Daily Archive : Wednesday July 24, 2013

News

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    Chris Otis of Woodridge gets a panoramic shot of a 50-ft-wide magnet making its way from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York to Fermilab in Batavia. It made a stop on Wednesday at the Costco parking lot in Bolingbrook.

    Fermilab's giant magnet headed near Glen Ellyn today

    A massive 50-foot-wide electromagnet is making its way to Fermilab from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. It's nearing the end of its journey by truck, stopping at a Costco store Wednesday in Bolingbrook. “A 50-foot-wide electromagnet rolling down a road is really something to see,” said David Hertzog of the University of Washington, co-spokesman for the Muon g-2 experiment.

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    Cop in fatal Kane shooting back on duty; probe continues

    A Kane County Sheriff's Department sergeant involved in the fatal shooting of an armed Batavia Township man on July 8 returned to active duty on July 18. The 20-year veteran was placed on paid leave, a common practice, while authorities investigated the death of Luke Bulzak, 52. The Illinois State Police have been called in to investigate and referred questions to the sheriff's department, which...

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    A new document related to Abraham Lincoln has been verified by a program administered by Springfield's Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.

    Letter Lincoln jotted on discovered, verified

    A new document related to Abraham Lincoln has been verified by a program administered by Springfield's Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.

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    Carol Stream cop seeks disability leave after accident

    Bryan Pece was set to return to work May 6 after being off for roughly six months as a result of injuries he suffered while on duty as a Carol Stream police sergeant

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    Elgin looks at cultural arts grants for symphony

    The Elgin Symphony Orchestra might soon be treated like any other cultural arts organization in Elgin. The Elgin City Council’s committee of the whole voted 5-3 on Wednesday to move forward with a plan to require ESO to apply for grant money from the city’s cultural arts commission, rather than resume direct funding to ESO. This was council members’ first concrete step after months of discussions...

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    A Shih Tzu named Shibui Fong, left, was killed Tuesday when it was attacked by a pit bull in Wauconda’s Cook Park.

    Pit bull kills smaller dog in Wauconda park, police say

    A 20-pound Shih Tzu was attacked and killed by a pit bull while the smaller dog was being walked by a caretaker in Wauconda’s Cook Park, police confirmed Wednesday. The attack occurred around 8 a.m. Tuesday, and the 10-year-old dog named Shibui Fong died of its wounds while being taken to Wauconda Animal Hospital, officials said.

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    Joe Moore

    Chicago alderman denied honor by White House

    The White House decided not to honor a Chicago alderman at a Tuesday ceremony honoring groups and individuals who positively affect their communities after it learned shortly before it started that the alderman was the subject of an ethics investigation.

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    Lisle man resigns job after failing to inspect ski lift, bouncy house

    A Lisle man resigned from his state job after lying about inspecting a ski lift and bouncy house and leaving work early to go to side gigs as a vocal impressionist throughout the suburbs, a report from the state’s executive inspector general says.

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    Arlington Heights man dies after four-vehicle crash

    A 61-year-old Arlington Heights man has died of the injuries he sustained in a Wednesday morning crash that involved four vehicles near Channahon, authorities said. John R. Hoeppel was pronounced dead at Presence St. Joseph Medical Center in Joliet.

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    Lake County Fair board member Kelli Kepler-Yarc drops the time capsule in the hole Wednesday in Grayslake.

    Time capsule honors history at the 85th annual Lake County Fair

    A time capsule containing ribbons, pictures and other historical reminders was buried near the main entrance of the Lake County Fairgrounds as part of the opening day activities at the 85th Lake County Fair in Grayslake. The fair runs through Sunday.

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    Athletes complete the 100-yard swim during the Juniors event that was part of the MMTT Splash and Dash race at Cadence Fitness and Health Center in Geneva Wednesday night.

    Kids compete in Geneva Splash and Dash event

    About 75 kids took part in a Splash and Dash race Wednesday night at Cadence Fitness and Health Center in Geneva. The event is one of 40 annual races offered across the country by USA triathlon, and Wednesday night's event, for youth ages 6 to 15, was organized by the MMTT Elite Triathlon Team.

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    Burt rides Sasha, left, and BoBo rides Scooby Blue during the Banana Derby at the Lake County Fair in Grayslake Wednesday.

    Images: Wednesday’s Lake County Fair
    Photos of the 85th Annual Lake County Fair in Grayslake from Wednesday, July 24, including Banana Derby monkey races, burial of a time capsule, the Miss Lake County pageant, and much more.

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    Teen again charged with impersonating cop

    A teenager who gained notoriety at age 14 for impersonating a Chicago cop is again facing charges of pretending to be a police officer. Cook County prosecutors say Vincent Richardson, now 19, is accused of walking into a uniform shop Tuesday and telling a salesman he was a police officer and wanted to buy supplies.

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    Chicago awards $10 million to torture victim

    The Chicago City Council has voted to award $10 million to a man who spent more than two decades in prison for a double murder he didn’t commit. Eric Caine’s conviction in the 1986 slayings of Vincent and Rafaela Sanchez was largely based on a false confession made after he was physically abused by detectives under former Chicago police Cmdr. Jon Burge.

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    A train traveling in northwestern Spain derailed Wednesday night, toppling passenger cars on their sides and leaving at least one torn open as smoke rose into the air. It was not immediately clear how many people were hurt or had died, but Spanish National TV showed footage of what appeared to be several bodies covered by blankets alongside the tracks next to the wrecked train cars.

    Death toll climbs to 40 in Spain train derailment

    A passenger train derailed Wednesday night on a curvy stretch of track in northwestern Spain, killing at least 40 people caught inside toppled cars and injuring at least 140 in the country's worst rail accident in decades, officials said. Bodies were covered in blankets next to the tracks and rescue workers tried to get trapped people out of the train's cars, with smoke billowing from some of the...

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    Prospective students tour Georgetown University’s campus in Washington, in this Wednesday, July 10, 2013, file photo. The Senate was weighing legislation Wednesday, July 24, 2013, that would link interest rates to the financial markets, providing lower rates for all college students this fall but perhaps resulting in higher rates in the years ahead.

    Senate passes student loan bill

    The Senate was weighing legislation Wednesday that would link interest rates to the financial markets, providing lower rates for all college students this fall but perhaps resulting in higher rates in the years ahead. Senate aides said lawmakers were on track to finish work by late Wednesday afternoon. “Rates on every single new college loan will come down this school year, offering relief to...

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    Sports fields revamp added to Batavia schools' capital plan

    A plan to revamp athletics fields at Batavia High School moved forward Tuesday, with the school board agreeing to work it in to the district's overall capital-improvement plan. "But again, reiterating, this is just accepting a plan," said board member Gregg Hodge, stressing the board hasn't actually decided to spend any money or do the work, roughly estimated at $13 million.

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    Scott R Baudin Arrested on warrant for possession of Child Pornography charges

    Cops: Bloomingdale sex offender went to library to look at child porn

    A Bloomingdale sex offender was arrested Wednesday after police say he picked an unlikely place to view child pornography -- the public library. Scott Baudin, 58, of the 100 block of Lakeview Lane, is scheduled to appear Thursday in DuPage County court for bond setting.

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    Aaron Thurmond

    Prostitution victim remains in jail while boyfriend awaits trial

    A downstate woman who says she was forced to work as a prostitute for her boyfriend remains held in Lake County jail without a chance to post bail because she is considered a flight risk and may not return to testify in her boyfriend’s trial.

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    Judge admonishes preacher

    A federal judge in Chicago scolded a preacher Wednesday for telling a newspaper “the wrath of God” would soon befall her at her home — words that led officials this week to beef up security around the judge. As Herman Jackson stood before her clutching a well-worn Bible, Judge Sharon Johnson Coleman told him his comments to the Chicago Sun-Times were “outrageous” and offended “the dignity of the...

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    Joseph (Jake) Kleiman

    Family, friends mourn 2 suburban men killed in crash

    Longtime friends Joseph Kleiman and Mahatkumar Patel, or Jake and Mahat to those who knew them best, were making their way back to the Northwest suburbs from visiting another good friend’s vacation home when tragedy struck. The 20-year-olds, both 2011 graduates of Schaumburg High School, died Tuesday afternoon when their car collided with a pickup truck at about 4:55 p.m. in Christiana,...

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    House narrowly rejects effort to halt NSA program

    WASHINGTON — The House narrowly rejected a challenge to the National Security Agency’s secret collection of hundreds of millions of Americans’ phone records Wednesday night after a fierce debate pitting privacy rights against the government’s efforts to thwart terrorism.

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    Round Lake park camps perform:

    Two youth theater programs in the Round Lake Area Park District will present productions at the Park School Campus, 400 W. Townline Road in Round Lake.

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    Mud Run in Lake Villa:

    The Lindenhurst — Lake Villa Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a 5K Mud Run on Saturday, Aug. 3.

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    New restaurant planned:

    The Libertyville village board on Tuesday increased the number of Class D liquor licenses from three to four after an application from that could bring a new venture to the shuttered Burger King restaurant at 1240 N. Milwaukee Ave., near Winchester Road.

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    Dunk the sheriff:

    Lake County Sheriff Mark Curran and other sheriff’s officials will participate in a dunk tank fundraiser for Special Olympics at the Lake County Fair from noon to 8 p.m. Thursday, July 25, through Sunday, July 28.

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    New COD rules may threaten some part-time profs

    New employment rules at the College of DuPage have drawn fire from some part-time professors who fear they may soon be losing their jobs. The state’s largest community college will begin phasing out the employment of those instructors who are already receiving a pension through the State Universities Retirement System, which manages retirement benefits for 65 community colleges, state...

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    A resident of the 2S500 block of Heaton Drive near Batavia got a phone call at 7 a.m. Tuesday from a man who said he was from “Windows” and needed to check on a problem with the resident’s computer, according to a sheriff report. The caller took control of the computer remotely and suggested the resident buy some computer software to fix it. The resident was noncommittal; the man said he would...

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    Moody’s downgrades Chicago schools’ debt rating

    Moody’s Investors Service has downgraded its rating of the Chicago Board of Education’s general obligation debt. Moody’s says the downgrade to A3 from A2 reflects significant debt and pension obligations of overlapping governmental entities on the district’s tax base.

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    Brian Townsend

    St. Charles administrator details decision to leave

    Departing St. Charles City Administrator Brian Townsend said Wednesday that St. Charles is a great city, but once Schaumburg officials reached out to see if he was interested in leading their community it was really just a matter of working out the details. It’s a bigger town with a bigger budget and bigger tax base, Townsend said.

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    Deborah Mell has been sworn in as a Chicago City Council member, replacing her father, Dick Mell.

    Mell sworn in to father’s city council seat

    State Rep. Deborah Mell was sworn in as a Chicago city council member Wednesday, hours after Mayor Rahm Emanuel named her as a replacement for her father after facing a politically awkward predicament. Dick Mell, who has spoken glowingly of the good old days of Chicago patronage politics, pushed for his daughter’s selection despite criticism that her appointment could be seen as nepotism. But...

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    Former state Rep. Constance Howard

    Former lawmaker pleads guilty in charity case

    Prosecutors say they will recommend a six-month prison sentence for a former Illinois lawmaker who has pleaded guilty to fraud. Former state Rep. Constance Howard was accused of spending scholarship money raised through a golf charity on herself and her political campaigns.

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    Dancers perform at Barrington Cruise Night

    Dancers from all over the U.S. and Canada have to come to Barrington once again for the Dancewerks National Werkshop, directed by resident Ellen Werksman. The students will perform at the village of Barrington’s Cruise Night at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, July 25 on South Cook Street in the heart of the village’s downtown. Dancers will take the stage and entertain audience members to the traditional...

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    This weekend’s Winfield Criterium is expected to draw more than 400 cyclists to the village.

    Criterium bike races returning to Winfield

    Speeding cyclists will dominate Winfield’s residential streets this weekend when the village plays host to its annual criterium-style bicycle races.

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    Nathan Woessner visits the Comer Children Hospital’s rooftop landing pad earlier this week. The boy survived being buried for more than three hours in a dune at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore on July 12.

    Boy buried by Indiana sand dune leaves hospital

    A 6-year-old Illinois boy who survived being buried by a sand dune has been released from the hospital, less than two weeks after the accident in Indiana. Officials said Nathan Woessner of Sterling was discharged late Tuesday afternoon from the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital.

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    Batavia schools’ proposed budget counting on more taxes from Aurora mall area

    The 2013-14 Batavia schools budget will be helped somewhat by the receipt of additional tax dollars, from property that is in an Aurora tax-increment financing district that has expired.

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    $70 million blitz to promote health overhaul in Illinois

    More than $70 million in public money will be spent in Illinois to promote new opportunities for health insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act, according to an analysis by The Associated Press. That places the state at the forefront of a campaign the Obama administration and many states are launching this summer to get the word out before enrollment for new benefits begins in October.

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    Elgin rally for Trayvon Martin on Saturday

    The group Occupy Elgin is planning a protest on Saturday calling for justice for Florida teenager Trayvon Martin and advocating the repeal of stand-your-ground self-defense laws across the nation. The protest takes place at 1 p.m. at the corner of Grove Avenue and Kimball Street, across from Gail Borden Public Library in Elgin. There will be an informal “speak out” at 2 p.m.

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    Inspector: State employee tried to influence case

    The state Office of the Executive Inspector General has found that a former investigator for the Illinois Department of Human Rights tried to influence a sexual harassment settlement for personal gain.

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    U of I raises record $428 million

    The university said Wednesday that the $428 million raised by the school and its foundation in the fiscal year that ended June 30 was the first time the annual figure for donations and pledges topped $400 million.

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    Richard J. Daley was mayor of Chicago from 1955 until his death in 1976.

    UIC to unveil Daley archive

    The University of Illinois at Chicago is getting ready to debut its collection of documents from former Mayor Richard J. Daley. The school says the archive takes up 150 linear feet and includes more than 7,000 photographs that were amassed by Daley during his six terms in office.

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    Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. With this year’s spending, the Obama administration will have devoted $200 million over four years to keep the Great Lakes carp-free.

    Feds update plan to protect Great Lakes from carp

    A $50 million federal plan released Wednesday for keeping hungry Asian carp from reaching the valuable fish populations of the Great Lakes calls for reinforcing electrical and other barriers currently in place and for field-testing other methods, including the use of water guns and hormonal fish love potions.

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    More cuts for Chicago schools

    The Chicago Public Schools, facing a $1 billion deficit, has announced more funding cuts, this time $68 million that was to be spent in its classrooms. The cuts were included in a $5.6 billion budget introduced Wednesday by district officials.

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    President George H.W. Bush poses with 2-year-old Patrick, last name withheld at family’s request, in Kennebunkport, Maine. Bush this week joined members of his Secret Service detail in shaving his head to show solidarity for Patrick, who is the son of one of the agents. The child is undergoing treatment for leukemia and is losing his hair as a result.

    Why George H.W. Bush shaved his head

    Former President George H.W. Bush has shaved his head to show solidarity for the sick child of a Secret Service agent. A statement issued by a Bush spokesman Wednesday says the 89-year-old former president acted earlier this week at his summer home in Kennebunkport, Maine.

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    West Nile mosquitoes found in two Naperville parks

    Tests of mosquito traps at Seager Park, 1163 Plank Road, and Springhill Park, 703 Springhill Circle, found one instance of West Nile virus at each location, the Naperville Park District said Wednesday.

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    Bicyclist Bob Lee of Barrington, who received media attention coast to coast for his three Ride for Reasons, is back in the community supporting a campaign for living wills called BeAtEase.

    Barrington launches campaign encouraging living wills

    Barrington’s famous fundraising bicyclist Bob Lee is the driving force behind a new campaign to get everyone 18 and older in the Barrington area to complete a comprehensive but easy-to-do living will. The BeAtEase campaign aims to let loved ones know all aspects of care the Barrington area’s adults would wish to receive in the event of an incapacitating injury or illness.

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    In this Thursday, May 9, 2013 photo, Marc Fucarile smiles while speaking with reporters, in Boston. Fucarile, who lost a leg during an explosion at the Boston Marathon, was released from the Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital Wednesday July 24, 2013, exactly 100 days after the attack that killed three people and wounded more than 260. He is the last hospitalized victim of the Boston Marathon bombings to be discharged.

    Last hospitalized Boston Marathon victim heads home

    The last hospitalized Boston Marathon bombing victim went home Wednesday, exactly 100 days after the attack that killed three people and wounded more than 260. Marc Fucarile lost his right leg above the knee, broke his spine, as well as bones in his left leg and foot, ruptured both eardrums and suffered severe burns and shrapnel wounds when the second of two bombs exploded near him and a group of...

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    Ellen Toplin, left, and Charlene Kurland, right, who obtained a marriage license at a Montgomery County office despite a state law banning such unions, meet with Nicola Cucinotta, center left, and Tamara Davis before they get their license, Wednesday, July 24, 2013, in Norristown, Pa. Five same-sex couples have obtained marriage licenses in the suburban Philadelphia county that is defying a state ban on such unions.

    Pennsylvania county defies state, allows gay marriages

    At least five same-sex couples obtained marriage licenses Wednesday in a suburban Philadelphia county that is defying a state ban on such unions. Alicia Terrizzi and Loreen Bloodgood, of Pottstown, were the only couple to marry right away, exchanging vows in a park before a minister and their two young sons. “We’re not setting out to be pioneers. We don’t think our family is any different than...

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    This June 23, 2011, booking photo provided by the U.S. Marshals Service shows James “Whitey” Bulger, one of the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted fugitives, captured in Santa Monica, Calif., after 16 years on the run.

    Ex-Bulger partner details role as FBI informant

    BOSTON — James “Whitey” Bulger’s former partner in crime returned to the stand Wednesday for a fifth day of testimony, with the defense harping on his role as an informant for the FBI as it tried to discredit him.

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    ‘Little Shop of Horrors’ in Buffalo Grove

    Big Deal Productions, the theater program of the Buffalo Grove Park District, is presenting “Little Shop of Horrors” in the West Auditorium at Stevenson High School 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, July 26 and 27, and 2 p.m. Sunday, July 28. Tickets are $16 in advance or $19 at the door.

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    Britain's Prince William, right, and Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, hold the Prince of Cambridge, Tuesday July 23, 2013, as they pose for photographers outside St. Mary's Hospital exclusive Lindo Wing in London where the Duchess gave birth on Monday July 22. Palace officials said Wednesday that the new prince has been named George Alexander Louis.

    Royal baby named George Alexander Louis

    The little prince has a name: George Alexander Louis. The announcement Wednesday that Prince William and his wife, Kate, had selected a moniker steeped in British history came as royal officials suggested the new parents are seeking quiet time away from the flashbulbs and frenzy that accompanied the birth of their first child. While the news put to rest intense curiosity over what name the couple...

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    Changes eyed in door-to-door mail delivery

    The U.S. Postal Service wants to end door-to-door delivery for new homes in favor of curbside service and neighborhood cluster boxes. A House panel is considering legislation that would take that one step further, phasing out door-to-door delivery for nearly all Americans.

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    Aaron Hernandez’s probable cause hearing delayed

    A Massachusetts judge Wednesday gave prosecutors more time to present evidence to a grand jury in their case against former New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez. Judge Daniel O’Shea rescheduled the probable cause hearing for Aug. 22, after considering defense objections to a delay. Hernandez will be held without bail until then. Hernandez has pleaded not guilty to murder in the death of...

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    Chris Leiner is the new assistant superintendent of parks and planning for the Des Plaines Park District. He formerly worked for the Oak Park park system.

    Des Plaines names new parks assistant superintendent

    The Des Plaines Park District has hired Chris Leiner as assistant superintendent of parks and planning. He has 12 years of experience as the revenue facilities maintenance and operations manager for the Park District of Oak Park. “Leiner is perfectly suited to step into this position,” said Paul Cathey, superintendent of parks and planning.

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    Teen stabbed in Villa Park

    A 15-year-old is facing an aggravated battery charge following a stabbing Monday night in Villa Park, authorities said Wednesday. Villa Park police said a 17-year-old was found with a stab wound about 7:10 p.m. in the area of area of Yale Avenue and Ridge Road.

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    War veterans to be honored at Gilberts event Aug. 11

    Veterans from World War II and the Korean conflict will be the center of attention in Gilberts on Aug. 11. On that day, they will be special guests of the Northern Fox Valley and the True Patriots Care Foundation.

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    Bullets hit Villa Park house

    Villa Park police are asking the public for help after several bullets struck a house early Tuesday morning on the village’s northeast side.

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    Student, community safety a priority for Waubonsee

    Safety is among the many priorities addressed by Waubonsee Community College. There are some exciting new projects the college is working on to further enhance the health and safety of our students and college community.

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    U-46 discrimination case might be far from over

    Attorneys on both sides of a discrimination case against Elgin Area School District U-46 will be in court Thursday hoping for some clarity on the next steps of a lawsuit that has already dragged on for eight years. Judge Robert Gettleman will discuss his decision, released July 11, and talk attorneys through "the final stage of this litigation,” but even these last steps may take a while,...

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    Dragon boats will race at Lake Arlington on July 27.

    Lake Arlington to host Dragon Boat Festival on July 27

    A colorful and dramatic event will play out on Lake Arlington on July 27 -- the Chicagoland Dragon Boat Festival is back for a second year, complete with boats, teams from all over the Midwest and more than 1,000 spectators.

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    A portion of a green roof collapsed on Feb. 13, 2011, at Aquascape in St. Charles. The company is suing contractors and subcontractors for $13 million.

    Firms deny liability in $13 million St. Charles green roof collapse

    Defendants in a $13 million lawsuit filed after the partial collapse of a green roof in February 2011 at St. Charles-based Aquascape argue they are not liable because the company signed rider to a contract that waives a right to seek damages. Aquascape's attorney argues the rider was only in effect during construction. A judge will sort this out in November.

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    The lynching of 14-year-old Emmett Till in 1955 galvanized the civil rights movement.

    Witness to Emmett Till lynching dies in Illinois

    A witness who went into hiding after testifying at the Emmett Till trial about hearing the lynching victim’s screams has died in a Chicago suburb at the age of 76. After the 1955 trial, Willie Louis fled his native Mississippi for Chicago. He changed his name and told no one of his connection to the case, not even his future wife.

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    British newspapers are displayed for sale in London, Wednesday, July 24, 2013. The newspapers show coverage of the new royal baby boy, third in line to the throne.

    Britain’s new prince enjoys privacy, for now

    After the frenzy and the flashguns, Britain’s new royal baby and his parents spent Wednesday out of the media spotlight. But for how long? The 2-day-old prince doesn’t have a name yet, but he’s the most famous infant on Earth, and as a future British king he faces a lifetime of celebrity.

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    Barrington officials this week cleared the way for renovations to the historic John Robertson House, also known as the “White House.” The plan calls for the 19th century home to ultimately include a cultural center, office space for nonprofit groups and a ballroom for special events. The village bought the house in 2007.

    Barrington will restore historic Robertson House by 2015

    Barrington officials this week approved special use permits that will allow the historic John Robertson House to become a community and cultural center after renovations are complete in 2015. “This house is an icon in the community,” Village President Karen Darch said. “We are recreating the vibrant village and community that we all know and love.”

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    Christopher Kinney

    Three charged in West Chicago revenge stabbing

    Bail was set Wednesday for three men charged in a West Chicago stabbing that prosecutors said was revenge for a gang-related shooting earlier this month. Logan Baker, 19, of Geneva; Mario Hightower, 25, of Wayne; and Christopher Kinney, 19, of West Chicago, each face felony mob action charges.

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    East Cleveland Mayor Gary Norton, left, speaks during a news conference with Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner Dr. Thomas Gilson, in East Cleveland, Ohio, Tuesday, July 23, 2013. Norton announced that Shetisha Sheeley, 28, has been identified as the second of three murdered women found in trash bags in the city.

    Ohio authorities identify 2nd of 3 slaying victims

    Authorities have identified the second of three female victims whose bodies were found last week near Cleveland wrapped in trash bags. The victim’s mother, Kim Sheeley, asked for prayers and told WEWS-TV that her daughter’s death “has been really, really” hard on her.

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    Pope Francis holds up the Eucharist as he gives Mass inside Aparecida Basilica in Aparecida, Brazil, Wednesday, July 24, 2013.

    Pope: Resist “idols” of money, power, pleasure

    Pope Francis urged Catholics to resist the “ephemeral idols” of money, power and pleasure during a pilgrimage Wednesday to one of the most important shrines in Latin America. Francis celebrated the first public Mass of his trip to Brazil after praying before the statue of Our Lady of Aparecida, Brazil’s patron saint. His eyes welled up with emotion as he stood silently in deep prayer before the...

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    Ariel Castro, center, looks up during court proceedings Wednesday, July 24, 2013, in Cleveland. Defense attorney Craig Weintraub, left, and Jaye Schlachet watch. Attorneys for Castro, the man accused of holding three women captive in his home for more than a decade, have told a judge that plea negotiations in the case are still ongoing. Castro has pleaded not guilty to nearly 1,000 counts of kidnap, rape and other crimes.

    Ohio kidnap suspect in court, plea talks ongoing

    Prosecutors and lawyers for a Cleveland man accused of holding three women captive in his home for more than a decade signaled Wednesday that they are talking about a possible plea deal. With a trial less than two weeks away, there was no mention of whether the prosecutor will seek the death penalty. Attorneys for Ariel Castro, 53, say a deal is dependent on taking it off the table.

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    A rock formation known as The Wave in the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in Arizona. A hiker visiting The Wave died of cardiac arrest Tuesday July 23, 2013.

    Anniversary hike ends in tragedy near scenic spot

    They left their two young children with relatives and set off to celebrate their fifth wedding anniversary at one of the most beautiful hiking destinations in the Southwest. Months earlier, the luck of a draw had brought Anthony and Elisabeth Ann Bervel coveted hiking permits for The Wave, near the Utah-Arizona border. But just hours into Monday’s trek, 27-year-old Elisabeth Bervel died of...

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    Dozens of extremists shouting “Kill the gays” have attacked gay activists as they were gathering for the event in staunchly conservative Montenegro. The assailants threw rocks, bottles and various other objects at some 20 gay activists and supporters and at police.

    Opponents attack Montenegro’s first gay pride

    Several hundred people shouting “Kill the gays” attacked gay activists and clashed with police on Wednesday in a bid to disrupt the first ever pride event in staunchly conservative Montenegro, which is seeking to improve its human rights record as it bids to join the European Union.

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    Egyptian Defense Minister Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi has called on Egyptians to hold mass demonstrations to voice their support for the military to put an end to “violence” and “terrorism.”

    Egypt: Army chief seeks mandate to fight violence

    Egypt’s military chief on Wednesday called on his countrymen to hold mass demonstrations to voice their support for the army and police to deal with potential “violence and terrorism,” a move that signals a stepped-up campaign against supporters of the ousted Islamist president.

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    Labor board nominees advance in Senate

    A Senate panel has approved President Barack Obama’s new nominees for the National Labor Relations Board, setting them up for confirmation in the full Senate as early as next week. The two were nominated last week as part of an agreement in which Republicans agreed to end stalling tactics that blocked some of Obama’s appointments.

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    Rolling Meadows has pickup for storm damage

    Rolling Meadows residents should set out storm damage brush as soon as possible this week, and no later than 6 p.m. Monday, July 29, for city pickup. The city’s brush chippers will be collecting brush occasionally throughout this week, and will make their final pass through all streets Monday.

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    Dist. 214 names 4 administrators

    The District 214 school board has made four appointments to its administrative ranks: a new associate principal at Wheeling High School; a new director of Vanguard School; a new assistant principal at Elk Grove High School; and a new division head for Career Technical Education at Buffalo Grove High School.

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    A lawyer advising National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden says his asylum status has not been resolved and that he is going to stay at the Moscow airport for now.

    Lawyer: Snowden to stay in Moscow airport for now

    A lawyer advising National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden says his asylum status has not been resolved and that he is going to stay at the Moscow airport for now. Anatoly Kucherena, who was visiting the American at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport on Wednesday, said that migration officials are still looking at this asylum request and that this process had been drawn out.

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    New York mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner and his wife, Huma Abedin. The former congressman says he’s not dropping out of the New York City mayoral race in light of newly revealed explicit online correspondence with a young woman.

    Weiner faces new scandal, now with wife at side

    When a heckled, harried Anthony Weiner resigned from Congress and apologized for the explicit text messages that had destroyed his career, a key figure was notably absent: his then-pregnant wife, Huma Abedin. On Tuesday, there was Weiner again, making a public mea culpa for a newfound sexting scandal that erupted amid his mayoral run. But the Democrat was there to stay in, not bow out — and...

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    Associated Press/June 6, 2013 The sign outside the National Security Administration (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md. The authority of the National Security Agency to collect phone records of millions of Americans sharply divided members of Congress on Tuesday as the House pressed ahead on legislation to fund the nation’s military.

    Obama, lawmakers square off over NSA authority

    “We oppose the current effort in the House to hastily dismantle one of our Intelligence Community’s counterterrorism tools,” White House press secretary Jay Carney said in a late-night statement. “This blunt approach is not the product of an informed, open or deliberative process.”

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    Singer-songwriter Lisa McClowry, shown here performing in 2006, will serve as one of the celebrity judges during the fifth annual Aurora Public Library Teen Talent Show and Competition at 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 10, at the Copley Theatre, 8 E. Galena Blvd., in downtown Aurora.

    Singer joins Aurora judging panel for talent show

    Singer-songwriter Lisa McClowry, whose distinctive voice has been heard in major motion pictures as well as on worldwide radio and in TV jingles, will join Paramount Theatre Artistic Director Jim Corti as a celebrity judge in the fifth annual Aurora Public Library Teen Talent Show and Competition.

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    Richard Anderson

    CLC spending $2.2 million on land recently proposed for sports dome

    College of Lake County trustees have approved spending $2.2 million for lands adjacent to the flagship Grayslake campus that recently attracted interest from an entrepreneur who wanted to build a sports dome there. Officials say some of the 10 acres near CLC’s Washington Street entrance could be used to grow vegetables and fruit for the school’s local food program.

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    Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Chair Edith Ramirez is sworn in Tuesday on Capitol Hill in Washington prior to testifying before the Senate Judiciary subcommittee on Antitrust, Competition Policy and Consumer Rights hearing on “pay-for-delay” deals between pharmaceutical companies and their generic drug competitors.

    Senators decry corporate deals to delay generic drugs

    At issue Tuesday at a Senate hearing were so-called “pay for delay” agreements: A brand-name drug manufacturer pays a settlement to a company that challenges its patent and looks to produce the same drug under its generic name but is willing to delay introducing it for a price.

  •  
    Did you miss the royal reveal? Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, holds the Prince of Cambridge, yesterday outside St. Mary’s Hospital exclusive Lindo Wing in London.

    Dawn Patrol: Rolling Meadows grocery delay; race talk in DuPage

    Quinn signs law ending benefits for transit boards. Rolling Meadows grocery store behind schedule. Frank talk on race in Naperville. Carol Stream considers alcohol sales at rec center. Round Lake to remove, replace ash trees. Ill. coalitions want to raise taxes for road repairs. Konerko: drug testing system working.

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    Photography student Charlie Anderson transfers black and white prints from a fixer bath to a wash bath in the ECC darkroom.

    Darkroom photography still alive at suburban colleges

    In this era of Instagram and point-and-shoot digital cameras, students in at least three community colleges -- DuPage, Elgin and McHenry -- are staying close to the roots of the art that date back to the 1800s. “Why do we have to get rid of the old process just because we get something new?” said ECC photography professor Travis Linville.

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    Huntley Village Manager David Johnson received a $10,108 raise this year.

    Municipal administrators are getting big raises

    After years of pay freezes, most suburban municipal administrators are receiving raises this year, according to an analysis of 74 suburbs in six counties. In fact, 55 suburban administrators are averaging a 3.7 percent average pay hike, with Huntley's village manager getting a $10,018 raise, Aurora's getting $10,586 and Prospect Heights' getting $10,000.

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    Decorative artwork stands in front of the 55 foot long swimming pool at the Versace mansion on Miami Beach, Fla.

    Versace’s former Miami Beach home up for auction

    Half a dozen buyers have expressed interest since the auction was announced last week, said Lamar Fisher, president and CEO of Fisher Auction Company. “They range from very, very high-profile individuals and celebrities to international buyers from the Russian market to the South American market."

  •  
    Former New York Gov. George Pataki, left, arrives for a Federal Court appearance Tuesday n New York.

    NY ex-governor testifies at sex-offender trial

    Ex-New York Gov. George Pataki is a defendant in a civil lawsuit filed by six convicted sex offenders who said their constitutional rights were violated when a Pataki-initiated program in 2005 caused them to be transferred indefinitely to psychiatric centers when their prison terms ended. A state court ruled a year later that the program was illegal, but the men remained institutionalized for...

Sports

  •  

    How great year at Ohio State fizzles

    Urban Meyer was hailed as a savior when he agreed to take over Ohio State in the wake of the tattoo scandal that sullied the program. That support became even more frenzied when he coached the Buckeyes to a 12-0 record in his first season.Like Meyer said Wednesday at the Big Ten media days, it’s been a great year — right up until last weekend.

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    FILE- In this Feb. 16, 2010 file photo, USA's Evan Lysacek reacts after performing his short program during the men's figure skating competition at the Vancouver 2010 Olympics in Vancouver, British Columbia. It's been more than three years since Lysacek skated off with the gold medal in Vancouver. The next Olympics are 6 1-2 months away, and he is preparing to defend his title, something no male figure skater has done since 1952. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta, File)

    Naperville’s Lysacek begins long climb toward Sochi

    t’s been more than three years since Evan Lysacek skated off with the gold medal in Vancouver. He hasn’t competed since.Yet the skater, who grew up in Naperville embraces the idea of making history; Dick Button was the last repeat men’s Olympic champion. He embraces being back on the ice in any capacity even more. “I love skating and wouldn’t be coming back if I didn’t love it,” he said Wednesday

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    Bears' Cutler not worried about contract

    Jay Cutler appears unaffected about the status of his contract as he approaches the final year of his current deal, his fifth as a Bear. “It's fine with me,” Cutler said, minutes after arriving early Wednesday night at Olivet Nazarene. “I haven't really talked about any of my contracts in my career, and I'm not going to start now. I'll play it out and however it's supposed to go it's going to work out.”

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    Chicago Bears general manager Phil Emery, left, and coach Marc Trestman listen to questions during an NFL football news conference on Wednesday, July 24, 2013, in Bourbonnais, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

    Emery: No Bears contracts addressed this year

    Bears general manager Phil Emery and new head coach Marc Trestman because their team is focused on the ultimate goal of winning a Super Bowl championship as players reported Wednesday afternoon to Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais for the start of training camp. “I prefer the focus to be on the field in the present tense, fully dialed in on this season and our efforts to win championships,” Emery said. “But it also is a reflection of where we are with the cap."

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    White Sox shortstop Alexei Ramirez could be one of any number of players who will not be on the roster heading into August.

    White Sox trade talk really heating up

    As the July 31 nonwaiver trade deadline draws closer, trade rumors involving White Sox players Jake Peavy, Alex Rios, Jesse Crain, Alexei Ramirez and Alejandro De Aza are heating up.

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    Chicago Cubs left fielder Alfonso Soriano leans against the front of the dugout as the Cubs were down to their final out against the Colorado Rockies in a baseball game in Denver on Sunday, July 21, 2013. The Rockies won 4-3. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

    Epstein: Soriano to take 2-3 days to think on trade

    It appears the Cubs have cleared a major hurdle in their efforts to trade left fielder Alfonso Soriano, and that is Soriano himself. Soriano has the right to veto any trade involing him, but he indicated Wednesday he'd be willing to go to the New York Yankees if the Cubs can work out a deal.

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    Boomers fall in 10 innings

    The Schaumburg Boomers dropped an extra inning game for the third time this season as the visiting Florence Freedom collected an 8-5 win on Wednesday.

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    Abbott, Bandits win 11-1

    Monica Abbott delivered another dominating performance Wedmesday against the visiting Comets, registering 12 strikeouts in guiding the Bandits to an 11-1 victory.

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    Baker, Cougars fall 5-1

    Chicago Cubs pitcher Scott Baker made his third rehab start for the Kane County Cougars on Wednesday at Pohlman Field, but it wasn’t a happy result as the Cougars fell 5-1 loss to the host Beloit Snappers.

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    Libertyville falls short in tournament semifinals

    Matt Reed’s puffy right elbow wasn’t the worst of it. Despite a second state berth in as many months, Reed and his Libertyville baseball teammates were stinging bad following a 4-1 loss to St. Rita in the semifinals of the Phil Lawler Summer Classic at Benedictine University in Lisle on Wednesday night.

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    St. Charles East drops heartbreaker at Lawler Classic

    With the way St. Charles East righty Kyle Cook and Lyons Township lefty Quinton Hughes were trading goose eggs in Wednesday’s Lawler Classic semifinal at Benedictine University, the outcome seemed destined to come down to one big play. Turns out there were two key plays, and neither one went the Saints’ way. Lyons Township capitalized on a pair of controversial calls — and some lights-out pitching from Hughes — to end the Saints’ summer season with a 1-0 victory.

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    Chicago White Sox's Alexei Ramirez swings on an RBI single off Detroit Tigers relief pitcher Bruce Rondon during the seventh inning of a baseball game Wednesday, July 24, 2013, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    White Sox fall again to Tigers, 6-2

    Prince Fielder, Austin Jackson and Torii Hunter homered, and Anibal Sanchez pitched six scoreless innings to help the Detroit Tigers overcome Miguel Cabrera’s absence in a 6-2 win over the White Sox on Wednesday night.

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    GEORGE LECLAIRE/gleclaire@dailyherald.com ¬ Chicago Bears' Jay Cutler after warmups in game against Arizona Cardinals' on Saturday, August 28th at Soldier Field in Chicago.

    Will Cutler mystery finally be solved?

    Bears players are reporting to training camp and new head coach Marc Trestman's primary assignment is to solve, for better or worse, the mystery that is Jay Cutler.

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    Delany echoes calls for changes to FBS

    Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany knows change is coming to the NCAA, major developments that will alter the landscape of college sports. He just wants to make sure it’s done right.

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    Blackhawks agree to 1-year deal with Winchester
    The Blackhawks have agreed to a one-year contract with forward Brad Winchester.Winchester has 37 goals and 31 assists over 390 NHL games with Edmonton, Dallas, St. Louis, Anaheim and San Jose. He had nine goals and 18 assists last season with the Milwaukee Admirals of the American Hockey League, a Nashville Predators affiliate.

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    Joe Kinney of Antioch won the 2013 Illinois Open Championship Wednesday after defeating amateur Dustin Korte and Carlos Sainz Jr. in a three-hole, total stroke playoff at The Glen Club in Glenview.

    Antioch’s Kinney wins llinois Open playoff

    There were lots of doubts about who would win the 64th Illinois Open during Wednesday’s final round at The Glen Club in Glenview. In fact, no one did. Antioch’s Joe Kinney, who’s been laboring on golf’s mini-tours, clearly showed who was best in the three-man three-hole cumulative score playoff that determined the champion, however.

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    This photo shows an artist rendering provided May 1, 2013 by the Chicago Cubs showing planned renovations at Wrigley Field. On Wednesday, the Chicago City Council aldermen are set voted to approve the proposed renovations at the historic ballpark.

    Bricks, ivy, Jumbotron: Wrigley gets $500M upgrade

    The Cubs, who have clung to the past the way ivy clings to Wrigley Field's outfield walls, won final approval Wednesday for a $500 million renovation project at the 99-year-old ballpark — including a massive Jumbotron like the ones towering over every other major league stadium. A voice vote in the City Council gave the team permission to move forward with plans that will dramatically change the ballpark experience on Chicago's north side.

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    New York Yankees' Alex Rodriguez flips his bat after striking out for the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders against the Louisville Bats in a baseball game Saturday, July 20, 2013, in Moosic, Pa. Rodriguez is on a rehab assignment with the RailRiders. (AP Photo/The Scranton Times-Tribune, Jason Farmer) WILKES-BARRE TIMES-LEADER OUT

    Rodriguez reports to Yanks’ minor league complex

    Alex Rodriguez reported back to the New York Yankees’ minor league complex Wednesday, three days after he was diagnosed with a strained left quadriceps on the final day of his injury rehabilitation assignment.Rodriguez, under investigation by Major League Baseball for his reported ties to a clinic accused of distributing banned performance-enhancing drugs, spent a little over four hours at the complex.

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    Washington Mystics' Crystal Langhorne (1) drives against Chicago Sky's Elena Delle Donne (11) during the second half of a WNBA basketball game at Verizon Center Wednesday, July 24, 2013 in Washington. The Mystics won 82-78. (AP Photo/The Washington Post, Katherine Frey) MANDATORY CREDIT; WASHINGTON TIMES OUT; NEW YORK TIMES OUT;THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER AND USA TODAY OUT; MAGS OUT; NO SALES

    Delle Donne suffers concussion in Sky loss

    Everything came crashing down for the Sky during the second half against the Washington Mystics, including star rookie Elena Delle Donne.The top All-Star vote-getter suffered a concussion in the Sky’s 82-78 loss Wednesday to the Mystics and is questionable for the All-Star game on Saturday.

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    Former SIU hoops star joins Loyola staff

    Bryan Mullins, a former standout player at Downers Grove South and Southern Illinois University, has been named director of men’s basketball operations at Loyola University Chicago.

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    Public money will help fund Red Wings' arena in broke Detroit

    A state board on Wednesday unanimously gave the go-ahead for a new Red Wings hockey arena in downtown Detroit to be paid for in part with tax dollars as the broke city works through bankruptcy proceedings. Gov. Rick Snyder and others defended against potential criticism that the $650 million project should be entirely financed with private money because the city can't provide basic services and its retirees are facing cuts in their pensions. The arena is designed to be a catalyst for more development and to link downtown with underutilized nearby areas, officials said.

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    New England coach Bill Belichick says the Patriots will learn from “this terrible experience,” and that it’s time for New England to “move forward” after that arrest of former Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez, above, on murder charges. Belichick made his remarks on Wednesday, four weeks after Hernandez was arrested.

    Pats’ Belichick breaks silence on Hernandez

    FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick broke his silence Wednesday four weeks after former Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez was charged with murder. Belichick says the Patriots will learn from “this terrible experience,” and that it’s time for New England to “move forward.”

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    Mike North video: Sky Star
    Mike North can't believe he's talking WNBA, but with a star like Elena Delle Donne on the Chicago Sky, why not? She is the first rookie ever to lead the all star voting.

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    Alfonso Soriano breaks his bat as he hits a slow groundball for an out in the first inning Tuesday in Arizona. There are rumblings that the Yankees are interested in trading for Soriano, who said, “It's nothing serious and nothing close.”

    Soriano discusses trade rumors to Yanks

    With all the talk of trades in the air, Alfonso Soriano was in the starting lineup for the Cubs Tuesday night in Arizona. Soriano has 10-and-5 rights and can veto any trade involving him. Reports of a trade for Soriano to the Yankees were labeled premature. “I saw the news and got surprised,” Soriano was quoted as saying. “My agent told me the Yankees just called, but it's nothing serious and it's nothing close."

Business

  •  
    Caterpillar says its second-quarter profit fell 43 percent as dealers cut inventories more than it had anticipated and the company cut its profit and revenue outlook for the year.

    Caterpillar 2Q profit falls 43 pct; cuts outlook

    Caterpillar says its second-quarter profit fell 43 percent as dealers cut inventories more than it had anticipated and the company cut its profit and revenue outlook for the year. The world's largest maker of construction and mining equipment is reporting earnings of $960 million, or $1.45 per share, compared with $1.7 billion, or $2.54 per share a year ago. Revenue slid 15.8 percent to $14.63 billion.

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    BBB warns seniors of medical alert phone scam

    The Better Business Bureau is warning senior citizens about a phone scam promising them a free medical alert system. The agency says the automated calls claim that someone has ordered the senior a medical alert system to help protect them in case of medical emergencies or break-ins.

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    AAR modifies 2 Boeing 737s for U.S. Marshals Service

    The U.S. Marshals Service has signed a purchase commitment with AAR Corp. for two Boeing 737-400 aircraft for delivery in September.

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    Natural gas spewing from the Hercules 265 drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana, Tuesday, July 23, 2013. No injuries were reported in the midmorning blowout, about 55 miles off the Louisiana coast in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Owner of burning Gulf rig considers relief well

    The owner of a drilling rig that’s ablaze in the Gulf of Mexico says it may drill a relief well as part of a plan to control the natural gas well that blew wild. A news release from Hercules Offshore Inc. says the relief well is among the options being considered. It says it’s also trying to find out why the well blew and then caught fire, but its first focus is cutting off the flow of natural gas.

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    Customers receive store gift cards as the doors open for Wednesday’s grand opening of Macy’s in Gurnee Mills. The first 300 customers received a gift card.

    Macy’s now officially open at Gurnee Mills

    Macy’s has made its long-awaited debut at Gurnee Mills and is receiving high marks from some shoppers. At least a couple hundred customers were in line for a ribbon-cutting ceremony for Wednesday morning’s grand opening. Gurnee Mayor Kristina Kovarik, village board trustees and other dignitaries attended the festivities.

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    Grim Caterpillar outlook tugs stocks mostly lower

    A gloomy outlook from Caterpillar, the world’s largest construction equipment company, tugged the stock market lower Wednesday. The meager drop gave the stock market two consecutive days of losses, the first time that’s happened all month. Caterpillar’s earnings fell 43 percent in the second quarter as China’s economy slowed and commodity prices sank. The company also warned of slowing revenue and profit, and its stock dropped $2.08, or 2 percent, to $83.44.

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    The federal government has awarded a $65 million grant for runway construction as part of the massive project to modernize Chicago's O'Hare International Airport.

    O'Hare modernization work gets $65 million grant

    The federal government has awarded a $65 million grant for runway construction as part of the massive project to modernize Chicago's O'Hare International Airport. U.S. Rep. Mike Quigley announced the grant Tuesday. Quigley sits on a House subcommittee on transportation.

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    President Barack Obama speaks about the economy, Wednesdayat Knox College in Galesburg.

    Obama: Washington took its eye off economic ball

    President Barack Obama said Wednesday that Washington has "taken its eye off the ball" as he pledged a stronger second-term commitment to tackling the economic woes that strain many in the middle class nearly five years after the country plunged into a recession.

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    Chicago’s City Council approved $500 million renovation of historic Wrigley Field that includes its first massive Jumbotron, improved facilities for the players in the bowels of the 99-year-old ballpark and a hotel across the street.

    Chicago City Council approves $500 million Wrigley Field renovations

    Chicago’s City Council gave final approval Wednesday to a $500 million renovation of historic Wrigley Field that includes its first massive Jumbotron, improved facilities for the players in the bowels of the 99-year-old ballpark and a hotel across the street. Under the plan, the Cubs would erect a 5,700-square-foot electronic Jumbotron in left field above the ivy-covered outfield walls that is roughly three times as large as the iconic manual scoreboard in center field, as well as another large advertising sign in right field.

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    Napersoft names new marketing executive

    Naperville’s Napersoft has named David Hinrichsen as the company’s vice president of sales & marketing. Hinrichsen brings more than 30 years of experience in the software industry to Napersoft. He began his career at SPSS, a worldwide provider of predictive analytics software and solutions.

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    Shareholders approve CNH Global merger with Fiat Industrial

    Shareholders of Burr Ridge’s CNH Global N.V. approved the merger between Fiat Industrial S.p.A. and CNH Global N.V. into a newly established company to be named CNH Industrial N.V. Subject to the closing of the transaction, CNH shareholders will receive 3.828 common shares of CNH Industrial for each CNH Global share they hold at the time of the merger.

  •  

    OfficeMax CFO resigns, replacement named

    Naperville-based OfficeMax Inc. announced Bruce Besanko, executive vice president and chief financial officer, will leave the company to become the executive vice president and chief financial officer of SuperValu Inc.His last day at OfficeMax will be August 6.

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    Innovation Group to move call center to Rolling Meadows

    The Innovation Group plc said it will relocate call center operations, which primarily provide first notice of loss service, from Springfield, Mass. to its North American headquarters in Rolling Meadows.

  •  
    Chicago-based Boeing posted a bigger-than-expected second-quarter profit as it ramped up deliveries of commercial planes like its 737 and 787.

    Boeing 2Q profit tops expectations; boosts outlook

    Chicago-based Boeing posted a bigger-than-expected second-quarter profit as it ramped up deliveries of commercial planes like its 737 and 787. Boeing’s net income rose 13 percent to $1.09 billion, or $1.41 per share. During the same period last year it earned $967 million, or $1.27 per share. Revenue rose 9 percent to $21.82 billion.

  •  
    Associated Press In this Aug. 17, 2011 photo, President Barack Obama huddles with the Galesburg High School football team in Galesburg during a three-day economic bus tour.

    Obama keeps returning to layoffs-plagued Galesburg
    Ever since his first campaign for U.S. Senate, President Barack Obama has been returning to Galesburg — a small Illinois town where household incomes still lag far behind the statewide average nearly a decade after a major factory closure.

  •  
    A federal plan for keeping hungry Asian carp from reaching the valuable fish populations of the Great Lakes calls for reinforcing electrical and other barriers currently in place.

    Feds update plan to protect Great Lakes from carp

    A federal plan for keeping hungry Asian carp from reaching the valuable fish populations of the Great Lakes calls for reinforcing electrical and other barriers currently in place and for field-testing other methods, including the use of water guns and hormonal fish love potions.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Frequent watering needed to keep plants in baskets and containers alive may strip the soil of its nutrients, requiring a dose of water-soluble fertilizer.

    Containers, baskets may need a fertilizer boost

    If the plants in your containers or baskets are looking stunted or have leaves that are yellowing, they may need supplemental fertilizer. The frequent watering required for containers and baskets can leach nutrients out of the growing medium. Use a water-soluble fertilizer as needed to perk them up.

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    There will be plenty of fresh corn to eat at the annual Sugar Grove Corn Boil.

    Weekend picks: Fill your belly at Sugar Grove Corn Boil

    Come hungry and ready to listen to music at the annual Sugar Grove Corn Boil this weekend. The famed Budweiser Clydesdales will make an appearance Friday night at the MB Financial Park in Rosemont. The FIXX and Wang Chung perform radio hits like “One Thing Leads to Another,” “Saved by Zero” and more Friday at the Arcada Theatre in St. Charles.

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    Aged rib-eyes helped earn Ruth’s Chris Steak House a mention on Yahoo’s list of top five steakhouses in the U.S.

    Chicago Cut, Ruth’s Chris named top steakhouses in U.S.

    Ruth’s Chris Steak House and Chicago Cut Steakhouse have been picked as Top 5 Steakhouses in America by Yahoo! Finance. The list was compiled by chef Allison Fishman-Task, host of “Blue Ribbon Hunter” on Yahoo!

  •  
    Guy Clark, “My Favorite Picture of You”

    Guy Clark returns with powerful album

    On the cover of the album “My Favorite Picture of You,” veteran singer-songwriter Guy Clark holds an old Polaroid snapshot of his wife, Susanna, who died in 2012. The photo captures a fierce look on Susanna Clark’s face, her arms crossed. As the title song explains, she was upset and considering leaving because of her husband’s behavior. The song is a tribute, in Clark’s concisely poetic fashion, as he notes lovingly in his sweetly gruff voice that his wife was “a stand-up angel who won’t back down.”

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    Preservation Hall Jazz Band, “That’s It!”

    Preservation Hall shines on 1st album in 50 years

    With high-profile collaborations at Bonnaroo (Jack Johnson) and the Grammys (The Black Keys), the Preservation Hall Jazz Band has been reaching out to a wider audience. “That’s It!,” co-produced by Jim James of the indie rock band My Morning Jacket, continues this trend as the first album of entirely new compositions in PHJB’s 50-plus-year history.

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    The best complement for eggplant is some combination of sweet, salty and tangy, like in this caponata with raisins, nuts and capers.

    How to: Eggplant done right

    Generally, vegetables (especially ones with a reputation for being vile) do not benefit from overcooking — think fetid brussels sprouts, gray peas, floppy asparagus. Eggplant is the opposite: Its unpleasantness is directly correlated with how undercooked it is. "I would rather go hungry than eat a grill-marked yet stiff slice of eggplant," writes Slate's L.V. Anderson.

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    Country music artist Jerrod Niemann will be the headline performer Friday, Aug. 30, during the Naperville Jaycees Last Fling festival in downtown Naperville.

    Last Fling adds country music star Jerrod Niemann

    Country music artist Jerrod Niemann will be the headliner Friday, Aug. 30, during the Naperville Jaycees Last Fling celebration over Labor Day weekend in downtown Naperville.

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    Jim Rash hosts Sundance Channel's "The Writers' Room."

    TV Writing 101: ‘Community’ star hosts new show about ... shows

    When Jim Rash isn’t busy donning crazy costumes and tormenting Jeff Winger as Dean Pelton on NBC’s “Community,” he’s a screenwriter of family dramedies like this summer’s “The Way, Way Back.” It’s that second job that makes him an apt host for a new joint venture from Entertainment Weekly and the Sundance Channel. “The Writers’ Room,” Rash’s half-hour talk show that premieres at 9 p.m. Monday on Sundance, examines a popular TV show each week with its writers and stars.

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    Noah Wright of Wheaton hands in his answer to Donna Breckenridge of Pub Trivia U.S.A. during Tuesday night trivia night at Warren's Ale House in Wheaton.

    Trivia nights liven up suburban bars

    Trivia nights are popular draws at suburban bars, often livening up slower nights with a mix of questions, answers and comic comebacks. Jerry Hernandez, owner of Warren's Ale House in Wheaton and Ellyn's Tap and Grill in Glen Ellyn, hired Pub Trivia U.S.A. a few years ago to help get people in the door. “People come in every Wednesday just because (trivia night) has grown so much,” Hernandez said.

  •  
    “Downfall” by Jeff Abbott

    ‘Downfall’ is ‘must read’ for action-thriller fans

    A chance encounter with a woman in a bar thrusts Sam Capra into the deadliest and scariest mission yet in Jeff Abbott’s new thriller, “Downfall.” Capra is an ex-CIA agent. One night in San Francisco, two men chase a woman into his bar. Capra defends the woman — and himself. Both men are killed. Soon Capra’s face is plastered on the front page of newspapers, and a man named Belias decides Capra is worth investigating.

  •  
    “Stars Dance” by Selena Gomez

    Selena Gomez mundane on ‘Stars Dance’

    Selena Gomez has gone into a studio and recorded her new album, “Stars Dance,” which consists of 11 pop songs she didn’t pen herself backed by instruments she isn’t playing. It might be fun for the causal young summertime listener. But it begs the important question: Why bother? Artistically, there’s very little Selena Gomez here.

  •  
    Artisanship meets whimsy in Antoine Shapira’s two-door Brazilian rosewood lacquered cabinet.

    Right at home: Crisp geometrics shape decor

    Quadrilaterals, cubes, polyhedrons ... sound like 10th-grade math class? Perhaps, but they’re also examples of one of this fall’s biggest trends in home decor. Crisp, contemporary and pleasing to the eye, geometrics work well for tables, lighting, accessories and soft furnishings.

  •  
    Britain’s Prince William and Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, hold the Prince of Cambridge, as they pose for photographers outside St. Mary’s Hospital exclusive Lindo Wing in London. Even the royal couple may face unwanted advice from well-wishers.

    Avoid what-not-to-say moments with new parents

    Your sex life will never be the same. In my day. What, not breast-feeding? From diet tips to “little baby, little problems,” sleep-deprived and super-stressed new parents have heard it all. And they want you to stop it. As Britain’s Prince William and his wife, Kate, move along on their parenting journey, they will probably hear it, too. Most every new parent has a greatest hits of lame advice and annoying remarks.

  •  
    Enjoy grilled bread and tomato salad at your next picnic, be it in your own backyard or your favorite park. See recipes for more picnic fare on Page 2.

    Easy-to-eat salads, sandwiches make a picnic perfect

    Picnics should be about cool, lighter fare — foods like sandwiches and salads that are easy to eat whether you’re perched on a wobbly wooden table in a forest preserve or balancing a plate on your lap at an outdoor concert.

  •  
    Diners eat at picnic tables with colorful umbrellas at Brooklyn Crab in Red Hook, a popular seafood eatery in a working-class industrial neighborhood in New York City’s Brooklyn borough. The restaurant offers a view of the Brooklyn waterfront.

    Go for the food: Brooklyn Crab in NYC’s Red Hook

    In the last 40 years, Brooklyn has evolved from a joke to the ’hood to a brand. The working-class industrial neighborhood of Red Hook has been part of that transformation, with shopping, restaurants and waterfront parks drawing visitors. One of Red Hook’s most popular eateries is Brooklyn Crab. Its open-air, three-story building offers a friendly, funky bar at street level; picnic tables with colorful umbrellas up one flight; and a roof deck with a view of the Statue of Liberty. The backyard has a minigolf course.

  •  
    Enjoy grilled bread and tomato salad hot off the grate, or let the components cool and assemble at your favorite picnic spot.

    Grilled Bread and Tomato Salad
    Grilled Bread and Tomato Salad

  •  
    Lemony Pasta Salad gets a protein boost from albacore tuna.

    Lemony Pasta Salad
    Lemony Pasta Salad

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    When making a sandwich, like this pressed Italian loaf, ahead of time, be sure moist ingredients do not touch the bread or it will get soggy.

    Do-ahead picnic sandwich feeds a crowd

    Alison Ladman's Overnight Pressed Picnic Sandwich starts with a loaf of oblong Italian bread, but pretty much any shape and variety will work so long as the bread isn't crumbly. And while we used pesto as our moisture barrier, mayonnaise or a cheese spread would work fine, too.

  •  
    Cool off with a Dark Island Cooler.

    Dark Island Cooler
    Dark Island Cooler

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    Relax with homemade wine coolers, like a Watermelon Bellini, front, or a Rose Tinted Glasses.

    Rose Tinted Glasses
    Rose Tinted Glasses

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    Relax with homemade wine coolers, like a Watermelon Bellini, front, or a Dark Island Cooler.

    Watermelon Bellini
    Watermelon Bellini

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    White Chiller wine cooler

    White Chiller
    White Chiller

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    Cool off with a Dark Island Cooler.

    Chill out with do-it-yourself summer wine coolers

    The wine cooler has a bit of an identity problem. Is it a wine spritzer? A wine cocktail? Sangria? And what about that wild child moment in the '80s when it was the hottest thing on the party scene? Luckily, this cocktail conundrum is easily solved. As Gertrude Stein might put it, wine cooler is wine spritzer is wine cocktail is sangria. And the versions being whipped up today have nothing in common with the cheap, mass-produced products of 30 years ago.

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    Models walk the runway during the Dolores Cortes show at the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Swim show in Miami Beach, Fla.

    Latest swimwear trends have wild side this season

    Welcome to the jungle. The latest swimwear trends have a wild side this season, with animal and tropical foliage prints seen on the runways at the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Swim 2014 at the Raleigh Hotel in Miami Beach. Orange made a splash at the Cia.Maritima (now CM) and Nanette Lepore shows. And the must-have accessory this season is a bold necklace.

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    Miss Illinois 2012 Ashley Hooks will host a fundraiser for Bright Pink July 26 at Saranello’s restaurant in Wheeling.

    From the food editor: Suburban eateries cited for stellar wine lists

    Wine Spectator magazine bestowed honors on a few dozen suburban restaurants for their stellar wine lists. Fine dining spots, tony steakhouses, Italian classics and casual bistros made the cut.

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    Mediterranean Bean Salad
    Mediterranean Bean Salad

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    Yes, bruschetta is a lovely summer appetizer, but it’s just too messy for a picnic. So toss the traditional ingredients with couscous for a yummy, spoon-friendly salad.

    Bruschetta Couscous Salad
    Bruschetta Couscous Salad

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    When making a sandwich, like this pressed Italian loaf, ahead of time, be sure moist ingredients do not touch the bread or it will get soggy.

    Overnight Pressed Picnic Sandwich
    Overnight Pressed Picnic Sandwich

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    Albarino Terras Gauda “Abadia de San Campio” Rias Baixas, Galicia, Spain 2012

    Good wine: Salad and wine can be a perfect pairing

    With our new generation of salads and salad-lovers, wine can be a delicious “do,” says Good Wine writer Mary Ross. Look for low-alcohol wines and wines from cool regions. Also, the adage “white wine with fish, red wine with meat” holds true on the salad plate she says.

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    Frugal living: Tips for cleaning grease and wax

    Frugal Living's Sara Noel has tips for making chocolate-covered toffee and cleaning that gunky grease off your stove, hood and under cabinets.

Discuss

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    Ken Bouche, Schaumburg interim police chief

    Editorial: What Schaumburg’s police crisis can teach others

    A Daily Herald editorial says all suburban police departments can benefit from a careful study of the findings of a report on issues in the Schaumburg Police Department related to the arrests of three officers on corruption charges.

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    Editorial: What Schaumburg’s police crisis can teach others

    A Daily Herald editorial says all suburban police departments can benefit from a careful study of the findings of a report on issues in the Schaumburg Police Department related to the arrests of three officers on corruption charges.

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    Doubling down on double standards

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: Perhaps the next step in this evolutionary process is not to make women more like men to neutralize the double standard but to place more women in public office, the better to demonstrate the behaviors necessary to maintaining a civil society.

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    Hispanics now sit squarely in a difficult conversation

    Columnist Ruben Navarrette: Now that the George Zimmerman murder trial is over, let’s hope we’ve heard the last of the awkward term “white Hispanic.” For the most part, it is a media concoction that has only served to stir resentment from both whites and Hispanics. Welcome to multicultural America, circa 2013, where you can’t tell the players without a program.

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    No ‘good science’ for macroevolution
    A Grayslake letter to the editor: These are just a few of the more than 25 lies used to provide “evidence” for macroevolution in the textbooks. Why is the idea so fragile that it must be protected from both truth and questioning as an authentic idea in science?

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    Religious dogma has no place today
    A Schaumburg letter to the editor: God gave each of us a conscience to bear witness to ourselves. Or are we just ignoring all of God’s words that don’t conveniently fit our world view?

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    Where’s the integrity in college football?
    A Rolling Meadows letter to the editor: Why didn’t Notre Dame let coach Brian Kelly coach that last game with his players? He left just days before the bowl game.

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    Today’s kids have it made
    A Elk Grove Village letter to the editor: Back in the day ... if you wanted to watch a show you’d have to wait until the neighbors had their weekly Friday night fight. To see a TV program you’d be lucky to find two receivers in the entire neighborhood. We had to go to my Uncle Mike’s to watch on his 7-inch fishbowl screen. If you wanted to watch anything but a White Sox game you’d “git yer arm broke!”

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    Some things just don’t change
    A letter to the editor: In the July 16 Daily Herald Sports section, Page 2, was the headline, “Cubs: Still some rebuilding to be done.” When I was a young boy learning to read, my dad and I would practice my skills by reading the newspaper sports section together.

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    Flags are in honor of fallen local soldier
    A Wildwood letter to the editor: When people walk or drive through the Wildwood area they notice the American flags on the street sign posts, and many believe that the Wildwood Home Owners Association or Warren Township placed them there for the Fourth of July holiday. Let me tell you the true story.

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    Why have trial if you oppose its outcome?
    A Wayne letter to the editor: A lot has been said and yet to be said about the verdict in the Zimmerman/Martin trial. The facts are a jury of six, all women, five of the white race and one Hispanic were chosen. That is our “system,” and there were only six because Florida law requires 12 jurors only for capital crimes.

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    Thinking Illinois might be doomed
    A Naperville letter to the editor: Illinois has one of the highest business tax rates in the nation, one of the highest income tax rates in the nation, the highest gas tax rates in the nation, one of the highest sales tax rates in the nation, and, on average, one of the highest real estate tax rates in the nation.

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    A better fireworks show in Roselle
    A Geneva letter to the editor: Maybe the good citizens of Roselle could have had an even more spectacular display if it was not for the machinations of the politicians running the City of Roses. The good mayor can well thank the volunteers and private donations made to the city to have the “mad bomber” light up the sky.

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