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Daily Archive : Tuesday July 23, 2013

News

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    Naperville Deputy Police Chief John Gustin answers a question Tuesday night during the DuPage County NAACP meeting titled “Where do we go from here?” at the Harold and Eva White Activities Center at North Central College in Naperville. On the left is education consultant Lourdes Ferrer, and on the right is the Rev. Theresa Dear, a national board member of the NAACP.

    NAACP event in Naperville provides frank talk on race

    Members of the DuPage County branch of the NAACP hoped to jump-start a "courageous conversation" about race by hosting a town hall-style event Tuesday night at Naperville's North Central College. The session, titled “Where do we go from here?”, was inspired by the reaction to the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the Trayvon Martin murder case.

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    Retired Chicago police officer, William Foley, rehearses with the Chicago Police Department Pipes and Drums band before performing at the Arlington Heights Irish Fest Saturday, July 27. The group consists of current and retired Chicago police officers.

    Irish Fest returns to Arlington Hts.

    Situated in the historic district of Arlington Heights, the Historical Museum’s Irish Fest boasts two days packed with Irish dancing, heritage, fun and food.

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    Palatine High School teaching assistant Kimberly Grauer’s father Chuck, who lost his battle with liver disease, was the inspiration for the start of her journey to fight the disease. She promised him she would “finish Boston,” and that has led to many other opportunities.

    Palatine teaching assistant races to honor father

    The Boston Marathon bombing has changed the life of Palatine High School teaching assistant Kimberly Grauer. She had made a promise to her dying father to “finish Boston.” The bombing drew additional attention to her message spreading the word about the fight against liver cancer. "I never in my wildest dreams thought that everyone would know dad’s story," she said.

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    Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick has volunteered with Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn in Chicago to pay up on their Stanley Cup championship bet. Donning smocks, the two sorted pears at the Greater Chicago Food Depository on Tuesday. Patrick and Quinn had bet on the National Hockey League finals featuring the Blackhawks and the Boston Bruins. If the Bruins won, Quinn would have volunteered at the Greater Boston Food Bank.

    Mass. governor makes good on Hawks wager

    Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick has volunteered with Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn in Chicago to pay up on their Stanley Cup championship bet. Donning smocks, the two sorted pears at the Greater Chicago Food Depository on Tuesday.

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    Rolling Meadows will condemn the land behind the Brookwood Condominiums if the community's residents don't agree on a flood prevention project. The land in question is located along the tree line hiding a creek bed.

    Rolling Meadows might condemn land for flood prevention

    Rolling Meadows will condemn an easement on 35 feet of land behind a condominium complex if the community's residents don't agree on a flood prevention project, the city council decided Tuesday.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn

    Quinn signs law ending pension, health benefits for future transit boards

    On the heels of the ongoing Metra scandal, Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation that would take state health insurance and pension benefits away from future members of transit boards. The plan, written by state Rep. Jack Franks of Marengo and Dan Duffy of Lake Barrington, applies to Metra, the RTA, PACE and the CTA. “I could tell they were going to screw up again,” Franks said of Metra.

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    Chicago Alderman Joe Moore

    Chicago alderman to be honored by White House

    A Chicago alderman is being honored by President Barack Obama in Washington, a day after he acknowledged he'd been questioned by the FBI in an ethics case. Joe Moore will be recognized Tuesday as part of the president's Winning the Future Initiative, which throws a spotlight on people and organizations whose accomplishments positively impact communities.

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    The Prince of Cambridge, who was born on Monday, is carried in Princess Kate’s arms into public view for the first time Tuesday outside the Lindo Wing of St. Mary’s Hospital in London.

    Behold the young prince of Cambridge

    A beaming Prince William and his wife, Kate, emerged from a London hospital on Tuesday with their newborn baby boy, presenting the world with a first glimpse of the prince who is third in line to the British throne. The royal couple, both 31, looked happy and relaxed as they waved at the crowds of journalists and onlookers gathered outside London’s St. Mary’s Hospital. “It’s very emotional. It’s...

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    Robert Sauceda

    Lauzen throws support to political ally for animal control job, again

    Robert Sauceda’s days on the payroll in Kane County’s Animal Control agency may not be numbered if County Board Chairman Chris Lauzen has anything to say about it. In an interview, Lauzen said the agency needs an effective administrator, not a veterinarian. And if bringing in revenue and paying the bills is the top job of any administrator, then Sauceda has already shown he’s...

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    Bicyclist pleads guilty to manslaughter in Calif.

    A bicyclist pleaded guilty to vehicular manslaughter after running down a 71-year-old pedestrian in what San Francisco's top prosecutor said Tuesday appeared to be the first such conviction of its kind in the nation.

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    A Discover logo in the window at the entrance of a shop in Cambridge, Mass.

    Discover Financial’s profit jumps 13 percent

    The Riverwoods-based credit card issuer and lender said Tuesday that sales volume for its namesake credit card grew 4 percent to $27.6 billion in the April-June period. Credit card loans rose 5 percent to $49.8 billion. David Nelms, Discover’s chairman and CEO, told Wall Street analysts during a conference call that card loan growth during the quarter was at the high end of what the company...

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    Brian Townsend

    Schaumburg formally hires Townsend as new manager

    Schaumburg trustees Tuesday approved Brian Townsend as their new village manager, welcoming him back to where he spent seven years as assistant village manager before eight as city administrator of St. Charles. “The board has made a good choice,” retiring manager Ken Fritz said of his successor and former assistant. For me, there’s not another position I’d rather have right now,” Townsend said.

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    The Transportation for Illinois Coalition wants to raise more money from gasoline taxes to help maintain the state’s roads and bridges.

    Business coalition: Raise gas taxes for road repairs

    A coalition of business and labor groups wants to raise more money from gasoline taxes and vehicle fees to pay for the immense costs of keeping Illinois’ roads from crumbling. The result could be higher prices at the pump by more than 13 cents per gallon. “The long and short of it is: We need more money,” a coalition leader said.

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    Fire destroys garage, shed in Round Lake Beach

    Two garages and a shed were damaged in a fire in Round Lake Beach Tuesday afternoon.

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    Massachusetts State Police Sgt. Sean Murphy, right, a tactical photographer, and his son Connor Patrick Murphy, arrive at State Police Headquarters for his hearing Tuesday to determine his duty status after he released images of the arrest of the Boston Marathon bombing suspect, in Framingham, Mass.

    Cop who leaked bombing suspect photos disciplined

    A state police photographer who released photos of the bloodied Boston Marathon bombing suspect during his capture was placed on restricted duty Tuesday.

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    Chris Lauzen

    Metra vacancy has Kane County chairman wondering how to fill it

    Kane County Board Chairman Chris Lauzen said he’s not sure what to do in the wake of Mike McCoy resigning as the county’s representative on the Metra board. Given the latest scandal, Lauzen said he’s not sure who would want the job, or who would be qualified. He speculated a lawyer or investigator might be the best qualified candidate now.

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    Coyote drags 2-year-old girl

    CYPRESS, Calif. — A 2-year-old girl is recovering after she was bitten and dragged by a coyote at a Southern California cemetery.The Orange County Register reports Klarissa Barrera, of Long Beach, was given a rabies shot and treated for a 2 1/2-inch gash on her calf.

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    CDC: 250 in 6 states have unidentified stomach bug

    More than 250 people in at least six states have come down with a stomach bug that could be linked to foodborne illness.

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    Marlboro cigarettes are on display in a CVS store in Pittsburgh. Altria reported quarterly earnings on Tuesday.

    FDA: Menthol cigarettes likely pose health risk

    The FDA evaluation concluded that there is little evidence to suggest that menthol cigarettes are more or less toxic or contribute to more disease risk to smokers than regular cigarettes. However, there is adequate data to suggest that menthol use is likely associated with increased smoking initiation by younger people and that menthol smokers have a harder time quitting, the review said.

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    Starbucks jumping into Greek yogurt craze

    The Seattle-based coffee chain says it’s teaming up with French food and drink company Danone to sell Greek yogurt.

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    Downtown Elgin food store co-op still in the works

    Efforts to establish a food store cooperative in downtown Elgin are moving forward, though not as fast as its supporters initially hoped.

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    Bourbon brands offering up special blend

    Kentucky’s renowned bourbon brands are offering up a bit of their whiskeys for a special blend to benefit efforts to find a cure for Lou Gehrig’s disease.

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    Peter Breen

    Lombard trustee eyes House primary bid

    Lombard village Trustee Peter Breen Tuesday announced a Republican primary bid for the Illinois House that pits him against veteran state Rep. Sandra Pihos of Glen Ellyn.

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    James N. Trelford

    Libertyville man charged in bomb threat at Vernon Hills festival

    A man who threatened to blow up three bombs Saturday night at the Vernon Hills Summer Celebration festival, remained jailed on Tuesday. According to police, James N. Trelford said there were no bombs but he was mad because a woman he met at the festival didn't like him.

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    The Carol Stream Park District is considering whether to allow the sale of alcohol at its concession stand at McCaslin Park. Officials are also considering allowing alcohol sales during rental events at the new Fountain View Recreation Center.

    Carol Stream Park District ponders alcohol sales

    Carol Stream Park District officials are considering allowing alcohol sales during paid rental events at the new Fountain View Recreation Center and during adult softball tournaments at McCaslin Park. Residents interested in renting out rooms at the new recreation center, which is expected to open Labor Day weekend, have already been contacting the park district to inquire if alcohol will be...

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    Antioch officials have authorized incentives for an unnamed company that would become the first user in the Antioch Corporate Center. It has been empty since it opened five years ago.

    Antioch officials ready to offer incentives for company expansion

    Antioch officials have authorized incentives for an unnamed company that would become the first user in the Antioch Corporate Center, which has been empty since it opened five years ago. Three other sites, including another in Lake County and two in Wisconsin, also are in the running for the business that would create new 300 jobs.

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    Fidel W. Garcia

    Elgin man arrested after storage unit search turns up marijuana

    A 31-year-old man is charged after nearly two pounds of marijuana were found in a storage locker in Elgin in August 2012. Fidel W. Garcia, of the 0-99 block of Jefferson Avenue, Elgin, was arrested Monday and faces up to seven years in prison on the possession with intent to deliver charge. Garcia has minor drug offenses on his record, but spent time in jail for at least 12 arrests for drving...

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    A section of a rock formation known as The Wave in the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in Arizona. A hiker visiting The Wave died of cardiac arrest Tuesday.

    Hiker dies on trek to ‘Wave’ in Arizona-Utah desert

    The latest death led to further questions about the lottery system that makes it hard to win one of only 20 permits issued a day for the hike that starts in Utah before reaching The Wave in Arizona. More than 48,000 people applied last year for 7,300 available hiking permits, officials said.

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    Associated Press Kate O’Brian, former Senior Vice President, News Gathering, ABC News, and now president of Al Jazeera America.

    Al-Jazeera America plans live programming 24/7

    Al-Jazeera America’s incoming president said Tuesday that people interested in news will get live programming whenever they tune in, even in the middle of the night on a weekend.

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    Lake Zurich chamber breakfast:

    Lake Zurich Area Chamber of Commerce hosts the annual Breakfast with the Villages from 7 to 9 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 1, at Kemper Lakes Golf Club on Old McHenry Road in Hawthorn Woods.

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    Out to Lunch music lineup:

    MainStreet Libertyville’s Out to Lunch musical lineup in August will feature Rhythm Bureau on Aug. 2, Keeghan on Aug. 9 and The Mojo Daddies to end the season on Aug. 16.

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    Medical alert packets available:

    Yellow Dot program packets are available 24 hours at the Vernon Hills police department, 740 Lakeview Parkway. The program launched in late 2011 by the Illinois Department of Transporation alerts first responders of a driver or passenger’s medical condition.

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    Search & rescue officer David Vanbuskirk

    Officer killed during rescue of hiker near Vegas

    Associated PressLAS VEGAS — A Las Vegas police officer who was rescuing a hiker stranded in an off-limits area of a mountain northwest of the city died after falling from a helicopter hoist line Monday night.

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    Round Lake to remove, replace 500 diseased ash trees

    Round Lake is losing the fight against the destructive emerald ash borer and officials say they are preparing to remove and replace hundreds of diseased trees. The village board recently approved $91,000 for an urban forest management fund — most to be used to target 500 blighted ash trees.

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    The Punjabi Cultural Society of Chicago will hold its 19th annual Punjabi Sports Festival this Saturday in Palatine. The festival features athletic competitions and free samples of Punjabi cuisine.

    Palatine to host 19th annual Punjabi Sports Festival

    The Punjabi Cultural Society of Chicago will hold its 19th annual Sports Festival this Saturday in Palatine. The event, open to the entire community, aims to encourage youngsters to maintain a healthy lifestyle while promoting Punjabi culture.

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    Lombard seeks volunteers to serve on commissions

    Lombard officials are looking for interested residents to fill vacancies on committees and commissions of the village board, officials said Tuesday. There are immediate openings on several panels, including two spots on the economic and community development committee, one on the finance committee, one on the liquor commission and two on the historical commission.

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    W. Dundee water main break means lane closing on Rt. 72

    A water main break that took place Monday night in West Dundee on Route 72, means a portion of that road will be closed between Thursday and the following Monday, officials said. “It’s a slow leak, it’s not like it’s a safety issue,” Village Manager Joe Cavallaro said.

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    Ted Stec

    District 44 picks assistant superintendent

    A veteran educator and administrator, Ted Stec, has been named assistant superintendent of finance and operations in Lombard Elementary District 44, officials said Tuesday. Stec, who assumed his duties July 1, comes with 12 years of experience in education, including stints with Burbank School District 111 and Argo High School District 217.

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    Shane Mercer points to a photo of his father, Airman Will Small, as his mother Alecia Mercer looks on at their home in Kinston, N.C. Small, whose organs were donated to four patients after he died, had at least two untreated raccoon bites several months before he became sick, and tests confirm his rabies-infected kidney led to a recipient’s death.

    Study: Organ donor with rabies had two raccoon bites

    It was just the third documented transmission of rabies through a solid organ transplant, the report says.

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    Court: Passport law on Jerusalem unconstitutional

    Judge says the passport law “runs headlong into a carefully calibrated and longstanding executive branch policy of neutrality toward Jerusalem.”

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    Associated Press/July 18, 2013, from Univision Jennifer Lopez and Pitbull perform during the awards for “Premios Juventud” held at the BankUnited Center at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. For the first time, the Spanish-language Univision network will have a larger audience than its English counterparts for a full month in the youthful demographic that television advertisers are most eager to reach.

    Univision sets TV ratings milestone

    It’s a big month at Univision. For the first time, the Spanish-language television network has reached a larger prime time audience than ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox for a full month in the youthful demographic that advertisers are keen to reach.

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    Associated Press/Feb. 16, 2002 A barred owl in Calais, Vt.

    Feds advance plan to kill barred owls

    “If we don’t manage barred owls, the probability of recovering the spotted owl goes down significantly,” said Paul Henson, Oregon state supervisor for Fish and Wildlife.

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    ECC collecting school supplies for area students

    Last year the line formed at 3 a.m. for Elgin Community College’s school supply giveaway, which officially started at 10 a.m. By then about 4,000 people were waiting for the chance at backpacks filled with school supplies for their children. “It’s very bittersweet for us,” said Katie Storey, ECC’s student life coordinator. Organizers distributed more than 2,200 backpacks, but the event...

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    Deontae Johnson

    Warrenville men face heroin charges after home searched

    Two Warrenville brothers have been arrested on heroin-dealing charges following an “extensive investigation” by Wheaton police, authorities announced Tuesday. Deontae Johnson, 18, and Dominique Johnson, 21, were charged after police executed a search warrant June 21 at their home on the 3S600 block of Melcher Avenue.

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    Gun turn-in collects 33 unwanted weapons

    Thirty-three guns were received during a Gun Turn In event hosted Saturday by Church of the Holy Spirit in Schaumburg. Church pastor the Rev. John Dearhammer was inspired to hold the event by last December’s school shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut last December.

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    Sponsors sign on for Roosevelt golf outing

    Two major sponsors have signed up for Roosevelt University’s 20th Annual Scholarship Golf Outing, which will be held Monday, Aug. 12 at the Schaumburg Golf Club & Academy. Proceeds from the outing will be used to support scholarships for deserving students at Roosevelt’s Schaumburg campus.

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    Barrington Sidewalk Sale Days, July 25-27

    The Barrington Chamber of Commerce Sidewalk Sale Days will be held Thursday-Saturday in downtown Barrington by the Metra Station.

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    Fox Valley police reports
    Fox blotter

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Tri blotter

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    North Koreans welcome veterans of the Korean War as they pass by inside buses after arriving at the Pyongyang railway station Tuesday. Veterans arrived in Pyongyang as the country prepares to mark the 60th anniversary of the end of the Korean War on July 27.

    North Korea halts rocket launch-pad work

    Why did North Korea stop construction on the launch pad, rocket assembly building and launch control center at what was intended to be a major new facility at the Tonghae Satellite Launching Ground on the northeast coast?

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    Romeo Sora

    Des Plaines to launch search for community development director

    With a new information technology director on board, Des Plaines has one senior level staff position remaining to fill. City officials are getting ready to launch a nationwide search for a new community development director after the resignation of previous community and economic development director, Alex Dambach, in May.

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    Taxi driver apologizes for killing DEA agent

    Driver Edgar Bello said in the interview Tuesday from a Bogota prison that neither he nor the other five men arrested in the June 20 killing of DEA agent James “Terry” Watson realized he was a foreigner.

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    Keith Pecka, president of the Wheeling Park District board of commissioners, views progress made during the past year at Heritage Park. Heritage Lake is at the right.

    Heritage Park flood control project end is in sight

    It won't solve every flooding problem along the Des Plaines River, but the Heritage Park project will do its part to protect Wheeling, Mount Prospect and Prospect Heights from the worst of it. And now, the end is in sight, as the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District says completion is only about a year away. “We are providing a floodplain shelf that will fill and empty with the ebb and flow of...

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    Associated Press/Sept. 2, 2006 Iraqi army soldiers stand guard at the Abu Ghraib prison on the outskirts of Baghdad, Iraq.

    Al-Qaida claims deadly Iraq prison raids

    Al-Qaida’s branch in Iraq claimed responsibility Tuesday for audacious raids on two high-security prisons on the outskirts of Baghdad this week that killed dozens and set free hundreds of inmates, including some of its followers.

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    Investigators viewing the scene of a school bus crash in Chesterfield, N.J. Federal investigators are expected to make new school bus safety recommendations based on fatal accidents in New Jersey and Florida last year.

    NTSB pushes technology to allow cars to communicate

    WASHINGTON — The government should set performance standards for new safety technology that allows cars and trucks to talk to each other and then require the technology be installed in all new vehicles, a federal accident investigation board recommended Tuesday.

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    Anthony Weiner and his wife Huma Abedin pose for photographs after the ceremonial swearing in of the 112th Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington.

    Weiner admits to more lewd photos

    New York City mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner admits he sent additional explicit photos and texts to a woman online.The new lewd correspondence was posted Monday by the gossip website The Dirty. The woman involved was not identified.

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    Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, carries her new born son, the Prince of Cambridge.

    Images:The Royal Baby
    Images of the baby boy born to William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge as the family appears outside the St Mary’s Hospital in west London and then heads toward Kensington Palace. The child yet to be named will become third in line for the British throne.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Vandals cut the top of an exterior air conditioner unit and broke the fan between July 14 and 16 at a home on the 600 block of North Meadow Drive, Des Plaines. Damage was estimated at $5,400.

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    Naperville Park District in September will launch the first phase of plans to remove lead from outside the fence line at Sportsman’s Park.

    Lead remediation set to begin at Naperville’s Sportsman’s Park

    Naperville Park District will begin the first of two remediation phases in September to remove lead from outside the fence line at Sportsman’s Park, which houses three trapshooting ranges at West Street and Martin Avenue near downtown. The first phase of work is scheduled for completion in 2014, park district officials said Tuesday.

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    A chicken raised by Astrid Bentley stares out of its cage Tuesday at Lake County Fair in Grayslake. The fair runs Wednesday through Sunday.

    Images: Lake County Fair set up
    Officials, vendors, work crews and participants set up and prepare for Wednesday's opening of the Lake County Fair in Grayslake. The fair continues through Sunday.

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    The DuPage County Fair returns Wednesday to Wheaton and runs from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. each day through Sunday at 2015 Manchester Road.

    Exotic animals, demo derby highlight DuPage Fair

    The animal kingdom is coming to the DuPage County Fair, and this year that goes beyond typical barnyard denizens like sheep, pigs and cows. When the fair opens Wednesday for its annual five-day celebration at 2015 Manchester Road in Wheaton, it will include a new exhibit called the “Wild World of Animals,” featuring such exotic creatures as a 13-foot python, a warthog and a mandrill..

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    Naperville Municipal Band performs at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Community Concert Center in Central Park, 104 E. Benton Ave., Naperville. Features vocalist Cathy Lord and the Firefighters Highland Guard of Naperville. Free. Includes ice cream social to benefit a local nonprofit. Info: napervilleband.org or (630) 778-9994.

    Mark your calendar Things to do in DuPage County
    dupage calendar for thursday

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    Samantha Skowronski imitates the dancers on stage.

    Arlington Hts. Irish Fest is July 26-27

    It's time to get your Irish on. The annual Arlington Heights Irish Fest, which takes over the Historical Museum grounds Friday and Saturday, July 26-27, is back - with all the music, dancing, Irish trinkets, games and more from years' past.

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    In this file photo provided by the Omaha Police Department is Dr. Anthony Garcia who is scheduled to make his first appearance in a Nebraska court Tuesday, July 23, 2013. Garcia, accused in four Omaha slayings, is being held without bond on first-degree murder charges.

    Doctor to be held without bond in Omaha slayings

    A Nebraska judge says an Indiana doctor accused of killing four people with ties to an Omaha medical school must remain in jail to await trial. Judge Lawrence Barrett ruled Tuesday morning that no bond would be set for Dr. Anthony Garcia. Garcia, of Terre Haute, Ind., was arrested in Illinois last week and extradited Thursday to a jail in Omaha.

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    In this May 11, 2010 file photo, Immigration Services Director (USCIS) Alejandro Mayorkas listens to a question on Capitol Hill in Washington. Mayorkas, President Barack Obama’s choice to be the No. 2 official at the Homeland Security Department is under investigation for his role in helping a company secure an international investor visa for a Chinese executive.

    Homeland Security official probed

    President Barack Obama’s choice to be the No. 2 official at the Homeland Security Department is under investigation for his role in helping a company secure an international investor visa for a Chinese executive, The Associated Press has learned. The root of the complaint against Alejandro Mayorkas is an allegation that he helped a financing company win approval for an investor visa even after...

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    The annual Mount Prospect Midsummer Downtown Block Party draws all ages.

    Downtown Mt. Prospect hosts two-day Block Party

    Mount Prospect will become a festival zone this weekend as the annual Downtown Block Party will be held Friday and Saturday, July 26-27.

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    In this Jan. 16, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama, and White House Senior Advisor Dan Pfeiffer react to a reporter’s question as they leave the Treasury Department in Washington. Pfeiffer, on Tuesday, July 23, 2013, accused the House GOP of “cruel hypocrisy” for contemplating legal status for unauthorized immigrants brought to the U.S. as children — without also legalizing their parents.

    House GOP, Democrats clash over immigration

    A House committee is holding a hearing on what to do about child immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as lawmakers search for a way forward on immigration in the Republican-led chamber. House Republicans took a tentative step toward offering citizenship to some unauthorized immigrants Tuesday, but hit an immediate wall of resistance from the White House on down as Democrats said it wasn’t...

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    Bill Devore

    Longtime College of Lake County Foundation executive director retires

    Bill Devore has retired after a lengthy and distinguished career as executive director for the College of Lake County Foundation. CLC Foundation, a nonprofit organization, raises money to help the college offer greater access to education and cultural enrichment for Lake County residents. It works to fund needs that are beyond the school's budget as determined by CLC's board of trustees.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A Prospect Heights man was arrested around 1:40 p.m. July 8 at Walmart, Mount Prospect Plaza at Rand and Central roads, and charged with criminal damage to property after a security agent said he saw him break a cellphone display rack and remove several cellphones. The man also was charged with retail theft after he was seen on a security video taking a laptop computer valued at $748 around 10:45...

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A woman stole a white English bulldog valued at $3,200 from an Arlington Heights pet store. According to employees, she walked behind a kennel around 12:15 p.m. July 13 at Happiness is Pets, 15 W. Golf Road, and hid the dog in a backpack and fled. Another woman, who may have been an accomplice, distracted an employee. The possible accomplice left after the thief fled.

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    A Syrian refugee girl pauses while painting a mural on the wall of one of the public bathrooms to make it look like an aquarium, at Zaatari refugee camp, near the Syrian border, in Mafraq, Jordan, Tuesday, July 23, 2013. A U.S.-based artist is leading children haunted by the conflict to paint buildings and walls at the crowded camp with murals expressing their lives and hopes.

    US artist, Syrian children beautify refugee camp

    Most of the trailers and tents match the beige color of the swirling sand surrounding the Zaatari refugee camp, home to about 120,000 Syrians who fled the nearly three-year war still gripping the nation. Slowly though, that’s changing with the help of a U.S. artist who is leading children haunted by the conflict to paint buildings and walls at the crowded camp with murals expressing their lives...

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    This undated photo provided by The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) shows Diexi, which is sold as a traditional Indian “herbal formula,” which actually contains metformin, the most common prescription drug used to treat diabetes. The FDA sent warning letters to 15 companies, including Amrutam Life Care, ordering them to stop selling diabetes treatments such as Diexi which violate U.S. drug laws.

    FDA cracks down on illegal diabetes remedies

    The Food and Drug Administration is cracking down on more than a dozen companies that market illegal treatments for diabetes, ranging from bogus dietary supplements to prescription drugs sold online without a prescription. “Consumers should exercise caution before using products claiming to be herbal or all-natural alternatives to FDA-approved prescription drugs,” the agency said in a statement...

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    Pope Francis, the 76-year-old Argentine who became the church’s first pontiff from the Americas in March, returns to the embrace of Latin America to preside over the Roman Catholic Church’s World Youth Day festival. During his flight from Rome, Francis warned about youth unemployment in some countries in the double digits, telling about 70 journalists aboard the papal plane that there is a “risk of having a generation that hasn’t worked.” He said, “Young people at this moment are in crisis.”

    Images: Pope Francis in Brazil
    Pope Francis arrived in Rio de Janeiro to begin a weeklong visit to participate in the World Youth Day festival. After making a no-frills flight on a charter jet from Italy on Monday, the pontiff got a rousing, and sometimes alarming, welcome on his first trip back to his home continent since becoming the leader of the Roman Catholic Church.

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    Geneva thinking again about all-day kindergarten

    Geneva public schools are again studying whether to offer all-day kindergarten. "I would like us to pursuit this aggressively. I think it is way past the time that we do this," said school board member Kelly Nowak.

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    Stranded passengers are handed blankets while they wait at LaGuardia Airport as multiple flights were canceled after a Southwest Airlines 737 plane’s nose gear collapsed during a landing, Monday, July 22, 2013, in New York. The airport fully reopened Tuesday

    NYC airport fully reopens after jet’s hard landing

    New York City’s LaGuardia Airport fully reopened Tuesday, a day after the collapse of a plane’s front landing gear sent it skidding along the tarmac and temporarily closed the airport. The nose gear of Southwest Airlines flight 345 arriving from Nashville, Tenn., collapsed Monday right after the plane touched down on the runway, officials said. “When we got ready to land, we nosedived,” said a...

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    Pope Francis waves from his popemobile as he makes his way into central Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, July 22, 2013. The pontiff arrived for a seven-day visit in Brazil, the world’s most populous Roman Catholic nation. During his visit, Francis will meet with legions of young Roman Catholics converging on Rio for the church’s World Youth Day festival.

    Pope all smiles as Brazilians swarm his car in Rio

    Pope Francis wants to ignite the passion of Roman Catholics for their faith while on his first international trip, and the boisterous, sometimes frenzied welcome he got on his first day in Rio seemed to fill those hopes. Returning to his home continent for the first time since becoming pontiff, Francis smiled broadly as thousands of people rushed his car in Rio’s center.

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    Ohio has Defense Dept’s most powerful computer

    The U.S. Air Force says a supercomputer up and running at an Ohio base is the most powerful in the entire Department of Defense. It has the capacity to calculate 1,500 trillion calculations every second, making it the seventh most powerful computer in the U.S. and 14th in the world.

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    Eric Peterson/epeterson@dailyherald.com ¬ Accident investigators say heat likely caused a coal train derailment last July that sent a railway bridge crashing down onto a road near Northbrook, killing a couple who were driving underneath.

    Report: Heat likely cause of fatal Northbrook derailment

    Accident investigators say heat likely caused a coal train derailment last July that sent a railway bridge crashing down onto a road near Northbrook, killing a couple who were driving underneath. The Federal Railroad Administration says it is likely that temperatures of 103 degrees heated the track and caused it to buckle a few feet before the bridge near the suburb of Northbrook.

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    Judge rules for Ohio men’s same-sex marriage

    A federal judge has ruled in favor of two Ohio men who want their out-of-state marriage recognized as one of them nears death, a case that’s seen as encouraging for same-sex marriage supporters in the state. “This is going to open the door to create a large number of same-sex couples married in other states” to try to change the law, said the couple’s attorney, Al Gerhardstein.

  •  
    Janet Adkisson and her children, Payton and Ashley, search for DVDs at the Vernon Area Public Library in Lincolnshire. Audiovisual circulation has increased since the library reopened in late May, officials say.

    Traffic, circulation increase after Vernon Area Public Library renovation

    Foot traffic and circulation at the Vernon Area Public LIbrary in Lincolnshire have boomed since a recent $1.3 million renovation. “With even just one month of checkouts, it is clear that these strategic moves are having the desired effect,” library spokeswoman Catherine Savage said.

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    Associated Press Congress is considering a new series of hard-hitting Iran sanctions on everything from mining and construction to the Islamic republic’s already besieged oil industry, despite concern from the Obama administration that the measures could interfere with nuclear negotiations.

    Congress, Obama at odds over new Iran sanctions

    Congress is considering a new series of hard-hitting Iran sanctions on everything from mining and construction to the Islamic republic’s already besieged oil industry, despite concern from the Obama administration that the measures could interfere with nuclear negotiations.

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    Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said Monday establishing a no-fly zone to protect Syrian rebels would require hundreds of U.S. aircraft at a cost of upward of $1 billion per month and no assurance that it would change the momentum in the 2-year-old civil war.

    U.S. surveillance, Syria at issue on defense bill

    Limits on secret U.S. surveillance programs and President Barack Obama’s push to help Syrian rebels were in dispute as the House weighed legislation to fund the nation’s military. The House planned to begin debate Tuesday on the $598.3 billion defense spending bill for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1, and late Monday the House Rules Committee voted to allow votes on the contentious issues.

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    A woman injured in an earthquake is helped by medical workers in Minxian county in Dingxi city in northwest China’s Gansu province on Monday, July 22, 2013. A strong earthquake that shook an arid, hilly farming area in northwest China sparked landslides and destroyed or damaged thousands of brick-and-mud homes Monday, killing at least 94 people and injuring more than 1,000, the government said.

    Toll from China quake hits 94, with 1,000 injured

    Rescuers with shovels and sniffer dogs chipped away at collapsed hillsides Tuesday as the death toll rose to 94 from a strong earthquake in a farming region of northwest China. Just one person was listed as missing and 1,001 as injured in Monday morning’s quake. About 123,000 people were affected, with 31,600 moved to temporary shelters.

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    This May 26, 2013, satellite image shows an unfinished new missile assembly building, top left, and control center, top right, at the Tonghae facility in North Korea. An eight-month construction standstill at the North Korean site meant to launch bigger and better long-range rockets may signal Pyongyang is slowing or even stopping development of larger rockets, according to a new analysis of recent satellite imagery. (AP Photo/Astrium — 38 North) CREDIT MANDATORY

    AP: Images show N. Korea launchpad halt

    An eight-month construction standstill at a North Korean site meant to launch bigger and better long-range rockets may signal Pyongyang is slowing or even stopping development of larger rockets, according to a new analysis of recent satellite imagery.

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    Dutch court blocks extradition of terror suspect

    Dutch judges blocked the extradition Tuesday of a terror suspect to the United States, saying he was tortured in Pakistan after his 2010 arrest and it is unclear whether American authorities had any involvement. “He is very satisfied that the role of the Americans is finally being looked at in a critical light,” his lawyer Andre Seebregts said. “He has said from the very beginning that the...

  •  
    A notice proclaiming the birth of a baby boy to Prince William and Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, is displayed for the public view at Buckingham Palace in London yesterday. Now the world waits for a royal name, and London is saying just relax on that.

    Dawn Patrol: Six Aurora shootings; Glen Ellyn nursing home vote

    Aurora police investigate half-dozen shootings. Glen Ellyn approves zoning for nursing home. Forest preserve near Libertyville back to summer. Driver pleads guilty in fatal Addison crash. Cleanup continues in Arlington Heights, Mount Prospect after Friday’s storm. Cubs trade Garza.

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    Libertyville-Vernon Hills Dist. 128 budget up 3.4%

    The Libertyville-Vernon Hills Area High School District 128 board is considering an $84.5 million budget for the 2014 fiscal year, which began July 1.

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    Prospect Hts. will install surveillance cameras

    Prospect Heights police will install seven surveillance cameras outside apartment buildings on the east side of the city. Police Chief Jamie Dunne views the cameras as an important tool to fight gangs.

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    New downtown St. Charles parking lot will cost more

    With St. Charles City Administrator Brian Townsend staying mute on his departure, the focus of debate for aldermen was a cost overrun on the construction of a new downtown parking lot.

  •  
    Trustee Daniel Wilbrant, Village President Chris Nelson and Village Manager Joe Cavallaro assess a street sign in West Dundee as apart of their community walking tour on Monday. The board members were in search of property maintenance issues, things that can be repaired and other neighborhood issues.

    W. Dundee trustees take to the streets, meet the public

    Rather than sitting in a boardroom and waiting for the community to come to them, West Dundee trustees and top officials walked through the village Monday to meet the people, to take note of problems and discuss ways to solve them. “It has the potential to keep the residents engaged and it keeps the board engaged with the community," Village President Chris Nelson said.

  •  
    Rivers Casino in Des Plaines, which opened in July 2011, is the state's highest-grossing casino, and it rebuts claims that it's not doing enough for Des Plaines.

    Union: Rivers Casino tax appeals hurt Des Plaines

    A national union representing hospitality industry workers claims Rivers Casino has not been a good neighbor to Des Plaines because it is not paying its fair share of property taxes. “Rivers has generated $339 million more than its closest Illinois competitor, the Grand Victoria Casino in Elgin,” a union spokesman said. But the casino said it has been worth millions to Des Plaines.

Sports

  •  
    Chicago White Sox second baseman Jeff Keppinger, second from left, tags Detroit Tigers' Torii Hunter during a rundown as relief pitcher Hector Santiago and first baseman Adam Dunn watch during the first inning of a baseball game Tuesday, July 23, 2013, in Chicago. First base umpire Gary Darling called Hunter safe due to interference by Dunn on the play. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    Bad defense continues to plague Sox

    The White Sox' poor defensive play has defined their poor season. In Tuesday night's 6-2 loss to the Tigers at U.S. Cellular Field, the Sox commited a season-high 4 errors that allowed 3 unearned runs to score.

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    Paul Konerko said Tuesday that baseball players are tested for banned substances even during the off-season.

    White Sox’ Konerko believes baseball on right track

    White Sox captain Paul Konerko said major-league players like Ryan Braun are always going to try beating the system, but baseball is relatively clean due to all of the testing for banned substances.

  •  

    Sky scout for Wednesday

    Sky scout for Wednesday...please post to web

  •  
    First base umpire Gary Darling, right, throws out Chicago White Sox manager Robin Ventura as Ventura argues Darling's call that first baseman Adam Dunn interfered with Detroit Tigers' Torii Hunter getting back to first on a rundown during the first inning of a baseball game Tuesday, July 23, 2013, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    Porcello shuts down Sox

    Rick Porcello pitched four-hit ball over seven scoreless innings, Jhonny Peralta homered and the Detroit Tigers took advantage of four errors in a 6-2 victory over the White Sox on Tuesday night.

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    Libertyville has St. Charles East’s number again

    Libertyville senior Andrew Mack earned his nickname years ago in part for being messy, quite the contrast to the clean, crisp complete game he tossed at St. Charles East Tuesday at the Phil Lawler Summer Classic. Mack held a St. Charles East team coming off a 15-run, 14-hit game Monday to a pair of third-inning runs and 4 hits, pitching Libertyville to a 5-2 win and a spot in the semifinals of the 38th annual summer state tournament.

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    Maybe Wrigleyville not so special anymore

    So, it could be official as soon as today that the Cubs are going to stay in Wrigleyville. However, the Ricketts family should commission a study to figure out why so little public resistance greeted the idea of the team moving to Rosemont or DuPage County.

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    White Sox manager Robin Ventura listens to club chairman Jerry Reinsdorf during batting practice before Tuesday’s game against the Detroit Tigers.

    Ventura managing to focus on White Sox

    Apparently, Robin Ventura is more engaged than many White Sox fans suspected and he suddenly seems more interested in continuing to manage than most expected.

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    The Brewers’ Ryan Braun, right, and Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers chat during a spring training workout in Phoenix.

    Rodgers bets on Braun — and loses

    One NFL fan is having a little fun with Green Bay Packers star Aaron Rodgers over his vociferous support of Milwaukee Brewers slugger Ryan Braun. It all started when Todd Sutton tweeted last year that Rodgers was delusional over his insistence that Braun had not used performance-enhancing drugs. Rodgers then responded that he would bet a year’s salary that his friend was clean, including the hashtags ponyup and exonerated.

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    FILE - In this Feb. 24, 2012 file photo, Milwaukee Brewers' Ryan Braun speaks during a news conference at baseball spring training in Phoenix. The 2011 National League MVP was suspended without pay for the rest of the season and the postseason Monday, July 22, 2013, the start of sanctions involving players reportedly tied to a Florida clinic accused of distributing performance-enhancing drugs. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

    Ryan Braun reaction: Fed-up players feel ‘sick’

    They felt sick, angry, cheated, deceived.Not only did Ryan Braun let down scores of baseball fans Monday, he riled up players all around the majors.The guys who used to be in his corner. The guys who make up the union membership.“Watching him talk right now makes me sick,” Skip Schumaker of the Los Angeles Dodgers said. “I have an autographed Braun jersey in my baseball room that I’ll be taking down. I don’t want my son identifying what I’ve worked so hard to get to and work so hard to have — I don’t want him comparing Braun to me.”The Milwaukee Brewers slugger accepted a 65-game suspension Monday for unspecified “violations” of baseball’s drug program and labor contract.Just last year, the 2011 NL MVP dodged a 50-game penalty when an arbitrator overturned his positive test for elevated testosterone because the urine sample had been improperly handled.Then he held a news conference at spring training in Phoenix and read a defiant statement, insisting he was innocent and “the truth” was on his side.Jason Bay watched it on television, just like everyone else.“I think for me what makes me mad,” the Seattle outfielder said, “basically it just kills all the credibility of anybody.”Reaction poured in after Major League Baseball banned Braun without pay for the rest of the season and the postseason, the beginning of sanctions involving players reportedly tied to a Florida clinic accused of distributing performance-enhancing drugs.Plenty of it was pretty harsh.“I think everybody’s frustrated, especially the players. I think we all feel a little bit cheated,” Mariners pitcher Joe Saunders said.Schumaker thinks Braun should hand over his MVP award to Dodgers outfielder Matt Kemp, who finished second in the 2011 balloting.“In my opinion, he should be suspended — lifetime ban. One strike, you’re out. It’s enough. It’s ridiculous,” Schumaker said. “He lied to a lot of people. I was convinced, after that MVP, that he didn’t do it.”Braun, struggling through an injury-plagued season, will miss Milwaukee’s final 65 games, costing him about $3 million of his $8.5 million salary. But his punishment probably won’t affect the Brewers’ playoff chances much — they were last in the NL Central at 41-56, already far out of wild-card contention.“I talked to a lot of the guys and we think the penalties aren’t harsh enough,” Saunders said. “I think it should have been a year’s suspension, at least. Just my take on it. I don’t get why guys have to do that stuff.”Braun issued a statement Monday saying he’s not perfect and realizes now that he has made some mistakes. He apologized “to anyone I may have disappointed” and said he was happy to have the matter behind him “once and for all.”But that doesn’t mean there’s no fallout for others in the game.“It’s a sad day,” Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia said. “It’s a black eye when something like this happens.”New York Yankees pitcher CC Sabathia, Braun’s former teammate in Milwaukee, said he was shocked.“I never would have thought it, but I guess you never know,” Sabathia explained.Some players were more forgiving.“He stepped up. It’s just like when you get a ticket, a speeding ticket,” Tigers outfielder Torii Hunter said. “You know you were speeding. You get a ticket and you go and you do your time or pay your speeding ticket, then you’re doing what you’re supposed to do. That’s what Braunie is doing. Everybody makes mistakes. It takes a man to forgive him. If you don’t forgive him, then are you a man?”Bay thinks Braun could have handled his situation differently.“If you look at the guys who have done stuff and just come out and admit it, a lot of guys don’t remember who those guys were,” Bay said. “But the guys who run up and down and say, ‘No, no,’ and then it gets drug through the mud 10 times worse, it makes it tougher on themselves and the rest of us.”It appears more penalties are coming, too.

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    Deerfield’s India leads Illinois Open

    Deerfield's Vince India was right at home Tuesday in the 64th Illinois Open. Starting with a 20-foot putt for eagle at The Glen Club, India was 9-under-par on his round through 17 holes before a double-bogey finish left him with a 7-under 65 for the lead.

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    Big 12 Commissioner Bob Bowlsby and fellow commissioners Mike Slive of the Southeastern Conference and John Swofford of the Atlantic Coast Conference have taken turns critiquing the NCAA over the last week, and it's likely Jim Delany of the Big Ten and Larry Scott of the Pac-12 will follow suit in the coming days.

    Will 5 power conferences break away from FBS?

    The five power conferences are trying to redefine what it takes to operate a Division I college athletic program, with their commissioners calling out the NCAA at media days around the country. Big 12 Commissioner Bob Bowlsby and fellow commissioners Mike Slive of the Southeastern Conference and John Swofford of the Atlantic Coast Conference have taken turns critiquing the NCAA over the last week.

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    A proposed $500 million renovation of historic Wrigley Field received crucial backing Tuesday from the local alderman and a City Council committee, clearing a path for final approval. Alderman Tom Tunney said he signed off on the deal after winning concessions from the Cubs owners, who also own the ballpark. Among them was an agreement not to erect any outfield signs in addition to an electronic Jumbotron in left field — a first for the 99-year-old ballpark — and another large sign in right. Tunney said the Cubs also agreed to postpone indefinitely a proposed bridge over adjoining Clark Street.

    Wrigley update set for final approval

    A proposed $500 million renovation of historic Wrigley Field received crucial backing Tuesday from the local alderman and a City Council committee, clearing a path for final approval. Alderman Tom Tunney said he signed off on the deal after winning concessions from the Cubs owners, who also own the ballpark. Among them was an agreement not to erect any outfield signs in addition to an electronic Jumbotron in left field.

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    The Royals’ George Brett, center, is restrained by umpire Joe Brinkman after his bat, held by umpire Tim McClelland, right, was ruled illegal because of the amount of pine tar on the handle. Brett had hit a home run that would have won the game against the Yankees but was instead called out.

    Brett embraces his infamous Pine Tar Game

    George Brett remembers sitting next to Frank White and Vida Blue in the dugout at Yankee Stadium, his ninth-inning home run having just given the Kansas City Royals the lead. But then, after Yankees manager Billy Martin protested, Brett was called out for having too much pine tar on his bat. The rest of the story has been part of baseball lore for 30 years.

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    NCAA seeks dismissal of Paterno family lawsuit

    The NCAA asked a Pennsylvania court on Tuesday to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the family of the late coach Joe Paterno that seeks to overturn the sanctions against Penn State for the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal.

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    FILE - In this June 6, 2013 file photo, New York Giants coach Tom Coughlin watches players during a football practice in East Rutherford, N.J. No pads, no real blocking, no power football for the Giants, as mandated by the labor agreement between the league and the players. It's difficult enough when the players can hit each other to evaluate whether NFL wannabes have what it takes, or if veterans still can carry the load pro football demands. (AP Photo/Bill Kostroun, File)

    Practice? NFL players, coaches feel pinch

    Looking perplexed, Tom Coughlin stood on the field watching a minicamp practice. No pads, no real blocking, no power football for the New York Giants, as mandated by the labor agreement between the league and the players.

  •  
    Lance Armstrong, left foreground, rides through Gutherie Center, Iowa, on Monday during RAGBRAI.

    Armstrong finds support in Iowa

    Cyclist Lance Armstrong says fellow riders have been generally supportive of him this week during an annual bike ride across Iowa. It’s the first extended public appearance on a bike since he ended years of denials in January and admitting he doped to win seven Tour de France titles that have since been stripped.

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    Focus will be on Jeray at Illinois Women’s Open

    Mistwood, in Romeoville, will again host the 19th Illinois Women’s Open next week. And the spotlight will be on Berwyn’s Nicole Jeray, who will bid to become the second player to win the tournament three times.

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    Boston Red Sox's Dustin Pedroia gets the throw before tagging out New York Yankees' Eduardo Nunez (26), who was trying to steal second base in the 11th inning of a baseball game in Boston, early Monday, July 22, 2013. The Red Sox won 8-7 in 11 innings. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

    AP Source: Pedroia close to $100M deal through 2021

    All-Star second baseman Dustin Pedroia is close to a contract that could keep him with the Boston Red Sox for his entire big league career.A person with knowledge of the talks said Tuesday that Pedroia is in the process of agreeing to a deal adding $100 million over seven seasons through 2021.

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    Phil Mickelson celebrates Sunday after his final putt on the 18th green during the final round of the British Open at Muirfield.

    Mickelson, Woods two ships passing in the night

    With Phil Mickelson’s Sunday victory, has he positioned himself for a career surge while Tiger Woods falters? Mike North thinks Phil might just be hitting his stride even at the age of 43.

Business

  •  
    Clark Street Development has announced only one tenant, Uncle Joe’s grocery store, for the Rolling Meadows center that once held a Dominick’s.

    Rolling Meadows grocery store behind schedule

    The eagerly awaited Uncle Joe’s Tuscan Fresh Market, the grocery store expected to anchor the long-vacant Dominick’s in downtown Rolling Meadows, is behind schedule. The store’s owner won’t give a new timetable, but he says progress is being made. Originally it was hoped construction on the Kirchoff Road store would start in May for an October opening, but city officials can’t issue building permits until they see the plans. “Things are just taking longer than we anticipated,” owner Louis Ruffolo said Tuesday. “We are still going forward. We are finishing up the plans.”

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    Crew rescued from Gulf rig after blowout

    Wild well experts are expected to arrive soon at the site of a natural gas well blowing out of control in the Gulf of Mexico off Louisiana’s coast.

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    Specialist Douglas Johnson is reflected in a screen Monday at his post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

    Stock market ends mixed after uneven earnings news

    Better earnings from big banks, health insurers and other companies have helped drive the stock market higher this month. On Tuesday, however, the encouraging and the discouraging seemed evenly matched. Wendy’s and United Technologies surged after posting stronger results than financial analysts expected. Netflix and the Altria Group, maker of Marlboro cigarettes, sank after their results fell short.

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    Round Lake industrial park to get live auctions

    A Round Lake company has won approval to host live auctions in the village’s industrial park to sell bulk municipal goods. Obenauf Auction Services will run the events on Saturday mornings in a lot next to their offices in the industrial park at Sunset Drive and Hart Road.

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    Rail World Inc. CEO Edward Burkhardt has been named in a wrongful-death lawsuit against the Rosemont-based parent company of the runaway oil train that derailed and exploded earlier this month in Quebec, Canada. The lawsuit was filed by the family of one of 50 people who died.

    Lawsuit filed against Rosemont company for Canadian train explosion

    The family of one of 50 people who died in a fiery Canadian oil-train explosion is suing the train’s Rosemont owners. The wrongful death case was filed Monday in Cook County Circuit Court. The lawsuit against Rosemont-based Rail World and its Montreal, Maine and Atlantic Railway also names CEO Edward Burkhardt. It seeks at least $200,000 in damages.

  •  
    Activist investor Dan Loeb is leaving Yahoo’s board with a windfall after a 15-month stint that vindicated his crusade to shake up the long-slumping company under new leadership.

    Loeb to sell 40M Yahoo shares as he leaves board

    Activist investor Dan Loeb is leaving Yahoo’s board with a windfall after a 15-month stint that vindicated his crusade to shake up the long-slumping company under new leadership. Yahoo Inc. is spending $1.16 billion to buy back 40 million of the shares that Loeb’s hedge fund, Third Point LLC, began buying in 2011 around the same time Yahoo was ushering out Carol Bartz as its CEO.

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    Grants and scholarships are taking a leading role in paying college bills, while parents are picking up less of the costs. That’s according to a report from loan giant Sallie Mae.

    Grants, scholarships key to paying college bills

    Grants and scholarships are taking a leading role in paying college bills, while parents are picking up less of the costs. That’s according to a report from loan giant Sallie Mae. Since the recession, more college-bound students have eliminated schools from their searches based on costs and have relied less on their parents once they get to campus.

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    If President Barack Obama’s new focus on the economy sounds familiar, that’s because he’s done it before. Since the first year of his presidency, Obama has been launching — and re-launching — initiatives on the economy. Some came with new policy proposals, others with catchy slogans.

    Obama’s latest economic push has familiar feel
    If President Barack Obama’s new focus on the economy sounds familiar, that’s because he’s done it before. Since the first year of his presidency, Obama has been launching — and re-launching — initiatives on the economy. Some came with new policy proposals, others with catchy slogans.

  •  
    Obediah Lewis grinds the ends of the track wells on a private crossing south of Chatham as Union Pacific crews replace a stretch of track outfitted with ties not suitable for high-speed rail applications.

    IDOT: $1.45B awarded so far for high-speed rail
    The Illinois Department of Transportation says about $1.45 billion in contracts have been awarded so far for high-speed rail construction. The (Springfield) State Journal-Register says work on the project is in its fourth season. Most of the current construction focuses on sidings and design of an automated control system.

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    Wendy’s reported a quarterly net income that came in above Wall Street expectations and said it’s selling 425 of its restaurants to franchisees, a move that’s expected to help boost its profit margins.

    Wendy’s tops expectations, selling restaurants

    Wendy’s reported a quarterly net income that came in above Wall Street expectations and said it’s selling 425 of its restaurants to franchisees, a move that’s expected to help boost its profit margins.

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    RadioShack said Tuesday that its second-quarter loss widened as the struggling electronics retailer works to revamp its stores and product assortment ahead of the crucial holiday season.

    RadioShack 2Q loss widens, CFO leaves

    RadioShack said Tuesday that its second-quarter loss widened as the struggling electronics retailer works to revamp its stores and product assortment ahead of the crucial holiday season. Although the loss was bigger than analysts expected, revenue beat expectations and the company said it was bringing on consultants to help improve results.

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    Coal miner Peabody reports lower 2Q earnings

    Coal miner Peabody Energy Corp. said Tuesday its second-quarter earnings slid 56 percent because of lower pricing, but the results still handily beat Wall Street’s expectations partly because of the company’s continued belt-tightening. St. Louis-based Peabody, the world’s biggest private-sector coal producer, said its net income attributable to common shareholders fell to $90.3 million, or 33 cents per share, for the April-June period.

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    UPS said Tuesday that second-quarter profit fell 4 percent as customers shifted from premium toward lower-priced shipped services. The company called the results disappointing and said it was adapting to the changing market.

    UPS profit falls on shift to lower cost services

    UPS said Tuesday that second-quarter profit fell 4 percent as customers shifted from premium toward lower-priced shipped services. The company called the results disappointing and said it was adapting to the changing market.

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    DuPont reports drop in 2Q earnings

    The chemicals giant DuPont reported a nearly 12 percent decline in second-quarter earnings Tuesday partly because of lower pricing for titanium dioxide, a widely used whitening pigment, and said it is exploring a possible sale or spinoff of its performance chemicals unit.

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    In a complaint to the ICC, East Dundee President Lael Miller says ComEd bowed to political pressure and blocked a company's route to this site, where it wants to auction off wrecked vehicles.

    E. Dundee complains ComEd bowed to political pressure on auction site

    East Dundee Village President Lael Miller has filed a formal complaint with the Illinois Commerce Commission against ComEd, alleging the utility caved to political pressure and tried to block an auto auction business from coming to the village. “This is not the type of behavior that we, as the public, expect from Commonwealth Edison,” Miller said.

  •  

    Oak Brook’s A. M. Castle names two new executives

    Oak Brook’s A. M. Castle & Co. named two new executive who the company said will lead the global commercial and operations functions. Steve Letnich, 45, was appointed chief commercial officer. Prior to joining Castle, Letnich served as the vice president of sales and chief marketing officer for Central Steel and Wire and previously as the vice president of sales for Worthington Steelpac.

  •  

    Advocate Health Care makes ‘most wired’ system list

    Downers Grove-based Advocate Health Care has been named as one of the nation’s most wired health systems in this year’s Most Wired Survey by Hospitals & Health Networks magazine. It is the 11th straight year Advocate has made the list.

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    Naperville health care firm names product strategy chief

    Naperville-based Context 4 Healthcare Inc. has named John Danza to the position of vice president, product strategy. Danza brings more than 20 years of health care insurance experience. He spent more than 19 years with The TriZetto Group serving in various leadership positions including assistant vice president, benefits administration product management.

  •  
    Gov. Pat Quinn signs a bill expanding Medicaid to cover low-income Illinois adults who don't have children at home, a big part of President Barack Obamaís health care law, Monday, July 22, 2013, at the University of Illinois at Chicago Outpatient Care Center in Chicago.

    Gov. Quinn signs Medicaid expansion into law

    Illinois became the latest state Monday to implement a central part of President Barack Obama's health care law by expanding Medicaid to cover low-income adults who don't have children at home. Gov. Pat Quinn signed the state legislation into law, which will allow an estimated 342,000 Illinois residents to enroll by 2017.

  •  
    U.S. sales of previously occupied homes slipped in June to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.08 million but remain near a 3½-year high.

    U.S. home sales dip but remain near 3½-year high

    U.S. sales of previously occupied homes slipped in June to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.08 million but remain near a 3½-year high. The National Association of Realtors said Monday that sales fell 1.2 percent last month from an annual rate of 5.14 million in May. The NAR revised down May’s sales, but they were still the highest since November 2009.

  •  
    Taco Bell said Monday it will stop serving kids’ meals and toys, which weren’t really boosting sales anyway.

    Taco Bell axing unpopular kids meals

    Taco Bell said Monday it will stop serving kids’ meals and toys, which weren’t really boosting sales anyway. The chain said it will start removing the options this month at select restaurants, and that it anticipates that no U.S. restaurants will have them by next January. Taco Bell has traditionally gone after younger men who want to load up on fast-food for cheap.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Dress your elementary-schooler up in a bold, graphic tee. $22 at Lucky Brand, $START_URL$luckybrand.com;http://www.luckybrand.com$STOP_URL$

    Get trendy for back-to-school

    Buying back-to-school clothes is almost as hard as waking your kids up for their first day back to school. And maybe you’re the parent who surprised your children with new outfits but was told that your choices were “so five minutes ago.”

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    Relieving back-to-school stress

    Fingernail biting, sweaty palms and an elevated heart rate? It must be time to return to school, a ritual that can stress out even the coolest students and their parents. Virtually any task can set this stress-o-meter soaring: shopping for clothing and school supplies, making changes to bedtime hours, even worrying about new teachers, new classes and new friends.

  •  
    Talk show host Johnny Carson, right, appears with the show’s announcer Ed McMahon during the final taping of the “Tonight Show” in Burbank, Calif. Content from “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson” is available for digital download.

    Carson’s ‘Tonight’ highlights now available online

    For the first time, content from "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" is available for digital download. Starting today, two volumes of material from the King of Late Night can be purchased from the iTunes store.

  •  
    Spike Lee has launched a Kickstarter campaign to help fund his next feature film. The Brooklyn director on Monday unveiled his bid to raise $1.25 million over the next month. Lee offered few details on the film, but said it would be about “the addiction of blood.”

    Spike Lee launches Kickstarter campaign for film

    Following in the footsteps of “Veronica Mars” and Zach Braff, director Spike Lee has launched an online campaign to help fund his next feature film. The Brooklyn filmmaker on Monday unveiled his bid to raise $1.25 million over the next month using the fundraising site Kickstarter.

  •  
    U.S. gymnast Kyla Ross competes in the 2013 Secret U.S. Classic at the Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates on Saturday, July 27.

    Best bets: See Olympic gymnasts, hopefuls compete at Sears Centre

    See Olympic gymnasts like 2012 team gold medalists McKayla Maroney and Kyla Ross compete in the 2013 Secret U.S. Classic at the Sears Centre Saturday. Craig Gass co-starred on the CBS sitcom “King of Queens.” See him live this weekend at Zanies in Rosemont and Chicago. Pianist Lang Lang teams up with conductor James Conlon and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra for a gala concert Saturday to commemorate the bicentennials of the births of composers Guiseppe Verdi and Richard Wagner at Ravinia.

  •  
    Amanda Bynes has been hospitalized for a mental health evaluation after deputies said she started a small fire in the driveway of a home in Southern California.

    Bynes hospitalized after allegedly starting fire

    Actress Amanda Bynes was hospitalized for a mental health evaluation after deputies said she started a small fire in the driveway of a home in Southern California. Deputies responding to a 911 call Monday night found Bynes, 27, standing next to the flames in the city of Thousand Oaks, according to Ventura County sheriff’s Capt. Don Aguilar. The deputies determined she met the criteria for a mental health hold and took her into custody.

  •  

    Give sister some time, then make amends

    Should this reader forgive her sister for a major meltdown, or stay out of her life like she was told? Caroline Hax said give a little time and then talk about it.

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    Greek yogurt tames the sugar in Annie Overboe's strawberry ice cream pie.

    Baking secrets: Greek yogurt, ice cream combine for cool, summery pie

    It's July, the heat's on and when asked to make dessert for a party I pull an ice cream pie from my summertime recipe collection. I do make the occasional exception, but as a rule my oven takes a siesta in July and August. This baking vacation used to limit my dessert possibilities, that is, until premium ice creams hit the market. But if you want to tame the sweet, Annie Overboe has found a solution: Greek yogurt.

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    Billy Ray Cyrus, wife call off divorce again

    Country musician Billy Ray Cyrus and his wife are calling off their divorce proceedings for a second time. Tish Finley Cyrus filed for a divorce last month in Los Angeles, citing irreconcilable differences. But in a statement provided by their publicist on Monday, the couple said they are working on their relationship in therapy.

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    Hoffman Estates native and Fremd High grad Andy McDermott had been a professional soccer player and Phoenix cop before he moved to L.A. to become an actor.

    Hoffman Estates native goes from cop to action star

    Hoffman Estates native and Fremd High School gradute Andy McDermott had always dreamed of being an actor, but never really had the nerve to follow his dream. That changed nine months ago when he and his wife, Julie, sold their house, gave up their careers and went off to L.A. with four little kids. “Everybody in my family thinks we're crazy! Nuts!” he said.

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    The cheery blue color of dayflowers (Commelina communis) -- so named because each flower lasts but a day.

    Dayflowers are pretty but recall something sad

    The cheery blue color of dayflowers (Commelina communis) — so named because each flower lasts but a day — does nothing to dispel some pity I feel for them. Not that the petals cry out for sympathy. You have to get fairly close to the plant, or really stop and look at it, to even see its blossoms. Its stems and leaves, though, are bold, seemingly ready to gobble up any piece of ground they can grab with their succulence and lushness.

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    A visitor views illustrations at “The Snowy Day and The Art Of Ezra Jack Keats” exhibition at the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia. The exhibit opened Friday.

    Kids’ book ‘The Snowy Day’ is focus of Pa. exhibit

    During the height of the civil rights movement, a gentle book about a black boy in a red snowsuit crunch-crunch-crunching through the snow broke down racial barriers and now is the subject of an upcoming exhibit. The National Museum of American Jewish History is presenting a retrospective, “The Snowy Day and the Art of Ezra Jack Keats,” now through Oct. 20, that includes more than 70 original works, ranging from preliminary sketches to final paintings and collages.

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    Honey soy glazed chicken breast, greens, baby spinach, pea pods and chow mein noodles make for a flavor-filled wrap at On the Side in Elgin.

    Elgin’s On the Side a bright spot for breakfast, lunch

    Anyone looking for a lunch or breakfast experience several cuts above the norm would do well to check out On the Side, a charming fast-casual restaurant in a tastefully rehabbed vintage storefront in downtown Elgin. Menus change weekly, according to chef-owner Tom Creighton, who trained at Le Cordon Bleu and the French Pastry School in Chicago. That training was evident in the lunch dishes we sampled on a recent weekday.

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    Authentico Mexican Restaurant celebrates with drink specials throughout the week of July 29.

    Night life events: Authentico’s anniversary means drinks, music

    Authentico Mexican Restaurant in Lake Forest celebrates its anniversary with a celebration beginning July 29 that includes drink specials and live music throughout the week. Tuesday’s activities include celebratory half-priced margarita flights and a mariachi band.

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    “The Blessed Unrest” by Sara Bareilles

    Sara Bareilles shines on ‘Blessed Unrest’

    There’s a sweet way Sara Bareilles sings about her breakup on her new album. She’s soft on the honeyed, piano pop gems that make up “The Blessed Unrest,” her voice is solid and her lyrics are strong.

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    “& Sons” by David Gilbert

    A novel about fathers & sons struggling to connect

    The ghost of J.D. Salinger hovers over David Gilbert's new novel, “& Sons.” Set amid Manhattan's toniest neighborhood, the novel centers on A.N. Dyer, a reclusive author best known for his coming-of-age story set in a boys' prep school. “& Sons” isn't primarily social satire, though parts are hilarious. It's about the emotional bonds between fathers, sons and brothers — the overwhelming love that can't be adequately expressed and the burden of unspoken expectations.

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    Chocolate Chip Cookies
    Chocolate Chip Cookies: Karen Felker

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    A piece of Karen Felker’s Angel Lemon Custard comes in at less than 200 calories.

    Angel Lemon Custard Dessert
    Angel Lemon Custard Dessert: Karen Felker

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    Karen Felker says her small-town roots have helped her find balance when it comes to her love of dessert.

    Cook of the Week: Wheaton mom finds balance on the plate, in life

    Karen Felker of Wheaton believes in saying yes to dessert. It was this philosophy and her recipe for Angel Lemon Custard, a delicious confection that miraculously manages to stay under 200 calories, that helped her win a low-calorie dessert challenge on the Steve Harvey show last May.

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    Caramel Brownies
    Caramel Brownies: Karen Felker

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    Greek yogurt tames the sugar in Annie Overboe’s strawberry ice cream pie.

    Strawberry Ice Cream and Greek Yogurt Pie
    Strawberry Ice Cream and Greek Yogurt Pie:Annie Overboe

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    Judges Micky York, left, Connie Canaday Howard, Barbara Vitello and Charlie Beck reflect on an act during the Suburban Chicago’s Got Talent competition.

    Time to vote for Suburban Chicago’s Got Talent

    Online voting the "Fan Favorite" of the 2013 edition of Suburban Chicago's Got Talent begins today! Readers can view videos of the top 16 finalists and help push through the contestant with the most votes to the next round of competition. The contest is presented by the Daily Herald, produced by the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre and sponsored by the Arlington Heights Chamber of Commerce.

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    To figure out how much sprinkling time equals 1 inch of water, set out a shallow can marked at the 1-inch mark.

    Be consistent with watering

    Established bluegrass lawns need an inch of water a week to keep growing and stay green throughout the summer. This year, consistent rain and generally cooler temperatures kept lawns green and growing through June without much watering.

Discuss

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    Gilbert R. Boucher II/gboucher@dailyherald.com ¬ Boating fun on Lake Zurich.

    Editorial: Law is timely emphasis to keep waterways fun, safe

    A new law on boating safety may be more symbolic than practical, but a Daily Herald editorial says it emphasizes the risks of mixing alcohol and boating.

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    An important tool to reduce gun violence

    Guest columnist Dick Durbin: Because crime gun tracing is such an important part of its efforts to combat gun crime and illegal gun trafficking, ATF has made it free and simple for local police departments and sheriff’s offices to trace their guns.

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    Health care not just about landscaping
    A Geneva letter to the editor: Take a good look at the Delnor/Cadence property on Randall Road in Geneva. As you look beyond the new cancer center or drive through the Delnor property, you will notice the whole front entrance, parking lot, and landscaping are completely gone.

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    (No heading)
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: It is a shame that Nelson Mandela, a model of humanity, a champion of justice and a sage recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize is not being granted the opportunity to approach his death in the same way he lived his life, i.e., in dignity and with amazing grace.

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    Cohen needs a lesson in civics
    A Lombard letter to the editor: We pledge our allegiance to a republic and not to a democracy because we live in a republic and not a democracy.

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