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Daily Archive : Saturday August 3, 2013

News

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    A dozen pediatric nurses took smartphone photos of the Stanley Cup as John McDonough, president and CEO of the Chicago Blackhawks, placed it on the counter of their workstation Saturday at Advocate Children's Hospital in Park Ridge.

    Stanley Cup thrills kids at Advocate Children's Hospital

    John McDonough, president and CEO of the Chicago Blackhawks, brought the Stanley Cup to pediatric patients at Advocate Children's Hospital in Park Ridge on Saturday. Patients, parents and staff at the hospital got to touch and pose for pictures with the cup during a half-hour visit in the family waiting area. Afterward, McDonough took it to individual patients' rooms.

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    Dawn Kelsey and her dog look at items for sale at the Pampered Pooch Couture booth during the annual Dog Days celebration Saturday at Cantigny Park in Wheaton.

    Wheaton’s Cantigny Park goes to the dogs

    Winston the English bulldog had quite the 6th birthday on Saturday, what with getting to splash in mini pools, enjoying free treats and meeting hundreds of other pooches. Well, all the hoopla at the 5th annual Dog Days at Cantigny Park wasn’t really for Winston, but he was none the wiser. “He think this is his birthday party,” said his owner Debbie Carroll of Brookfield.

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    Arlene Mulder

    Ex-Arlington Heights mayor in running for Metra chair?

    Is Arlene Mulder next for the Metra chairman's job? The former Arlington Heights mayor is on one official's shortlist for the position. Asked if she would take the position, Mulder said, “I'd consider it.” But Vice Chairman Jack Partelow of Naperville “is doing a good job, and we can't do anything until we have eight people. So many things are fluid here,” she said.

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    The United States issued an extraordinary global travel warning to Americans Friday Aug. 2, about the threat of an al-Qaida attack and closed down 21 embassies and consulates across the Muslim world for the weekend. The alert was the first of its kind since an announcement preceding the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

    Top U.S. officials meet to discuss embassy threat

    Top U.S. officials met Saturday to review the threat of a terrorist attack that led to the weekend closure of 21 U.S. embassies and consulates in the Muslim world and a global travel warning to Americans. President Barack Obama was briefed following the session, the White House said.

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    Amer Kahn

    Naperville boy, 6, drowns in retention pond

    A 6-year-old boy found floating face down Saturday morning in a retention pond on Naperville’s southwest side was pronounced dead at Edward Hospital, fire officials said. A person out walking noticed the boy in the pond near 95th Street and Cedar Glade Drive at about 11:30 a.m. The passer-by removed the boy and began CPR until Naperville police arrived.

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    Nearly 60 riders compete Saturday in stage two of the women’s pro three-day, three-stage race, a 45.3-mile criterium, at the Tour of Elk Grove.

    Cycling fans flock to Elk Grove competition

    As the pack of cyclists flashed past him, Jimbo Ritchie relived the thrill of competition, the high of crossing the finish line as well as the risky aspects of bike racing. “I feel their pain,” said Ritchie of Indian Head Park, who rode competitively when he was younger. His memories proved prescient Saturday when two cyclists in the Comcast Women’s Pro Stage 2 Criterium in Elk...

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    Jordan Cook of the Band Reignwolf performs on day 2 of Lollapalooza 2013 at Grant Park on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 in Chicago.

    Images: Lollapalooza, Day Two
    Lollapalooza continued to rock Grant Park and Chicago on the second day of the huge music festival.

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    Associated Press/Jan. 12, 2012 John Palmer attends the “Today” show 60th anniversary celebration at the Edison Ballroom in New York.

    Longtime NBC news correspondent John Palmer dies

    He served as a correspondent in Chicago, Paris and Beirut, as well as at the White House. In 1980 he landed one of his biggest scoops, breaking the news of the Carter administration’s failed attempt to rescue the American hostages being held in Iran.

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    Zimbabwe’s main opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai in Harare, Thursday. Tsvagirai said the election is “null and void” due to alleged violations in the voting process, but president Robert Mugabe has denied vote rigging.

    Mugabe declared winner in Zibabwe

    Zimbabwe’s electoral panel on Saturday declared that longtime President Robert Mugabe had won re-election by a landslide, a result that could exacerbate tensions in the country, where the 89-year-old’s chief rival and former coalition partner has accused him of poll-rigging.

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    A plainclothes police officer takes a photo with his mobile phone of a damaged gate at the jail, caused when Taliban militants attacked, Tuesday in Dera Ismail Khan, Pakistan. Dozens of Taliban militants armed with guns, grenades and bombs attacked the prison, freeing more than 250 prisoners, including 25 “dangerous terrorists,” officials said.

    Interpol makes new warning linked to prison breaks

    Interpol has issued a global security alert in connection with suspected al-Qaida involvement in several recent prison escapes including those in Iraq, Libya and Pakistan.

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    Christine Swidorsky carries her son, the couple’s best man, Logan Stevenson, 2, down the aisle to her husband-to-be Sean Stevenson during the wedding ceremony on Saturday in Jeannette, Pa.

    Dying 2-year-old is couple’s best man

    After a whirlwind week, the Jeannette couple tied the knot in a hastily arranged backyard ceremony that formalized their union and celebrated Logan’s life, which doctors say will be cut short soon by cancer.

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    While wearing his blue suit Saturday during Art & Soul on the Fox in Elgin, 15-year-old Mason Keys has some fun with people as they pass by.

    Art & Soul in Elgin a hit with kids, adults

    Eleven-year-old Ethan Reattoir pretty much had to be dragged by his mother and sister to Art & Soul on the Fox on Saturday in Elgin. By the time he’d listened to Jazz Consortium Big Band and perused a few artists’ booths, the Geneva boy decided it was all worth it.

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    An explosion knocks down one of the remaining towers Saturday at the old Kern Power Plant, in Bakersfield, Calif.

    Spectators injured after old power plant implosion

    More than 1,000 people had gathered at 6 a.m. in a nearby parking lot to watch the planned implosion of the plant owned by Pacific Gas and Electric to make way for a minor league baseball park. After the plant came crashing down, a police officer at the scene heard a man screaming for help and saw his leg had been severed, police said.

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    Michael Ansara on location for the TV series, “Law of the Plainsman” in 1960.

    Notable deaths last week

    A roundup marking the deaths of people of note over the past week.

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    Some readers who responded to a Dave Heun question about change said they’d like to see a more vibrant Charlestowne Mall in St. Charles.

    What would you change? Dave’s readers weigh in

    Dave Heun recently asked readers what they'd like to change with a snap of their fingers. Here's what they had to say.

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    Riders compete in stage two of the women’s pro three-day, three stage race, a 45.3-mile criterium, of the Tour of Elk Grove Saturday.

    Images: Tour of Elk Grove, Day Two
    Day Two of the Tour of Elk Grove

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    Roads, garages and many condos flooded in the Hearthwood Farms subdivision in Bartlett in September 2008. Village officials announced Friday that a U.S. grant of $3.8 million will help pay for flood prevention measures.

    Bartlett receives $3.8 million FEMA grant for stormwater management

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency is awarding a $3.8 million grant to Bartlett's stormwater management project. Village President Kevin Wallace said the grant will be used mostly to address flooding issues in the Hearthwood Farms subdivision, where homes were extensively damaged by floodwaters five years ago, and in the area near North and Prospect...

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    Five dead after Legionnaires’ outbreak at Ohio retirement center

    Health officials say Ohio’s largest outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease has killed five people and sickened 39 others at a retirement community since July.

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    Discarded NYC theater prop sparks bomb scare

    NEW YORK — A New York City playwright who directed a show called the “American Suicide Bomber Association” unwitting sparked a bomb scare when he threw a prop from the production into the trash at his home.Playwright Ethan Fishbane tells The New York Post he wasn’t thinking when he discarded the fake bomb while cleaning out his Manhattan apartment Tuesday.

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    Actors with fake guns bring police with real ones

    “One of the officers made the decision that had the man moved, he would have been killed,” said Glendora police Capt. Tim Staab. “It was just milliseconds from a tragedy.”

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    Donna Heller talks about her recent stomach illness in Burleson, Texas.

    Once rare stomach illness becoming more widespread

    Doctors or labs may not notify state health departments as quickly as they would for a more common foodborne illness like salmonella. And there are different rules in different states about whether cyclospora has to be reported to federal health authorities.

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    President Barack Obama and Yemen’s president, Abdo Rabby Mansour Hadi shake hands Thursday as they speak to the media in the Oval Office of the White House. On Saturday, the president took a birthday day off and played golf. The White House said there were three golfing foursomes, which included some of Obama’s friends from Hawaii, where he grew up, and Chicago, where he lived before becoming president, as well as current and former aides.

    Obama tees off into birthday weekend

    President Obama, who turns 52 on Sunday, left the White House unusually early for the half-hour trip by motorcade to Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland to squeeze in some golf before the celebration was to shift to the presidential retreat.

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    A CBS advertisement in Times Square in New York on Friday.

    CBS, Time Warner in talks

    Neither side would say Saturday if there was a chance the standoff could end quickly. Time Warner dropped CBS Friday in New York, Los Angeles, Dallas and several other cities.

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    Buffalo Grove studying possible fee increases

    Buffalo Grove is looking at increasing some of the village’s fees and fines. Among the fees that were discussed by the village board at last week’s committee of the whole meeting were false alarm fees, which are intended to encourage property owners to test, maintain and fix their alarm systems to prevent unnecessary emergency calls. Solicitor fees and towing fees also were discussed.

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    Wheeling cyclist walks away from crash with car

    A cyclist hit by a car early Saturday was ambulatory, officials said, but was taken to the hospital. Police are investigating the collision that happened in Wheeling, one of a number of car vs. cyclist occurrences this summer.

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    After final votes were cast, members of Congress walk down the steps of the House of Representatives Friday on Capitol Hill in Washington as they leave for a five-week recess.

    Congress: Divided, discourteous — taking a break

    Across the Capitol, unsteady bookends tell the story of the House's first seven months in this two-year term. Internal dissent among Republicans nearly toppled Speaker John Boehner when lawmakers first convened in January. And leadership's grip is no surer now: A routine spending bill was pulled from the floor this week, two days before the monthlong August break, for fear it would fall in a...

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    Fonterra's Hautapu dairy factory is seen in the Waikato, New Zealand. New Zealand authorities have triggered a global recall of up to 1,000 tons of dairy products across seven countries after Fonterra, the world's fourth-largest dairy company, announced tests had turned up a type of bacteria that could cause botulism. New Zealand's Ministry of Primary Industries said Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 that the tainted products include infant formula, sports drinks, protein drinks and other beverages. It said countries affected beside New Zealand include China, Australia, Thailand, Malaysia, Vietnam and Saudi Arabia.

    New Zealand botulism scare triggers global recall

    New Zealand authorities have triggered a global recall of up to 1,000 tons of dairy products across seven countries after dairy giant Fonterra announced tests had turned up a type of bacteria that could cause botulism.

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    Kid Rock offers $5K reward after burglary attempt

    Authorities are investigating an attempted burglary at Kid Rock's Detroit-area home.

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    6-year-old boy shot on Chicago's West Side

    Chicago police say a 6-year-old boy was shot and wounded while riding in a car with his mother on the city's West Side.

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    Cook Co. preserve converts gas-burning mowers to propane

    Forest Preserve of Cook County officials say the agency is taking a small but notable step to help the environment. The forest preserve is converting some of its riding lawn mowers from gasoline to propane power.

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    US lawmakers want end to ban on gay blood donors

    Illinois Congressman Mike Quigley has joined more than 80 members of Congress in a renewed push to end a ban on donating blood by men who have engaged in gay sex.

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    This Feb. 11, 1964 image provided by the David Anthony Fine Art gallery in Taos, N.M., shows a photograph of George Harrison taken by photographer Mike Mitchell during the Beatles first live U.S. concert at the Washington Coliseum.

    New Mexico exhibit shines light on rare Beatles photos

    Snow and frigid temperatures didn't stop thousands of screaming teenagers from crowding into the Washington Coliseum in the nation's capital for the Beatles first live concert on American soil. And not having a flash didn't stop photographer Mike Mitchell, then just 18 years old, from using his unrestricted access to document that historic February night in 1964 using only the dim light in the...

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    Fox River Grove helping eatery rebuild

    A Chinese restaurant in Fox River Grove for nearly 40 years is getting some financial help from the village as it looks to reopen in about six weeks.

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    Jonathan “Goose” Helton of Naperville plays for the Windy City Wildfire, which is up for the American Ultimate Disc League championship today. Helton was the league MVP in 2012.

    Suburbs figure big in Ultimate Disc League championship

    Chicago hosts the American Ultimate Disc League championship this weekend for the Frisbee league's season finale. The hometown Windy City Wildfire are in the final four, and many of their players are homegrown talent with suburban ties, like reigning league MVP Jonathan “Goose” Helton of Naperville. “I wanted to help make the closest team to me successful,” he said.

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    Katelyn Schoepke, 7, of St. Charles listens Friday to an audio guide while being led on a tour re-creating a day in the life of a child in a poor, developing community as First Baptist Church of Geneva hosts Compassion International’s presentation of “Change the Story.” The immersive, interactive exhibit will be in Geneva through Sunday.

    Geneva church hosts exhibit about kids in poverty

    In 20 minutes, step out of your world and into another culture at "Change the Story," a new and immersive experience from Compassion International. The sights and sounds of life in a poor, developing-world community will come alive as you journey with a child through the challenges of daily life. The exhibit is at First Baptist Church in Geneva.

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    Chris Ihle describes Thursday how he pushed an elderly couple’s car off train tracks in Ames, Iowa.

    Iowa man saves couple from oncoming train
    Chris Ihle tried pushing the car forward, but it wouldn’t budge. So he moved to the car’s front and told Marion Papich to make sure it was in neutral. He then dug in his cowboy boots and heaved as the train bore down on them with its horn blaring and brakes screeching.

Sports

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    FILE - This April 13, 2013, file photo shows New York Yankees' Alex Rodriguez sitting in the dugout during a baseball game at Yankee Stadium in New York. Three MVP awards, 14 All-Star selections, two record-setting contracts and countless controversies later, A-Rod is the biggest and wealthiest target of an investigation into performance-enhancing drugs, with a decision from baseball Commissioner Bud Selig expected on Monday, Aug. 5, 2013. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)

    Drug suspension will define A-Rod’s career
    Three MVP awards, 14 All-Star selections, two record-setting contracts and countless controversies later, A-Rod has become baseball’s marked man, the biggest and wealthiest target of an investigation into performance-enhancing drugs that’s likely to culminate with a lengthy suspension Monday.

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    Detroit Tigers relief pitcher Phil Coke, lower right, watches as Chicago White Sox left fielder Dayan Viciedo catches the a long fly ball hit by Tigers designated hitter Victor Martinez during the sixth inning of a baseball game in Detroit, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

    White Sox drop 9th straight, 3-0 to Tigers

    Max Scherzer took a shutout into the eighth inning before being pulled, and the Detroit right-hander became baseball’s first 16-game winner when the Tigers held on for a 3-0 victory over the punchless White Sox on Saturday night.

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    Los Angeles Dodgers’ Hanley Ramirez, left, collides with Chicago Cubs shortstop Starlin Castro after Castro doubled him up at second base after catching a line drive hit by Adrian Gonzalez during the ninth inning of a baseball game, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013, in Chicago.

    No stopping red-hot Dodgers

    The Cubs picked a bad time to be playiing the hottest team in baseball. Nothing is going right for the North Siders, who fell 3-0 Saturday to the Dodgers, who have won a club-record 13 consecutive road games.

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    Red Stars keep playoff hopes alive

    The Chicago Red Stars treated a sell-out home crowd of 3,400 to a 3-1 victory over the Seattle Reign on Saturday at Illinois Benedictine University Sports complex in Lisle. The win kept the Red Stars (7-7-5, 26 points) alive in the National Professional Soccer Leageue playoff race and knocked the Reign (5-11-3, 18 points) out of the postseason picture.

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    Boomers fall in 11 to snap six-game winning streak

    The Rockford Aviators needed 11 innings to earn a 7-4 win over the Schaumburg Boomers Saturday night in front of 5,313 that saw the the Boomers’ six-game winning streak end at Boomers Stadium.

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    Dodgers shortstop Hanley Ramirez, right, leaps over Cody Ransom after turning a double play on a ground ball hit to second baseman Skip Schumaker by Darwin Barney.

    Cubs send message by designating Borbon

    The Cubs said they wanted to send a clear message about heads-up play Saturday, after they designated backup outfielder Julio Borbon for assignment. Borbon made a baserunning blunder in Friday's loss to the Dodgers.

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    Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler rushes forward during NFL football training camp at Soldier Field in Chicago, Saturday Aug. 3, 2013. (AP Photo/Andrew A. Nelles)

    Martellus Bennett enjoys energy of Soldier Field

    For Martellus Bennett, Saturday night’s practice was his first time at Soldier Field, and he said the 29,000 made it special when he and his teammates were introduced and ran through the tunnel onto the field. “I never played here before, so it was pretty fun,” the sixth-year veteran said.

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    Former NFL football player Cris Carter, left, and his son, Duron, unveil Carter’s bust during the induction ceremony at the Pro Football Hall of Fame Saturday in Canton, Ohio.

    Carter’s induction concludes football hall ceremony

    Forcefully and emotionally, Cris Carter summed up the 50th induction ceremony for the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Saturday night. The seventh and final inductee from the Class of 2013, Carter honored dozens of people in his life who were “going into the Hall of Fame with me tonight,” as he followed Jonathan Ogden, Dave Robinson, Larry Allen, Bill Parcells, Curley Culp and Warren Sapp in being inducted.

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    Cougars belt 3 homers in win over LumberKings

    Kane Count Cougars game report:Kane County smashed 3 home runs in the first three innings as the Cougars earned a 6-1 triumph over the Clinton LumberKings on Saturday night at Ashford University Field in the opener of a four-game series.

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    Fire edge Union 2-1

    Mike Magee scored his league-leading 14th goal in the 75th minute to lift the Chicago Fire over the Philadelphia Union 2-1 on Saturday. Magee scored a goal in his third straight game and has eight goals in 10 games since coming to the Fire from the L.A. Galaxy.

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    Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler rushes forward during NFL football training camp at Soldier Field in Chicago, Saturday Aug. 3, 2013.

    Imges: Chicago Bears Family Fest
    Chicago Bears Family Fest during NFL football training camp at Soldier Field in Chicago, Saturday Aug. 3, 2013.

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    Catchings helps Fever beat short-handed Sky 79-58

    Tamika Catchings had 17 points and 10 rebounds to lead to lead the defending-champion Fever to a 79-58 win over the short-handed Sky on Saturday night.Karima Christmas scored 12 points, including two timely 3-pointers in the third quarter for the Fever (9-10). Catchings also had five steals and four blocked shots.

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    Los Angeles Dodgers' Yasiel Puig, left, slides safely into third base, advancing from first base on a single hit by teammate Andre Ethier, as Chicago Cubs third baseman Cody Ransom tries to make a play during the third inning of a baseball game, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Brian Kersey)

    Cubs drop third straight to Dodgers

    Chris Capuano scattered six hits over 6 1-3 innings and the Los Angeles Dodgers set a team record with their 13th straight road win, 3-0 over the Cubs on Saturday. The Dodgers, who haven't lost on the road since July 6 in San Francisco, eclipsed the 1924 mark set by the Brooklyn Robins.

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    Brandon Marshall wants to play up from his previous playing weight of 230 pounds this season with the hope that he can break more tackles, like the one being attempted here by Minnesota’s A.J. Jefferson last season.

    Bears’ Marshall plans to play at heavier weight

    Wide receiver Brandon Marshall, who has always been capable of going into Betts Mode after he catches the ball, wants to be even bigger and stronger this season, as the go-to receiver in a Bears offense that is switching schemes under new head coach Marc Trestman and offensive coordinator Aaron Kromer.

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    New York Yankees’ Alex Rodriguez autographs a ticket stub for a fan before the start of a Class AA baseball game with the Trenton Thunder against the Reading Phillies, Friday, Aug. 2, 2013, in Trenton, N.J.

    Selig needs to show his hand

    Matt Spiegel says Bud Selig needs to show his hand on what he has on Alex Rodriguez before he can hand down any kind of sanction against him.

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    Fans celebrate with Tiger Woods, center, after Woods chipped in for birdie from off the 13th green during the third round of the Bridgestone Invitational golf tournament, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013, at Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio. Woods leads the tournament by seven shots at 15-under par. (AP Photo/Phil Long)

    Woods just ordinary, still up by 7 at Bridgestone

    AKRON, Ohio — With an elite field chasing the lead, Tiger Woods decided to play keep-away.Already up by a staggering seven shots through 36 holes thanks to a career-tying best of 61 in the second round, Woods shot a solid 2-under 68 on Saturday in the Bridgestone Invitational to maintain that same seven-stroke lead.It was as if he was turning around and daring the world’s best players to come after him. No one really could.“You know, today was a day that I didn’t quite have it,” said Woods, who was at 15-under 195. “But I scored. And that’s the name of the game, posting a number, and I did today. I grinded my way around that golf course.”Now he’s only 18 holes away from making even more history in a career of historic accomplishments. He’ll be competing against the record book as much as the elite field.“It’s kind of tough to pick up seven or eight shots on Tiger around here,” said Henrik Stenson, a distant second after a 67. “It would take something spectacular on my behalf or any of the other guys around me, and obviously a very, very poor round for him.”Woods, by the way, is 41-2 when leading after 54 holes in a PGA Tour event.A victory would be his eighth at Firestone Country Club and in the Bridgestone and its forerunner, the NEC Invitational. That would match the tour-record eight he already has at Bay Hill and the eight wins Sam Snead had at the Greater Greensboro Open.Woods also could capture his 79th victory on the PGA Tour, drawing him within three of Snead’s record of 82. “I’ll just go out there and execute my game plan,” he said. “It all starts with what the weather is doing, and then I build it from there. We’ll see what I do tomorrow.”Unlike in a second-round 61 that could easily have been a 59 or even lower, Woods didn’t recover from all of his errant shots. He bogeyed the ninth, 14th and 16th holes, failing to bounce back from wayward shots.Yet he still was good enough to put himself in position for yet another lopsided victory, one that will likely mark him as the player to beat next week in the PGA Championship at Oak Hill.“Any time you can go into a major tournament or any tournament with a win under your belt, it’s nice,” Woods said. “It validates what you’re working on and you have some nice momentum going in there.”Of course, Woods has failed to win his last 17 major championships. No longer is it a lock that, with 14, he’ll surpass the mark of 18 by Jack Nicklaus.Woods began the third round with a seven-shot lead after rounds of 66 and the career-best 61 — the fourth time he has gone that low, also matching the tournament record originally set by Jose Maria Olazabal in 1990.Jason Dufner was third, eight strokes back after a 67, and Luke Donald (68), Bill Haas (69) and Chris Wood (70) followed at 6 under.Dufner said Firestone isn’t all that unique because it is just one of a number of places where Woods dominates.“Yeah, he has a pretty good track record here,” he said. “There’s quite a few events out here that he does really well. Torrey Pines comes to mind, Bay Hill comes to mind, the Memorial. So he obviously feels comfortable on those courses, and it’s our job to try and chase him down if we can.”Defending champ Keegan Bradley, with a 71, was another shot back along with Miguel Angel Jimenez, who put up a 65. Rounding out the top 10 were 2011 Bridgestone winner and reigning Masters champ Adam Scott and Zach Johnson.Woods has overwhelmed everyone in a glittering field that includes 48 of the top 50 players in the world ranking.Much like he did a day earlier, Woods started out fast. He birdied the first two holes (he had also eagled No. 2 in the second round). He rolled in a 12-footer at No. 1 and then two-putted from 40 feet at No. 2, most likely causing the rest of the players to just shake their heads.

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    Michelle Wie of the US, left, reacts to France's Karine Icher, right, after play has been suspended due to the high winds on the 13th fairway during the third round of the Women's British Open golf championship on the Old Course at St Andrews, Scotland, Saturday Aug. 3, 2013. (AP Photo/Scott Heppell)

    Wind suspends 3rd round at Women’s British Open

    Inbee Park was hopeful of tough conditions to help her make up an eight-shot deficit at the Women’s British Open.It turned out to be too tough.Park’s ball moved on the fourth green from 40 mph gusts at St. Andrews, and the third round was suspended a short time later.

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    FILE - In this Jan 20, 2013, file photo, Tottenham Hotspur's Clint Dempsey celebrates after scoring a goal against Manchester United during an English Premier League soccer match at White Hart Lane stadium in London. Dempsey is returning to Major League Soccer, ending his six-year spell in English soccer.The 30-year-old Dempsey played for the New England Revolution from 2004-06 before joining Fulham in 2007. He moved to Tottenham last summer and scored 12 goals in 43 games, but wasn't a regular. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)

    Dempsey set to leave England, move to MLS

    Clint Dempsey is returning to Major League Soccer, ending his six-year spell in English soccer.The 30-year-old Dempsey played for the New England Revolution from 2004-06 before joining Fulham in 2007. He moved to Tottenham last summer and scored 12 goals in 43 games, but wasn’t a regular.

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    Missy Franklin of the United States smiles as she holds the gold medal she won in the Women's 200m backstroke final at the FINA Swimming World Championships in Barcelona, Spain, Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013. (AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)

    Franklin wins 5th gold, Ledecky sets another WR

    Missy Franklin made history at the world swimming championships — and she might not even be the most impressive swimmer on her own team. The U.S. women’s coach gives his vote to Katie Ledecky.“She’s not normal,” said Dave Salo, marveling at another world-record performance by the 16-year-old who doesn’t even have her driver’s license yet.

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    Bears sign tight end Pope

    The Bears have signed tight end Leonard Pope to a one-year contract.

Business

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    A salesperson at a mobile phone shop displays an Apple iPhone 4 to a customer in New Delhi.

    Apple gets reprieve, can continue IPhone 4 sales

    No president has overturned an ITC import ban since Ronald Reagan did it in 1987, in a case involving Samsung computer-memory chips.The iPhone 4 models sold for other networks weren’t impacted, nor were newer devices including the iPad mini and iPhone 5. The company is expected to release new iPhone and iPad models later this year.

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    People line up at the job fair in South Burlington, Vt. A disproportionate number of the added jobs in July were part-time or low-paying, or both.

    New jobs disproportionately low-pay or part-time

    Analysts say some employers are offering part-time over full-time work to sidestep the new health care law’s rule that they provide medical coverage for permanent workers. (The Obama administration has delayed that provision for a year.)

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    Boston Red Sox owner John Henry stands on the field before a baseball game in Boston, in this May 11 photo.

    Red Sox owner enters $70 million deal for Boston Globe

    The impending purchase from The New York Times Co. marks Henry’s “first foray into the financially unsettled world of the news media,” the Globe said Saturday. The deal reportedly will give Henry the 141-year-old newspaper, its websites and affiliated companies.

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    A screen grab of the new Blu Ecigs advertisement featuring Jenny McCarthy.

    Old tobacco playbook returns with e-cigarettes

    The industry started by selling e-cigarettes on the Internet and at shopping-mall kiosks. It has rocketed from thousands of users in 2006 to several million worldwide who have more than 200 brands to choose from. Some e-cigarettes are stocked in prime selling space at the front of convenience-store and gas-station counters — real estate forbidden to the devices’ old-fashioned cousins.

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    Offshore oil drilling platform ‘Gail’ operated by Venoco, Inc., off the coast of Santa Barbara, Calif.

    Oil companies frack in coastal waters off California

    Marine scientists, petroleum engineers and regulatory officials could point to no studies that have been performed on the effects of fracking fluids on the marine environment. Research regarding traditional offshore oil exploration has found that drilling fluids can cause reproductive harm to some marine creatures.

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    Google is enlisting film students from five colleges to help it explore how its wearable computing device can be used to make movies. The $1,500 Google Glass headset is already being used by 10,000 so-called explorers. The device resembles a pair of glasses and allows users to take pictures, shoot video, search the Internet, compose email and check schedules.

    Students to explore filmmaking with Google Glass

    Google is enlisting film students from five colleges to help it explore how its wearable computing device can be used to make movies. The $1,500 Google Glass headset is already being used by 10,000 so-called explorers. The device resembles a pair of glasses and allows users to take pictures, shoot video, search the Internet, compose email and check schedules.

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    Facebook said to plan to sell tv-style ads for $2.5 Million

    Facebook Inc., the world’s largest social-networking site, which has 1.15 billion members, expects to start offering 15-second spots to advertisers later this year, according to the people, who asked not to be named because the plans aren’t public.

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    Facebook draws more young prime-time viewers than major networks

    Facebook Inc., the largest social- networking company, attracts more 18- to 24-year-old people during prime-time viewing hours than any of four major television networks, a study from Nielsen found. Fifty percent of television and computer users in that age group will access Facebook between 8 p.m. and 11 p.m. on weeknights, according to Nielsen.

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    Netflix clones in Russia get a head start with piracy law

    Russia is seeking to shed its image as a hub for pirated movies and become the next hot market for legal online video, a boon for local services trying to lure users before competitors such as Netflix Inc. enter the country. A law signed by President Vladimir Putin makes it harder for Russian websites to host illegal copies of movies or TV shows.

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    The Color Zen app isn’t the most complicated game, or the most challenging — but it has the potential to be addictive.

    App Reviews: Color Zen, MyScript Calculator
    By Hayley TsukayamaThe Tao of ‘Zen’Color Zen isn’t the most complicated game, or the most challenging — but it certainly has the potential to be addictive. This graphically brilliant game presents players with colorful patterns and a straightforward objective: Get the whole screen to be the same color as the border of the level. The puzzles start off pretty easy but grow harder as players have to negotiate layers of colors to land on just the right finishing move. With soothing sound effects (which can be turned off) and devilishly simple gameplay, Color Zen is a pretty good candidate to be your next favorite puzzle game. And, as an added illustration of thoughtful design, the app is touted as colorblind friendly. Free for Android devices, 99 cents for iOS devices.Easy to figure outHaving trouble figuring out the tip on that bill or the discount on that shirt? Getting frustrated fiddling with your calculator? MyScript Calculator offers the option of just scribbling down your equations rather than trying to remember how, exactly, to use the order of operations. The handwriting recognition on the app is strong and able to read a number of mathematical functions whether you’re puzzling with arithmetic or trigonometry. Users can switch the app to better fit the needs of southpaws, if needed, and can enable “palm rejection” to keep extraneous inputs from messing up your calculations. Free, for iOS and Android devices.

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    Apple’s iOS 7 software will be fully integrated into models made by General Motors, Honda, Nissan and Hyundai, Apple says.

    iCar dream downsizes to dashboards as Apple takes on foes

    By year end carbuyers will be able to choose from several vehicles that incorporate Apple’s iPhone functions, using Siri voice controls for navigation, texting, emails and music. Displacing competitors in the car may be more difficult than in desktop computing or mobile phones, as the technology giant grapples with challenges including extreme temperatures, noisy cabins and long product cycles.

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    Starbucks to partner with Google to upgrade Wi-Fi

    Starbucks says it’s reached a deal to partner with Google that will allow it to offer its customers dramatically faster Wi-Fi service. Financial terms were not disclosed. Starting in August, new U.S. company-operated Starbucks stores will begin to receive up to 10 times faster network and Wi-Fi speeds.

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    Review: Google finally gets tv right with Chromecast

    The Chromecast is a thumb-size dongle that plugs into your television and, using your Wi-Fi network, connects it to the Internet. At the moment, the programming choices are severely limited compared to competing devices, notably the Apple TV and Roku 3 set-top boxes. But the Google gadget is much cheaper than they are — both cost $100 — and just as easy if not easier to use. That makes it a good choice that will grow more attractive as Google adds more content partners.

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    Scott Simon, the longtime host of NPR’s Weekend Edition Saturday, tweeted from his mother’s hospital room as she died. The tweets provided a look at grieving in real time through social media.

    NPR host’s tweets from mother’s hospital room, shows grieving in real time

    Scott Simon sent 140-character dispatches into the world narrating the minutiae of his mother's last moments on Earth: watching movies together, singing her favorite songs, helping her floss her teeth. “I love holding my mother’s hand,” he wrote. “Haven’t held it like this since I was 9. Why did I stop? I thought it unmanly? What crap.” His mother, readers learned, was cultured and genteel, with a glinting, flinty wit. “Believe me,” she told Simon as he sat by her bedside July 27, “those great deathbed speeches are written ahead of time.”

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    Google’s got the best way to watch TV

    Google’s Chromecast doesn’t do much. But what it does do, it does so consistently well, and so cheaply, that it’s quickly became a primary part of my media-watching routine. Chromecast, a little USB-stick-sized device called a dongle, streams Netflix, YouTube and websites to your TV.

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    Google’s Chromecast, a small device that works wirelessly to stream video and music to a high-definition TV, is controlled by a smartphone or tablet computer and lets the user connect and view content from services like YouTube and Netflix via Wi-Fi.

    Review: Chromecast streams media at a nice price

    Chromecast joins Roku, Apple TV and several other devices meant to project Internet content onto TVs. In the early days of online video, people were content watching movies and shows on their desktop or laptop computers. But as these services become more popular and even replace cable TV in some households, there’s a greater desire to get them playing on television sets, which tend to be the largest screens in living rooms.

Life & Entertainment

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    Tryon Farm located in Michigan City, Ind., offers a variety of properties for everyone, from wooded lots to farmland lots.

    Acres of farmland converted into residential living

    Baby boomers are reinventing retirement, just like they redefined American work and family life when they were younger. They are truly investing themselves in a second life during which they can pursue their passions, not just provide for their families. For some, that passion involves living on a farm or in some other rural environ and communing with nature as much as possible.

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    Bamboo planters could face legal liabilities

    Public officials elsewhere in the U.S. have embraced similar legislation. In April, the town of Huntington, N.Y., on Long Island passed a law prohibiting residents from planting any new running bamboo. They’re also required to contain their existing plants or face financial penalties. In Brick, N.J., a 2011 local ordinance identifies bamboo as an invasive plant that must be controlled by property owners. If they don’t comply, the township is allowed to remove the plant and bill the property owner.

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    The home page for Twitter is displayed on an iPad and a laptop computer. If Twitter is the chirping chatterbox of the Internet, trolls are its dark underground denizens. The collision of the two is driving a debate in Britain about the scale of hatred and the limits of free speech online.

    Twitter threats highlight blight of online trolls

    If Twitter is the chirping chatterbox of the Internet, trolls are its dark underground denizens. The collision of the two is driving a debate in Britain about the scale of online hatred and the limits of Internet free speech. The furor erupted this week after several women went public about the sexually explicit and often luridly violent abuse they receive on Twitter from trolls — online bullies and provocateurs who send abusive or disruptive messages, often for their own amusement.

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    People walk pass the Sierra Design Backcountry Bed, Mobile Mummy, and Backcountry Quilt, display at the Outdoor Retailer Summer Market in Salt Lake City.

    Annual Utah outdoor show features lighter gear

    It’s a showcase of technology for everything from socks that can take a beating to water bottles equipped with battery-powered ultraviolet purifiers. At the world’s largest trade show for outdoor gear, one trend this year is lighter or more powerful equipment. The makers of a pint-size hydrogen battery say it can give a cellphone five complete charges before it needs a recharge itself. Others are showcasing solar cells that roll up for easy packing. Also on display are featherweight canoes, kayaks and standup paddleboards.

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    A new home is under construction at 1007 N. Wilshire Lane in Arlington Heights.

    Uptick in new construction in Arlington Heights neighborhoods

    The adjoining Stoltzner and Arlington Farms areas of Arlington Heights are significant now because of the recent uptick in new construction, with a growing demand for single-family ranch homes and lots to build on, said Maria DelBoccio, broker with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Northwest.

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    The flowers of lady’s mantle appear in July.

    Art in the garden: There are lots of easy-care perennials for your landscape

    Homeowners with busy lifestyles and smaller yards search for neat and tidy plants that don’t take a lot of time to maintain. They want pretty flowers on compact mounding perennials with foliage that remains attractive all season. There are plenty of perennials that fit this description.

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    Leopard sharks at La Jolla Shores Beach in La Jolla, Calif. The sharks attract onlookers when they come close to shore from June to early December, peaking between August and September, along a small stretch of beach north of San Diego.

    Swimming with the sharks of La Jolla

    Just beyond the breakers at La Jolla Shores Beach, hundreds of dark figures cruise through the sandy shallows like a scene in a horror movie. In most cases, the sight of one shark, much less hundreds, would spark panic. The leopard sharks of La Jolla induce a different response. Instead of racing toward shore, visitors here head out toward the deeper water to get a closer look.

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    Two brown bears look for salmon at Brooks Falls in Alaska’s Katmai National Park and Preserve.

    Bears, humans coexist in Alaska park

    Kim Spanjol has seen gorillas in Congo and orangutans in Borneo. But for a honeymoon with her husband Jim O’Brien, she planned a trip to Katmai National Park and Preserve in remote Alaska, where they started seeing brown bears the minute their floatplane landed on the beach. “There’s a bear in the water, and there’s a bear coming down the beach,” said Spanjol, a psychologist from New York. “And then, we were coming in to eat and there was a bear running by, and there were three bears just over there by the river. So, that was amazing to have it so accessible.”

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    Tye Sheridan, left, Jacob Lofland, and Matthew McConaughey, right, star in the coming-of-age drama “Mud.”

    DVD previews: ‘Mud,’ ‘Place Beyond the Pines’

    Matthew McConaughey proves that the rom-com star with the bedroom eyes and bong-hit grin is a real actor, after all. His low-key comeback continues with “Mud,” in which he plays the title character as a modern-day cross between Boo Radley and Robert Mitchum’s Max Cady. Also, Ryan Gosling plays a kind of tattooed lover-boy role as a drifter named Luke in the drama “The Place Beyond the Pines.”

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    Dwayne Johnson, a cast member in “G.I. Joe: Retaliation,” also hosts “The Hero,” competition series on TNT. The season finale airs Thursday, Aug. 1.

    Actor Dwayne Johnson leaves wrestling career open

    If Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson never steps back into the ring for a professional wrestling match, he won’t have a problem staying retired, even though his last bout was a loss to nemesis John Cena. But the 41-year-old action movie hero said he won’t rule out a return to the ring that made him famous.

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    Blake Shelton brings his “Ten Times Crazier Tour” to the First Midwest Band Amphitheatre in Tinley Park Saturday.

    Weekend picks: Shelton's 'Ten Times Crazier Tour' comes to Tinley Park

    Enjoy the country sounds of Blake Shelton during his “Ten Times Crazier Tour” Saturday at the First Midwest Bank Amphitheatre in Tinley Park. Bring your canine for a day of entertainment and socializing at the annual Dog Days fest at Cantigny in Wheaton. Enter a world of faeries and magical tales at the ninth annual World of Faeries Festival at Vasa Park in South Elgin.

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    This book cover image released by St. Martin's Press shows "Dogtripping: 25 Rescues, 11 Volunteers and 3 RVs on Our Canine Cross-Country Adventure," by David Rosenfelt. (AP Photo/St. Martin's Press)

    ‘Dogtripping’ will make you laugh out loud

    When was the last time you laughed out loud? When is the last time you cried tears of genuine sadness? When was the last time you did both while reading a 260-page memoir? David Rosenfelt, who is best known for a series of mystery novels, has written a book-length love letter to his canine companions through the years. “Dogtripping” is a delightful romp through his adventures — and misadventures — running a dog rescue along with his wife, Debbie, out of their Southern California home and their cross-country move.

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    The image on this fob is very Art Deco.

    Watch fob’s time has come and gone

    Q. I have an item that was handed down to me after my parents’ passing. I have seen nothing like it before. On the hideaway nail file is engraved “Robeson Shuredge” and on the back of the fob is the name “Airco.” Can you help me?

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    A model wears a sheer blouse. An unexpected flash of skin under a sheer fabric can be one of the best tools to perpetuate a womanís feminine mystique.

    Playing peek-a-boo with sheers

    An unexpected flash of skin under a sheer fabric can be sexy and sophisticated on a date, at a party, even in the office. But with anything much more than a sliver, it’s easy to cross the too-much-of-a-good-thing line. And there’s no taking it back. Just ask Tom Mora, women’s design director at J. Crew, who’s created sheer beach cover-ups stylish and elegant enough to be worn as tops and dresses. But, he says, wearer beware: “You should wear a slip, or a cami and brief. They are great pieces but their real intent is for a swimsuit to be underneath.”

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    Comedian Bob Hope entertains sailors of the U.S. 6th Fleet Saratoga at the flagship’s anchorage in the southern Italian port of Gaeta, on Dec. 19, 1970. Hope was on his annual United Service Organizations (USO) tour to entertain Americans serving overseas. Hope, beloved actor and comedian, who died 10 years ago at age 100, is being celebrated at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans, where the World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum has brought the “Bob Hope: An American Treasure” traveling exhibition. The exhibit officially opens Saturday Aug. 3.

    Exhibit recalls Bob Hope, who made troops laugh

    Bob Hope entertained 11 presidents at the White House, hosted the Academy Awards 19 times and told thousands of jokes to some 10 million U.S. troops over the course of four wars. Now the long life and legacy of the beloved actor and comedian, who died 10 years ago at age 100, is being celebrated at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans, where the World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum has brought the “Bob Hope: An American Treasure” traveling exhibition.

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    Adam Kern and his wife, Cheryl, combined their Official and Acme heating and cooling offices into one business last year.

    New advancements made in home HVAC systems

    When it comes to home heating and cooling, today’s homeowners have several primary areas of concern, said Adam Kern, co-owner with his wife, Cheryl, of Official/Acme Heating and Cooling in McHenry. Electric dampers and mechanical filters are some of the recent advancements in home HVAC systems.

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    Avoid annual meeting pitfalls

    Annual meeting season for many Illinois associations will occur over the balance of the year. The annual meeting may be the most important event for an association, yet there are numerous potential pitfalls that can raise legal challenges (or create political havoc) if the process is not conducted properly.

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    Holding a mortgage can be safe under certain conditions

    Q. I have owned a two-family rental home for over 30 years. It has been paid for long ago and has been a nice source of income. I have decided to sell this property. I have not listed it yet. I have someone who is interested in buying the property. This person wants me to hold the paper on it.

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    Why it’s tough to refinance with your current lender

    A small group of borrowers might profit from refinancing with their current lenders — the firm to which they remit their monthly payment. Most borrowers, however, will do better refinancing with a new lender.

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    GE’s new Artistry line of appliances, designed for millennials, are stylish with simple features and priced to be very affordable.

    GE designs appliances for millennials

    Millennials, the generation that grew up on ramen noodles and Vitaminwater, now have a major appliance line designed for them by a fellow millennial. GE recently released photos and tweeted links to its new Artistry series of five affordably priced kitchen appliances.

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    A painter adds color in extreme detail to a seasonal dish at the Lenox china factory in Kinston, N.C.

    Lenox workers still produce U.S.-made china

    Brenda Bizzelle likes to check out the dinnerware counters at nice stores when she goes out of town, just to admire the fruits of her labor. She can run her fingers over the bumps of bright enamel that form 421 grapes, oranges, pineapples and flower petals on every gold-rimmed dinner plate of a fine old Lenox china pattern called Autumn.

Discuss

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    The Soapbox

    Daily Herald editors reflect on topics ranging from Babe, the missing African spur thigh tortoise, to our debt to men and women in blue.

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    Responsible owners raise responsible pets
    A Palatine letter to the editor: I just read in your paper the sad story about the poor little Shih Tzu that died from being attacked by a pit bull running loose. I don’t blame the dog; I blame the owner.

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    Bible still relevant on homosexuality
    A letter to the editor: While the Bible does not say interracial marriage is a sin and the 19th Century abolitionists cited the Bible over and over in supporting their arguments that slavery was apostate, these comparisons are not germane to homosexuality.

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    Zimmerman case shows twisted system
    A Hoffman Estates letter to the editor: Was George innocent? Probably not. But George did not plead “innocent” but rather “not guilty” of second-degree murder. George is still responsible for Trayvon’s death, and should be subject to proportionate punishment. Had a lesser charge than manslaughter been offered to the jury, the result may have been different.

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    Middle class better wake up
    A Libertyville letter to the editor: Americans need to stop fighting each other and wake up to what is happening to the middle class in this country.

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    No longer the party of Lincoln
    An Elgin letter to the editor: When I was in college the great civil rights battles took place. Brave students and federal agents undertook to fight and ultimately eliminate the tactics used — then in the South — to cheat black and brown Americans out of their opportunity to participate in the American experience by voting in elections there. Some of these brave people gave their lives in the effort.

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    Thoughts on saving government money
    A Wood Dale letter to the editor: Some thoughts regarding postal service:1) Stop Saturday delivery except for next day and raise the fee on that. 2) Increase postal rates for junk mail. There will be less of it as a result and that would be a good thing for the environment.

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