Fittest loser

Daily Archive : Thursday July 4, 2013

News

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    New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks during the reopening ceremony of the Statue of Liberty, Thursday.

    Statue of Liberty officially reopens for July 4th

    The Statue of Liberty reopened on the Fourth of July, eight months after Superstorm Sandy shuttered the national symbol of freedom, as Americans around the country celebrated with fireworks and parades and President Obama urged citizens to live up to the words of the Declaration of Independence.

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    Chicago Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville brought a special guest to Hinsdale’s Fourth of July parade.

    Hinsdale goes Cup crazy with Coach Quenneville

    The Stanley Cup celebration continued in the Chicago suburbs Thursday as Blackhawks Coach Joel Quenneville hoisted hockey's ultimate prize in Hinsdale's Fourth of July parade. Quenneville, who also lives in Hinsdale, was the parade's grand marshal.

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    Arrest made in stabbing of Aurora taxi driver

    A 33-year-old Aurora man suspected of stabbing a taxi driver in the throat and then stealing his cab early Thursday was taken into custody following a brief police chase. The 39-year-old driver, also from Aurora, was not seriously injured and has been released from the hospital. According to Aurora police, the driver got a call at 4:45 a.m. asking for a pickup at a gas station in the 600 block of...

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    Members of the West Chicago Historical Preservation Commission say the Joel Wiant House at 151 W. Washington St. should be saved. The 144-year-old structure was built for one of DuPage County's first white settlers, who became a prominent businessman.

    Panel rejects West Chicago's request to raze 144-year-old home

    West Chicago aldermen would need to overrule a local historical preservation commission in order to allow the city to demolish a 144-year-old house to make room for downtown redevelopment.

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    Oamohetswe Mabitsela, 4 months old, is placed by his mother next to a picture of Nelson Mandela for her to take a photograph of him with her camera phone, outside the Mediclinic Heart Hospital where former South African President Nelson Mandela is being treated in Pretoria, South Africa Thursday.

    Mandela on life support as family grave restored

    Nelson Mandela is being kept alive by a breathing machine and faces “impending death,” court documents show, as his family gravesite was restored Thursday. Mandela’s health is “perilous” and he is being kept alive by life support, according to documents filed in the court case that resulted in the remains of the former president’s three deceased children being reburied Thursday in their original...

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    Egypt’s chief justice Adly Mansour prepares to be sworn in as the nation’s interim president Thursday, July 4, 2013. The chief justice of Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court was sworn in Thursday as the nation’s interim president, taking over hours after the military ousted the Islamist President Mohammed Morsi.

    Top Brotherhood figures seized in Egypt sweep

    Egypt’s military moved swiftly Thursday against senior figures of the Muslim Brotherhood, targeting the backbone of support for ousted President Mohammed Morsi. In the most dramatic step, authorities arrested the group’s revered leader from a seaside villa and flew him by helicopter to detention in the capital.

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    Passers-by stop to read messages written on cutouts of purple ribbons dedicated to the 19 fallen Granite Mountain Hotshot firefighters hanging in a business window Thursday in Prescott, Ariz. The ribbons, each containing a name of one of the Hotshots, will later be given to the firefighters’ families.

    Ariz. town remembers the 4th, fallen firefighters

    On a day meant to ponder the nation’s birth, and those who built and defended it over 237 years, the residents of Prescott, Ariz., had 19 of their neighbors, their friends, their relatives to remember.

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    Two injured in rollover crash on I-90

    Two young women received “relatively minor” injuries when their SUV flipped on its roof Thursday evening, Illinois State Police said. The one-vehicle crash happened at 5:48 p.m. on the westbound lanes of the Jane Addams Tollway in the Rolling Meadows area, Sgt. Tim Zych said.

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    Members of the Sons of the American Revolution Illinois, march down Front Street in the 4th of July parade in Wheaton on Thursday.

    Images: July 4th in the suburbs
    The spirit of America was on display Thursday as thousands of people celebrated Independence Day by donning patriotic garb, watching parades and having fun at festivals all around the suburbs.

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    Medical examiner: Body in lake is missing student

    The Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office has identified a body recovered from Lake Michigan as that of a 25-year-old Loyola University student who went missing Sunday morning.

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    Building begins on Schaumburg’s Pleasant Square

    A groundbreaking ceremony will be held at 10:30 a.m. Monday, July 8 for the long-delayed residential development of Pleasant Square, at the northwest corner of Roselle and Schaumburg roads in Schaumburg. Representatives of the village and Chicago-based developer M/I Homes will be on hand for the official start of construction.

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    Cook County Sheriff puts on holiday patrols

    The Cook County Sheriff’s Police are stepping up patrols over the Independence Day weekend, on the lookout for seat belt violators and other traffic violations.

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    Nancy Morgan

    Mt. Prospect human services leader wins national honor

    Nancy Morgan, head of the human services department in Mount Prospect, recently received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Association of Social Workers for work done during her 28 years of service in the village. “I’m still in awe that I was recognized that way by my peers,” Morgan said. “But it’s something that wouldn’t be possible without the staff we have here.”

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    Doug Hill, center, a 2013 recipient of the Barb Basl Award, pictured with the Hoffman Estates village board and his family.

    Hoffman Estates honors disabled citizens

    Three Hoffman Estates residents, including U.S. Rep. Tammy Duckworth, were honored this week with the Barb Basl award, which is presented annually to disabled citizens who have worked to overcome the challenges associated with their physical, mental or cognitive disability.

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    Ryan Beatty in Schaumburg

    YouTube singing sensation Ryan Beatty will meet fans at the AT&T store in Schaumburg from 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Friday, July 5, to discuss his support of the “It Can Wait” public campaign discouraging texting and driving.

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    Chad A. Coe

    West Dundee youth minister facing sex charges bonds out

    Bail was set at $100,000 Thursday for a West Dundee church youth minister accused of having sex with a minor. Chad Coe, 31, of Elgin, must post $10,000 to be released from the Kane County jail while his case is pending. If released, he is to surrender his passport, have no contact with the victim of the victim's family and no contact with anyone younger than 18 unless it is a family member. He is...

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    Where to find fireworks
    Still looking for a suburban fireworks display? There are plenty to be had. Here is a comprehensive look at what's on tap for tonight.

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    Victims detail Inverness home burglary, shooting

    A 63-year-old man who was shot last Friday night at his girlfriend’s Inverness home interrupted a burglary at her residence, he and his girlfriend said Wednesday -- contradicting earlier police reports. “Basically, it was an armed robbery. Attempted murder came later,” the girlfriend said.

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    Who else wanted to be a Batavia school board member?

    Who else applied for the vacancy on the Batavia school board, besides eventual nominee Melanie Impastato? Two men who sought election in April, and two critics, were among the 10 applicants.

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    Assessor-Recorder Carmen Chu, right, laughs as Jen, left, and Frances Rainin’s dog Punum climbs on the counter as they fill out paper work for their marriage certificate after they were married at City Hall in San Francisco, Friday, June 28, 2013. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals issued a brief order Friday afternoon dissolving, “effective immediately,” a stay it imposed on gay marriages while the lawsuit challenging the ban advanced through the courts.

    State-by-state look at same-sex marriage

    Short-term targetsIllinois: Has allowed civil unions since 2011. The state Senate passed legislation legalizing same-sex marriage, but the House adjourned without passing it. Advocates will press for a House vote by November because the bill is still viable; Gov. Pat Quinn (D) has vowed to sign it.

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    Jin Lee, 51, of Des Plaines immigrated with his parents to the United States in 1975 from Seoul, South Korea.

    Des Plaines man crafts Korean War exhibit to thank soldiers

    Since Jin Lee, 51, of Des Plaines immigrated with his parents to the United States in 1975 from Seoul, South Korea, he has wanted to pay tribute to the American soldiers who kept his homeland free. Over the years, he has sponsored small exhibits on the Korean War, but the one he recently opened at the Skokie Heritage Museum is his grand achievement.

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    This handout photo provided by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), taken in April 2013 at Indianapolis International Airport, shows a gun among personal belongings that was confiscated in a carry-on bag at the airport.

    More air passengers show up with guns

    Several times every day, at airports across the country, passengers are trying to walk through security with loaded guns in their carry-on bags, purses or pockets, even in a boot. And, nearly a dozen years after 9/11, it's happening a lot more often. In the first six months of this year, Transportation Security Administration screeners found 894 guns on passengers or in their carry-on bags, a 30...

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    Showing off just a portion of his vast T-shirt offerings, former presidential candidate Ed Gombos of Addison makes products promoting everything from “Albania Body Building” to a surprisingly best-selling “Iran Track.”

    Jesus, Heston, White House all part of Addison man's tale

    The spirit of 76-year-old Ed Gombos of Addision promises to be every bit as sincere and patriotic as it was two decades ago, when the T-shirt maker saw Jesus in the wood grain of his door and ran for president of the United States. About to celebrate his 76th birthday, the Addison shopkeeper warehouses voluminous files that help visitors navigate through the times of his life. “It starts...

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    This combination of 2013 file photos shows, from left, top row, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky. and Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. and bottom row, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush. Pivotal developments on two cultural issues - immigration reform and gay marriage - offer an early preview of potential fault lines among Republicans weighing White House bids in 2016.

    GOP fault lines emerging on social issues

    Pivotal developments on two cultural issues — immigration reform and gay marriage — offer an early preview of potential fault lines among Republicans weighing White House bids in 2016. When the Senate approved a comprehensive immigration reform measure, Sens. Marco Rubio of Florida and Rand Paul of Kentucky voted in opposite directions amid divisions in the party over how to curb the...

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    Obama urges Americans to live up to Declaration

    President Barack Obama is urging Americans on the Fourth of July to live up to the words of the Declaration of Independence by securing liberty and opportunity for their own children as well as for future generations.

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    An Acehnese man carries a sack of rice he salvaged from a shop destroyed by Tuesday’s earthquake at a market in Blang Mancung, Aceh province, Indonesia, Thursday, July 4, 2013. The death toll from an earthquake that hit Indonesia’s Aceh province earlier this week has reached 30, and police and soldiers are searching the debris for another 12 people believed missing, officials said Thursday.

    Death toll from Indonesian earthquake rises to 30

    The death toll from an earthquake that hit Indonesia’s Aceh province earlier this week has reached 30, and police and soldiers are searching the debris for another 12 people believed missing, officials said Thursday.

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    In this June 30, 2013 file photo, re-enactors portray Pickett’s Charge during ongoing activities commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg at Bushey Farm in Gettysburg, Pa. One of the most difficult challenges for any mock general at a Civil War battle re-enactment is deciding which of his men must “die.”

    Who ‘dies’ is tough decision at Gettysburg

    You’re a Civil War re-enactor carrying an authentic musket, out on the field with your history-buff buddies making a charge under withering enemy fire. It’s great fun except for one thing: Someone’s going to have to “die.” Deciding who lives and who dies — and when they must fall — is one of the heaviest responsibilities a pretend commander at a Civil War re-enactment is likely to face.

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    This Thursday, June 27, 2013 photo in Bow, N.H. shows one of New Hampshire’s two coal-fired power plants. In the days since Obama announced strict rules on carbon dioxide emissions it has raised new questions about the fate of New Hampshire’s coal-fired power plants.

    Obama climate change push draws industry criticism

    President Barack Obama’s push to fight global warming has triggered condemnation from the coal industry across the industrial Midwest, where state and local economies depend on the health of an energy sector facing strict new pollution limits. But such concerns stretch even to New England, an environmentally focused region that long has felt the effects of drifting emissions from Rust Belt states.

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    Counselor killed, children OK in camp accident

    An art counselor at a Jewish summer camp popular with San Francisco Bay Area families was killed when a large oak tree fell on her. Four other adults were injured, but no children were harmed.

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    In this undated file photo provided by Maritime New Zealand, the Nina is tied at dock at a unidentified location. The American schooner missing in the South Pacific with seven people aboard sent an undelivered text message a month ago saying its sails were shredded and it was traveling at four knots.

    Last text from missing US boat said sails shredded

    An American schooner carrying seven people that’s missing in the South Pacific sent an undelivered text message a month ago saying its sails were shredded and it was traveling at four knots.

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    US Sen. Kirk presses VA to reduce claims backlog

    U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk has a plan he says will help the Veterans Affairs Department reduce its backlog of disability claims. The Illinois Republican visited the VA Hospital in Hines on Wednesday and later met with his Veterans Advisory Board.

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    Ill. halts roadwork to speed July Fourth traffic

    Illinois has suspended non-emergency roadwork to help keep traffic moving over the July Fourth holiday weekend, the most heavily traveled summer holiday.

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    Pets part of workday for some in McHenry

    Bob loves to sit around the office all day and greet customers as they enter Precision Body Works in Crystal Lake.During his downtime, he drinks water, eats snacks and plays an occasional game with some co-workers and customers. He also can be found napping every once in a while.

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    Arizona Senator McCain visits US troops in Kabul

    Senior Republican Sen. John McCain is visiting American troops in Afghanistan to celebrate the Fourth of July holiday.

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    In this January 2010 photo provided by the journal Nature via Przewalski’s Horse Association, a Przewalski’s horse is shown in Khomyntal, western Mongolia, in one of three reintroduction sites. From a tiny fossil bone found in the frozen Yukon, scientists have deciphered the genetic code of an ancient horse about 700,000 years old — nearly 10 times older than any other animal that has had its genome mapped. The researchers also found new evidence that the endangered Przewalski’s horse, found in Mongolia and China, is the last surviving wild horse.

    Genome shows horses to 4 million years ago

    The genome of a horse that lived 700,000 years ago in Canada’s Yukon Territory suggests the common ancestor for modern horses, zebras, and donkeys dates to 4 million years ago.

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    In this June 16, 2013 file photo a television screen shjows the news of Edward Snowden, a former CIA employee who leaked top-secret documents about sweeping U.S. surveillance programs, in the underground train in Hong Kong.

    Surveillance prevented 54 terror cases, NSA says

    Gen. Keith B. Alexander, the director of the National Security Agency said that because of the surveillance programs, 42 terrorist plots were disrupted and 12 individuals were identified as having provided material support to terrorist groups. Of the 54 cases he referred to, Alexander said only 13 had a “homeland nexus.”

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    Fisher v. University of Texas had the potential to be a cease-and-desist order for race-conscious admissions policies, but the court clearly could not find a majority of justices willing to go there just now. One of the striking things about Justice Anthony Kennedy’s scant 13-page opinion is that there is very little discussion of the matter at the heart of the issue: race.

    Ginsburg, Thomas spark over race on Supreme Court

    Fisher v. University of Texas had the potential to be a cease-and-desist order for race-conscious admissions policies, but the Supreme Court clearly could not find a majority of justices willing to go there just now. One of the striking things about Justice Anthony Kennedy’s scant 13-page opinion is that there is very little discussion of the matter at the heart of the issue: race. The only real...

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    Bruce Bassett

    Asphalt plant winding down on Grayslake border

    Grayslake officials have agreed an industrial use would be best on land where an asphalt plant is scheduled to close on a southern border of the village.

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    Bartlett passes on opportunity to ban assault weapons

    In anticipation of Illinois’ new concealed carry gun legislation going into effect, a discussion among Bartlett village board members took place Tuesday regarding the possible creation of a village ordinance banning assault weapons. Meeting as the Committee of the Whole, the board members agreed early on in the discussion that they didn’t feel an assault weapon ban was the role of the village.

Sports

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    Boomers bash Miners before big crowd

    The third largest crowd in franchise history — 5,788 — enjoyed a 7-1 Schaumburg Boomers victory over the Southern Illinois Miners on Thursday at Boomers Stadium. Two big innings and a dozen hits propelled the Boomers (24-19), including 3 runs in the second inning and 4 in the fourth.

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    Quick start keys Cougars past River Bandits

    The Kane County Cougars scored 3 runs in the first inning and never looked back en route to treating 11,304 fans to a 7-4 victory over the Quad Cities River Bandits on Thursday at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark in Geneva. After Kevin Encarnacion walked and Albert Almora was hit by a pitch in the first, Dan Vogelbach knocked home both runners with a double to give the Cougars (33-47, 3-11) a 2-0 lead. Vogelbach scored on an infield hit by Marco Hernandez.

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    White Sox starting pitcher Jose Quintana allowed only 2 hits Thursday while striking out a career-high 11 against the Baltimore Orioles. He ended up with a no-decision.

    Report: Catching prospect Phegley to join White Sox

    After batting .316 with 15 home runs and 41 RBI for Class AAA Charlotte, catcher Josh Phegley is expected to join the White Sox Friday in Tampa Bay.

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    The White Sox’ Adam Dunn, Baltimore Orioles catcher Matt Wieters and umpire Andy Fletcher watch Dunn’s solo home run in the ninth inning that give the White Sox a 3-2 victory Thursday at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Sox’ Dunn drives in runs, drives up trade value

    Adam Dunn has been on a tear since June, and the White Sox' first baseman/designated hitter kept hitting in Thursday's 3-2 win over the Orioles. Dunn's walkoff home run against reliever Tommy Hunter decided the outcome.

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    Cubs scouting report
    Cubs scouting report

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    Three former champions highlight Arlington Sprint field

    Saturday’s $100,000 Arlington Sprint has attracted three of the last four winners of the 5½-furlong turf dash including one who went on to win the Breeders’ Cup Sprint.

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    Oakland Athletics’ Seth Smith singles against the Cubs during the seventh inning of a baseball game Thursday, July 4, 2013 in Oakland, Calif.

    Cubs lose on passed ball in Oakland

    OAKLAND, Calif. — Derek Norris scored on a passed ball with two outs in the seventh inning and the Oakland Athletics beat the Cubs 1-0 on Thursday.Dan Straily (5-2) gave up a hit over seven innings after being recalled from Triple-A Sacramento earlier in the day. He made the start to allow a sore Jarrod Parker to get two extra days of rest. Straily walked three and struck out six.Norris walked with two outs and went to third on Seth Smith’s single. Matt Guerrier (2-4), making his first appearance with the Cubs since being acquired from the Los Angeles Dodgers, threw a strike on the outside part of the plate. Pinch hitter Eric Sogard swung at the pitch and Cubs catcher Wellington Castillo had the ball glance off his mitt, allowing Norris to score the unearned run.Cubs’ starter Travis Wood allowed three hits over six innings. He walked one and struck five in recording his third consecutive no-decision. Alfonso Soriano got Chicago’s lone hit off Straily.Wood extend his winless stretch to six starts despite an ERA of 2.58 over that span.Ryan Cook pitched the eighth and Grant Balfour recorded the final three outs for his 21st save in as many chances.In the fourth, Yoenis Cespedes threw out Starlin Castro trying to score from second on Soriano’s single to left field. Soriano was later thrown out by Norris attempting to steal second, ending the inning.Castro walked to open the inning and advanced when Nate Schierholtz grounded out.The A’s also had a potential run thrown out on the bases. Against Matt Guerrier, Chris Young singled with one out in the seventh but was caught stealing by Castillo. Norris drew a walk and went to third on Seth Smith’s single prior to the passed ball.Pedro Stroup also made his Cubs debut with a scoreless ninth as the Cubs matched their franchise record for players used before the All-Star break with 41. The Cubs also extended their franchise record by using 23 pitchers before the break.

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    Bandits’ win a singles sensation

    The host Chicago Bandits collected 11 singles en route to a 5-1 victory over the NY/NJ Comets on Thursday in National FastPitch softball action at The Ballpark at Rosemont. Tammy Williams delivered 3 of the hits and scored twice to pace the Bandits (13-4), who rebounded from a loss to the Comets (3-15) on Wednesday to make a winner of starter Andi Williamson (4-0).

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    Chalupny sparks Red Stars to 1-0 victory

    The Chicago Red Stars treated their fans to just enough offense, earning a 1-0 victory over the Western New York Flash on Thursday at Illinois Benedictine University Sports Complex in Lisle. A goal early in the second half by captain Lori Chalupny proved to be the difference for the Red Stars (4-6-3), who handed the Flash its first loss in 10 matches. The teams had tied 2-2 earlier this season.

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    White Sox starting pitcher Jose Quintana struck out 11 Baltimore players Thursday at U.S. Cellular Field.

    Quintana strikes out 11 in Sox’ walk-off win

    Adam Dunn hit a one-out home run in the bottom of the ninth inning off Tommy Hunter to give the White Sox a 3-2 victory over the Baltimore Orioles on Thursday at U.S. Cellular Field.Sox starter Jose Quintana had a career-high 11 strikeouts and reliever Addison Reed (2-0) got the victory.Dunn homered to left off Hunter (3-2) to end the game.Quintana went a seventh straight game without a decision, allowing two hits over seven innings. He retired the last 13 Orioles he faced.Alex Rios broke up a scoreless tie in the sixth inning with an RBI single and Dunn followed with an RBI single off Zach Britton.Baltimore scored twice in the eighth off reliever Nate Jones, one on an RBI infield grounder by pinch-hitter Matt Wieters and the other on Nick Markakis’ sacrifice fly.Quintana’s previous career high for strikeouts had been eight on July 5, 2012 against Texas.Baltimore starter Zach Britton struck out three, walked one and gave up six hits over seven innings in his longest stint of the season.Rios, who went 2 for 3, singled up the middle off Britton for the game’s first run after Alexei Ramirez had led off with a double down the left-field line. After Ramirez scored on Rios’ hit and Dayan Viciedo flew out, Dunn singled up the middle for a 2-0 Chicago lead.

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    Blackhawks goalie coach Stephane Waite, center,is leaving the team after 10 seasons to join the Montreal Canadiens, officials announced Thursday.

    Hawks lose goaltender coach to Montreal

    After 10 seasons and two Stanley Cup titles with the Blackhawks, veteran goaltender coach Stephane Waite is leaving Chicago to join the Montreal Canadiens. Waite helped Blackhawks goalies Corey Crawford and Ray Emery earn the Jennings Trophy last season with the best goals-against average in the NHL. In 2010, he helped develop Antti Niemi as the Blackhawks won their first Stanley Cup title in 49 years.

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    Chicago Rush head coach Bob McMillen of Naperville is one the finalists for the 2013 Arena Football Hall of Fame. Fans can cast their vote at arenafootball.com through July 26.

    Rush’s McMillen not distracted by HOF nomination

    Chicago Rush head coach Bob McMillen is one of the finalists for the 2013 Arena Football Hall of Fame class. The Naperville resident won three AFL championships in 13 seasons in the AFL as a fullback/linebacker. In 2006, he helped the Rush win their first championship and was named the ArenaBowl Ironman of the Game. McMillen is honored by the possibility of becoming a hall of famer, but he's focused on getting his team to the playoffs and beating the Philadelphia Soul this weekend.

Business

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    President Barack Obama gestures during a statement about the Affordable Care Act on June 7. The latest hitch gives employers an additional year before they must offer medical coverage to their workers or pay a fine. What does the delay mean for workers? And struggling businesses?

    What now? Q&A about latest snag in health care law

    Nothing’s ever easy with President Barack Obama’s health care law. The latest hitch gives employers an additional year before they must offer medical coverage to their workers or pay a fine. What does the delay mean for workers? And struggling businesses?

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    In this April 9, 1997 file photo, Doug Engelbart, inventor of the computer mouse and winner of the half-million dollar 1997 Lemelson-MIT prize, poses with the computer mouse he designed, in New York. Engelbart has died at the age of 88.

    Engelbart, inventor of computer mouse, dies at 88

    Doug Engelbart, a visionary who invented the computer mouse and developed other technology that has transformed the way people work, play and communicate, died late Tuesday. He was 88. His death of acute kidney failure occurred at his home in Atherton, Calif., after a long battle with Alzheimer’s disease, according to one of his daughters, Diana Engelbart Mangan. Back in the 1950s and `60s, when mainframes took up entire rooms and were fed data on punch cards, Engelbart already was envisioning a day when computers would empower people to share ideas and solve problems in ways that seemed unfathomable at the time.

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    Pakistani Finance Minister Muhammad Ishaq Dar, center addresses a news conference with IMF mission chief Jeffrey Franks, left, at the finance ministry in Islamabad, Pakistan on Thursday. Pakistan and the International Monetary Fund have reached an initial agreement on a bailout of at least $5.3 billion to stave off an economic crisis as the countryís foreign reserves dip perilously low, officials said Thursday.

    Pakistan, IMF agree to $5.3 billion bailout

    Pakistan took a major step toward averting an economic crisis Thursday, reaching an initial deal with the International Monetary Fund on a bailout of at least $5.3 billion to help shore up the country’s rapidly diminishing foreign reserves.

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    Portugal’s Prime Minister Pedro Passos Coelho arrives for a weekly meeting with Portugal’s President Anibal Cavaco Silva at the Belem presidential palace in Lisbon Thursday. Portugal’s governing coalition parties have held urgent talks in a bid to resolve differences over crushing austerity policies that have pushed the government to the brink of collapse.

    Portugal politicians try to save government

    The leaders of Portugal’s governing coalition parties remained locked in negotiations Thursday as they attempted to repair differences that threatened to pitch the bailed-out country into turmoil and reignite concerns over Europe’s debt crisis.

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    Paula Deen continued to feel the effects of her admission that she used racial slurs, as most recently she ended her business relationship with a longtime agent.

    Deen parts with agent after racial slur fallout

    Paula Deen is ending her business relationship with a longtime agent after her admission that she used racial slurs in the past resulted in the loss of major pieces of her media and merchandising empire.

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    President of European Central Bank Mario Draghi smiles during a news conference in Frankfurt, Germany, Thursday, following a meeting of the ECB governing council. The ECB decided to leave the key interest rate unchanged.

    ECB says rates low ‘for extended period’

    The European Central Bank and the Bank of England on Thursday underlined their determination to keep interest rates low in an attempt to reassure markets unsettled by the possible end of the U.S. Federal Reserve’s bond-buying program.

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    U.K. lawmaker asks police to quiz Murdoch over bribes comment

    A U.K. lawmaker called for News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch to be questioned by police after a secret recording showed him saying that bribery had been routine practice by reporters.

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    This April 28, 2010 photo shows the Colstrip Steam Electric Station, a coal-fired power plant in Colstrip, Mont. Plants such as Colstrip, which produces more than 15 million tons of carbon dioxide annually, could face new regulations under President Barack Obama’s latest climate change proposal. The coal industry, which was hoping for a rebound in 2013 after struggling to stay competitive in recent years, is back on the defensive after President Barack Obama renewed calls for carbon dioxide reductions from new and existing power plants.

    White House has coal country on the defensive

    After several years of taking a beating from the poor economy, new pollution rules and a flood of cheap natural gas, the coal industry was on the rebound this year as mining projects moved forward in the Western U.S. and demand for the fuel began to rise, especially in Asia. But almost overnight, coal is back on the defensive, scrambling to stave off a dark future amid President Barack Obama’s renewed push to rein in climate change.

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    President Barack Obama and his administration had hoped to recruit sports leagues like the NFL or Major League Baseball to help promote the new health-care law. But, after some initial interest, the leagues are backing away now that they see the volatile political arena they would have been entering.

    NFL says no to entering Obamacare arena

    President Barack Obama and his administration had hoped to recruit sports leagues like the NFL or Major League Baseball to help promote the new health-care law. But, after some initial interest, the leagues are backing away now that they see the volatile political arena they would have been entering.

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    BlackBerry 10 failing to revive company

    BlackBerry reported a disappointing first-quarter loss last week, putting a serious hitch in the company’s comeback narrative as it fights to stay relevant in the competitive smartphone market. The company has staked its future on luring BlackBerry customers back into the fold with a new operating system, BlackBerry 10, and phones with slick, modern features. But the early results were disappointing and sent the company’s stock plummeting more than 27 percent.

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    Toyota Motor Corp. has released a luxury bicycle priced at 1 million yen ($10,083) under its Lexus brand and will limit sales to 100 units worldwide.

    Toyota produces $10,000 bicycle

    Toyota Motor Corp. has released a luxury bicycle priced at 1 million yen ($10,083) under its Lexus brand and will limit sales to 100 units worldwide.

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    Curry County, with heavily wooded tracts along the rugged Oregon coast, is verging on insolvency after U.S. officials designated the northern spotted owl as a threatened species, drying up area timber revenue and making the region reliant on federal subsidies that have ended.

    Spotted owl protection pushes Oregon county to insolvency

    Curry County, with heavily wooded tracts along the rugged Oregon coast, is verging on insolvency after U.S. officials designated the northern spotted owl as a threatened species, drying up area timber revenue and making the region reliant on federal subsidies that have ended. About $7 million in annual payments the county had received from the U.S. government expired in October. “When we have to cannibalize our very unemployment reserves and working capital just to build one last budget, that is insolvent,” a county official said.

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    Due to a poor catch for the fourth year in a row in Japan, the trading price for young eels, or elvers, has broken last year’s record of about 2.14 million yen (about $21,945) per kilogram. The price of live adult eels has also risen.

    In Japan, eel shops struggle to survive

    People hoping to enjoy kabayaki grilled unagi eel in a special soy-based sauce at the peak of the summer heat -- July 22 is this year’s “Doyo no Ushi,” a traditional eel-eating day -- will feel the effect of a recent surge in domestic eel prices. Due to a poor catch for the fourth year in a row, the trading price for young eels, or elvers, has broken last year’s record of about 2.14 million yen (about $21,945) per kilogram. The price of live adult eels has also risen.

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    Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, helped engineer its largest and perhaps most controversial program — the rescue of the euro zone.

    ‘We have delivered,’ IMF director says in Q&A

    In two years as managing director of the International Monetary Fund, Christine Lagarde has steered the agency beyond the arrest of her predecessor and helped engineer its largest and perhaps most controversial program — the rescue of the euro zone. Criticism has been intense and Lagarde has been stymied on other fronts.

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    In ruling against Fox Searchlight, U.S. District Judge William Pauley in Manhattan said internships can be exempt from minimum wage requirements only if they adhere to all the criteria in the Labor Department test, which is based on a 1947 U.S. Supreme Court decision concerning railroad trainees.

    Courts could spell end of unpaid internships

    To critics, unpaid internships are an abuse of the labor system, a way for employers to take advantage of desperate job seekers. Supporters, including some former unpaid interns, see it as a way to get training and career contacts. Unpaid internship could change if the appeals court upholds the ruling of a federal judge in New York who found that moviemaker Fox Searchlight Pictures violated labor laws by not paying two of its interns.

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    The Space Needle flies Marriage Equality flag atop the iconic landmark to celebrate Marriage Equality, Pride, Seattle and Washington State's role in bringing about monumental change for human and civil rights. (PRNewsFoto/Space Needle)

    Q&A: What gay marriage ruling means for taxes, benefits

    United States v. Windsor, the Supreme Court decision striking down Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act, was obviously of huge symbolic importance for LGBT Americans, but as we’ve been stressing this week, it matters in practical terms as well. Thousands of other same-sex married couples will see their lives change in ways big and small because of the federal government’s recognition of them. Here are some specifics.

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    In this June 23, 2013 file photo, a television screen shows a news report of Edward Snowden, a former CIA employee who leaked top-secret documents about sweeping U.S. surveillance programs, at a shopping mall in Hong Kong.

    Federal wiretaps up 71 percent

    The number of wiretaps secured in federal criminal investigations jumped 71 percent in 2012 over the previous year, according to newly released figures. Federal courts authorized 1,354 interception orders for wire, oral and electronic communications, up from 792 the previous year.

Life & Entertainment

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    This publicity image released by Disney shows Johnny Depp as Tonto, right, and Armie Hammer as The Lone Ranger, in a scene from “The Lone Ranger.”

    Tonto: An upgrade or just an updated stereotype?

    Just in time for the birthday of the nation that was founded on the decimation of its native inhabitants, Johnny Depp leaps onto 3,700 theaters across the United States as Tonto, that mothballed stereotype of American Indians, in Disney’s theatrical reboot of “The Lone Ranger.” Hi-yo, controversy!

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    Lulo’s Cuban Cafe in Grayslake serves its own take of the traditional Cuban pressed sandwich.

    Cuban fare a family affair at Lulo’s in Grayslake

    The brother-sister team of Rick Felipez and Hayden Felipez-Taylor own and run this casual and vibrant eatery at Prairie Crossing. This is Felipez-Taylor’s first restaurant, and one she should be proud of. The Cuban flavors shine.

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    Shakespeare's bloodiest play, “Titus Andronicus,” is presented by Adam Kander, left, Andrew Pond and Michael Woods as a TV cooking show in Eclectic Full Contact Theatre's production of “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)” at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre in Arlington Heights.

    Much ado at Metropolis: 'Shakespeare' delivers the laughs

    Shakespeare's dramatic canon gets comically pulverized in a hilarious rendition of "The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)," now being presented by Eclectic Full Contact Theatre at the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre in Arlington Heights. These collaborators bring the comedy goods to make “Shakespeare (Abridged)” feel fresh as if they're devising it on the spot.

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    A recent study says your response to stress may well depend on your gender. Researchers from the University of Arizona found that, for couples who cooperate well, men tend to mimic their partner’s mood while women try to regulate their partner’s emotions. “Women try to keep the peace,” speculates relationship researcher and lead study author Ashley Randall.

    Study: Men try to follow, women try to moderate emotions

    A recent study says your response to stress may well depend on your gender. Researchers from the University of Arizona found that, for couples who cooperate well, men tend to mimic their partner’s mood while women try to regulate their partner’s emotions. “Women try to keep the peace,” speculates relationship researcher and lead study author Ashley Randall.

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    In this Wednesday, July 3, 2013 photo, Bollywood actor Shah Rukh Khan speaks during the releasing of the music of his upcoming movie “Chennai Express” in Mumbai, India. Shah Rukh Khan confirmed late Wednesday that he’s the father of a new baby amid feverish media speculation.

    Indian actor Shah Rukh Khan announces new baby

    Bollywood star Shah Rukh Khan has confirmed that he’s the father of a new baby amid feverish media speculation. Talking to reporters at a news conference to promote the music from his latest film, Khan said late Wednesday that the news was “extremely personal.”

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    Barry Manilow will play “A Capitol Fourth” in Washington on Thursday. The show will be broadcast live on PBS.

    Barry Manilow: Songs of love and love of country

    Having reached 50 singles on the adult contemporary chart, Barry Manilow is still performing before large audiences. He returns to Washington to play “A Capitol Fourth” on the West Lawn of the Capitol on July 4.

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    Nearly 50,000 buyers from 148 countries and 2,400 exhibitors descended on the five-day Bordeaux’s Vinexpo wine and spirits trade fair, which is as much about late-night schmoozing as early-morning selling.

    James Bond $13,000 champagne blings up Vinexpo

    Nearly 50,000 buyers from 148 countries and 2,400 exhibitors descended on the five-day Bordeaux’s Vinexpo wine and spirits trade fair, which is as much about late-night schmoozing as early-morning selling. The fair’s ultimate bling wine is a $13,000 “Bollinger Experience,” that includes a jeroboam (three-liter bottle) of Bollinger R.D. Champagne, a James Bond favorite.

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    Music notes: Holiday heralds a weekend of rock
    The suburbs will be alive with music this weekend, as prominent rockers like Slash, .38 Special and Bret Michaels take the stage at summer festivals under way in Naperville, Hoffman Estates and Arlington Heights, respectively.

  •  
    Derek Vincent Smith, better known as Pretty Lights, played the 2013 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in Manchester, Tenn.

    Pretty Lights gets deep on all-original new album

    Derek Vincent Smith, the internationally renowned DJ who performs under the name Pretty Lights, has a simple request: Don’t call what he does electronic dance music. “My music is made electronically,” Smith said. “It’s definitely music and I do want people to dance at my shows, so I guess it is EDM. But it’s not because it’s more than that, you know what I mean?”

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    Theater events: St. Charles’ Zanies hosts standup comic Ms. Pat

    Standup comedian Ms. Pat has gone from selling drugs on the streets of Atlanta as a teenage mom to performing on Nickelodeon’s “Mom’s Night Out,” as well as opening national tours and headlining comedy clubs. That includes Zanies in St. Charles where she performs this weekend.

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    Singer-songwriter Natalie Cole is promoting her new album, “Natalie Cole en Espanol.”

    Natalie Cole releases her first Spanish album

    It’s been four years since Natalie Cole received a kidney from a Salvadorian donor, and the singer says it not only connected her to Hispanic culture, it has given her the strength to record her first post-operation album — totally in Spanish. “I don’t believe in coincidences. I believe everything happens for a reason."

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    Monee Hauducoeur, from Upland, Calif., keeps a bowl of fresh water for her dog, Summer, as she awaits in the shade to adopt another dog outside the City of Rancho Cucamonga Animal Care & Adoption Center in Rancho Cucamonga, Calif.

    Bombs bursting in air a nightmare for dogs

    Liberty is loud and a lot of dogs have problems with those Fourth of July sounds of freedom, Erika Gamez said. She should know — she takes care of over 150 at work and five at home. On Thursday, the 150 dogs, 150 cats and all the other creatures at the Rancho Cucamonga Animal Care and Adoption Center will be moved inside the buildings, said Gamez, the Southern California shelter’s animal care supervisor. Classical music will be played throughout the center in the early evening to soothe animals that have sensitive hearing and can’t tolerate loud noise.

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    Steve Schneider, a former U.S. Marine, reinvented himself as a drink-mixing rock star in the documentary "Hey Bartender."

    ‘Bartender’ doc mixes right ingredients

    Dann Gire reviews “Hey Bartender,” a new nonfiction film all about the history and art of making cocktails. For a liquor documentary backed by a major independent distillery, it never devolves into the pro-drinking propaganda you might imagine. Dann also interviews the co-directors of the coming-of-age drama “The Way, Way Back,” Jim Rash and Nat Faxon, plus provides some Reel Life film notes.

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    Duncan (Liam James) begins what he imagines to be the worst summer of his adolescent life in "The Way, Way Back."

    'Way, Way Back' radiates charm, comedy

    “The Way, Way Back” features a frustrated, misunderstood teen, malfunctioning parents and a quirky, lovable mentor, all standard-operating materials for the coming-of-age genre. But this movie has been written by Jim Rash and Nat Faxon making their auspicious co-directorial debut. They stuff this delightful drama with plenty of charm, good humor and a really, really odd sense of nostalgia.

Discuss

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    Editorial: Freedom’s everyday call to each of us

    On this Fourth of July, a Daily Herald editorial reflects on the need for the nation's citizens to help maintain their freedoms through community involvement.

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    Daily journalism with a shelf life of a lifetime

    Columnist Jim Slusher: The shelf life of a daily newspaper has always been, well, pretty much by definition, just one day. But we aren’t always limited to journalism that’s so short-lived.

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    Citizens key to independence
    A Mundelein letter to the editor: As we celebrate Independence Day, I’ve been thinking about the reasons why the United States was founded.

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    A great day to read the Declaration
    A Chicago letter to the editor: Once again our country’s birthday is here, commemorating the day our Founders wrote what is inarguably the finest document ever written by those who fostered the Revolution and sent the Declaration to the king of England. All freedom-loving people should take the time to read the Declaration of Independence

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