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Daily Archive : Friday August 9, 2013

News

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    A firefighter surveys the scene Friday of a small plane crash in East Haven, Conn. The multi-engine, propeller-driven plane plunged into a working-class suburban neighborhood near Tweed New Haven Airport.

    Connecticut crash not pilot's first accident

    A fire department official says four bodies have been pulled from the site of where a small plane crashed into two Connecticut homes. Anthony Moscato of the East Haven Fire Department said Saturday that the bodies of two people from the plane and two people in one of the homes were recovered overnight. The deputy chief says authorities now believe those were the only victims.

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    The Salt Lake County Jail shows Kendra McKenzie Gill.

    Utah beauty queen charged with possessing bombs

    Prosecutors filed charges of bomb possession Friday against a recently crowned Utah beauty pageant winner. Kendra McKenzie Gill was arrested last weekend with three accomplices for what one described as a prank.

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    President Obama speaks Friday during a news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, D.C.

    Obama: ‘Appropriate reforms’ for spy program in works

    The president announced a series of changes in a program begun under the anti-terror Patriot Act that was passed in the wake of the attacks of Sept, 11, 2001. But none of the moves would alter the basic core of the program, the collection of millions of Americans’ phone records.

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    Mark Welsh/mwelsh@dailyherald.com Hundreds of people attend the Mane Event in downtown Arlington Heights on Friday including Tammy Green of Grayslake (front) and her friend Minda Smith of Vernon Hills who take in the sights from high above.

    Perfect conditons lead to big turnout at Mane Event

    There was no rain at Friday night's Mane Event in Arlington Heights, but it turned out to be the perfect storm. The combination of a cool summer evening, with blocked off streets, more than 25 restaurants and the popular cover band, Mike and Joe playing, all added up to a jam packed street festival to kick off Million Week in Arlington Heights.

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    COURTESY OF ABC 7 A man was killed Friday when a car crashed into a tree at Route 31 near Woodridge Circle in South Elgin.

    Man killed in S. Elgin Route 31 crash

    A 44-year-old man is dead after a car struck a tree Friday afternoon in South Elgin, officials said. Kane County Coroner Rob Russell confirmed that the crash near the intersection of Route 31 and Woodridge Circle resulted in the fatality.

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    Marty Jordan

    St. Charles family awarded $400,000 settlement

    The family of a St. Charles man who died saving his son, nephew and three nieces off the coast of Lake Michigan has received a $400,000 settlement and assurances from officials in a southwestern Michigan town that they will put in place heightened safety measures. Marty Jordan, who was 45, drowned Aug. 1, 2009, after rescuing his five young relatives from strong rip currents near South Haven,...

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    Navistar announced Friday that it was cutting “at least a couple hundred” jobs, as well as 140 contractors.

    Navistar looks at ‘couple hundred’ layoffs

    Navistar International Corp. officials announced Friday the company would cut “at least a couple hundred” jobs by early next month as part of an ongoing effort to lower costs. The Lisle-based truck and engine manufacturer will also cut about 140 contractors, officials said.

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    U.S. to reopen 18 diplomatic missions after threat

    The State Department says that 18 of the 19 U.S. embassies and consulates in the Middle East and Africa that have been closed due to a terrorist threat will reopen on Sunday or Monday.

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    Hanover Park man charged in Bartlett teen’s heroin death

    A Hanover Park man was charged Friday with supplying the heroin that killed a 15-year-old Bartlett boy last month. Nolan McMahon, 18, of the 2200 block of Cinema Drive West, appeared in DuPage County bond court on charges of heroin possession and drug-induced homicide. McMahon was identified through text messages to the victim and witnesses who saw him packaging heroin before selling it to the...

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    Regulators shutter small bank in Wisconsin

    egulators have closed a small bank in Wisconsin, bringing the number of U.S. bank failures to 18 this year. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. said Friday that it has taken over Bank of Wausau, based in Wausau, Wis.

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    Benjamin G. Sebena is led into the courtroom on Friday in Milwaukee.

    Wisconsin man gets life for killing his police officer wife

    Benjamin G. Sebena, 30, pleaded guilty in June to first-degree intentional homicide in the death of Jennifer Sebena. Ben Sebena has not said exactly why he killed his wife. His attorney noted that he was diagnosed with severe post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury, and sometimes has trouble distinguishing between what is real and what’s not.

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    Associated Press/July 12, 2013 A worker from the health ministry fumigates the backyard of a home where the man who lives there sits in his wheelchair in the neighborhood of Waspam in Managua, Nicaragua.

    Dengue epidemic looms for Central American region

    Central America is on track to have one of its worst years ever for the painful, sometimes fatal disease of dengue, prompting governments across the region to mobilize against the mosquito-borne virus.

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    Matthew Olszewski

    Authorities: Theft arrest led to Glendale Hts. murder plot

    A Glendale Heights man charged with soliciting the murders of three relatives after he was accused of stealing from them told an undercover cop “this is what happens to people who cross me,” prosecutors said Friday. DuPage County Judge Elizabeth Sexton set bail at $1 million for 23-year-old Matthew Olszewski, who faces up to 40 years in prison if convicted.

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    This shark fin was confiscated from a restaurant in Chicago’s Chinatown neighborhood, state officials say.

    1st shark fin citation given to Chicago restaurant

    The Illinois Department of Natural Resources said it cited Minghin Cuisine for $120 on Tuesday in Chicago’s Chinatown neighborhood for violating a new law banning shark fins.

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    The Rev. Shirley Fleming has organized forums at Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago to educate the community about the Affordable Care Act.

    Faith leaders emerge as key to health law outreach

    Religion and the nation’s new health law haven’t exactly been viewed as friendly partners in the public eye, with most of the attention focused on religious employers’ objections to covering the cost of birth control. But under the radar, leaders in some Illinois faith communities are spreading the word about the Affordable Care Act to make sure their uninsured members know about new benefits...

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    Illinois state parks getting license plate money

    A $2 surcharge on Illinois license plate renewals is paying off for state parks. The Illinois Department of Natural Resources will use the expected annual haul of $18 million to $22 million to defray a $750 million maintenance backlog.

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    Quinn says no Democrat rally, speeches at state fair

    Gov. Pat Quinn says Democrats will skip the traditional rally and speeches at this year’s Illinois State Fair. Angry union members booed Quinn at last year’s event.

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    Chicago schools release ‘safe passage’ routes

    Chicago Public School administrators released a map of dozens of “safe passage” routes in the city that will be used by students who have to attend new schools when classes begin later this month.

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    Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan and Senate President John Cullerton, left, sued Gov. Pat Quinn last week over lawmakers’ suspended pay.

    Lawmakers seek to speed up lawsuit over withheld pay

    Illinois Senate President John Cullerton and House Speaker Michael Madigan are trying to speed up the resolution of a lawsuit they filed over Gov. Pat Quinn’s decision to cut lawmakers’ pay. Legislators already have missed their August paycheck as a result of Quinn cutting $13.8 million for lawmaker salaries from the state budget, and they’re expected to miss at least one more before the next...

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    From left, Alexandra Vasquez, Bevan Sukowaty, and Dante Drake, all of Chicago, dressed up as various comic book characters.

    Images: Friday at Comic Con in Rosemont
    Scenes from Friday at the Chicago Comic Con at Donald E Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont.

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    Jimmy Butler of the Chicago Bulls signs a book for camper Simon Schwartz, 8, Friday during an appearance at the Bulls/Sox Academy in Lisle. Butler spent more than an hour giving kids high-fives, posing for photos and signing memorabilia.

    Bulls’ Butler motivates Lisle campers with story of basketball success

    When Jimmy Butler started playing basketball, he was, in his own words, “tiny” and “terrible.” Now, he’s the Bulls’ projected starting 2-guard ready to join Derrick Rose and company for a season fans have reason to be excited about.

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    Associated Press Thomas George Paculis walks past reporters Friday after pleading guilty in federal court to attempting to extort $200,000 from celebrity cook Paula Deen.

    N.Y. man pleads guilty in Paula Deen extortion case

    “I had, I guess, some bad judgment,” 62-year-old Thomas George Paculis told a U.S. District Court judge in Savannah. “I do take responsibility for what I have done.”

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    Daniel Happ

    Happ pleads ‘guilty but mentally ill’ in Carpentersville attack, rape

    Daniel Happ pleaded guilty but mentally ill to bludgeoning a woman with a hammer, raping an 8-year-old girl and stabbing a dog in a 2012 attack at a Carpentersville apartment. He will be sentenced Oct. 15.

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    Probation violation alleged in Carpentersville stabbing case

    Jacqueline Loyola, who got probation when she pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in 2011,wais being held in the Kane County jail on a warrant for failure to appear in court at a hearing about whether she violated her probation. Her next court date is Tuesday.

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    Pet vaccination clinic in Fox Lake

    The Lake County Health Department/Community Health Center’s Animal Care and Control Program, Fox Lake Parks and Recreation Department and Fox Lake police will offer a low-cost pet vaccination clinic Saturday, Aug. 24.

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    District 41 meeting Monday

    Lake Villa Elementary District 41 officials will discuss possible grade level configurations during a school board meeting on Monday, Aug. 12, at 6 p.m. The meeting will take place at Polumbi Middle School, 131 McKinley Ave., Lake Villa.

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    Property tax presentation Monday

    District 59 State Rep. Carol Sente said she is hosting a bipartisan property tax presentation for Fremont Township residents on Monday, Aug. 19, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The event will take place in the cafeteria of Carmel Catholic High School.

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    Carol Stream pushes recycling at apartments, condos

    Apartment and condominium residents in Carol Stream looking for somewhere to recycle their plastic, glass and paper will be able to toss those items into new 6-gallon containers being distributed to their homes this week.

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    Improv high school all-stars

    The Improv Playhouse is presenting an afternoon of all-star improv at its main stage facility, 735 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville. Performances of the 2013 Illinois All Star High School Improv Team are from 5 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 10 and Saturday, Aug. 17.

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    This undated file photo distributed by the Mexican government shows Rafael Caro Quintero, considered the grandfather of Mexican drug trafficking.

    Mexico releases notorious drug kingpin

    The court ruled that Caro Quintero was improperly tried in a federal court for a crime that should have been treated as a state offense. Prison officials were notified of the ruling on Thursday, and an official at the Jalisco state prosecutors’ office said the 61-year-old drug lord left prison before dawn on Friday.

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    Volunteers Jacob Anderson of South Elgin and Libby Harvey of St. Charles pack donated school supplies into backpacks Friday for Elgin Community College’s annual school supply giveaway. The packing started Thursday afternoon for the Saturday giveaway. They packed about 1,800 backpacks.

    Elgin Community College event starts at 10 a.m.

    Volunteers worked Thursday and Friday packing school supplies ahead of Saturday's backpack giveaway at 10 a.m. at Elgin Community College.

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    Judge blocks NJ state law on online sex ads

    During oral arguments Friday, the judge lauded the motives behind the law but said those didn’t outweigh the fact that it is pre-empted by federal legislation from the 1990s that gives websites and Internet providers a measure of immunity for content provided by third parties. He also said the law likely violates the First Amendment.

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    IOC President Jacques Rogge speaks during a press conference Friday with IAAF President Lamine Diack on the day before the World Athletics championships in Moscow.

    IOC wants assurances from Russia on anti-gay law

    IOC President Jacques Rogge said Friday the Russian government provided written assurances about its anti-gay law Thursday but some elements remain unclear.

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    All lanes of Jane Addams reopened after crash

    All lanes of the inbound Jane Addams Tollway have been reopened for the Friday afternoon rush following a crash just east of the Des Plaines Oasis that backed up traffic for miles. The accident, which occurred about 2:30 p.m., involved at least two cars and appeared to have been a chain-reaction crash.

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    Mundelein police say they are seeking robbers who struck grocery store

    Mundelein police are hunting for two men they say pulled off an armed robbery at a grocery store. Police said the bandits struck Supermercado Vargas Grocery, 814 S. Lake St. Authorities were summoned to the store about 9:50 a.m. Friday.

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    The Illinois Youth Center in Warrenville saw four suicide attempts in late 2012.

    Warrenville youth center installs suicide-resistent furniture

    The state is spending $750,000 to install suicide-resistent fixtures and furniture at Illinois Youth Center Warrenville after four suicide attempts by residents in the final months of 2012, the agency that runs the center says.

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    John Ford Coley will appear with other musicians of the 1970s at RiverEdge Park’s “Sail Rock” concert Saturday.

    At play
    5 things to do this weekend.

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    Blaze Foster (34) of the United States team returns a volley Thursday against the European volleyball team during a game at the 2013 World Dwarf Games in East Lansing, Mich.

    World Dwarf Games showcase athletes, ‘family’

    The Games, which conclude Saturday with the basketball finals at the Breslin Center followed by closing ceremonies, are held every four years. This year’s sixth installment is the largest ever and includes more than 400 athletes — slightly more than two-thirds are male — from 23 nations and every U.S. state taking part.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A 21-year-old Schaumburg man was arrested July 29 and charged with battery and theft. A male victim identified Linzy as the man who punched him in the face at Sheffield Park, reports said. The victim fell to the ground and was kicked and punched. He dropped his cellphone when he fell and saw the man take it, reports said. The victim chased the man but stopped when he made a comment about going to...

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    Prosecution ends its Manning sentencing case

    The 25-year-old native of Crescent, Okla., faces up to 90 years in prison for giving more than 700,000 documents and some battlefield video to the anti-secrecy group while working as an intelligence analyst in Iraq.

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    An air tanker drops fire retardant on a hot spot Friday as firefighters continue to battle a wildfire near Banning, Calif.

    Aerial assaults have California wildfire 25 percent contained

    “We have seen a significant increase in our fire activity, and much earlier than normal,” said Berlant, adding that fire season began in mid-April, about a month ahead of schedule. “We’re not even yet into the time period where we see the largest number of damaging fires.”

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    Dr. Edward Cho tries to get a nervous Nayomi Baumeister, 4, of Elgin to open up to him a little bit by making a balloon glove Friday as volunteers from the Delta Dental of Illinois Foundation provided free dental care to kids at Elgin Community College.

    Delta Dental offers free services to youngsters

    Kids get free dental care Friday at Elgin Community College thanks to Delta Dental of Illinois and the Greater Elgin Family Care Center.

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    Goalie Jesse Easterwood, 10, of Chicago, blocks shots during a hockey camp Friday at Glacier Ice Arena in Vernon Hills.

    Vernon Hills hockey campers learn from Olczyk, other NHL players

    Using a whistle and a loud voice instead of a microphone, Blackhawks television analyst Eddie Olczyk was in command as an instructor on the finale of a youth hockey camp Friday at Glacier Ice Arena in Vernon Hills.

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    Joe Oberweis

    Kaneland 302 school board member resigns

    Kaneland District 302 school board member Joe Oberweis is resigning, effective Tuesday, because he is moving out of the district.

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    Mt. Prospect OKs stormwater drainage work

    The Mount Prospect village board this week approved a contract for the Golfview Estates Drainage Project, part of its effort to address flooding.

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    From left, Jessie, voiced by Joan Cusack, Buzz Lightyear, voiced by Tim Allen and Woody, voiced by Tom Hanks are in a scene from, “Toy Story 3.” With more than 45,000 fans expected to attend, Disney is teasing several of the studio’s upcoming animated movies.

    ’Star Wars’ film won’t be previewed at Disney expo

    The Walt Disney Co. is cracking open the vault, rolling out the red carpet and pulling back the curtain for more than 45,000 expected fans at this weekend’s D23 Expo, a three-day celebration of all things Disney.

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    This combination of photos provided by the San Diego Sheriff’s Department shows James Lee DiMaggio, 40, left, and Hannah Anderson, 16.

    Car in California missing teen case found in Idaho

    A car belonging to a man suspected of killing a California woman and her young son and then fleeing with the 16-year-old daughter was found in the Idaho wilderness on Friday after horseback riders reported seeing the man and girl hiking in the area two days earlier, authorities said.

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    Burglaries a concern in Mt. Prospect

    Recent burglaries in Mount Prospect led one citizen to approach the village board this week. John Weisser of the 700 block of South Glendale Lane told the board Tuesday he was concerned about a string of residential burglaries in his neighborhood. “It is pretty unsettling,” he said, adding he is particularly concerned because he has a wife and six-month-old son at home.

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    Construction on Route 53 to start Monday in Long Grove

    A road resurfacing project on Route 53 in Long Grove that is expected to last more than two monthswill result in traffic delays, officials warned Friday. Work begins Monday morning on Route 53 from Old McHenry Road to just north of Lake-Cook Road through Long Grove in southern Lake County.

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    Juveniles suspected of Hanover Park burglaries

    Hanover Park police on Wednesday took into custody two juveniles accused of multiple vehicle burglaries and a residential burglary between July 25 and Aug. 1.

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    Lombard officials are asking DuPage County to deny a request to rezone the Ken-Loch Golf Links property along Finley Road, north of 22nd Street. The county's zoning board of appeals is expected to make a recommendation in October.

    Lombard opposes rezoning for Ken-Loch golf course

    Rezoning a golf course site near Lombard to allow multifamily residential development would contradict decades of land-use planning, village officials say. Lombard village and park district officials are joining neighbors in opposing a proposal to rezone the Ken-Loch Golf Links property along Finley Road, north of 22nd Street.Currently, DuPage County has the 31-acre site zoned for single-family...

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    Renzo Barduagni

    Guilty plea from Naperville man who secretly filmed teens

    A Naperville man pleaded guilty to child pornography Friday in a case that also uncovered videos he shot of teen neighbor girls through their bedroom windows. Renzo Barduagni, 50, could receive to up to seven years in prison.

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    A public hearing on a proposed waste transfer station at Route 120 and Porter Drive in Round Lake Park is scheduled to begin Sept. 23.

    Proposed waste transfer station in Round Lake Park will get lengthy attention to detail

    A public hearing on a proposal by Groot Industries Inc., to build a garbage transfer facility in Round Lake Park has been scheduled to begin Sept. 23. Village officials expect considerable testimony and public input and have booked a meeting space for 20 days.

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    Doves fly during a ceremony to mark the 68th anniversary of the world’s second atomic bomb attack over the city, at Nagasaki Peace Park in Nagasaki, southern Japan Friday, Aug. 9, 2013.

    Nagasaki marks 68th anniversary of atomic bombing

    Nagasaki’s mayor criticized Japan’s government on Friday for failing to back an international nuclear disarmament effort as the country marked the 68th anniversary of the atomic bombing of his city. Mayor Tomihisa Taue said Japan’s inaction “betrayed expectations of the global community.” About 6,000 people attended Friday’s ceremony.

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    Terry Tincher, left, and his brother Leonard watch a helicopter work to put out flames burning near their grandmother’s home off Ida Ave., Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013 in Cabazon, Calif. The brothers’ boyhood home burned in the neighborhood during a wildfire exactly 37 years ago to the day. Firefighters successfully defended two homes on the families property.

    Calif. wildfire spreads, threatening hundreds of homes

    Southern California firefighters are facing another day of battle as they try to corral a wildfire that has destroyed 26 homes. The fire continues to burn Friday in the rugged San Jacinto Mountains about 90 miles east of Los Angeles. The flames have forced hundreds of people from their homes since the blaze erupted Wednesday afternoon.

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    Gary “The Professor” Schiappacasse of Vernon Hills stretches before a game at Cantigny Park on Saturday, July 27. He is the coach of the Chicago Salmon, a 1858-style re-enactment baseball team.

    Moving Picture: Vintage baseball team follows old rules

    Gary Schiappacasse of Vernon Hills plays a different kind of baseball than what you will find at The Cell or the Friendly Confines these days. In fact, his vintage base ball team (two words back then) plays different positions and has different rules for outs. But the re-enactors play a version that harkens back to a simpler time. “We tell people that we play as gentlemen, for the love of...

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    A golden sunset over Denver, Colorado on July 3rd.

    Images: Photo Contest Finalists
    Each week you submit your favorite photo. We pick the best of the bunch and select 12 finalists. Here are the finalists for the week of August 5.

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    A blindfolded Atlantic bottlenose dolphin named Tanner copies the behavior of trainer Wade Davey, left, during a demonstration at the Dolphin Research Center on Grassy Key in Marathon, Fla. Dolphins may be known for their intelligence and playful behavior. But turns out they can also switch on other senses to figure out a problem, just like humans.

    Study: Dolphins can problem solve like humans

    A dog may be man’s best friend, but dolphins can imitate human actions, and even how they solve problems. When a dolphin has one of its senses blocked, it can use other senses to mimic a human’s movements, according to a recent study.

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    Fruit sculptures, falafel and vegetarian dishes from India, Italy, Mexico and other countries will be on display and for sale Saturday and Sunday at the eighth annual Veggie Fest hosted by Science of Spirituality Meditation Center, 4S175 Naperville Road in Naperville.

    Naperville Veggie Fest makes name with food demos, speakers

    Organizers of Veggie Fest in Naperville knew they made it big when they no longer had to recruit speakers. “What's exciting is we no longer have to go out and find people. They find us,” said Jonathan Krueger. Billed as one of the largest vegetarian festivals in North America, Veggie Fest drew 25,000 people over two days last year to enjoy an international food court, listen to music,...

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    Courage, a young Yorkie-mix, started his life on the mean streets. But since being taken in by people who care, including Naperville-based Animals Deserving of Proper Treatment, he's got a chance to turn his life around.

    Abandoned Yorkie goes from Tragedy to Courage

    Courage is a young Yorkie-mix who grew up on the mean streets and didn't seem long for this world. But thanks to some caring people -- including those at Naperville-based Animals Deserving of Proper Treatment -- he's got a new name and a new lease on life.

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    US, Russia diplomatic and defense chiefs to meet

    The crisis in Syria, arms control and missile defense headline what are expected to be chilly talks between top U.S. and Russian foreign and defense chiefs, a sit-down tainted by the case of National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden, which led President Barack Obama to cancel his upcoming meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

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    Lebanese policemen stand guard outside a hotel where the rest of the Turkish Airlines crew stay after six gunmen ambushed their vehicle on an old airport road and snatched two men of the Turkish crew, according to Lebanese officials, in Beirut, Lebanon, Friday, Aug. 9, 2013. Gunmen on Friday ambushed the van carrying the Turkish Airlines crew in the Lebanese capital and kidnapped the two of its members, a pilot and a co-pilot, security officials said.

    2 Turkish Airlines crew kidnapped in Lebanon

    Gunmen on Friday ambushed a van carrying a Turkish Airlines crew in the Lebanese capital and kidnapped two of its members, a pilot and a co-pilot, security officials said. According to the officials, six gunmen ambushed the vehicle on an old airport road in Beirut, snatched the two men, both Turkish nationals, and let the rest continue on.

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    In this courtroom sketch, Maj. Nidal Hasan, second from right, sits with his standby defense attorneys Maj. Joseph Marcee, left, and Lt. Col. Kris Poppe, second from left, as presiding judge Col. Tara Osborn looks on, during Hasan’s trial Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was allowed to continue representing himself on Thursday after the judge barred his standby attorneys from taking over, despite their claims that the Army psychiatrist was trying to secure his own death sentence.

    ‘D’ written on those killed in Fort Hood shooting

    The soldier knew she had to decide quickly who she could save, so she grabbed a black marker and wrote a “D” on the foreheads of those she couldn’t. To people lingering over the dead amid the chaos of the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood, she shouted: “You need to move on!” Sgt. 1st Class Maria Guerra recalled those moments while testifying Thursday during the trial of Maj. Nidal Hasan.

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    A Pakistani vendor rides his bicycle past the U.S. Consulate in Lahore, Pakistan, Friday, Aug. 9, 2013. The State Department warned Americans not to travel to Pakistan and evacuated nonessential government personnel from the country’s second largest city of Lahore because of a specific threat to the consulate there, a U.S. official said Friday.

    U.S. orders diplomats out of Lahore, Pakistan

    The State Department has warned Americans not to travel to Pakistan and evacuated nonessential government personnel from the country’s second largest city because of a specific threat to the consulate there, a U.S. official said Friday. The move was not related to the threat of an al-Qaida attack that prompted Washington to close temporarily 19 diplomatic posts in the Middle East and Africa, U.S.

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    Paul White, of Ham Lake, Minn., is one of the winners of the $448.4 million Powerball Jackpot, Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013 in Minneapolis. White’s share of the jackpot is $149.4 million. At rear left is White’s girlfriend, Kim VanReese.

    16 NJ county workers have ticket for $448M Powerball

    Sixteen workers from a county garage in a New Jersey coastal community hit hard by Superstorm Sandy have one of the three winning tickets in the $448 million Powerball jackpot, officials in Ocean County said. A Minnesota man claimed his third of Wednesday’s jackpot. The holder of the third winning ticket, also from New Jersey, has not come forward yet.

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    Vodka ignites after car hits Highland Park liquor store

    About $100,000 of alcohol was destroyed after a Highland Park woman drove her car into a liquor store, causing a vodka-fueled fire. Eighty-four-year-old Marty Anderson says the gas pedal on her BMW got stuck on Thursday, causing her car to jump a curb and crash through the window of Binny’s Beverage Depot in Highland Park.

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    Jonathan Ball practices with Tsunami in the first round of training for a study that will eventually involve detecting cancerous tissue at Penn Vet Working Dog Center in Philadelphia.

    Dogs help sniff out ovarian cancer in Pa. study

    Researchers in Philadelphia have begun an ovarian cancer detection study that relies on dogs’ keen sense of smell. Scientists at the Monell Chemical Senses Center want to combine old-fashioned olfactory work with modern technology to help catch the disease in its earliest stages. Ovarian cancer affects about 20,000 U.S. women each year. But survival rates are low because it’s often not diagnosed...

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    Tom Roeser

    Carpentersville's biggest employer not happy with village

    Carpentersville's biggest employer says he's so fed up with what he calls a lack of leadership on the village board and a lack of competency in its community development department, that he plans on shaking things up by running his own slate of candidates in the next trustee election. “Sometimes the coach has to throw a few bats to show people he means it,” said Tom Roeser, president...

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    Bears backups like quarterback Matt Blanchard (4) figure to see most of the action in tonight’s preseason game against Carolina.

    Dawn Patrol: Man accused of plotting to kill relatives; former hoops star guilty

    Glendale Heights man accused of plotting to kill family members. Former Lake County hoops star faces up to seven years in prison. Sprint store reportedly robbed in Rolling Meadows. Augustfest starts in Des Plaines. An Elgin group can offer mobile pregnancy services. The Bears start preseason play tonight against Carolina. And why Northwestern fans are brimming with optimism for this year's...

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    David Harris

    Harris troubled by Quinn salary veto

    State Rep. David Harris called the other day to say he’s troubled by the populist portrayal of Gov. Pat Quinn’s decision to take away state lawmakers’ salaries because they haven’t cut teachers’ and state workers’ pension benefits.

Sports

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    Chicago White Sox relief pitcher Dylan Axelrod looks down after Minnesota Twins' Oswaldo Arcia hit a solo home run during the 10th inning of the second baseball game of a doubleheader in Chicago, Friday, Aug. 9. 2013. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

    Sox drop both games of DH to Twins

    Oswaldo Arcia homered leading off the 10th inning, and the Minnesota Twins beat the White Sox 3-2 to complete the day-night doubleheader sweep on Friday.Josh Willingham and Chris Hermann also went deep. Brian Duensing (6-1) picked up the win in both games, and the Twins prevailed in the nightcap after rallying to take the opener 7-5.

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    Cougars bitten by Bees

    Fifth Third Bank Ballpark couldn’t provide the Kane County Cougars with enough time to finish a three-game sweep of the Burlington Bees as they fell 6-5 in 10 innings.

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    Colon’s homer boosts Boomers

    Alexi Colon’s two-out, two-run home run in the seventh inning allowed the Schaumburg Boomers to rally to a series sweep over the host Normal CornBelters by a 5-4 final.

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    Bears quarterback Josh McCown is sacked by the Panthers’ Colin Cole in the first half Friday night at Carolina.

    McCown relishes role in new system

    The first time the Bears signed quarterback Josh McCown was on Nov. 23, 2011, after an injury to Jay Cutler, and he wound up starting two games just over a month later.Last year, McCown spent the off-season with the Bears but was waived in the final cutdown and then re-signed on Nov. 13 when Cutler was injured again.

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    Chicago Bears' Fendi Onobun (84) drops a pass in the end zone as Carolina Panthers' Jason Williams (54) and D.J. Campbell (26) defend during the first half of a preseason NFL football game in Charlotte, N.C., Friday, Aug. 9, 2013. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone)

    Bears’ preseason opener quite a mixed bag

    Friday night’s preseason opener for the Bears and Panthers was an excellent example of why the NFL is considering reducing ticket prices for preseason games. The sloppy game featured 7 turnovers and a lot of players who won’t be around when the regular season opens.

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    There was no way the Sky were going to lose three straight. Epiphanny Prince scored 23 points and Elena Delle Donne added 19 to lead the Sky to a 77-61 victory over the Connecticut Sun on Friday night. Sylvia Fowles had 14 points, 10 rebounds and three blocks for Chicago (14-7). "We want to stay at the top of the conference," Prince said. "And we know that Atlanta (11-6) is right behind us. We came out. We were focused. We had a game plan and we executed it."

    Sky snap skid with 77-61 win over Sun

    There was no way the Sky were going to lose three straight. Epiphanny Prince scored 23 points and Elena Delle Donne added 19 to lead the Sky to a 77-61 victory over the Connecticut Sun on Friday night. Sylvia Fowles had 14 points, 10 rebounds and three blocks for Chicago (14-7). "We want to stay at the top of the conference," Prince said. "And we know that Atlanta (11-6) is right behind us. We came out. We were focused. We had a game plan and we executed it."

  •  
    Chicago Bears' Jon Bostic (57) spikes the ball in the end zone after returning an interception for a touchdown against the Carolina Panthers during the first half of a preseason NFL football game in Charlotte, N.C., Friday, Aug. 9, 2013. (AP Photo/Mike McCarn)

    Despite 24-17 loss, Bears D shines

    The Bears forced three first-half turnovers and linebacker Jonathan Bostic returned an interception 51 yards for a touchdown, but the Carolina Panthers spoiled Marc Trestman’s NFL head coaching debut with a 24-17 win over Friday.The Bears — who forced four turnovers — picked up where they left off last season when they led the NFL with 44 takeaways and finished with nine defensive touchdowns, one shy of the league record.

  •  
    Chicago Bears head coach Marc Trestman, center, argues a call with head linesman Tony Veteri, left, during the first half of a preseason NFL football game in Charlotte, N.C., Friday, Aug. 9, 2013.

    Images: Bears vs. Panthers Preseason
    Images from a Chicago Bears preseason game at Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, NC against the Carolina Panthers on Friday, Aug. 9.

  •  
    New York Yankees' Alex Rodriguez stands on the field during batting practice before a baseball game against the Detroit Tigers on Friday, Aug. 9, 2013, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

    A-Rod returns home: Big ovation or Bronx cheer?<

    NEW YORK — Alex Rodriguez stepped into the batting cage, three hours before gametime at Yankee Stadium. A coaching assistant pitched to him, a bullpen catcher retrieved the balls.Other than that, he was all alone Friday. Not a single teammate from the New York Yankees was on the field as A-Rod started to swing away. He was by himself, once again.It was sure to be louder Friday night when Rodriguez played at home for the first time since last October. With his 211-game suspension on appeal, Yankees fans were set to render their verdict on the man at the center of baseball’s latest drug scandal.Bronx cheer or big ovation?“I’m not so sure how it’s going to go,” manager Joe Girardi said before the Yankees hosted Detroit, adding he hoped “it’s not personal.”Neither was Daniel Correa.A Yankees fan from Hartford, Conn., he stood in line to get into the stadium before the doors opened. Wearing a pinstriped No. 13 jersey, too.“Hopefully, it’s a positive reaction for him,” Correa said. “But New York is a rough crowd.”Correa said he also owns a Derek Jeter jersey, and decided to go to wear Rodriguez’s number.“I’m disappointed in him, but he plays for my team, the Yankees, and you’ve got to support him,” he said.Rodriguez, meanwhile, didn’t talk to the media before the game. He rearranged two boxes in his locker before heading out the clubhouse door, not pausing to talk with any of the Yankees, and quickly got to work.Rodriguez later kidded with star second baseman Robinson Cano near the indoor batting cage and stretched with the rest of the team in the outfield. Wrapped up, he signed a couple dozen autographs, posed for pictures and chatted with fans.Out beyond the All-Star break while recovering from hip surgery, the three-time AL MVP made his season debut Monday night in Chicago against the White Sox, hours after Major League Baseball suspended him through the end of the 2014 season. He can play until there’s a decision on his appeal — likely after the season.Rodriguez heard loud boos during his three games at U.S. Cellular Field. The 38-year-old third baseman hit three singles in 11 at-bats without driving in a run or scoring one for the wobbling Yankees.Rodriguez was ready to bat fifth against the AL Central-leading Tigers. He was certainly the star attraction — he was the focus of a story on Detroit’s clubhouse television, and a few players watched.“Alex is a hot topic,” Girardi said.He certainly was a lightning rod among fans. Michael King, a Yankees rooter from Knoxville, Tenn., said he’d gotten tickets to this game a couple of months ago. He came wearing a No. 3 jersey, honoring Babe Ruth.“I wasn’t planning on seeing Rodriguez, I thought he wouldn’t be here,” King said. “I think it’ll be more boos than cheers for him tonight.”“I think it’ll be louder than in Chicago. The fact that he lied about it, that’s why,” King said. “Facts are facts.”

  •  

    Million may feature 14-horse field

    The last time the Arlington Million featured a 14-horse field was all the way back in 1994.Well, that number may be equaled next week if all 14 horses on the pre-entries list released Friday head to the gate for the 31st running of the Million a week from today.

  •  
    White Sox outfielder Alex Rios has been traded to the Texas Rangers.

    White Sox trade Rios to Rangers

    The White Sox traded right fielder Alex Rios to the Texas Rangers early Friday afternoon. Rios was originally in the Sox’ lineup for Game 1 of a day/night doubleheader against the Twins at U.S. Cellular Field, but he is headed to Texas along with $1 million in exchange for a player to be named later or cash considerations.

  •  
    Jason Dufner matched a major championship scoring record with a 7-under 63 in the second round of the PGA Championship on Friday. Dufner had a golden chance at history, sticking his second shot within 12 feet of the flag on the tough closing hole at Oak Hill. But, realizing the significance of his round for the first time all day, he left the putt 18 inches shy of the cup. The next one barely made it, dropping in on the last roll to give Dufner a share of history.

    Dufner ties major scoring record with 63 at PGA

    Jason Dufner matched a major championship scoring record with a 7-under 63 in the second round of the PGA Championship on Friday. Dufner had a golden chance at history, sticking his second shot within 12 feet of the flag on the tough closing hole at Oak Hill. But, realizing the significance of his round for the first time all day, he left the putt 18 inches shy of the cup. The next one barely made it, dropping in on the last roll to give Dufner a share of history.

  •  
    Chicago White Sox relief pitcher Nate Jones, left, wipes his face after giving up a grand slam to Minnesota Twins' Justin Morneau, rear right, during the seventh inning of a baseball game Friday, Aug. 9, 2013, in Chicago. Joe Mauer, Clete Thomas, and Pedro Florimon also scored on the play. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    Morneau hits 2 HRs, White Sox fall to Twins 7-5

    Justin Morneau hit late two homers, including a grand slam, and the Minnesota Twins rallied to beat the White Sox 7-5 in the first game of a day-night doubleheader on Friday.

  •  
    Adam Scott, of Australia, watches his tee shot on the 11th hole during the second round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at Oak Hill Country Club, Friday, Aug. 9, 2013, in Pittsford, N.Y. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

    Adam Scott proves again he’s a major player
    This is getting downright familiar for Adam Scott.The Aussie is right in the thick of things for the fourth time in the last six majors. On Friday, he shot a 2-under 68 and walked off the East Course at Oak Hill with the lead at the PGA Championship.

  •  

    ND’s Kelly surprisingly upbeat, blunt after 5 practices

    Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly was surprisingly upbeat about his team after five days of practice, and blunt about the benefit of bringing the Fighting Irish to a secluded camp 100 miles from campus.

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    Lisa Borel ,left, stands with her husband Inductee Calvin Borel as he is presented with his plaque by fellow Hall of Fame trainer Carl Zafzger, right, during the National Museum of Racing's Hall of Fame induction ceremony at the Fasig-Tipton Humphrey S. Finney Pavilion in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., Friday Aug. 9, 2013. (AP Photo/Hans Pennink)

    3-time Derby winner Borel leads Hall inductees

    Jockey Calvin Borel, who captured the Kentucky Derby three times in four years, led the class of inductees into the National Museum of Racing’s Hall of Fame during a ceremony Friday.Along with Borel, five thoroughbreds and two racing luminaries were inducted Friday in a ceremony at the hall across Union Avenue from storied Saratoga Race Course, where the nation’s best thoroughbreds are currently competing.

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    NCAA getting out of jersey-selling business

    The NCAA is getting out of the memorabilia business.NCAA President Mark Emmert said Thursday it would stop the practice immediately after reports this week that team jerseys and other items linked to individual schools could be found on its own website by searching for specific player names. “I think seeing the NCAA sell those kinds of goods is a mistake,” Emmert said. “It’s not what the NCAA is about.”

  •  
    New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera, who is retiring after this season, makes a point to visit with behind-the-scenes workers at each ballpark he visits.

    Yankees’ Rivera puts his class on display

    Mariano Rivera is making the rounds in every baseball park and visiting with some of the behind-the-scenes employees. That makes him a true Hall of Famer in my book. It’s a great idea, and it allows us to concentrate on some of the good that players are doing instead of just the negatives.

Business

  •  
    The building where Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities LLC, have their offices is seen in New York.

    Prosecutors: Sex, romance pervasive in Madoff offices

    Five of Madoff’s former employees pleaded not guilty Friday in federal court in Manhattan to the latest indictment in the case. Their trial is due to start Oct. 7.One defendant was in a love triangle with Madoff, and four of the five defendants were among those involved romantically or sexually, authorities said. The government said even investors got involved.

  •  
    Associated Press/July 26, 2013 Models of Samsung Electronics’ Galaxy S4 smart phones are displayed at a showroom of its headquarters in Seoul, South Korea.

    ITC issues import ban on some Samsung products

    Samsung Electronics Co. and Apple Inc. are in a global legal battle over smartphones. Apple argues Samsung’s Android phones copy vital iPhone features. Samsung is fighting back with its own complaints.The legal disputes come as competition in the marketplace intensifies. Samsung has been cutting into Apple’s dominance in phones and is now the leading smartphone manufacturer.

  •  

    West Dundee hockey firm seeks to reorganize after bankruptcy

    West Dundee-based Leafs Hockey Club Inc. and its ice rink are expected to file its reorganization plan in bankruptcy court in late September after the court allowed it to restructure its debt.

  •  
    President Barack Obama signs the bipartisan bill Friday to cut student loan interest rates.

    Obama signs student loan deal

    The legislation links student loan interest rates to the financial markets. It offers lower rates this fall because the government can borrow money cheaply at this time. If the economy improves in the coming years as expected, it will become more costly for the government to borrow money, and that cost would be passed on to students.

  •  

    Original Jake’s Pizza in Mount Prospect “temporarily” closed

    Jake’s Pizza in Mount Prospect, which owner Jake Flowers opened in the early 1960s, has been closed for more than a month. According to a recording at the pizzeria, the business at 302 W. Northwest Highway — the chain’s original location — is temporarily closed for “personal reasons” and will reopen in the “very near future.”

  •  
    Customers shop last spring at a J.C. Penney store in New York. Activist investor Bill Ackman said Friday he has lost confidence in J.C. Penney’s board and its chairman should be replaced.

    Summer doldrums grip Wall Street

    All three major indexes ended lower, and almost everything about the day screamed summer. Earnings season was quickly receding, with more than 90 percent of Standard & Poor’s 500 company already reporting second-quarter results. The only major economic data point that the government released was wholesale inventories — hardly the most closely watched indicator. Those still at work joked that all their colleagues had already taken off for the Hamptons.

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    Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush defended new uniform achievement standards for students around the nation Friday while calling for states to expand school-choice initiatives through more online classrooms.

    Jeb Bush backs new school standards, choices

    Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush defended new uniform achievement standards for students around the nation Friday while calling for states to expand school-choice initiatives through more online classrooms.

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    U.S. stocks slide as market heads for weekly loss

    U.S. stocks dipped Friday morning, the capstone to a disappointing week shaped by unimpressive earnings. Trading volume was light, typical of an August Friday, and there was little economic news to move the market.

  •  
    U.S. wholesalers cut their stockpiles in June for a third straight month even as their sales rose again. The combination suggests businesses have underestimated demand, a trend that could lead to stronger economic growth in coming months.

    US wholesale stockpiles fell 0.2 percent in June

    U.S. wholesalers cut their stockpiles in June for a third straight month even as their sales rose again. The combination suggests businesses have underestimated demand, a trend that could lead to stronger economic growth in coming months.

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    The new company will operate under the name GrubHub Seamless, but both brands and their respective websites will continue to operate separately,

    Chicago’s GrubHub, Seamless complete combination

    Rivals Seamless and Chicago-based GrubHub said Friday that they have completed their combination, creating an online takeout company covering about 25,000 restaurants in 500 cities. The new company will operate under the name GrubHub Seamless, but both brands and their respective websites will continue to operate separately, company spokeswoman Allie Mack said.

  •  
    Groupon’s stock soared Thursday after the beleaguered online deals company named co-founder Eric Lefkofsky permanent CEO and posted stronger-than-expected revenue for the second quarter.

    Chicago-based Groupon stock soars after 2Q results
    Groupon’s stock soared Thursday after the beleaguered online deals company named co-founder Eric Lefkofsky permanent CEO and posted stronger-than-expected revenue for the second quarter. Chicago-based Groupon Inc. reported a 7 percent increase in quarterly revenue, to $608.7 million, inching past Wall Street’s expectations.

  •  
    Caterpillar, Inc. CEO Doug Oberhelman

    Caterpillar CEO pushes for immigration reform

    PEORIA — The CEO of Caterpillar has joined U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin in pushing for comprehensive immigration reform.Doug Oberhelman and Durbin discussed the issue at an event in Peoria on Thursday. Durbin is an Illinois Democrat and one of the sponsors of legislation approved by the Senate that would provide a path to citizenship for immigrants who came to the country unlawfully. The bill also would expand access to visas for workers and graduates with advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering and math. Oberhelman says tackling the immigration issue in a comprehensive manner will help make the country and companies such as Caterpillar more competitive.However, it’s unlikely the Republican-controlled House of Representatives will approve the Senate’s bill. GOP leaders have indicated they’re more likely to advance their own, separate measures.

  •  
    Deerfield-based Spirits maker Beam Inc. said Thursday that its net income fell in the second quarter on costs related to debt, but sales of new Jim Beam bourbons, tequilas, and Pinnacle vodka helped boost revenue.

    Deerfield’s Beam 2Q net income slips, but sales improve
    Deerfield-based Spirits maker Beam Inc. said Thursday that its net income fell in the second quarter on costs related to debt, but sales of new Jim Beam bourbons, tequilas, and Pinnacle vodka helped boost revenue. Beam took a $43.1 million charge related to the early retirement of some of its debt.

  •  
    The Chicago customer care headquarters for online travel website Orbitz. Shares of Chicago-based Orbitz Worldwide Inc. hit their highest price in about six years Thursday.

    Orbitz shares soar after 2Q earnings report
    Shares of Chicago-based Orbitz Worldwide Inc. hit their highest price in about six years Thursday, after the online travel company reported a jump in hotel room nights and revenue that topped analyst expectations.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    The Wexford subdivision along Euclid Avenue straddles the line between Palatine and Rolling Meadows.

    Wexford neighborhood features larger homes

    The Wexford neighborhood, located in Palatine and Rolling Meadows, is an attractive community with large homes, excellent schools and a good location close to the expressway. Wexford features newer homes by Kimball Hill Homes.

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    Dr. Sanjay Gupta says he spoke too soon in opposing the medical use of marijuana in the past, and that he now believes the drug can have very real benefits for people with specific health problems. Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

    CNN’s Gupta: I was wrong about marijuana

    CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta says he spoke too soon in opposing the medical use of marijuana in the past and that he now believes the drug can have very real benefits for people with specific health problems. Gupta, the network’s chief medical correspondent and a brain surgeon, detailed his change of heart in an interview Friday and in an article for CNN’s website titled, “Why I changed my mind on weed.” He will narrate a documentary on the topic that will air on the network Sunday.

  •  
    Jimmy Fallon says he and his wife Nancy Juvonen had their baby daughter with the help of a surrogate.

    Jimmy Fallon: We had baby via surrogate

    Jimmy Fallon says he and his wife had their baby daughter with the help of a surrogate. Winnie Rose Fallon, the daughter of the NBC late-night comic and his wife, Nancy Juvonen, was born July 23. Fallon said in a portion of a “Today” show interview broadcast Friday that the couple had been trying for a while to have a child before succeeding with the help of a surrogate.

  •  
    Photographs about the life and films of Luis Bunuel sit on exhibit at the “Casa Bunuel” in Mexico City. Bunuel’s work continues to inspire filmmakers more than 80 years after he launched his career.

    Simple Mexico home of surrealist opens to public

    Down a narrow, dead-end street in a middle-class neighborhood of Mexico City, a three-story brick house with white window frames gives up no hint of the bizarre, even shocking images that were dreamed up inside. Luis Bunuel, known as the father of surrealist cinema, lived in the simple, gated house over the last 30 years of his life after settling in Mexico as an exile from post-civil war Spain. For a man who assaulted moviegoers with such shots as an ant-infested hand, an eyeball sliced open with a straight razor, and elegant dinners sitting on toilets, Bunuel enjoyed a surprisingly genteel life here.

  •  
    Tourists take photos of themselves outside the Cathedral in Havana, Cuba. For a place where most people earn just $20 a month at their government jobs, Havana can be a surprisingly expensive place to be a traveler. But there are plenty of free ways to have fun in this city known for sea, sun and salsa.

    5 free things in Havana, from cobblestones to cars

    For a city where people earn an average of $20 a month at government jobs, Havana can be a surprisingly pricey place — at least for tourists. From $6 daiquiris at El Floridita, Ernest Hemingway’s favored watering hole, to the ubiquitous hustlers looking to con visitors into buying knock-off cigars, much about the Cuban capital seems geared toward separating travelers from their money. Fortunately some of Havana’s most charming details can be experienced free of charge.

  •  

    Weekend picks: Comedian Tone Bell takes the stage
    Sheryl Crow and Cirque du Soleil are just some of the entertainment headliners at the 2013 edition of “Macy’s Glamorama: Fashion in a New Light” Friday at Millennium Park’s Harris Theater for Music and Dance. Also, find out which of the top 10 finalists of Suburban Chicago’s Got Talent will be the grand prize winner on Saturday at the Taste of Arlington Heights at Vail Avenue and Campbell Street in downtown Arlington Heights.

  •  
    Downers Grove native Cristina Panfilio plays Ophelia, talking to Polonius (David Daniel), in “Hamlet.” The production runs through October at the American Players Theatre in Spring Green, Wis.

    Suburban natives find artistic home on Wisconsin stage

    Naperville resident Barbara Zahora and Downers Grove native Cristina Panfilio both perform this summer at the American Players Theatre in Spring Green, Wisc. Zahora plays a neighbor in "All My Sons," premiering Aug. 17, and Panfilio plays Ophelia in the currently-playing "Hamlet" and "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead," premiering Aug. 10.

  •  
    Hosts Tamar Braxton, second left, with husband, Vincent Herbert, left, Tamera Mowry-Housley, center, with husband, Adam Housley, and Jeannie Mai, right, with husband Freddy Harteis, on the set of “The Real.”

    ‘The Real,’ ‘Exhale,’ take new approach to TV talk

    Five women sitting around talking has become a TV staple. Five women talking, each of whom is either black, Asian or Latino, is something different. It’s the approach tested by two shows: “The Real,” airing on a handful of Fox-owned stations, and the Aspire channel’s “Exhale.”

  •  
    Frank Agnew (Mark Strong) is dogged by Simon Boyd (David Costabile) for killing a fellow cop in AMC's “Low Winter Sun.”

    New drama a gritty portrait of a city and its flawed police force

    You don't need a TV drama to tell you these are dark days for Detroit. But a once-great city's headline status facing bankruptcy serves as poignant timing for the debut of “Low Winter Sun,” a gritty cop show whose Motor City setting gives this unforgiving saga even greater urgency. “Low Winter Sun” premieres on AMC Sunday at 9 p.m. right after the midseason premiere of “Breaking Bad,” adding up to quite a drama-series twofer.

  •  
    Director George A. Romero (center), circa 1984, is mobbed by zombies on the set of “Day of the Dead.” Romero will be at Flashback Weekend, Chicago's largest horror convention, today, Saturday and Sunday.

    All hail the zombie king!

    George A. Romero, director of "Night of the Living Dead," talks about his favorite movies and his zombie-making career. Romero will also introduce "Night" at the Rosemont Muvico Theater on Friday, Aug. 9, as part of Flashback Weekend.

  •  
    Oprah Winfrey says she had a racist encounter while shopping in Switzerland — and the apologetic national tourist office agrees.

    Oprah gets Swiss apology for racist encounter

    Talk show host Oprah Winfrey says she encountered racism while shopping in Switzerland — and the national tourism office agrees. The media mogul, who is one of the world’s richest women, told the U.S. program “Entertainment Tonight” that a shop assistant in Zurich refused to show her a handbag because it was “too expensive” for her.

  •  
    German meatballs are topped with mushrooms and served over spaetzle with red cabbage at Wunder-Bar in Antioch.

    Wunder-Bar returns to Antioch with hearty German fare

    Wunder-Bar is back. Seven years after closing, the Antioch restaurant has reopened. Both adventurous and timid eaters can find a dish they'll enjoy, and the friendliness of the other customers and staff will make diners feel like they've stumbled into an old German supper club.

  •  
    A group of researchers have started to use risk factor models in an effort to eliminate some of the harms associated with mammography.

    Reconsidering the mammogram

    A recent cover story in The New York Times Magazine made a convincing case against the mammogram. The author’s main criticism was that mammograms result in many false-positives, which other research has confirmed. Women get treated for cancers they don’t have, or cancers that are noninvasive, but which doctors at the moment can’t distinguish from the malignant ones. All of this leads to a lot of wasted money, stress and distrust of the system as a whole. While this is almost certainly true, many in the scientific community prefer to look at mammograms in a different way. Mammograms are a lifesaving screening method, but they are not being utilized properly. But there is a way to fix that.

  •  
    Joe Wycoff brings a low-key likability to the role of charismatic con man Bill Starbuck, right, who introduces the plain Lizzie (Hayley L. Rice) to her inner beauty in N. Richard Nash's “The Rainmaker,” in a revival at First Folio Theatre in Oak Brook.

    Understated con man sells First Folio's 'Rainmaker'

    First Folio Theatre's revival of "The Rainmaker" is a family affair, directed by Alison C. Vesely and featuring husband David Rice and daughter Haley Rice.

  •  
    Mutts is Bob Buckstaff, left, Mike Maimone and Chris Pagnani.

    Mutts hides joy, passion behind a smoky growl

    My first listen to Mutts' “Separation Anxiety” made me think it would be a perfect soundtrack for a heist film. I could see the unsavory characters huddled around a bottle of something strong in a darkened bar in the basement of an old office building on the shadier side of downtown. But then I heard the piano. And the joy. Behind the stories of struggle and the looks at the darker side of people, there’s a true happiness.

  •  

    Local theater: ‘9 to 5’ clocks in at Marriot

    This week in suburban theater marks a pair of regional premieres: "9 to 5 The Musical" at Marriott Theatre and "Next to Normal" at Drury Lane.

  •  

    Dining events: Fire up the grill at Saranello’s
    Saranello’s Thursday grilling parties. Wildfire’s Lagunitas beer dinner. Atwater’s afternoon tea.

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    The deep red blooms of Heartthrob Hibiscus add drama to a border.

    Art in the garden: There is a hibiscus for your landscape

    Hibiscus are heat-loving beauties at their prime in mid to late summer. Their large, exotic looking blooms add a showy splash of color to almost any sunny location. Choose from tropical, perennial or woody species — all are sure to brighten up your patio or garden.

  •  

    Home-mortgage interest deduction could be in play

    Since Congress has taken off on its annual summer recess, you might assume that nothing is happening on Capitol Hill that could affect the taxes you pay on your home. Quite the reverse.

  •  

    How to put a stop to water leaks

    Many parts of the country are in a drought, and water is precious. That’s one great reason to fix leaks. Of course, severe water leaks can cause a lot of damage, so let’s talk about how to best handle water leaks, big or small.

  •  

    Code violations can slip past city, private inspectors

    Q. We bought a new home about a year ago and hired a home inspector before closing. The inspector found no problems and said the house was perfect. Since then, we’ve learned that there are code violations in the plumbing and on the roof.

  •  

    Electrical systems with aluminum are more prone to problems

    Many builders used aluminum wiring systems in their homes in the 1960s and ‘70s. Many of those older systems pose serious risks.

Discuss

  •  
    Those who are uninsured will need to do their homework to find the best health coverage for themselves starting on Oct. 1.

    Editorial: Start your health insurance 101

    Uninsured individuals and small businesses would be wise to start educating themselves now about the Illinois health insurance exchange that opens Oct. 1, a Daily Herald editorial says.

  •  

    A ‘people’s contest’ for fair opportunity

    Columnist Donna Brazile: With the Civil War raging, Abraham Lincoln addressed the U.S. Congress on July 4, 1861, and talked about the stakes involved: “This is essentially a people’s contest." Almost exactly 152 years later, we’re having the same struggle. A “people’s contest” is under way across our land to see that the government provides a fair opportunity for all in bettering their lives. It’s a contest we’re losing.

  •  

    Letter lacks evidence on voting claims
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: In the Aug. 3 edition, Alfred Y. Kirkland Jr., in his attempt at Republican-bashing, claims that, “Today’s Republican politicians in Texas, in North Carolina, and in other states as well ... are seeking to cheat black and brown people out of their opportunity to vote, by selectively making it as inconvenient as possible for them.” This shows us once again that the First Amendment of our Constitution allow anyone to make outrageous and vague accusations without citing examples.

  •  

    Park district’s done job; now it’s up to us
    Letter to the editor: Martin Robinson marvels at how well the Arlington Hts. Park District has marked the Lake Arlington path to avoid collisions - and marvels more at the people who ignore the warnings.

  •  

    Concert series the best in the ‘burbs
    Letter to the editor: Jim Costas says Elk Grove Village's just-completed summer concert series once again was a classic. "This is just one of the reasons Elk Grove Village is the best place to live in the Chicagoland area," he writes.

  •  

    People step forward to help man who fell
    Letter to the editor: Debbie Salvesen is grateful for everyone who helped her husband the day he fell off a ladder onto their concrete driveway in Buffalo Grove. "Without all of you there today, my husband and I possibly would not have had the necessary of people to help him and I at the same time," she writes.

  •  

    This will only work if we all comply
    Letter to the editor: Paul Schmitz is hopeful that the new lane markings at Lake Arlington will prevent any more tragic accidents, but he points out that people have to follow the rules, if everybody is to be safe.

  •  

    Power of telephone now being realized
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: The telephone is now used as a strategic weapon by foreign terrorists to attack the core of our unprecedented, unheralded military prowess, vulnerably exposing its primary expenditures as wholly misdirected and utterly wasteful. Traditional warfare no longer exists, and the United States must eventually come to this realization.

  •  

    Safety is duty of motorcyclists, too
    A Des Plaines letter to the editor: Whenever I see the slogan “Start seeing motorcycles” I think about the times I do see motorcycles. More often than not they are weaving recklessly through traffic on the tollway. Or, they are zooming past everyone well above the speed limit — sometimes on the shoulder. I’ve even seen cyclists doing wheelies and other stunts on busy highways. If motorcyclists are so concerned about their safety, why is it so many don’t wear helmets?

  •  

    Opinions in paper are what they claim to be
    A Prospect Heights letter to the editor: I was amused to see the letter by Mr. Gordon Fallowfield on Aug. 5 accusing the Daily Herald of being in “cahoots” with President Obama. Most of the letters printed are critical of the president. Many of the paper’s columnists are as well. I disagree with many of them.

  •  

    Congress puts itself in a class above
    A Palatine letter to the editor: Dear Sen. Durbin: Knowing that you were a big supporter of the train wreck that is Obamacare, I would like to know that if it is so good for all of us why Congress, in a last-minute deal before fleeing Washington, felt it was necessary to exempt themselves and their staff from the Obamacare quagmire? I spoke with someone in your office and was told that without the exemption, congressional staff would not be able to afford it.

  •  

    Where does it stop on arming ourselves?
    A Palatine letter to the editor: Question: How do the rest of us know that you guys with your assault weapons aren’t arming yourselves so you can take over the country and wipe out the folks who are on your conspiracy lists? The next thing you know, there will be people arming themselves because they’ll perceive you as the bad guys.

  •  

    Kudos for Roskam for student loan bill
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: The recent debate in Congress over student loan interest rates is of particular interest to college students like myself. My friends and I wonder how soon we’ll be able to pay off our accumulating debt and how much the interest rates will compound that cost. Up until now, Congress has arbitrarily set interest rates on loans.

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    Texas did right to limit abortions
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor:In response to Sheryl Jedlinski’s July 19 letter (“New abortion law will hurt women”), thank you, Rick Perry and the citizens of Texas who voted to limit the killing of a child in the womb.

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    St. Charles not upfront about costs
    A St. Charles letter to the editor: In the past the city has delayed releasing the financials of projects and avoided discussing financial risks. Leading up to the First Street project the city spent over a year having public meetings and documenting every thing except the financials and the financial risk. Then suddenly, the Planning and Development Committee approved the project and released the financials (but not the financial risks) and two weeks later the city council approved the project.

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    Give health care law a chance to work
    A Lisle letter to the editor: As with all revolutionary ideas … the plan has controversy and potential flaws … but the essence of the plan is goodness and a “first step” toward protecting millions of Americans. Why not embrace, nurture and grow an original idea versus simply trying to tear it apart on the basis of party lines and pledge?

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    Talk about lowering taxes is missing
    An Elk Grove Village letter to the editor: With all this do-nothing talk about pension reform, I have a question to ask Illinois taxpayers. Why are we not hearing anyone talk about lowing taxes if and when reform happens?

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    Owning guns OK; concealing them isn’t
    A Palatine letter to the editor: If you want to have a gun in your home for protection or for hunting, that’s your right. I just hope you keep it secured, because it’s much more likely to be used on someone in your home than on an intruder.

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    Don’t dismiss Bible as irrelevant
    A Arlington Heights letter to the editor: A recent letter tries to compare homosexual marriage to race and slavery as an issue, and implies the Bible is no longer valid. While the Bible does not say interracial marriage is a sin and the 19th century abolitionists cited the Bible over and over in supporting their arguments that slavery was apostate, these comparisons are not germane to homosexuality.

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    Stronger rules needed for pet owners
    A Wauconda letter to the editor: Last week I read with sadness about the Shih Tzu that was killed by a pit bull in Cook Park, Wauconda. Today I read with equal sadness that the pit bull had been euthanized.

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