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Daily Archive : Saturday July 6, 2013

News

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    Maine West tab for hazing investigation: $115,000

    Maine Township High School District 207 spent about $115,000 on an investigation that found staff members responded appropriately to hazing allegations, a spokesman said Saturday. The bill stems from an independent probe launched in January.

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    This aerial photo shows the wreckage of the Asiana Flight 214 airplane after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, Saturday.

    2 die, 305 survive after San Francisco plane crash

    A Boeing Co. 777 operated by Asiana Airlines Inc. on a flight from Seoul crashed while landing at San Francisco International Airport, killing two. The plane appears to have struck a seawall where the runway meets San Francisco Bay. “We're very lucky that we have so many survivors,” Mayor Ed Lee said at a briefing late yesterday at San Francisco International Airport. “This...

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    Woman seriously hurt in McHenry motorized scooter accident

    A 51-year-old woman was hospitalized with serious injuries Saturday after a McHenry accident involving a motorized scooter, officials said. Emergency crews were dispatched at 8:21 p.m. to the 5800 block of Fieldstone Trail and found the victim lying on the roadside.

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    In this file photo taken Thursday, July 4, 2013, Egypt’s chief justice Adly Mansour listens to a speech during his swearing in as interim president. Interim president Mansour held talks Saturday, July 6, 2013, with the army chief and interior minister after an outburst of violence between supporters and opponents of ousted leader Mohammed Morsi that killed at least 36 people across the country and deepened the battle lines in the divided nation.

    Egypt’s emerging leaders after Morsi’s overthrow

    CAIRO — Contours are slowly emerging of Egypt’s new leadership, even though an initial announcement that a chief rival of deposed President Mohammed Morsi was named as interim prime minister was taken back later on Saturday.

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    Elgin boater ‘very lucky’ after trip over Fox River dam

    An Elgin man was "very lucky" to come out unscathed Saturday after his inflatable vessel was swept over an 8- to 10-foot dam on the Fox River, firefighters said. "Usually, you can't get out of the boil once you’re in it," Battalion Chief Bryan McMahan said.

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    Smoke rises from railway cars that were carrying crude oil after derailing in downtown Lac Megantic, Quebec, Canada, Saturday, July 6. The derailment sparked several explosions and forced the evacuation of up to 1,000 people.

    1 dead, more expected after Quebec train explosions

    Fires continued burning late Saturday nearly 24 hours after a runaway train carrying crude oil derailed in eastern Quebec, sparking explosions and a blaze that destroyed the center of a town and killed one person. Police said they expected the death toll to increase. Witnesses said the eruptions sent residents scrambling through the streets under the intense heat of towering fireballs and a red...

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    In this June 23 file photo, a television screen shows a news report of Edward Snowden, a former CIA employee who leaked top-secret documents about sweeping U.S. surveillance programs, at a shopping mall in Hong Kong.

    Edward Snowden’s fate unclear despite asylum offers

    MOSCOW — Edward Snowden has found supporters in Latin America, including three countries who have offered him asylum. But many obstacles stand in the way of the fugitive NSA leaker from leaving a Russian airport — chief among them the power and influence of the United States.

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    Volcanic ash coats the streets and a vehicle in San Pedro Nexapa, Mexico, Saturday. Just east of Mexico City, the Popocatepetl volcano has spit out a cloud of ash and vapor 2 miles (3 kilometers) high over several days of eruptions.

    Mexico volcano spits 2-mile-high ash cloud

    The Popocatepetl volcano just east of Mexico City has spit out a cloud of ash and vapor 2 miles high over several days of eruptions, and Mexico City residents awoke Saturday to find a fine layer of volcanic dust on their cars. It has been years since the center of the nation’s capital has seen a noticeable ash fall because prevailing winds usually blow the volcanic dust in other directions.

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    Wisconsin boy adjusts quickly after lightning strike

    WESTON, Wis. — An 8-year-old central Wisconsin boy who survived a lightning strike to the head last month is adjusting well to life back home now that he’s out of the hospital.

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    Lobbyists keep SEC’s executive-pay rule in limbo

    Soon after Congress approved the largest overhaul of financial regulation in generations, the Securities and Exchange Commission moved to enforce what it considered one of the simpler parts of a mammoth and complicated law. Nearly three years later, the rule remains unfinished, with no sign of when it will be done.

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    Egypt prime minister appointment rescinded

    Underscoring the sharp divisions facing the untested leader, Adly Mansour, his office said it was naming Mohammed ElBaradei, one of Morsi’s top critics, as interim prime minister but later backtracked on the decision.

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    Mena Rashdi, right, of Vienna, Va., rallies with other anti-Morsi demonstrators by the White House in support of the Egyptian military in Washington on Saturday.

    Obama: U.S. not backing any Egyptian party or group

    President Barack Obama on Saturday reiterated that the U.S. is not aligned with and is not supporting any particular Egyptian political party or group and again condemned the ongoing violence across Egypt. “The United States categorically rejects the false claims propagated by some in Egypt that we are working with specific political parties or movements to dictate how Egypt’s transition should...

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    Woodridge man pleads guilty to stalking Naperville woman

    A Woodridge man has been sentenced to probation after pleading guilty to stalking a Naperville woman. Ashish Kolli, 24, of the 2700 block of Laurel Court, also received a suspended jail sentence of 180 days.

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    Matthew Pearson, 4, and his mother Tiffany Martin of Hoffman Estates get acquainted with a sulcata tortoise belonging to Animals for Awareness at Northwest Fourth-Fest Saturday at the Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates.

    Rides, food and even animals at Northwest Fourth-Fest

    It’s not every day that you get the chance to enjoy a carnival ride solo, like four-year-old Emile Rojowska did on Saturday at Northwest Fourth-Fest in Hoffman Estates. Emile rode shotgun on the dragon train with a huge grin on her face. “We came so she could have some fun," her aunt Agnes Rojowska said. The festival, now in its second edition, is held on the grounds outside the Sears Centre...

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    A fire truck sprays water on Asiana Flight 214 after it crashed at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday, July 6, 2013, in San Francisco.

    Images: Asiana plane crash in San Francisco
    An Asiana Airlines flight from Seoul, South Korea crashed while landing at the San Franciso Airrport on Saturday, July 6. Passengers were forced to jump from the Boeing 777 to safety.

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    Justin Georgacakis of Mount Prospect and his 5-year old son, Cheydon, react to the feeling of free-fall on the “Super Shot” during the Mount Prospect Lions Club Festival at Melas Park Saturday.

    Mt. Prospect festival proves popular with families

    Ali Georgacakis and her family waited with nearly 60 people for the ticket booths to open Saturday afternoon at the Mount Prospect Lions Club Festival. With the $20 wristbands, family members could enjoy unlimited rides all afternoon. The relatively sparse crowd and a temperature in the low 80s added to the family-friendly atmosphere. “We came over the other night for the fireworks and it was...

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    Pileup on I-65 kills 1, injures several

    FRANKLIN, Ind. — Indiana State Police say several vehicles have crashed in a pileup on Interstate 65 south of Indianapolis, briefly closing the highway’s northbound lanes.

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    Richard Maxwell of Palatine shows his patriotic spirit during the Palatine Fourth of July parade on Saturday.

    Palatine’s parade a patriotic success

    The Palatine Hometown Fest parade Saturday morning included about 55 acts. The parade, which kicked off at 10 a.m., started at Wilson and Cedar streets and ended at Wood and Oak streets. Hometown Fest continues from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday with live entertainment, carnival, games, activities, food and drink sales, an arts and crafts fair, and a business and charity expo.

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    Maurice Martin

    $650,000 bail for Naperville man charged in cab driver stabbing

    Bail was set at $650,000 Saturday for a Naperville man accused of stabbing a taxi driver and stealing his cab. Maurice Martin, 33, appeared before Kane County Judge Susan Clancy Boles on charges including aggravated battery and aggravated vehicular hijacking.

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    James Vass and his mom, Angie, both of Fox Lake, use water cannons Saturday to sneak-attack floats that travel past their spot along the Celebrate Fox Lake parade on Grand Avenue after starting at Grant High School.

    Holiday weekend winds down with Fox Lake, Mundelein parades

    The Fourth of July has passed but that doesn’t mean the holiday celebration has ended. If you haven’t taken in a festival or watched a parade as part of the long holiday weekend in Lake County, you’ll have one last chance -- Mundelein’s annual Community Days festival and parade.

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    Seaweed scraped from the beach near 17th Street in Galveston, Texas, is piled into dunes where vegetation is already growing over decomposing seaweed. The Park Board of Trustees voted unanimously to support projects that will create ìseaweed-enhanced sand dunes on the island.

    Galveston uses pesky seaweed to fight storm surge

    Galveston beach-goers have long tiptoed around massive piles of seaweed, often using their children’s plastic beach toys and a few well-chosen expletives to rake away the stinky, dark muck that arrives daily. But now the Galveston Island Park Board of Trustees and Texas A&M University are launching a pilot program aimed at using the sticky muck to build a buttress against severe weather.

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    Chicago police officer hit, dragged by car

    A man has been arrested and charged with striking a Chicago police officer with a car and dragging him after a traffic stop. The suspect is identified as 26-year-old Christopher Hartzol of the Calumet Heights neighborhood. He was charged Saturday with aggravated battery of a peace officer, speeding and negligent driving.

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    In this photo taken with a mobile phone a doctor attends to a student from Government Secondary School in Mamudo, at the Potiskum General Hospital, Nigeria, after an attack by gunmen on Saturday July 6. Islamic militants attacked a boarding school before dawn Saturday, dousing a dormitory in fuel and lighting it ablaze as students slept, survivors said. At least 30 people were killed in the deadliest attack yet on schools in Nigeria’s embattled northeast.

    At least 30 killed as students sleep in Nigeria school
    Islamic militants attacked a boarding school before dawn Saturday, dousing a dormitory in fuel and lighting it ablaze as students slept, survivors said. At least 30 people were killed in the deadliest attack yet on schools in Nigeria’s embattled northeast.

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    DNR fights gypsy moth infestation at Purdue
    A gypsy moth infestation at Purdue University has prompted Department of Natural Resources crews to set traps and plan other treatments. State workers have placed burlap bands around trees to capture caterpillars and have installed moth traps around the infested area.

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    Associated Press Opponents of ousted Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi carry coffins of people who were killed during clashes with his supporters in Cairo Saturday, July 6. Security forces boosted positions near a protest camp by supporters of ousted leader Mohammed Morsi as authorities Saturday plotted their next moves after violence claimed dozens of lives across the country and deepened the battle lines in the divided nation.

    Egypt: Security boosted after deadly clashes

    Security forces boosted positions near a protest camp by supporters of ousted leader Mohammed Morsi as authorities Saturday plotted their next moves after violence claimed at least 36 lives across the country and deepened the battle lines in the divided nation.

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    Deadline soon for entry in Illinois State Fair parade

    The deadline is quickly approaching for individuals and groups that want to enter the “Twilight Parade” — the annual kickoff to the Illinois State Fair.

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    Chicago schools preparing for new academic year
    Chicago Public Schools officials say the district is working to ensure a smooth transition for students whose schools have been closed. In a statement Friday, the district says CPS has been contacting parents and families by phone, text message, emails and letters to encourage them to enroll their children for the 2013-2014 school year.

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    Rare look planned inside mansion with French ties
    Illinois residents can soon get a rare look inside a 213-year-old mansion whose owner was a refugee from the French Revolution. The Illinois Historic Preservation Agency says the Jarrot Mansion State Historic Site will be open on July 13.

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    Separatists protest Malian army’s return to Kidal
    Tuareg separatists who drove the Malian military out of Kidal 16 months ago protested Saturday against the soldiers’ return to the northern town, gathering outside the camp where soldiers are staying.

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    Fearful Lebanese Sunnis drawn to hard-line leaders
    Lebanese pop idol Fadel Shaker’s transformation from entertainer to militant extremist spotlights a broader phenomenon in Lebanon: the drift of its Sunni Muslim community away from its traditional moderate leadership to — in some cases — hard-line, sectarian preachers.

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    Associated Press Spectators stand as a Prescott Fire Department engine, carrying family members of the 19 fallen Granite Mountain Hotshot firefighters, slowly rolls down Montezuma Street during the Prescott Frontier Days Rodeo Parade, Saturday, July 6, in Prescott, Ariz. The procession of fire trucks started the parade to honor the Hotshots who were killed battling a blaze near Yarnell, Ariz. last week.

    A brewing storm: How fire turned tragic for 19 men

    Nineteen members of the Granite Mountain Interagency Hotshot Crew had been deployed to fight yet another wildfire in Arizona. Their last radio communication to fire commanders June 30 was utterly terrifying. The 19 remaining Hotshots were deploying their emergency fire shelters — lightweight cocoons made of reflective material intended as a firefighter's last resort. All 19 died in the fire.

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    The Star Cinema Grill has opened in downtown Arlington Heights.

    Dine-in theater now open in downtown Arlington Heights

    Star Cinema Grill, a new dine-in movie theater in downtown Arlington Heights, opened Friday night at 53 S. Evergreen St. Nearly every part of the former Arlington Theaters, which closed a year ago, was gutted, with the new owners spending millions to install updated seats, tables for food that is served in the theaters, upgraded digital movie screens, a bar in the lobby and a newer ticket window.

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    Associated Press/Robert F. Bukaty Egyptian Monica Baky, a counselor at the Seeds of Peace camp in Otisfield, Maine, congratulates a player during a softball game, Friday, July 5. Baky, speaking of the recent political turmoil in Egypt, says peace has to come from within before peace came be made with anyone else.

    Egyptian campers watch events unfold from afar
    Nearly two-dozen Egyptians who arrived in Maine last month at a special camp aimed at helping Israeli and Arab teens overcome their differences will return home to a country that ousted its leader following the largest demonstrations seen in their homeland.

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    Associated Press/Denis Farrell A worshipper offers prayers on top of a hill overlooking Johannesburg city Saturday July 6. There was no official update Saturday morning on the condition of the 94-year-old former president, Nelson Mandela who is in critical but stable condition after being diagnosed with a recurring lung infection. He was taken to a hospital in Pretoria, the capital, on June 8. There have been calls for prayers to be offered for the former statesman’s recovery.

    Mandela nears a month in Pretoria hospital
    Former South African leader Nelson Mandela has been in a hospital for nearly a month. There was no official update Saturday morning on the condition of the 94-year-old former president, who is in critical but stable condition after being diagnosed with a recurring lung infection. He was taken to a hospital in Pretoria, the capital, on June 8.

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    In this June 10, 2013 photo, guest workers harvest an onion field in Lyons, Ga. Two years after a handful of Southern states passed laws designed to drive away people living in the country illegally, the landscape looks much as it did before: still heavily populated with foreign workers, many of whom don't have legal authorization to be here. There are still concerns over enforcement and lingering fears among immigrants, but in many ways people have gone on with life much as it was before the laws were enacted. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

    Foreign workers still find work in South
    Two years after Georgia and Alabama passed laws designed to drive away people living in the country illegally, the states’ agricultural areas are still heavily populated with foreign workers, many of whom don’t have legal authorization to be here.

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    Champaign police to honor officer killed in 1913
    Police in Champaign plan to honor an officer who was killed 100 years ago in a shootout involving an alleged bootlegger.

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    Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama reacts after he was presented a headgear and a bouquet of flowers during an event organized to celebrate his 78th birthday at a Tibetan Buddhist monastery in Bylakuppe, about 137 miles southwest of Bangalore, India, Saturday, July 6. Speaking after an interfaith meeting, he said 150,000 Tibetans living abroad represent “six million Tibetans (in China) who have no freedom or opportunity to express what they feel.”

    Tibetans in India celebrate as Dalai Lama turns 78
    Thousands of Tibetans waved banners and danced and schoolchildren sang prayers Saturday at a Tibetan university in southern India in celebration of the Dalai Lama’s 78th birthday. Speaking after an interfaith meeting, the Tibetans’ spiritual leader called for love and compassion to promote world peace.

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    Naperville garage fire spreads to house

    Naperville Fire Department inspectors on Saturday were trying to determine what caused a Friday night fire that started in a Naperville garage spread to the attic.

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    Revelers enjoy themselves in Ayuntamiento square, in Pamplona, northern Spain on Saturday, July 6, celebrating the start of Spain’s most famous bull-running festival with the annual launch of the “chupinazo” rocket. Perhaps best glorified by Ernest Hemingway’s 1926 novel “The Sun Also Rises,” the San Fermin festival is known around the world for the daily running of the bulls.

    San Fermin bull-running festival starts
    The start of the annual San Fermin bull-running festival has been delayed briefly after suspected Basque nationalists obstructed the view in a historic city plaza before dignitaries could set off a firework marking the beginning of reveries.

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    No injuries in Island Lake cigarette store fire

    A fire in a walk-in cooler at the Cigarette Depot in Isalnd Lake caused an undetermined amount of damage early Saturday morning. Wauconda fire officials report no injuries.

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    Retrial of Egypt’s Mubarak adjourned to August
    Associated PressCAIRO — A Cairo court has adjourned to August 17 the retrial of former President Hosni Mubarak over charges of corruption and involvement in the killing of protesters during the 2011 uprising that ousted him. Mubarak and his two sons, Alaa and Gamal, who are on trial for corruption, appeared at the court session Saturday.

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    Marion Bartoli of France reacts as she wins the Women’s singles final match against Sabine Lisicki of Germany at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in Wimbledon, London, Saturday, July 6.

    Bartoli of France defeats Lisicki for Wimbledon title

    Marion Bartoli defeated Sabine Lisicki for the Wimbledon title, winning France’s first major tennis championship since 2006. Bartoli beat the No. 23 seed 6-1, 6-4, on Centre Court at the All England Club in southwest London. She dominated the German, breaking her serve five times and winning about two-thirds of baseline points.

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    Grafton Twp. officials shocked by $42,000 legal bill

    Although Grafton Township has shelled out more than $654,000 in legal fees stemming from various lawsuits that involved its former supervisor, it’s an unpaid legal bill of about $42,000 that’s giving the township sticker shock.

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    Millie and David Ramsay donated this Civil War-era flag to the Lake County Discovery Museum.

    Flag made for Lake County soldier in Civil War to get first public display

    A flag made by a Lake County mom to mark her son's enlistment in the 96th Illinois Regiment during the Civil War will get its first known public display during the Civil War Days reenactment at the Lakewood Forest Preserve near Wauconda. “This is the first Civil War Days encampment since its donation. We thought it would be a special treat for the public,” said Katherine Hamilton-Smith, director...

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    The former First Baptist Church in Batavia. An open house is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. July 30, as the city council decides the fate of the building.

    Saving Baptist church in Batavia looking less likely

    Batavia aldermen seem less than inclined to spend any money on the sanctuary of the former First Baptist Church building, given the cost and the uncertainty about whether a private developer would even keep the building. “I don’t think given all the things on our plate ... we are not in a financial position to do anything, like restoring or razzle-dazzle,” Mayor Jeff Schielke said. “We should...

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    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently announced that two brown, moth-like butterfly subspecies are likely extinct in south Florida, which some entomologists say is ground zero for the number of butterfly species on the verge of annihilation. At least one species of butterfly has vanished from the United States, along with the two subspecies in Florida. Seventeen species and subspecies are listed as endangered nationwide, and two are listed as threatened.

    Butterfly decline signals environmental trouble

    Butterflies are the essence of cool in the insect world, a favorite muse for poets and songwriters who hold them up as symbols of love, beauty, transformation and good fortune. But providing good fortune apparently goes only one way. As humans rip apart woods and meadows for housing developments and insecticide-soaked lawns, butterflies across the country are disappearing.

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    Palatine brothers Jack, 6, left to right, Danny, 4, and Tommy Houser, 8, ride the Speedway at Palatine Jaycees’ 56th annual Hometown Fest.

    What’s on tap at suburban festivals today

    The Fourth may be over, but festivals in the suburbs are just getting started. You can get your fesitval fix for anything from ribs and rides to music and games this weekend. Here’s a look at what’s happening today and the rest of this weekend.

Sports

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    With jockey E.T. Baird aboard, Saint Leon wins Saturday’s Arlington Sprint at Arlington Park.

    Big day in winner’s circle at Arlington Park

    Hockey and horse racing intersected Saturday afternoon at Arlington Park.The connections of Saint Leon celebrated his second consecutive Arlington Sprint victory and Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville and a cast of thousands celebrated the Hawks winning their second Stanley Cup in four years.

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    Valadez’s single lifts Boomers to walk-off win

    [No Paragraph Style]NewsThe Schaumburg Boomers rallied from a 2-0 deficit to record the fifth walk-off win of the season 3-2 over the River City Rascals when Michael Valadez singled home Sean Mahley in the bottom of the ninth.River City posted single runs in the first and third against Boomers starter Cody Griebling. Griebling allowed just 1 earned run in 6 innings of work but did not factor in the decision. Brian McConkey homered in the fourth while Alexi Colon notched an RBI single in the fifth to plate Mahley with the tying run. Frank Pfister finished with three hits, falling a homer shy of the cycle. Clark Labitan collected the win out of the bullpen, his first as a pro, working 1.2 scoreless innings.

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    Cougars blanked by River Bandits

    With just 3 hits on the night, the Kane County Cougars didn’t manage much offense in a 5-0 defeat at the hands of the Quad Cities River Bandits on Saturday night at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark. Quad Cities (49-36, 11-5) grabbed the advantage in the top of the second as Austin Elkins drew a two-out walk from Jose Rosario (0-5). Jobduan Morales made the Cougars (34-48, 4-12) pay as he walloped a double to the wall in center, scoring Elkins.

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    Messi’s Friends’ Lionel Messi handles the ball against the Rest of the World during the first half of the Messi and Friends charity soccer exhibition, Saturday, July 6, 2013 in Chicago.

    Messi visits, but Lombard’s Eliason puts on a show at soccer match

    Lionel Messi’s public-relations disaster made for a dream day for Lombard native Matt Eliason. The former Glenbard East soccer star and former Northwestern University walk-on scored 2 goals, including one that made even the few world-class players who didn’t back out of Saturday night’s Messi and Friends charity exhibition game at half-filled Soldier Field congratulate him.

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    Fire scouting report
    Sporting Kansas City at Chicago FireWhen: 2 p.m. at Toyota ParkTV: ESPNScouting Sporting Kansas City: Sporting Kansas City (7-5-6, 27 points) is undefeated in its last three matches. Claudio Bieler leads the club with 8 goals, but Graham Zusi is the engine in the middle of the park. Zusi has 5 assists.Scouting the Fire: The Fire (6-7-3, 21 points) will try to extend its nine-match unbeaten streak, but it might have to play without midfielder Patrick Nyarko (hamstring) and Logan Pause (back). Paolo Tornaghi again replaces Sean Johnson (international duty) in goal.Next: Club America, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Toyota Park— Orrin Schwarz

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    Goalie Nikolai Khabibulin played his last game with the Blackhawks in Game 3 of the 2009 Western Conference finals against the Red Wings.

    Khabibulin back with Blackhawks, leg problems and all

    Once backup goalie Ray Emery departed for Philadelphia as an unrestricted free agent for $1.65 million and the promise to compete for the starting job, Blackhawks general manager Stan Bowman went looking for a backup and turned to a familiar face: Nikolai Khabibulin.

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    Forward Josh Smith will be playing for the Detroit Pistons next season.

    Winners, losers and tankers in NBA free agency
    The dominoes toppled pretty quickly during the first week of NBA free agency, especially after Dwight Howard decided to take his questionable attitude to South Texas. This is a good time to take a look at the winners, losers and best tankers during the NBA’s opening week of free-agent frenzy.

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    White Sox third baseman Conor Gillaspie, center, throws over starting pitcher Chris Sale to put out Tampa Bay Rays’ Desmond Jennings during Saturday’s second inning at Tropicana Field.

    Sale, Sox come up short in Tampa

    ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Matt Moore won his fourth consecutive start to help the Tampa Bay Rays beat All-Star selection Chris Sale and the White Sox 3-0 on Saturday night.Moore (12-3), who could still become an All-Star as an injury replacement, gave up five hits, two walks and struck out six over 6 1-3 innings.The Rays have won seven of eight, improving to a season-best eight games (48-40) over .500. Fernando Rodney, the third Tampa Bay reliever, pitched the ninth for his 19th save — completing the six-hitter.Sale (5-8) allowed three runs, six hits, one walk and had nine strikeouts in seven innings for the White Sox, who have lost eight of 10. The left-hander, despite giving up just 20 runs — 17 earned — over 49 1-3 innings, is 0-6 in his last seven starts.

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    Cubs move Baez up a level to AA

    Highly touted Cubs prospect Javier Baez was promoted from Class A Daytona to Class AA Tennessee this weekend. The Cubs feel the promotion will challenge the shortstop, but he homered Saturday in his first Double-A plate appearance.

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    The Cubs’ Alfonso Soriano hits the second of his 2-run homers in Saturday’s victory over the Pirates at Wrigley Field.

    Soriano’s 2 homers power Cubs past Pirates

    Alfonso Soriano is officially hot. The Cubs left fielder crushed a pair of home runs Saturday in a 4-1 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates at Wrigley Field. Even though Soriano's contract is probhibitive, the hot streak is coming right before the trading deadline.

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    Cubs starting pitcher Travis Wood has proved this year that being an all-star pitcher isn’t just about wins and losses.

    Cubs’ Wood happy to be thrown in to all-star mix

    Lefty Travis Wood came to the Cubs at Christmas 2011 in a trade that sent popular reliever Sean Marshall to the Reds. Patience in Wood has paid off as he was named the Cubs' lone representative to this year's All-Star Game.

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    Baltimore Orioles first baseman Chris Davis drew more votes than any other player for the 2013 All-Star Game.

    Baltimore’s Davis tops All-Star fan vote

    NEW YORK — Baltimore first baseman Chris Davis has been picked to start for the American League in the All-Star game, drawing the most fan votes in the major leagues for his first selection. The rosters for the All-Star game at Citi Field in New York on July 16 were announced Saturday night. The Orioles have three starters for the first time since Cal Ripken played in 1997. St. Louis, Cincinnati and Colorado each had two players picked by fans.Shortstop J.J. Hardy and outfielder Adam Jones also made it for Baltimore. Outfielder Carlos Gonzalez and injured shortstop Troy Tulowitzki were selected from the Rockies. First baseman Joey Votto and second baseman Brandon Phillips have made it for the Reds. Outfielder Carlos Beltran and Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina, the NL’s top vote-getter, are representing St. Louis.Fans did not elect a player from either Chicago team to the All-Star squads, but each will be represented in the bullpen. The White Sox will sned pitchers Chris Sale and Jesse Crain, and the Cubs will send starter Travis Wood.

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    White Sox starting pitcher Chris Sale was named Saturday to the 2013 All-Star Game.

    3 Chicago players on All-Star rosters
    Rosters for the MLB All-Star game on Tuesday, July 16 at Citi Field in New York include three pitchers from Chicago teams.

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    Sky scouting report

    Sky scout for Sunday...please post to web

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    Cubs outfielder Alfonso Soriano, right, celebrates with closer Kevin Gregg after the Cubs defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates 4-1 Saturday at Wrigley Field.

    Soriano hits 2 homers in Cubs win

    Alfonso Soriano hit two-run homers in consecutive innings Saturday to lead the Cubs to a 4-1 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates at Wrigley Field.Edwin Jackson and three relievers combined on a five-hitter, and the Cubs handed the Pirates just their third loss in 14 games.Pittsburgh came in with the best record in the majors and a seven-game road win streak, but the Pirates couldn’t get much going at the plate or find a way to contain Soriano.His drive off Charlie Morton in the fourth after Pedro Alvarez homered in the top half put the Cubs ahead, and he followed that with a long drive to the bleachers in left to make it 4-1 in the fifth.That was enough for Jackson (5-10), who won his second straight start. A disappointment after signing a four-year deal with Chicago in January, the veteran right-hander had one of his better outings.He held the Pirates to just one run and four hits in 5 2-3 innings, leaving to cheers after he walked Garrett Jones to put runners on first and second.James Russell came in and struck out Alvarez to end the threat.Matt Guerrier worked two scoreless innings, and Kevin Gregg came on in the ninth for his 15th save in 16 chances.Morton (1-2) pitched six innings for Pittsburgh, allowing four runs and seven hits. He struck out six and walked three.Starling Marte had two hits for the Pirates after collecting three the previous day and extended his streak to 11 games. He also had two steals, although he got caught trying to swipe third in the third inning.Pirates second baseman Neil Walker left the game because of discomfort on his right side. Brandon Inge replaced him at second base in the fifth. Soriano put the Cubs ahead in the fourth after Anthony Rizzo doubled off the left-field wall, and he struck again with a shot in the fifth.The ball sailed to the last row of the left-field bleachers for his 12th homer this season.That gave him 32 multi-homer games in his career and two this season. He also tied Harold Baines for 59th on baseball’s career home run list with 384 and took sole possession of 12th place on Chicago’s list with his 175th and 176th homers as a Cub after beginning the day even with Hall of Famer Andre Dawson.

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    New overall leader Christopher Froome of Britain crosses the finish line to win the eight stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 195 kilometers (122 miles) with start in Castres and finish in Ax 3 Domaines, Pyrenees region, France, Saturday.

    Tour de France front-runner insists he’s no Lance Armstrong

    AX 3 DOMAINES, France — At his first real opportunity, Chris Froome blew away his main Tour de France rivals with a supersonic burst Saturday, a fierce uphill climb that felt a little like the bad old days of Lance Armstrong.But the Briton who took the race leader’s yellow jersey, and looks more likely than ever to keep it all the way to the finish in Paris on July 21, insisted there are fundamental differences between then and now.Armstrong was stripped of seven Tour titles last year for serial doping. Froome promised that his achievements won’t need to be erased in the future.“It is a bit of a personal mission to show that the sport has changed,” Froome said. “I certainly know that the results I’m getting, they’re not going to be stripped — 10, 20 years down the line. Rest assured, that’s not going to happen.”Froome hasn’t come out of nowhere. The 28-year-old was the Tour runner-up last year to teammate Bradley Wiggins, runner-up at the Tour of Spain in 2011 and has been the dominant rider this year coming into the Tour.Drug testing in cycling is also better and more credible than it was when Armstrong and his U.S. Postal Service teammates were pumping themselves with hormones, blood transfusions and other banned performance-enhancers.While improved doping controls do not guarantee that the 198 riders who started the Tour on June 29 are competing clean, they do allow Froome’s generation to argue more convincingly that they are a different and more believable breed of competitors from those who doped systematically in the 1990s and 2000s.“It’s normal that people ask questions in cycling, given the history of the sport. That’s an unfortunate position we find ourselves in at the moment, that eyebrows are going to be raised, questions are going to be asked about our performances,” Froome said. “But I know the sport’s changed. There’s absolutely no way I’d be able to get these results if the sport hadn’t changed. I mean, if you look at it logically we know that the sport’s in a better place now than it was, has been, ever, I think, for the last 20, 30 years.”Still, the hammer-blow Froome delivered on the first stage at this Tour to finish in the high mountains and the way his Team Sky support riders exhausted his rivals by riding hard at the front made it almost impossible to not think of Armstrong.At the Tours of 1999, 2001 and 2002, Armstrong also used the first high mountain stage to put a grip on the race. A favored tactic for his Postal team — the so-called Blue Train — was to ride so hard at the front that rivals would eventually peel off, spent, leaving Armstrong to then reap victory.“Any results now, they’re definitely a lot more credible,” Froome said. “The questions should be asked about people who were winning races maybe five, 10 years ago when we know that doping was more prevalent.”“Anyone who actually spends a bit of time with the team, with us, building up to an event like this, I mean this is months and months of preparation that’s gone into this,” he added. “That work equals these results, and it’s not something that’s so, `Wow. That’s unbelievable.’ It actually does add up if you look to see what actually goes into this.”There is a racing logic to why Froome and Sky wanted to impose themselves right from the outset in the Pyrenees. The time gaps they opened on Froome’s rivals will allow Sky to better manage the race. They won’t have to keep such a careful eye on riders who have been all but eliminated from the running for overall victory. The racing — so frantic, nervous and crash-prone in the first week of the Tour — should now calm down somewhat, with Sky expected to marshal the front of the pack to protect its yellow-jersey wearer.Peter Kennaugh, Froome’s teammate, said Sky can “take a lot of control of the race and do it how we want to do it.”

Business

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    Two new Android phones will look and sound familiar to those who have been paying attention to phones. That’s because these two devices are replicas of Samsung’s Galaxy S4 and HTC’s One, except they lack most of the bells and whistles added to the original models.

    Review: Price for simplicity in new Google phones

    Two new Android phones will look and sound familiar to those who have been paying attention to phones. That’s because these two devices are replicas of Samsung’s Galaxy S4 and HTC’s One, except they lack most of the bells and whistles added to the original models. And that’s a good thing.

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    In this June 12, 2013 photo, Christine Niezgoda collections manager for the flowering plant collection in the botany department at Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History, shows examples of the museum's plant collection that includes start to finish specimens of plant material that are used in the making of Panama hats. The museum, one of the world's pre-eminent research centers, is facing budget problems that is forcing it to cut research staff. Field President Richard Lariviere says the museum is poised to recover financially within two years. But some scientists say the cuts in its research operations will be significant. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

    Field Museum reorganizes amid money woes

    Best known for impressive public displays such as Sue, the towering Tyrannosaurus rex that greets visitors in the lobby of its Lake Michigan campus, the Field Museum’s larger mission always has been behind-the-scenes research. But the 120-year-old museum is now is setting the scientific world abuzz for another reason — its budget woes.

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    General Motors Co. and Honda Motor Co. are teaming up in a renewed push to market clean vehicles, with the two automotive giants seeking to have cheaper power- making fuel cells and hydrogen tanks ready by 2020.

    GM forges Honda fuel-cell alliance in renewed hydrogen push

    General Motors Co. and Honda Motor Co. are teaming up in a renewed push to market clean vehicles, with the two automotive giants seeking to have cheaper power- making fuel cells and hydrogen tanks ready by 2020.

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    Netflix Inc., signed an exclusive multiyear deal with Twentieth Century Fox Television to stream past seasons of “New Girl” to its U.S. online members.

    Netflix signs exclusive deal to rerun ‘New Girl’

    Netflix Inc., signed an exclusive multiyear deal with Twentieth Century Fox Television to stream past seasons of “New Girl” to its U.S. online members. The first season of the ensemble roommate comedy led by actress Zooey Deschanel became available this week, and subsequent seasons will go online after their regular broadcast run, the companies said.

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    Apple Inc., the world’s most valuable technology company, is seeking a trademark for “iWatch” in Japan as rival Samsung Electronics Co. readies its own wearable computing device.

    Apple Seeks ‘iWatch’ trademark in Japan

    Apple Inc., the world’s most valuable technology company, is seeking a trademark for “iWatch” in Japan as rival Samsung Electronics Co. readies its own wearable computing device. The company has a team of about 100 product designers working on a wristwatchlike device that may perform some of the tasks now handled by the iPhone and iPad.

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    Mozilla, the nonprofit behind the Firefox web browser, will launch its first Firefox smartphone this week in Spain. It’s not clear when the phone is coming to the United States, and you might not want to buy one even when it does. But you should root for it to succeed anyway because it’s a bet on the future of the mobile Web.

    Can Firefox phone help save the web from Apple and Google?

    Mozilla, the nonprofit behind the Firefox web browser, will launch its first Firefox smartphone this week in Spain. It’s not clear when the phone is coming to the United States, and you might not want to buy one even when it does. But you should root for it to succeed anyway because it's a bet on the future of the mobile Web.

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    How to turn your cell phone into a dolphin

    With a few cell phones and a newly developed mathematical algorithm, scientists can determine the precise shape of the room. So what, you ask? The algorithm could be used to develop more realistic video games and virtual reality simulations.

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    Apple’s new 13-inch MacBook Air promises 12 hours between charges and lots of new Windows-based laptops are offering similarly amazing stats. Why are laptops batteries getting so much better? The nominal reason is the new Intel processor Haswell — the dramatic result of Intel’s yearslong effort to alter its core assumptions about the future of technology.

    Why laptop batteries are gaining power

    Your days of fighting to get a plug in a cafe may soon be over. Apple’s new 13-inch MacBook Air promises 12 hours between charges and lots of new Windows-based laptops are offering similarly amazing stats. Why are laptops batteries getting so much better? The nominal reason is the new Intel processor Haswell — the dramatic result of Intel’s yearslong effort to alter its core assumptions about the future of technology.

Life & Entertainment

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    What to do when the mortgage is paid off

    Q. Years ago my uncle lent me the money to buy our house, and we have finally paid off the mortgage. You mention how important it is to have a satisfaction certificate filed in the public records to clear the debt. How do we get that?

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    A model wears a creation by French fashion Stephane Rolland’s Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2013-2014 collection presented Tuesday, July 2, 2013 in Paris.

    Rolland’s couture is elegant but not original

    Austere, but sensuous,” were were the words the program notes used to describe Stephane Rolland’s dark and luxuriant fall-winter couture display that continued in the elegant footsteps of last season.

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    Princeton University admissions officer Portia (Tina Fey) falls for a principal (Paul Rudd) trying to get a student into her school in “Admission.”

    DVD previews: ‘Admission,’ ‘Dead Man Down’

    An admissions counselor (Tina Fey) is called upon to help a kid with a spotty school record get into Princeton. Then, she finds out he might just be her son in "Admission," now on DVD.

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    Bret Michaels headlines the Frontier Days Festival at Recreation Park in Arlington Heights on Saturday, July 6.

    Weekend picks: Bret Michaels roars into Frontier Days

    It doesn't get much bigger at the local fests than a concert by Bret Michaels Saturday at Frontier Days in Arlington Heights. Zanies in Rosemont caps off its birthday this week with a special Roast of Rosemont Mayor Bradley Stephens Saturday. Revel in the re-created world of Elizabethan England when the Bristol Renaissance Faire returns Saturday.

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    This May 6, 2013 photo shows musician Bobby McFerrin posing for a portrait in New York. The 10-time Grammy Award-winning musician recently released his 14th album, ìspirityouall,î a CD thatís dedicated it to the legacy of his father, the Metropolitan Opera Baritone Robert McFerrin, Sr. (Photo by Scott Gries/Invision/AP)

    Bobby McFerrin honors the legacy of his father

    For Bobby McFerrin, breaking new ground has always been synonymous with his music. Yet most people know him for the feel-good a cappella tune “Don’t Worry Be Happy,” even though the 63-year singer says he hasn’t played the song in its entirety since 1988.

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    People leave a Sunday morning church service at the Cherry Grove Community House and Theater on Fire Island in Cherry Grove, N.Y. Residents of Cherry Grove are celebrating the addition of the theater to the National Register of Historic Places.

    NY gay resort community gains historic recognition

    Decades before the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City, lesbians and gay men were living freely and openly in a place called Cherry Grove. The seaside resort on Fire Island, about 60 miles east of Manhattan, was known as far back as the late 1940s as a sanctuary where gay writers, actors and businesspeople from the city and beyond escaped to relax, hold hands and show affection in public.

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    ‘Children’ more style than substance

    Let’s get one thing out of the way: I admire Sahar Delijani for taking on post-revolutionary Iran as the subject of her debut novel, “Children of the Jacaranda Tree.” It is a tough topic to tackle, especially for a novelist trying, as Delijani does, to explore the emotions involved in what is simply not a very black-and-white subject. It’s even more ambitious to explore the past 30-something years using multiple characters, multiple generations and multiple uprisings. Delijani didn’t make it easy on herself by taking on such a challenge.

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    “Let It Burn,” by Steve Hamilton.

    Steve Hamilton fires up another fine ‘Let It Burn’

    Each Alex McKnight novel has revealed a little about the part-time private detective’s troubled past: his failed marriage, his work as a young Detroit street cop, the day he got careless and ended up getting shot, and his retreat to Michigan’s rural northern peninsula where he now scrapes out a living running a string of rustic tourist cottages. Now, in the tenth book in Steve Hamilton’s fine crime-novel series, McKnight returns to the once great, now dying metropolis, propelled by a nagging fear that his last case there might have been a colossal mistake.

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    Nancie Battaglia photographs a scene during a canoe trip along the upper Hudson River as David Olbert navigates in Newcomb, N.Y.

    Canoeists find a new option in upper Hudson River

    After a big easy sweep across a flat-water pool on the upper Hudson River, Allison Buckley made sure she chose a better channel through the oncoming rapids than the previous canoe that hung up on a submerged rock. She also checked that her partner in front would paddle steadily on one side for speed while she steered and paddled as needed in the stern. Then her partner got distracted looking for boulders and attempting sideways draw strokes to avoid them.

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    Textile artist Kaffe Fassett’s crocheted skull caps, which are embellished with buttons and beads. Dozens of similar caps appeared in the show “Kaffe Fassett: A Life in Colour” recently at the Fashion and Textile Museum in London.

    Passionate crafters keep crochet alive, thriving

    Crocheting these days is so much more than granny squares and chunky Afghan blankets. It’s leaner and trendier than it was in the 1960s and ’70s, when the craft was known for its bulky, acrylic yarns. Crochet’s enduring popularity is due partly to today’s wide array of high-quality, luxurious yarns — many at affordable prices. Crochet can be found on high-fashion runways and in upscale home décor. Textile artists such as Kaffe Fassett use it.

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    Tim Jenkins of Virginia views the Devil's Den from Little Round Top during ongoing activities commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg.

    Shaped by history, Gettysburg celebrates milestone

    Gettysburg changed the direction of American history 150 years ago, and the town hasn't been the same since. The couple of hundred thousand visitors expected at events to mark the anniversary of the 1863 clash won't have to look far to find remnants of the pivotal campaign of the Civil War, even outside the grounds of the meticulously maintained national park.

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    Buyers tend to pay more attention to outdoor features in the summer, like the Elmas' swimming pool.

    Summertime, and selling a home isn't easy

    It's summer, and that's when the real estate market slows considerably. Listings tend to languish as buyers turn their attention from interest rates and open houses to cookouts and lounging on the beach.

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    Lighter wood finishes in the medium range are now popular.

    Contemporary, traditional looks coexist

    “Mix and match” is the trend in furnishings today as homeowners gravitate toward the eclectic look, said Catherine Cushing, vice president and co-owner of Geneva Home Works in West Chicago.

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    Defining a majority for the purposes of rule changes

    Q. An amendment to our condominium association’s declaration requires the affirmative vote of owners having not less than two-thirds of the vote in the association. A controversy has erupted as to whether this means the vote of two-thirds of the owners that are present at the meeting, or whether it means two-thirds of all of the owners in the association. Which is correct?

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    Real finds for DIYers

    Here are few of the items I found that might be pleasing to DIYers. When I’m working by myself I often find the need for an extra set of hands or a jig to support the longer pieces of lumber I need to cut or just to hold in place while I secure it.

Discuss

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    The Soapbox

    Daily Herald editors sound of on topics including suburbanites' amazing talents, saving pieces of history and yet another thrill from the Blackhawks.

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    Exercise rights given through FOIA
    A Bloomingdale letter to the editor: This Independence Day marked 47 years since the landmark Freedom of Information Act was signed into federal law — yet Americans are still distrustful of government. A 2013 Pew Research Center poll showed that only 26 percent of Americans surveyed say they can trust government in Washington “almost always or most of the time” — among the lowest ratings in the half-century since pollsters have been asking the question.

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    Respect those with PTSD when lighting fireworks
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: While PTSD is as real an injury of war as any outward physical wound, many of our veterans feel embarrassed or distressed by these symptoms, and experience significant anxiety around the Fourth because they cannot predict when a loud noise will occur.

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    Say no to disposable plastic water bottles
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Did you know it takes about 15 times as much water to make one plastic bottle of water than to fill it? What a waste! But add to that, the recycle rate of plastic water bottles is about 15 percent. That leaves over 60 million being discarded

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    Pro-choice politicians accessories to murder
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: The “doctor” Kermit Gosnell has been convicted of murder, but what about the accessories to his crimes? The pro-choice politicians — even the ones who say that babies who are product of rape could be killed. Don’t all babies have souls created by God?

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    Only House is trying to get answers
    A letter to the editor:

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