off the deep discounting that destroyed profits and led to disaster. Now, a price war has erupted in the industry’s smallest segment: electric cars. “It’s a competitive nightmare out there, so you have to play within the realm of what others are doing,” said Jeff Schuster, a Troy-based analyst with researcher LMC Automotive.

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    The news that the owners of The Washington Post are to sell the newspaper to billionaire Jeff Bezos is displayed on the front page of the newspaper in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013. Amazon.com Inc. Chief Executive Officer Bezos agreed to buy The Washington Post for $250 million, betting that he can apply his success in e-commerce to the struggling newspaper industry.

    If anyone can save The Washington Post, it’s Jeff Bezos

    As a billionaire many times over, the most obvious and immediate benefit Jeff Bezos brings to The Washington Post is his bottomless wallet. But billionaires are a dime a dozen. Bezos’ real value to the Post — the reason that people in the media are both shocked and optimistic about this deal — isn’t what’s in his wallet. It’s what’s in his head.

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    Nontraditional credit checks worry consumer groups

    Lenders are loosening once-tight credit standards, giving Americans with limited or poor credit histories a better shot at buying a car but raising concerns among consumer advocates about their methods.

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    Work Advice: Potty clarity in the office

    A longtime employee in our federal government office was “Bob” and now is “Barbara.” When it was time for Barbara to start living as a woman, she spent a year using a designated unisex bathroom with only one toilet. After a year, she began using the women’s multi-stall bathroom in preparation for her sex-change operation. Under federal policy, Barbara is using the “gender-appropriate bathroom.”

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    Career Coach: Keeping hope alive at work

    Some researchers suggest hopeful companies tend to be more creative and innovative, and make greater investments in employees than those that are not. Employees who are hopeful are likely to be more motivated to initiate a task, and are better equipped to envision alternative paths to achieve those goals, resulting in higher performance. Here are some of the ways you can help make your workplace feel more positive about the future.

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    Big business bows to small business hiring increase

    Employment at companies with fewer than 50 workers is stronger now than before the last recession, while larger businesses are still lagging behind, according to data from Automatic Data Processing Inc., a manager of employer payrolls. Establishments with less than 10 employees are hiring at a faster clip than before the downturn began in December 2007, Labor Department figures show.

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    Cars try to navigate their way through New York City during a blackout that hit U.S. and Canadian cities. Ten years after a blackout cascading from Ohio affected 50 million people, utilities and analysts say changes made in the aftermath make a similar outage unlikely today, though shifts in where and how power is generated raise new reliability concerns for the U.S. electric grid system.

    U.S. grid faces new threats 10 years after blackout

    The U.S. electrical grid is better managed and more flexible a decade after its largest blackout but remains vulnerable to increasingly extreme weather, cybersecurity threats, and stress caused by shifts in where and how power is produced. “This job of reliability is kind of impossible, in the sense that there’s just so many things that could happen that it’s hard to be sure that you’re covering all the bases,” said William Booth.

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    Gasbuddy.com, a website that uses data from volunteers, gas stations and other sources to keep track of gas prices nationwide, ranked more than 750 vehicles from the 2013 model year based on the cost of fuel per mile driven.

    New survey tells you what a new car costs to drive

    GasBuddy.com, a website that uses data from volunteers, gas stations and other sources to keep track of gas prices nationwide, ranked more than 750 vehicles from the 2013 model year based on the cost of fuel per mile driven. After Honda, the most efficient brands were Kia, Hyundai, Volkswagen, Mazda, Subaru, Mitsubishi and Toyota. The worst performers, after GMC, were Cadillac, Mercedes-Benz, Jeep, Jaguar, Infiniti, Chevrolet, Dodge, Porsche and Chrysler.

Life & Entertainment

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    Actress Lea Michele speaks on stage at the Teen Choice Awards at the Gibson Amphitheater on Sunday in Los Angeles. Michele dedicated her award to her late boyfriend and co-star Cory Monteith.

    Michele dedicates Teen Choice Award to Monteith

    Lea Michele made her first public appearance following the death of her co-star and real-life boyfriend Cory Monteith at Sunday's Teen Choice Awards. Monteith, who co-hosted the Teen Choice Awards in 2010, was found dead July 13 in Vancouver, British Columbia. An autopsy revealed the 31-year-old actor died of an overdose of heroin and alcohol.

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    Dean Norris plays Hank Schrader, left, and Bryan Cranston stars as Walter White in “Breaking Bad.” The series is returning for its eight final episodes starting Sunday.

    Dean Norris says he’ll miss ‘Breaking Bad’

    The wait is almost over. Since the debut of “Breaking Bad” in January 2008, this drama series — horrifying, funny, twisted and addictive — has kept its audience guessing. But one thing seemed certain from the earliest days. Walter White — the milquetoast-chemistry-teacher-turned-drug-kingpin — was on a collision course with Hank, his brother-in-law and a Drug Enforcement agent who was soon hot on the trail of the mysterious meth mass-producer known as Heisenberg.

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    Boundaries, not guilt, the answer to friend’s meltdowns

    Q. I have a friend who has a meltdown about twice or three times a week. I’ve become her go-to person because we are in the same profession.

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    A T-shirt with a sunglasses design.

    New Ts now school nonuniform ‘uniforms’

    The T-shirt is one of fashion’s most basic items, but even with today’s popular slim cuts, there’s wiggle room to change up the style. That can be pretty important to the kids and teenagers who practically live in them but like to feel that they have something new when they go back to school. This year’s news comes in next-generation graphics, old-school characters, and witty or powerful phrases.

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    Sheep leap out onto the road as a motorcycle passes while on the road to Dubbo, 250 miles from Sydney, Australia. Kangaroos, Emus, sheep and goats are an ever present danger on Australia’s Outback roads hopping, running or leaping across the roads without warning at any hour of the day or night.

    1,900 mile motorcycle trip across Outback just scratches the surface

    Australia has thousands of miles of roads crisscrossing the country’s vast Outback. But most travelers miss out on the beautiful sites dotted across the land by flying from one city to the next. Four mates and I decided it was time for a closer exploration of the country we call home. And so, armed with our cameras, we hit the road for a seven-day, 1,900-mile journey across the Outback on our motorcycles.

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    Sunday picks: Kite festival soars
    See members of the Chicago Fire Kite Team and the Kite Society of Wisconsin and Illinois show off their skills at the 9th Annual Kite Festival at Chicago Botanic Garden. Also, Sway to rumba, salsa and flamenco music when the Gipsy Kings perform this Sunday at the Ravinia Festival.

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    Ariayanna Stinson, 6, of Atlanta, walks around the playground next to a “smoking prohibited” sign in Woodruff Park in Atlanta. “No Smoking” signs are going up in parks, beaches and other outdoor venues across the country, but some experts are questioning whether there’s enough medical evidence to support the trend.

    Anti-smoking battle moves outdoors as bans increase

    First it was bars, restaurants and office buildings. Now the front lines of the “No Smoking” battle have moved outdoors. City parks, public beaches, college campuses and other outdoor venues across the country are putting up signs telling smokers they can’t light up. Outdoor smoking bans have nearly doubled in the last five years, with the tally now at nearly 2,600 and more are in the works. But some experts question the main rationale for the bans, saying there’s not good medical evidence that cigarette smoke outdoors can harm the health of children and other passers-by.

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    Eye some highflying at the Chicago Air & Water Show, Aug. 17-18.

    On the road: Air and Water Show

    Flying in an airplane is fun again — when you’re a spectator at the Chicago Air and Water Show, that is. The show, which turns 55 this year, will be Aug. 17-18 along Chicago's lakefront. Also, hundreds of garlic lovers will descending upon the city of Highwood for its third annual Garlic Fest.

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    Staci Dennett and her fiance Nadir Karim, both 25, are among a number of heterosexual couples who vowed not to marry until gay couples had the same rights. They set a wedding date for this fall after the U.S. Supreme Court wiped away part of a federal anti-gay marriage law in June.

    Gay marriage ruling prompts straight couples to say ‘I do’

    No, it wasn’t just an excuse to avoid getting hitched: Some heterosexual couples who postponed their weddings until gay couples had the right to marry are now making plans to say “I do.” And we’re not talking celebrities like Brangelina, Lena Dunham and Kristen Bell, all of whom vowed not to marry until gay marriage was legal. None of them have rushed to announce wedding dates. Instead, it’s ordinary folks who wasted no time following through on their pledges.

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    Green is once again giving a crisp look to kitchens across the country.

    New kitchen-sink colors making a splash

    Q. I’m looking to replace my kitchen sink and change the wall color of my kitchen to match the new sink. No matter the weather, I want my kitchen to look bright and colorful.

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    Second mortgage usually prevents ‘deed in lieu’

    Q. I want to do a deed in lieu of foreclosure with my mortgage company but I am told I cannot do this because I have an equity loan. Why is that?

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    Staining concrete is often a better option than painting it

    Q. We have an in-ground pool surrounded by concrete totaling 1,050 square feet. I have power-washed these areas for the last few years and now the concrete is pitted.

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    Leaking head gasket can spell doom for car

    Q. I have 2000 Eldorado with 82,000 miles. I bought it new and have always kept up the service. About a month ago it overheated.

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    Teddy Wolff/For The Washington Post This 3-D image, left, helped Julie Friedman envision the finished bedroom, right.

    New technology lets renovators see homes in 3-D

    Thanks to new technology, little needs to be left to the imagination when it comes to home building, renovations and purchases these days. Remodeling companies are using 3-D home-design software to present computer images of what a renovated home could end up looking like.

Discuss

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    Editorial: Colin Powell’s message of perpetual optimism

    A Daily Herald editorial, noting Colin Powell's message at a visit to Willow Creek Community Church last week, says optimism is a fundamental key to a happy life.

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    Changes in the family never easy, even in business

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: On Monday, when they called the Washington Post staff together to deliver the news, Weymouth and Graham explained what has long been known: The publicly held company simply doesn’t have the necessary resources for innovation and survival in the Internet age. It is a familiar story these days, but the sting is nonetheless fresh when it is one’s own. Divorce is also commonplace, but this fact is of little consolation when one’s own family falls apart.

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    Editorial wrong, unfair to village
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: I object to the Daily Herald’s reference to Buffalo Grove in the editorial on Thursday, Aug. 8, regarding housing for the disabled.

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