Daily Archive : Sunday June 2, 2013

News

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    Kenan Alhayek, 18, of Schaumburg gives the senior address at the Schaumburg High School forty-first annual commencement at the Sears Centre on Sunday.

    Images: Schaumburg High School Graduation
    Schaumburg High School held its commencement ceremony on Sunday, June 2, at the Sears Centre in Hoffman Estates.

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    Tornado chaser Tim Samaras is seen here in May 2006. His brother said Sunday that Tim Samaras was killed along with Tim’s son, Paul Samaras, and another chaser, Carl Young, on Friday while chasing a tornado near Oklahoma City.

    3 veteran storm chasers killed by Oklahoma tornado

    Three veteran storm chasers were among the 10 people killed when a violent tornado barreled into the Oklahoma City metro area. Jim Samaras said Sunday his brother Tim Samaras, 54, was killed Friday. Tim Samaras’ son, 24-year-old Paul Samaras, and another chaser, Carl Young, also died.

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    Illinois Treasurer Dan Rutherford is continuing his cross-state tour after kicking off his 2014 campaign for governor.

    Rutherford's campaign tour continues for 2nd day

    Illinois Treasurer Dan Rutherford is continuing his cross-state tour after kicking off his 2014 campaign for governor.The Republican is scheduled to make a series of stops on Monday, visiting supporters in Springfield, Marion, Cahokia, Quincy and Milan.Rutherford is a Pontiac native and former, longtime state lawmaker who will likely face a crowded GOP field. Meanwhile, Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn...

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    Gov. Pat Quinn finds himself politically vulnerable and facing another trial: fending off the string of potential candidates who want to unseat him in 2014.

    Legislative failures could hurt Quinn in 2014 bid

    Coming off a spring session in which all of his top legislative priorities failed, Gov. Pat Quinn finds himself politically vulnerable and facing another trial: fending off the string of potential candidates who want to unseat him in 2014. “I know it's easy to blame the governor. He's an easy target,” Rep. Tom Cross, of Oswego, told the chamber Friday night.

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    Steven Casstevens

    New Buffalo Grove police chief relishes challenge

    When Steven Casstevens moves from his old position as chief of police in Cary to his new job as chief in Buffalo Grove, the size of the police force he leads and community he serves will more than double. But Casstevens, who served 2½ years as Cary’s chief after a 30-year career with the Hoffman Estates Police Department, said he relishes the chance to take the helm in the larger suburb.

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    James Brown, right, the assistant principal of Benet Academy, hugs the father of Jennie Dizon, left, after presenting her family with her diploma to mark her graduation on Sunday, June 2.

    Images: Benet Academy Graduation
    Benet Academy held its commencement ceremony on Sunday, June 2, at the school.

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    The appropriately named Angelina Rose, the 2013 Rose Queen, rides atop a float Sunday during the Rose Parade in Roselle.

    Roselle crowd enjoys chilly Rose Parade

    They wore sweatshirts instead of sunscreen, but the people who lined Irving Park Road in Roselle Sunday said they never considered skipping the 54th annual Rose Parade because of the fall-like weather.

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    Christina Nowicki gives the thumbs-up to her family as she marches with graduates into the Sears Centre for Fremd High School's commencement ceremony on Sunday.

    Images: Fremd High School Graduation
    Fremd High School held its commencement ceremony on Sunday, June 2, at the Sears Centre in Hoffman Estates.

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    Renee Pond, left, and Margaret Dugan make funny faces as they pose for a picture during graduation ceremonies Sunday at Maine West High School.

    Images: Maine West High School Graduation
    Maine West High School held their commencement ceremony on Sunday, June 2, at the school.

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    Eliza Mercado waves to her family during the processional of the Elk Grove High School graduation Sunday.

    Images: Elk Grove High School Graduation
    Elk Grove High School held its commencement ceremony on Sunday, June 2, at the school.

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    Images from the Prospect High School graduation on Sunday, June 2, at the school.

    Images: Prospect High School Graduation
    Prospect High School held its commencement ceremony on Sunday, June 2, at the school.

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    Chris Gonzalez, left, Concepcion Blancas, and Donna Bledsoe have a laugh together before the Wheeling High School graduation on Sunday, June 2nd, at the school. There were 425 graduating seniors who participated in commencement exercises

    Images: Wheeling High School Graduation
    Wheeling High School held their commencement ceremony on Sunday, June 2, at the school.

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    Firefighters work on the scene of Sunday morning’s fire at Enzo & Lucia Italian Restaurant, 343 Old McHenry Road, in downtown Long Grove. The cause of the fire has still not been determined.

    Fire damages Long Grove restaurant, cancels graduation parties

    Investigators are looking into what caused the Sunday morning fire that severely damaged a downtown Long Grove restaurant. No one was injured in the blaze at Enzo & Lucia Italian Restaurant, 343 Old McHenry Road, but an owner said several post-graduation celebrations planned at the restaurant Sunday had to be canceled.

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    Images from the Hersey High School graduation on Sunday, June 2, at the school.

    Images: Hersey High School Graduation
    Hersey High School held its commencement ceremony on Sunday, June 2, at the school.

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    Student council president Hanah Chang gives a speech during the Buffalo Grove High School graduation on Sunday, June 2nd, at the school. There were 507 graduating seniors who participated in commencement exercises.

    Images: Buffalo Grove High School Graduation
    Buffalo Grove High School held its commencement ceremony on Sunday, June 2, at the school.

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    Smoke rises from the remains of a destroyed home in Lake Hughes, Calif., Sunday. Erratic winds fanned a blaze in the Angeles National Forest to nearly 41 square miles early Sunday, after fast-moving flames triggered the evacuation of nearly 1,000 homes in Lake Hughes and Lake Elizabeth, officials said.

    Thousands evacuated as crews fight Calif. wildfire

    A wildfire that destroyed at least six homes, damaged 15 others and threatened hundreds more grew quickly Sunday as it triggered evacuations for nearly 3,000 people and burned dangerously close to communities in the parched mountains north of Los Angeles.

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    Danny Werfel, the new acting commissioner of the IRS, issued a statement commenting on a report by Treasury Department’s Inspector General in which he criticized a $4 million IRS conference in August 2010 in Anaheim, Calif.

    House panel: Report finds $50M for IRS conferences

    A government watchdog has found that the Internal Revenue Service spent about $50 million to hold at least 220 conferences for employees between 2010 and 2012, according to a House committee.

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    Guadalupe Flores, right, takes a photo of herself with friend Sury Rodriguez prior to the Rolling Meadows High School graduation Sunday.

    Images: Rolling Meadows High School Graduation
    Rolling Meadows High School held their commencement ceremony on Sunday, June 2, at the school.

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    Egyptian anti-riot police stand gurad in front of the Supreme Constitutional Court in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday. An Egyptian court ruled Sunday the nation’s Islamist-dominated legislature and constitutional panel were illegally elected and that the legislature’s upper house, the only one currently sitting, must be dissolved when parliament’s lower chamber is elected later this year or early in 2014.

    Court says Egypt legislature illegally elected

    Egypt’s highest court ruled on Sunday that the nation’s interim parliament was illegally elected, though it stopped short of dissolving the chamber immediately, in a decision likely to fuel the tensions between the ruling Islamists and the judiciary.

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    Young Turks clash with security forces in Ankara, Turkey, Sunday. The demonstrations grew out of anger over a violent police crackdown of a peaceful environmental protest at Istanbul’s Taksim Square and spread to other Turkish cities.

    Erdogan rejects ‘dictator’ claims

    Turkey’s prime minister on Sunday rejected claims that he is a “dictator,” dismissing protesters as an extremist fringe, even as thousands returned to the landmark Istanbul square that has become the site of the fiercest anti-government outburst in years.

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    This citizen journalism image provided by the Local Council of Barzeh, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, shows destroyed homes from government airstrikes and shelling, in the Barzeh district of Damascus, Syria, Saturday.

    Hezbollah, Syrian rebels clash in Lebanon

    Syrian rebels and Hezbollah guerrillas battled Sunday in their worst clashes yet inside Lebanon, a new sign that the civil war in Syria is increasingly destabilizing its fragile neighbor. Syria’s foreign minister, meanwhile, rebuffed an appeal by the U.N. and the Red Cross to let humanitarian aid reach thousands of civilians trapped in the rebel-held town of Qusair.

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    President Barack Obama and Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping, left, visit at the White House Feb. 14, 2012. When Obama meets Jinping again this week, he will be visiting with China’s president — and cybersecurity will be high among issues that will be raised.

    Cybersecurity tops Obama’s agenda for China talks

    President Barack Obama will be looking for signs from China’s leader at their upcoming meeting that Beijing is ready to address its reported high-tech spying, which the White House sees as a top threat to the U.S. economy and national security.

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    Dave Slowik of Oswego and Marcus Ohnemus of Plainfield got turned around while competing in the 52nd Mid-American Canoe and Kayak Race on Sunday. The race had heats starting from St. Charles and Batavia with both finishing at McCullough Park in Aurora.

    Perfect conditions for Fox River canoe, kayak race

    Sunday's 52nd Mid-American Canoe and Kayak Race was a complete contrast from last year, when the Fox River was at its lowest point in decades — almost too low to paddle the route from St. Charles to Aurora. This year, a swift current and what one official described as the highest water level seen in six years helped propel racers along the river without reaching dangerous speeds.

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    Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey speaks during a news conference at the Pentagon on May 17 to discuss sexual assaults in the military and other topics.

    Military’s sexual-assault problem has deep roots

    Sexual assault occurs in myriad settings and the perpetrators come from every swath of U.S. society. Yet as recent incidents and reports make clear, it’s a particularly intractable problem in the military, with its enduring macho culture and unique legal system.

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    Bartlett teen faces felony drug charges

    A Bartlett teenager faces three felony drug charges after police executed a search warrant at his home on Friday morning, according to a news release. Police seized cannabis, drug paraphernalia, prescription medication and psilocybin mushrooms from Larry R. Gramhofer Jr., 19, of the 900 block of Island Court, according to the news release.

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    Police investigate bomb threat at Palatine graduation

    Palatine police are investigating online reports of a bomb threat to Palatine High School’s graduation ceremony Sunday afternoon. The ceremony took place as scheduled and police found no evidence of a bomb at the school, said police Sgt. Larry Canada.

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    Leon County officials work to corner Scooter, a 7-year-old llama that was on the loose in Tallahassee, Fla., Saturday. Scooter had to be subdued with a Taser, authorities said Sunday.

    Llama busts loose in Fla., subdued with taser

    When Scooter the llama busted out of his penned-in yard in Tallahassee, it took three county sheriff’s deputies and a taser gun to get him back in again. The 6-foot-tall, 7-year-old llama outran the authorities for a while, even leaping over a 4-foot fence to avoid capture, police said Sunday.

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    An Atlantic puffin with a beak crammed with hake makes its way to a burrow to feed its chick on Eastern Egg Rock, Maine, in this photo from 2007.

    Atlantic puffins in peril in U.S.

    The Atlantic puffin population is at risk in the United States, and there are signs the seabirds are in distress in other parts of the world. In the Gulf of Maine, the comical-looking seabirds have been dying of starvation and losing body weight, possibly because of shifting fish populations as ocean temperatures rise, according to scientists.

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    Usha Devi, right, who was suffering from cervical cancer, talks with health workers from Tata Memorial Hospital in a slum in Mumbai, India. A simple vinegar test slashed cervical cancer death rates by one-third in a remarkable study of 150,000 women in the slums of India, where the disease is the top cancer killer of women.

    Vinegar cancer test saves lives, India study finds

    A simple vinegar test slashed cervical cancer death rates by one-third in a remarkable study of 150,000 women in the slums of India, where the disease is the top cancer killer of women. Doctors reported the results Sunday at a cancer conference in Chicago.

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    Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, who is leading a U.S. congressional delegation to Russia this week, said at a press conference Sunday that there was “nothing specific” that could have helped April’s bombings, but that the U.S. and Russia needed to work more closely on joint security threats.

    Congressmen find few Boston attack clues in Russia

    The head of a U.S. congressional delegation said Sunday that its meetings in Russia showed there was “nothing specific” that could have helped prevent the Boston Marathon bombings, but that the two countries need to work more closely on joint security threats.

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    After defeat, Barrington Hills changes labor attorney

    Just weeks after suffering a defeat in its legal fight with the village’s police union, Barrington Hills officials have changed their special counsel in charge of labor relations with officers. Village President Martin McLaughlin hopes the change of attorney could potentially repair the adversarial relationship between the village and police union.

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    District 79 special ed meeting

    Fremont Elementary District 79 will host a meeting on Tuesday, June 11, at 10 a.m. to discuss plans for providing special education services to students with disabilities who attend private schools and home schools within the district for the 2013-14 school year.

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    3 honored for saving drivers in McHenry and Kane counties

    What do Matt Bonnie, Daniel Hibbeler and Randall Ho have in common? Besides being suburban men, each was recently recognized for saving a motorist in need. Hibbeler and Ho were the recipients of the Citizen’s Lifesaving Award, which is the highest honor that the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office can bestow upon a civilian. Bonnie, an Aurora police officer, recently received the Louis Spuhler Award...

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    Lake County retired teachers meet

    The Lake County Retired Teachers Association meets at noon Tuesday, June 11, at Lambs Farm restaurant, Route 176 and I-94, near Libertyville.

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    Have coffee with Sente

    State Rep. Carol Sente will meet with constituents Saturday, June 8, at Starbucks, 1240 E. Route 45 in Vernon Hills.

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    Veterans can help the environment

    Veterans are invited to join the Volunteer Veterans’ Conservation Corp. The group provides opportunities for veterans to continue serving their country by assisting with and developing projects to enhance state parks and natural areas.

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    Parents Luis Alanis and Edna Soares say they knew their daughter, Rebecca, had the potential to go on to college. But they credit the Project Excel program for minority students at Palatine High School with helping Rebecca earn a $50,000 scholarship to study architecture at Kent State University.

    In Palatine High program, minorities learn they can strive for more

    Today’s graduation ceremony at Palatine High School could have been viewed as the finish line for minority students challenging the stereotype of low expectations. Instead, the seniors in the high school’s Project Excel group look at today’s pomp and circumstance as simply a first step toward their college careers. “When I first moved here, I was two or three years behind. I never had read a...

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    GAT Guns owner Greg Tropino, left, and employee Randy Potter are preparing for a grand reopening of their store to accommodate Illinoisans wanting to take advantage of the state’s new conceal-and-carry law, which still needs the governor’s signature to take effect.

    E. Dundee gun shop has spent 2 years preparing for concealed carry

    “We wanted to be the benchmark for the business,” Greg Tropino said. “We really wanted to be the place to go to.” So his GAT Guns in East Dundee has been expanding its retail space, classrooms and shooting ranges in anticipation of Illinoisans wanting to carry weapons once the governor signs a controversial conceal-and-carry bill. “We have been preparing for this for two years,” he said.

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    People arrived at Fred and JoAnn Horn's home to help in their salvage efforts, Saturda in El Reno, Okla. .

    Cleanup goes on as storms move toward East Coast

    A violent weather system that claimed 12 lives in Oklahoma and Arkansas amid tornadoes and flash floods gave way to clearing skies as the storms trekked toward the East Coast on Sunday.A tornado killed nine people as it charged down Interstate 40 in Oklahoma City's western suburbs on Friday night, twisting billboards and scattering cars and tractor-trailers along a roadway clogged with rush-hour...

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    Larry Pearlman of Naperville captured this month’s winning picture north of Pincher Creek in Alberta, Canada.

    Naperville photographer isn’t afraid to ‘chimp’

    Photographers call it "chimping." Many pros kind of look down their noses at the practice but, in reality, it's what most of us amateurs do. It's that moment when you think you've captured a really good picture and you immediately look at the back of your digital camera to see if the image on your LCD screen comes close to matching what you thought you saw through your viewfinder. When it does,...

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    Tom Zawistowski, leader of the Portage County tea party in northeast Ohio, holds up a letter Wednesday he received from the IRS, while speaking at a gathering of tea party groups, in Cincinnati.

    IRS image changes through the years

    No one loves the IRS anymore, not for ages. It’s our culture’s king-sized pain that makes you do hard math, issues nonsensical directions, takes your money and gives it to politicians to waste even as they borrow unspeakable sums from China to waste even more.

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    Christopher Lorek knew he was destined to serve his country even when he was an Eagle Scout at age 13, here with his father Bill, mother Janet and younger brother Jason.

    ‘He belonged to his country,’ Glen Ellyn family says of late FBI agent

    Even in fifth grade, Christopher Lorek knew he had his work cut out for him. "I'm going to protect my country. This is my job," the former Glen Ellyn man wrote while in elementary school. Today, Janet Lorek realizes it's no surprise her son found a top-secret career at the FBI. Christopher Lorek, 41, was one of two special agents who fell to their deaths in a May 20 counterterrorism exercise off...

Sports

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    Blackhawks defenseman Brent Seabrook celebrates his first-period goal with teammate Duncan Keith on Sunday at United Center.

    Fast, furious Blackhawks pound Kings in Game 2

    Jonathan Quick had a pretty good seat to watch the last half of Sunday’s game at the United Center — from the bench. The Blackhawks chased arguably the world’s best goaltender midway through the second period after scoring their fourth goal on their way to a 4-2 win in Game 2 of the Western Conference finals. The Hawks lead the best-of-seven series 2-0 heading to Los Angeles for Games 3 and 4 on Tuesday and Thursday.

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    Coach Q's Quick thinking boosts Blackhawks

    The Blackhawks coaching staff has made a couple of huge changes to the game plan, and the result is a battered Jonathan Quick and a 2-0 lead for the Hawks in the Western Conference Finals.

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    Chicago Blackhawks defenseman Brent Seabrook (7) congratulates goalie Corey Crawford (50) after beating the Los Angeles Kings in Game 2 of an NHL hockey Stanley Cup Western Conference finals, Sunday, June 2, 2013, in Chicago. The Blackhawks won 4-2.

    Images: Blackhawks vs. Kings, Game Two
    The Chicago Blackhawks faced the Los Angeles Kings in game two of the NHL Western Conference finals Sunday at the United Center in Chicago.

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    Blaming Blackhawks for Sox’ struggles preposterous

    Clearly, it’s all the Blackhawks’ fault. Yep. They’re in the midst of an exhilarating Stanley Cup playoff run, the city of Chicago is transfixed — and that includes White Sox players. As a result, this South Side ballclub is far too focused on the ice and not on the diamond. At least that’s what I was told this week.

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    Much more to Hawks than just stars

    Maybe after the Hawks’ 4-2 victory Sunday night at the United Center, Kings goalie Jonathan Quick and Co. better be just as concerned about the Hawks’ depth as they are about the Hawks’ stars.

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    Chicago Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford and teammate Jonathan Toews watch the puck roll away from Los Angeles Kings left wing Dustin Penner in the second period as he charged the net during Game 2 of the NHL Western Conference finals at the United Center Sunday night in Chicago.

    Hawks goalie Crawford doing it all

    What can’t L.A. Kings goalie Jonathan Quick do? Well, so far in the playoffs, the answer would be this: beat the Blackhawks, who went up 2-0 in the Western Conference finals courtesy of their 4-2 victory Sunday night at the United Center.

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    Chicago Blackhawks center Andrew Shaw howls after his first-period goal against the Los Angeles Kings during Game 2 of the NHL Western Conference finals at the United Center Sunday night in Chicago.

    Blackhawks take 2-0 series lead

    Bryan Bickell and Michal Handzus scored on consecutive shots in the second period, and the Blackhawks chased goalie Jonathan Quick on their way to a 4-2 victory over the Los Angeles Kings on Sunday night in Game 2 of the Western Conference finals at United Center.Andrew Shaw and Brent Seabrook also scored as the rolling Blackhawks grabbed a 2-0 lead in the best-of-seven series with their fifth consecutive victory. Patrick Sharp added two assists, and Corey Crawford made 29 saves in another solid performance.Game 3 is Tuesday night at Los Angeles, where the Kings have won 14 consecutive games, dating to the regular season. The Kings also lost their first two games of the playoffs at St. Louis before winning four straight to eliminate the Blues in the first round.Jeff Carter and Tyler Toffoli scored for Los Angeles, but the Kings struggled to score while playing without Mike Richards, who was scratched because of an undisclosed upper body injury. The defending Stanley Cup champions have 29 goals in 15 postseason games.Richards, who leads the team with 10 playoff points, was sidelined after taking a big hit from Dave Bolland in the final minutes of the Blackhawks' 2-1 victory on Saturday. Kings coach Darryl Sutter said Richards was “fine” a couple of hours before the game, but the center was scratched from the lineup.Los Angeles forward Brad Richardson and defenseman Drew Doughty gingerly skated off at separate points of the first period, but both returned to the ice.The series took on a more physical tone in the second game in two days a rarity in the playoffs brought on by The Rolling Stones' tour.The top-seeded Blackhawks also won the series opener in each of the first two rounds, but they dropped three in a row following their Game 1 victory against Detroit in the conference semifinals.There was no such letdown this time.Shaw got Chicago off to a fast start, taking a nifty pass from Viktor Stalberg and sending a wrist shot past Quick on the glove side just 1:56 into the game. Marian Hossa set up Seabrook in the final minute for a low liner into the left corner. The defenseman put the Blackhawks into this round with an overtime goal in Game 7 against Detroit on Wednesday.The Blackhawks added two more in the second, separated by just 2:09. Bickell scored a power-play goal on a rebound in front, and Handzus skated in and beat Quick to make it 4-0 at 9:20.The capacity crowd of 21,824 roared after Handzus' second goal of the postseason, and cheered even louder when Quick skated off and was replaced by Jonathan Bernier. Quick, last year's playoff MVP who had played every minute of this year's playoffs, finished with 13 saves.Carter converted a one-timer at 18:57 of the second, and Toffoli netted a power-play goal with 1:02 left in the game, but that was it for the Kings. The Blackhawks killed three other power plays and have allowed just two goals in 47 attempts in the playoffs.Crawford heard chants of “Co-rey! Co-rey!” after he stopped Dustin Penner on a quality opportunity late in the second, and the salute resumed when he pulled Kings forward Kyle Clifford off Blackhawks captain Jonathan Toews during a scrum with 8:45 left.Crawford improved to 10-4 in the playoffs and has allowed just one goal in five of the last six games.

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    Fans file into the Untied Center before Game 2 of the NHL Western Conference finals between the Chicago Blackhawks and Los Angeles Kings Sunday night in Chicago.

    Frolik-Kruger pairing has been huge dividends

    Joel Quenneville has pushed so many of the right buttons this season. But the best move by the Blackhawks’ coach might have been putting Michael Frolik and Marcus Kruger together as penalty killers before the year started.

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    Cubs center fielder Julio Borbon drops a flyball hit by Patrick Corbin of the Diamondbacks in the second inning Sunday at Wrigley Field.

    Another loss for frustrated Jackson

    Edwin Jackson is looking like anything but money in the bank for the Cubs. In the early going, it's more like money down the drain. Jackson felll to 1-8 with a 6.29 ERA Sunday as the Cubs lost 8-4 to the Arizona Diamondbacks.

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    Oakland Athletics' Coco Crisp, left, scores past Chicago White Sox catcher Tyler Flowers in the eighth inning of a baseball game, Sunday, June 2, 2013, in Oakland, Calif. Crisp scored on a single by A's Jed Lowrie.

    Sox swept away in Oakland

    OAKLAND, Calif. — Josh Donaldson's sixth-inning sacrifice fly ended a career-best 28-inning scoreless streak by White Sox starter Chris Sale, and the Oakland Athletics beat the South Siders 2-0 on Sunday for a weekend sweep.Jarrod Parker (4-6) hung tough in an impressive pitcher's duel with Sale to win back-to-back starts for the first time this year. The right-hander matched his season high with seven strikeouts in 6 1-3 innings as Oakland won for the ninth time in 11 games.Sale (5-3) lost for the first time in six starts since an April 18 defeat at Toronto. The White Sox (24-30) lost their season-high sixth in a row and matched a season-worst by falling to six games below .500.Sale's 28-inning stretch without allowing a run was the longest by a White Sox pitcher since Wilson Alvarez went 31 scoreless innings from Sept. 11-27, 1993. The streak by Sale nearly ended last Tuesday, when he pitched three innings against the Cubs before the game was rained out keeping the run going for at least one more start as the rainout stats don't count.Coco Crisp drew a leaodff walk in the sixth Sunday, then Jed Lowrie singled as Crisp went to third. Sale received a mound visit from pitching coach Don Cooper before facing Yoenis Cespedes. The Cuban star was called out on an 80 mph curveball, then Donaldson had plenty on his flyball to right to bring home Crisp.Crisp scored again in the eighth when freshly called up center fielder Jordan Danks misplayed Lowrie's single for an error.Facing a left-handed starter for the seventh time in 10 games, Oakland did just enough a day after stranding 18 runners in a 4-3, 10-inning victory.The slumping White Sox missed more chances in the finale shut out for the second time this series after 40-year-old Bartolo Colon's five-hit gem Friday night.Adam Dunn hit a two-out double in the fourth that hit at the top of the wall as center fielder Crisp tried to make a play but didn't track it to where it landed and was not in the right place.But Parker struck out Casper Wells to end the inning moments later. Parker allowed two hits in 6 1-3 innings with two walks. Ryan Cook struck out three of the four batters he faced, then Grant Balfour finished the three-hit shutout for his 13th save in as many chances and 31st in a row dating to last season.Sale lost for the first time in his career against an AL West opponent, dropping to 10-1. He would have become the only pitcher in baseball history to win his first 11 career decisions against the division, according to STATS LLC.Chicago first baseman and designated hitter Paul Konerko sat out with a recurring stiff neck, but he expects to be back in the lineup Monday at Seattle.

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    Boomers win nightcap to split pair

    The Schaumburg Boomers split the first home doubleheader in franchise history, walking off with a 2-1 win in eight innings in Game 2 following a 7-0 loss in the opener to Evansville. Steve McQuail provided the game-winning RBI with a sacrifice fly that scored Frank Pfister, who walked to open the eighth. McQuail had also recorded the game-winner Tuesday in the 12th with the first walk-off homer in Boomers history.

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    ND faithful come out to support Diggins at Sky game

    They came in busloads, all sporting different colored T-shirts, but saluting the same thing. It was “Skylar Diggins Day” at Allstate Arena on Sunday night. OK, OK. It wasn’t exactly her day, but it was Diggins’ Tulsa Shock taking on the Chicago Sky in another matchup of two of the most hyped rookies in WNBA history: Diggins and the Sky’s Elena Delle Donne.

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    Fire gets win it needed so badly

    The Chicago Fire needed Sunday’s 2-0 victory against D.C. United like Mother Nature needs a calendar.

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    Weary McLeod preps for second pick in Thursday’s draft

    Jason McLeod, the Cubs' scouting and player-development chief, talked with reporters Sunday about the amateur draft, which gets under way Thursday. The Cubs have the second overall pick and may end up with a star college pitcher.

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    Bryan Bickell and Brandon Saad pressure King’s goalie Jonathan Quick in first-period action in Game 1 of the Western Conference finals between the Chicago Blackhawks and the Los Angeles Kings.

    Hawks’ Bickell playing well at right time

    Bryan Bickell is in the midst of a special postseason and his timing couldn’t be better as he’s scheduled to be an unrestricted free agent after the season. Bickell is the Blackhawks’ lowest paid forward with a salary of $541,667.

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    Illinois’ Thomas Detry hits from the tee on the 12th hole during the final round of play in the NCAA college men’s golf championship against Alabama, Sunday, June 2, 2013, in Milton, Ga.

    Illini can’t stem the Tide in title match

    MILTON, Ga. — Showing it’s more than just a football school, Alabama won its first national title in men’s golf with a dominating 4-1 victory over Illinois in match play Sunday.This championship was especially sweet for a team that lost to Texas in last year’s final.“It’s been a long 365 days,” said Alabama coach Jay Seawell. “But that just makes it more special. It makes you appreciate it more.”Bobby Wyatt got the Tide off to a rousing start in the first match, winning the first seven holes on the way to a 6-and-5 blowout of Thomas Detry. Alabama didn’t have to sweat it in the final match, either, as Cory Whitsett went 5-up by the turn and cruised to a 4-and-3 victory over Alex Burge. The middle three matches were much tighter — each of them all-square at one point coming down the stretch, giving Illinois a glimmer of hope at improbably pulling out its first national title.But Trey Mullinax, after squandering chances to pull ahead with 3-putts at the 14th and 16th, 2-putted from 60 feet for a par at the 18th for a 1-up victory over Charlie Danielson. The Illinois player missed the green with his approach, chipped up to about 10 feet, but rolled the putt past the right lip of the cup for a bogey.When Mullinax knocked down his 3-footer, a huge roar went up from the predominantly Alabama crowd that could be heard by the other groups still on the course. “You could tell Alabama had an edge to them today,” said Illinois head coach Mike Small. “They went through this last year. Going through this once and not winning is a powerful feeling when you group that together and come back this year. You could tell they had their mind made up it was going to get done.”Small knew his team had to be nearly perfect to beat the Tide.“I don’t think today there was any fear,” Small said. “I think today there was maybe a little bit of nervousness that we couldn’t get a hold of and anxiousness, maybe. Like I said, Alabama is good. They beat us. We couldn’t make any mistakes against them today and we did.”Thomas Pieters, the 2012 individual champion, earned the Fighting Illini’s lone point with a 1-up victory over Alabama’s top-ranked player, Justin Thomas. The Illini have a bright future but will come back next season without Pieters, who is turning pro. He broke down in tears after coming so close to adding a team title to the individual championship he won in 2012.“I don’t think a lot of people expected us to be in the national championship,” Pieters said. “We thought we could do it. We worked so hard to get to this moment. It’s a shame we didn’t get it done today. But Alabama played really, really well.”

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    The Bulls will almost certainly eat $1 million to buy Richard Hamilton out of his contract. Hamilton played in 50 games this season and averaged 9.8 ppg.

    Four Bulls that may not be back

    The Bulls probably won't make major changes this summer, but some players are less likely to return than others. Here's a rundown.

  •  
    Arizona Diamondbacks’ Jason Kubel right is tagged out by Chicago Cubs catcher Dioner Navarro left, at home plate after Wil Nieves grounded into a fielder’s choice during the second inning of an MLB baseball game against the Chicago Cubs in Chicago, Sunday, June 2, 2013.

    Cubs fall 8-4 to Arizona
    $PHOTOCREDIT_ON$Associated Press$PHOTOCREDIT_OFF$Patrick Corbin became the major leagues’ first nine-game winner, laboring through six inning Sunday in the Arizona Diamondbacks’ 8-4 win over the Cubs on Sunday at Wrigley Field.Corbin (9-0) allowed four runs and six hits, tying the team record for consecutive wins at the start of the season, set by Brandon Webb in 2008. The Diamondbacks are 11-0 in his starts.He hit two batters and walked two in a 33-pitch first inning, when he walked Dioner Navarro with the bases loaded. Corbin minimized the damaged by retiring Cody Ransom on an inning-ending flyout to the warning track in center. Brad Ziegler, David Hernandez and Heath Bell combined for hitless relief.Edwin Jackson (1-8) gave up seven runs — five earned — a season-high 12 hits, three walks and four wild pitches in 5 2-3 innings.Wil Nieves had three hits and two RBIs for Arizona.Scott Hairston hit his 100th career homer as the Cubs lost their second straight after a season-high five-game winning steak.Arizona loaded the bases in the second when, with two men on, center fielder Julio Borbon took his eyes off of Corbin’s routine fly ball to center and dropped the ball for an error.Gerardo Parra followed with a two-run single, and Jackson’s wild pitch allowed Corbin to score for a 3-1 lead.Jackson’s RBI single cut the deficit in the fourth, but Nieves’ two-out RBI single boosted the lead to 4-2 in the fifth.Hairston’s fifth homer this season, a two-run drive, tied the score in the bottom half.Jackson allowed three straight singles with two outs in the sixth, when Paul Goldschmidt drove in the go-ahead run. After an intentional walk to Jason Kubel loaded the bases, Cody Ross lined a two-run single for a 7-4 lead.Struggling Cubs reliever Carlos Marmol, who was booed, allowed three walks and an RBI single to Nieves in the eighth.

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    Cougars literally walk off with win

    Kane County fell behind for the third game in a row against Cedar Rapids, but this time the Cougars battled back to pick up a 3-2 victory over the Kernels in 10 innings Sunday at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark in Geneva. In the Cougars’ 10th inning, Tyler Jones (3-2) gave up a one-out double to Albert Almora. After Dan Vogelbach was intentionally walked, Meimer Candelario singled to load the bases. Rock Shoulders drew a walk to force home Almora with the winning run.

  •  

    Bears’ Rodriguez apologizes after arrest

    Bears fullback-tight end Evan Rodriguez issued an apology through the team after his arrest early Friday morning.

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    If you think fielding at the major league level has fallen off, Len Kasper says you should think again. In 1950 the error rate was nearly 1 per game, while it was at 0.62 per game in 2012.

    Two keys to enjoying baseball: stay humble and curious

    While Len Kasper won’t claim that old school vs. new school in baseball is only about age, he admits that baseball people, for the most part and like in most other areas of life, tend to process things along generational lines. That said, he's not afraid to admit he doesn't know everything, and he explains in this Cubs insider column.

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    Samardjiza goes as far as he can, then watches bullpen implode

    Cubs manager Dale Sveum wasn’t in the dugout as Samardzija took a pitch count of 103 into the seventh inning of Saturday’s 12-4 loss to the Arizona Diamondbacks at Wrigley Field. He had been ejected by home-plate umpire Joe West for arguing a play at first base in the second inning. Samardizja went to 115 pitches before being taken out, but he probably would have fared no worse than the bullpen.

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    Zoe Swift and Christa Szalach of Napervile North celebrate a goal during theClass 3A girls soccer championship match in Naperville Saturday.

    Naperville North finishes undefeated

    In the end there wasn’t a girls soccer team in Illinois that could beat Naperville North.

Business

  •  
    The Dan-Dee “Chicken Dance” Tap Dance Easter Chick. The recalled toy plays music and dances when the left wing is squeezed, but the music can reach decibel levels that exceed the ASTM F963 standard, posing a hearing damage hazard.

    Recalls this week: Toys, pajama sets, crib bumpers

    A line of toys that could damage a child's hearing and snowboard bindings with faulty straps are among this week's list of recalled products. Others include children's pajama sets and crib bumpers. Here are the whats, whys and what to do.

  •  
    Sen. Chuck Schumer, a New York Democrat, predicted that comprehensive immigration reform would overwhelmingly pass the Senate by July 4.

    Schumer: Immigration bill to pass Senate by July 4

    A lawmaker who helped negotiate a bipartisan bill to overhaul immigration predicted on Sunday that comprehensive legislation would overwhelmingly pass the Senate by July 4 while House Republicans cautioned that they would write their own version, one piece at a time. Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said he anticipates as many as 70 of the 100 senators will vote for the measure heading to the full Senate on June 10.

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    When the Fed makes a move, many investors probably won’t consider it a vote of confidence for the economy. Some believe the stock market could plunge without the Fed’s support. Others are likely to move money out of the market because they’re unsure about how everybody else will react.

    Rising rates: Reason to worry or sign of strength?

    The trends sound ominous. Mortgages get more expensive and both big companies and the federal government pay more to borrow. The stock market dips on suspicions that the Federal Reserve could start pulling its support for the economy this year. The thing is, these current trends fall under the heading “good news.”

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    Princeton University’s Dr. Jeff Nunokawa, Professor of English, holds the the school’s ceremonial mace as Ben S. Bernanke, Chairman of the Federal Reserve, leads the processional out of Princeton University Chapel after giving the Baccalaureate address Sunday.

    Bernanke offers wisdom but no hint of Fed moves

    Ben Bernanke gave the graduating class of Princeton University one of the more unusual speeches for a Federal Reserve chairman: He quoted everyone from Lily Tomlin to Forrest Gump and scarcely mentioned economics.Bernanke’s words are normally scrutinized by global investors for hints about the Fed’s possible next move. But in his address Sunday on Princeton’s campus in New Jersey, he specifically cautioned that his comments “have nothing whatsoever to do with interest rates.” Instead, he took a poke at his profession.

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    Wayne Losey, co-founder of Dynamo DevLabs, speaks about 3-D printing during the Hardware Innovation Workshop in San Mateo, Calif., May 13. With the printers users make whatever they like, iPad stands, guitars, jewelry, someone even made a rifle.

    3-D printing goes from sci-fi fantasy to reality

    Invisalign, a San Jose company, uses 3-D printing to make each mouthful of customized, transparent braces. Mackenzies Chocolates, a confectioner in Santa Cruz, uses a 3-D printer to pump out chocolate molds. And earlier this year, Cornell University researchers used a 3-D printer, along with injections of a special collagen gel, to create a human-shaped ear. Once a science-fiction fantasy, three-dimensional printers are popping up everywhere from the desks of home hobbyists to Air Force drone research centers.

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    The antitrust trial involving Apple, which was brought last year by the Justice Department, accuses Apple of helping hatch a scheme with the country’s largest book publishers to make consumers pay more for electronic books, in 2009 as it was preparing to launch the iPad.

    Apple antitrust suit over e-books set for trial

    In a civil case where the words of Steve Jobs play prominently, the government and Apple Inc. are set to square off over allegations that Apple Inc. conspired with the country’s largest book publishers to make consumers pay more for electronic books.U.S. District Judge Denise Cote is scheduled to begin hearing the price-fixing case Monday in federal court in Manhattan.

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    A sensor problem was found Sunday in one of the exchanged batteries for a JAL Boeing 787 jet due to bound for Beijing from Haneda but did not pose a safety risk, a Japanese broadcaster reported.

    Report: Problem found in 787 jet, no safety risk

    A sensor problem was found Sunday in one of the exchanged batteries for a Japan Airlines Boeing 787 jet but did not pose a safety risk, a Japanese broadcaster reported. The Boeing Co. jets had been grounded for four months until their safety could be reconfirmed. Boeing is based in Chicago.The problem emerged in a sensor that detects overheating in the modified version of the lithium-ion batteries used in the aircraft, NHK TV said. The batteries were encased to prevent overheating from spreading

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    Small business owners offer health perks

    Small business owners continue to struggle to provide traditional health care benefits to their workers, but some are providing other unusual perks, as an alternative, to help attract and retain employees. A new report released Wednesday by Bank of America found that only 33 percent of the small business owners it surveyed provide traditional health benefits. But 31 percent offer additional amenities in the workplace, such as healthy snacks or massages.

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    Risk-parity funds, the next ‘better mousetrap’?

    The mutual fund industry is forever trying to build a better mousetrap—with mixed results. The latest contender to be a better mousetrap is known as the risk-parity fund. Just four years after their debut, the new breed of funds has already attracted nearly $30 billion in assets—$16 billion of that in the past year alone, according to Lipper.

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    Career Coach: Respecting others at the workplace

    Just think about your day at work. You might hear people yelling at each other, or maybe they send nasty emails to one another or gossip about others behind their backs. These are very common problems, and sadly, ones I hear about much too frequently. So what can be done? Perhaps if we all just tried to adopt one simple strategy to treat people with respect, we could make a difference in the quality of the lives of those around us, and our own life as well.

  •  
    A Texas Longhorn stands at the Double Helix Ranch near Pontotoc, Texas. David Hillis, a University of Texas geneticist and biologist, and doctoral student Emily Jane McTavish, along with scientists from the University of Missouri-Columbia, conducted research showing Longhorns developed from cattle thousands of years ago in India and Pakistan and from cattle from Europe that bred in Africa and adapted to dry and hot conditions that make them ideal for Texas and the Southwest.

    Study: Longhorn ancestry spans globe, centuries

    A first-of-its-kind genetic analysis of Texas Longhorns shows the cattle breed — as much a state symbol as the Alamo and cowboys — shares a diverse ancestry that spans the globe and mirrors the spirit and self-sufficiency of the quintessential Texan. The Longhorn's roots are traced back thousands of years to far-off places such as the Middle East and Asia, with the animal's direct descendants crossing the Atlantic with Christopher Columbus.

  •  
    Jennefer Witter, Chief Executive Officer and the founder of The Boreland Group Inc., a public relations firm that represents small businesses and those in the real estate industry, says people need to get out of the office and network more.

    6 things small businesses should do this summer

    If you don't own a seasonal business such as an ice cream or surf shop that gets busier when it heats up, here are six things most small business owners can do this summer to set themselves up for a profitable end to the year.

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    Investors searching for income-generating investments are finding opportunities in the oil and gas pipelines that crisscross the country. Many of the pipelines, holding tanks and other equipment that help get fuel to consumers are owned by firms called Master Limited Partnerships.

    Are Master Limited Partnerships for you?

    Investors searching for income-generating investments are finding opportunities in the oil and gas pipelines that crisscross the country. Many of the pipelines, holding tanks and other equipment that help get fuel to consumers are owned by firms called Master Limited Partnerships. They typically generate high income and tax benefits for investors because the firms are required by law to “pass through” much of their income and deductions to shareholders.

  •  
    Hank Mann, 72, an engineer at Stanley Consultants, pointing at an image of a highway project he worked on, at the company’s headquarters in Muscatine, Iowa.

    Phased retirement becoming more popular in the U.S.

    The phased retirement idea was born in Sweden in the 1970s and gained a foothold in the U.S. soon after. Sarah Rix, a policy adviser at AARP who worked on the issue in its early years, said it has been hard to quantify how many people have taken part in such programs because most are informal. A 2010 study by AARP and the Society for Human Resource Management found that 20 percent of employers had phased retirement programs in place or planned to start them.

  •  

    Work Advice: Unlinking from unwanted connections

    Karla L. Miller writes an advice column on navigating the modern workplace. Each week she will answer one or two questions from readers.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    Try varying size, content of containers for a showy effect
    Think of your containers as large, exuberant floral displays when choosing plants.

  •  

    Impatiens susceptible to downy mildew

    Q. Every year my garden is exploding with impatiens. However, more and more I am reading about a disease that is attracting this popular annual. What can you tell me?

  •  
    Dwayne Johnson, left, Vin Diesel and Paul Walker star in “Fast & Furious 6.” The sixth installment of the franchise kept its hold on the box office with a $34.5 million haul.

    'Fast 6' hangs onto first place at box office

    With its supercharged muscle cars, “Fast & Furious 6” raced to first place at the box office for the second consecutive weekend. The Universal Pictures release is expected to add another $34.5 million to its North American ticket sales, keeping it in the No. 1 spot after opening to more than $120 million over the Memorial Day holiday weekend.

  •  
    Feather Down Farm Days operates farms in Europe and the United States for farm stays. The closest one to Chicago is Kinnikinnick, near Rockford.

    Agritourism helps travelers relax, connect with nature

    Most of us are more like Lisa Douglas than her husband, Oliver, of the old TV show. “Green Acres” may be the place to be, but farm living is really not the life for most of us. It does make a heck of weekend or entire vacation, though. Called “farm stays” and very popular across Europe, Australia and New Zealand, agritourism is a win-win. Visitors get to wind down and come to understand rural life and where their food comes from.

  •  
    Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie arrive for the World Premiere of World War Z at a central London cinema, Sunday, June 2, 2013.

    Jolie joins Pitt at ‘World War Z’ London premiere

    Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie stepped out together Sunday at the premiere of zombie thriller “World War Z” — Jolie’s first public appearance since announcing last month that she had undergone a double mastectomy. The couple walked a black, rather than red, carpet at the world premiere Sunday of the big-budget film. “The beautiful thing is that for us, life will go on. ... It certainly brought our family tighter together," Pitt said.

  •  
    Patrick Peters, portraying a Confederate captain, stands by an artillery piece at a ridge above the field of Pickett’s Charge, in Gettysburg, Pa. Tens of thousands of visitors are expected for the 10-day schedule of events that begin June 29 to mark 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg that took that took place July 1-3, 1863.

    Gettysburg ready for 150th anniversary of famous battle

    The commemoration of this year's milestone anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg will include amenities that soldiers would have relished 150 years ago. A groomed path to the top of Little Round Top. Expanded cellphone coverage. Dozens of portable toilets. The National Park Service and a cadre of community organizers are busily putting the finishing touches on preparations for the commemoration of the pivotal battle of the American Civil War that cemented this small Pennsylvania town's place in U.S. history. Tens of thousands of visitors are expected for a 10-day schedule of events that begin June 29.

  •  

    Simple solutions to disputing families

    Q. My husband and I get in a fight almost every time we try to do something fun together, either alone or with our kids, who are both under 3. I do something dumb (say, forgetting some important item). Husband says something insulting about it. I get defensive and badger him. ("You were supposed to ...") He gets angry at me for "ruining our day."

  •  
    “Cirque Sephira,” billed as the “World's First Spiritual Cirque,” is one of the attractions of the Whole Life Expo, which comes to the Renaissance Schaumburg Hotel and Convention Center in Schaumburg this weekend.

    Sunday picks: Get in healthy state of mind at Whole Life Expo

    Today's the last day to learn more about healthy living at The Whole Life Expo at the Renaissance Schaumburg Hotel and Convention Center. Celebrate summer when Roselle's Rose Parade steps off at 2 p.m. Sunday. Woody James and The Millington Trio perform a Johnny Cash tribute concert in the band shell at Cantigny Park in Wheaton. The Chicago Sky takes on the Tulsa Shock at the Allstate Arena tonight.

  •  
    Cyndi Lauper at the 79th Annual Drama League awards at the Marriott Marquis Times Square in New York. Lauper, along with John Mellencamp, Sarah McLachlan, Tori Amos, Edie Brickell, David Byrne, Fatboy Slim, Burt Bacharach, Elvis Costello and The Flaming Lips are making musicals. Lauper’s “Kinky Boots,” was nominated for a Tony for best musical.

    Pop songwriters find excitement in stage musicals

    There was a time when most of the songs played on the radio came from Broadway. Now some popular hit makers like Cyndi Lauper and Sting are finding it still feels like home. More and more singer-songwriters from the pop world seem to be hearing that siren song: The trickle of pop and rock stars turning to the stage is fast becoming a flood.

  •  
    The Chicago, a typewriter about the same age as the house, and a rotary telephone from a Belgian hotel decorate the library in Laurie Turpin-Soderholm and Rob Soderholm’s home.

    Century-old home participates in 20th Annual House Walk and Tea

    Peek into the library with its stash of books and antiques and a surprise — one wall opens to a two-story staircase. Yes, Laurie Turpin-Soderholm and Rob Soderholm love curling up with good books and collecting vintage treasures. The home that is well over a century old is one of five open for the June 9th Arlington Heights Historical Museum’s 20th Annual House Walk & Tea.

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    A fisherman sits near the Boardman River dam in Traverse City, Mich. The Boardman River, which meanders through town before flowing into the lake.

    5 free things to do in Traverse City, Mich.

    Residents of this picturesque Lake Michigan community are known to quip, "The view of the bay is half your pay." It's a sardonic commentary on the local wage scale, but also a tribute to the stunning scenery and small-town quality of life that have lured many a newcomer from the big city — and make the area one of the Midwest's top tourist draws.

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    "Mistresses," a new prime-time drama featuring Jes Macallan, Alyssa Milano, Yunjin Kim and Rochelle Aytes, premieres Monday on ABC.

    Four women weave tangled webs as 'Mistresses'

    When a show revolves around four women's lives and loves, as does "Mistresses," the comparisons to "Sex and the City." But don't look for a Carrie. Rather, the prime-time drama, premiering Monday, features two very different sisters, played by Alyssa Milano and Jes Macallan, and their pals Yunjin Kim and Rochelle Aytes.

  •  
    Beat the summer heat and crowds on Michigan’s Mackinac Island during its Lilac Festival from June 7-16.

    On the road: Lilac fest on Mackinac Island

    The 64th annual Mackinac Island Lilac Festival is 10 days of breathing deeply and saying "mmm" as the island is filled with sweet lilac scents and myriad events. There's also the 15th annual three-day Ribfest Chicago held in the Northcenter neighborhood, where Lincoln Avenue, Irving Park Road and Damen Avenue meet.

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    Being at the low point of the neighborhood, rain and snow cascade into what used to be what this family calls “the great room.”

    Outdoor makeover contest Week 5: Bottom of the barrel

    We have always dealt with the backyard flooding, so much so that the ducks swim in our yard every spring. And although we love animals, ducks included, it is just another reminder that WE can't enjoy our backyard...at least someone is. Our backyard used to be a place where we could entertain and lay in the sunr the backyard makeover.

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    This nasty view is the result of a beautification project put on hold after a sewer line break. This trellised, torn-up corner was supposed to have a pondless waterfall, landscaping, plants and lighting.

    Outdoor makeover contest Week 5: A mud pit

    Last summer, my husband and I started a backyard makeover project around our wooden deck. Over the course of several weekends, we jack-hammered out an old concrete pond and waterfall left behind by the previous homeowners.

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    With no patio, this family is constantly dragging mud into the house. They long for a nice place to barbecue without ruining their lawn.

    Outdoor makeover contest Week 5: Muddy paw print

    For a very long time, I have dreamed of putting a patio in my backyard so we weren't constantly dragging in the mud and outdoors as well as to have a pretty place to sit and enjoy the yard.

  •  
    A bikini top in different sizes is one of the swim separate options that have become popular.

    Mix-and-match swimwear suits different beach vibes

    For some women, it's just this way and probably always will be: The size of their swimwear tops and bottoms don't match. So, why not have some fun with it? There's no better place than the beach or the pool to show off the whimsical and creative sides of a woman's personality, says Josh Saterman, Macy's fashion director. The customer can let down her hair when she's there and break a few rules.

  •  
    The famous actor created the artwork on which this print is based.

    Will Barrymore prints bring fame, fortune?

    Q. I would appreciate your opinion on the enclosed pictures. Could they possibly be by THE Lionel Barrymore? They are brass (I guess) etchings that I purchased many years ago at a household auction. They are very attractive, but do they have any value?

  •  
    FieldTurf, an artificial turf gaining ground in home use, is particularly good for pet areas.

    Pet-friendly landscaping

    The furry children in your life also need to be considered when you are planning your yard. It is all about how you put together the entire package so that you can enjoy your yard, and so can your dog, without one's enjoyment infringing on that of the other, according to Jean Bragdon, operations manager of Lurvey's Garden Center in Des Plaines.

  •  
    Growing flowers and vegetables with children can teach them valuable life lessons and can help them connect with nature.

    Kid-friendly yards

    Yards need to meet the needs of the entire family. They need to provide space and amenities for people of all ages to be able to enjoy the outdoors. So if your home has pint-sized or even mid-sized residents, you need to keep their interests in mind when designing your outdoor spaces.

  •  
    A “user friendly” kitchen faucet can set the tone for your entire day.

    Kitchen-faucet choices away from the mainstream

    Q. I have seen the pull-out-style spray faucets and the single- and two-handle kitchen faucets, but I want something a little different from the standard choices. Any other suggestions?

  •  

    Sign away your property ownership at great risk

    Q. I have been trying to sell my condominium for more than two years. I have been contacted by a guy who will pay me what I want. He has proposed giving me $1,000 and signing a note and mortgage for the balance.

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: Blame, anger and the search for progress in Illinois

    A Daily Herald editorial says suburban residents must hold lawmakers accountable at the ballot box for their failures in the spring legislative session.

  •  

    Keep teachers’ own views out of classroom
    A Mount Prospect letter to the editor: Many children live under the constant threat of intimidation and potential academic recrimination if they dare challenge the teachers’ beliefs. This is simply an abuse of power leveraged by grades and group pressure.

  •  

    Put scientific research first in schools
    A Hoffman Estates letter to the editor: Arlene Sawicki would force public schools to “Teach alternatives to Darwin’s theories” (May 21). She hopes that books on the pre-scientific religious myths and legends of creationism and intelligent design are in the school library. Is this to promote religious ideologies? Whose?

  •  

    All should share in pension fix
    A Lake Villa letter to the editor: The fact is in my opinion the Herald uses the Opinion page to push its own agenda on its own position on issues.

  •  

    Responsible planners would be punished
    A Lake Zurich letter to the editor: Froma Harrop clearly shows her bias toward “Big Brother Government” protecting all of us whether we would like that protection or not.

  •  

    W. Aurora dodged a bullet on sex case
    A Batavia letter to the editor: We should thank the Kane County State's Attorney, the West Aurora School Board and officials of the West Aurora Schools for their recent lesson in civic education. You can violate state law and school policy and procedures, make no comments as to any fault, not be named for any wrongdoing and have the top law enforcement officer of the county just send you to school to remind you of the job you should have done in the first place.

  •  

    Send a better message to teens
    An Itasca letter to the editor: The average person sees 400-600 ads a day. I watched a video on YouTube called "Media's Effect on Beauty" and my thoughts on society are turning negative. There is a major difference from teen life 20 years ago.

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