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Daily Archive : Sunday May 19, 2013

News

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    Images from the Lakes Community High School graduation on Sunday, May 19 in Lake Villa.

    Images: Lakes High School Graduation
    Lakes Community High School held its commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 19 at the school in Lake Villa.

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    Traffic crackdowns in many Northwest suburbs

    Traffic crackdowns funded with federal grant money putting extra police on the streets with overtime pay are going on in many Northwest suburbs through Memorial Day.

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    Lewis University Provost Stephany Schlachter addresses the first graduates of the 3+1 program partnership coordinated by College of DuPage. The program allows students to get a bachelor's degree by taking three years of classes taught by COD professors, and one year taught by Lewis professors, all on COD's Glen Ellyn campus.

    COD paves new way to earn bachelor's degree

    Nine students will walk across the stage Sunday at Lewis University's commencement ceremony to receive bachelor's degrees in criminal justice. Yet, these students never took classes at the school's campus in Romeoville. Through a so-called 3+1 program partnership between Lewis and College of DuPage, the students earned their four-year degrees from Lewis by taking all their classes at COD's campus...

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    Emily Boldt, left and Kyle Hodyl, right, gets an iPhone photo before the Montini Catholic High School graduation ceremony on Sunday in Lombard. To see more photos and order reprints, visit www.dailyherald.com/galleries/news/graduations/

    Images: Montini Catholic High School Graduation
    Montini Catholic High School held its commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 19, at the school.

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    Graduate Sheah Lin Thompson hugs her mother, District 129 Board of Education member Mrs. Amie Thompson, who presented her diploma onstage Sunday during the West Aurora High School Class of 2013 commencement at Northern Illinois University in Dekalb.

    Images: West Aurora High School graduation
    West Aurora High School held its commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 19 at the NIU convocation center in DeKalb.

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    Tornado, severe thunderstorm watches in effect

    Tornado and severe thunderstorm weather watches are in effect in parts of the Chicago suburbs Sunday night.

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    Images from the Mundelein High School graduation on Sunday, May 19 at the Libertyville Sports Complex.

    Images: Mundelein High School Graduation
    Mundelein High School held its commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 19 at the Libertyville Sports Complex.

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    A tornado touches down southwest of Wichita, Kan. near the town of Viola on Sunday. The tornado was part of a line of storms that past through the central plains Sunday.

    Tornadoes level homes in Okla., hit other states

    One of several tornadoes that touched down Sunday in Oklahoma turned homes in a trailer park near Oklahoma City into splinters and rubble and sent frightened residents along a 100-mile corridor scurrying for shelter. The tornadoes that touched down in Oklahoma, Kansas and Iowa were part of a massive, northeastward-moving storm system that stretched from Texas to Minnesota.

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    Images from the Antioch High school graduation on Sunday, May 19 in Antioch.

    Images: Antioch High School Graduation
    Antioch High School held its commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 19 at the school.

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    Northwest Mosquito Abatement District Field Technician Shannon Stutzman performs mosquito abatement in the Portwine Road forest preserve area in Wheeling.

    Images:The Week in Pictures
    This edition of The Week in Pictures features things found in the air, including ducks, robins, owls, mosquitos, and rockets.

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    Joe Johnson of Menominee, Mich. was first to reach the shore at the Dam No. 2 Woods near Mount Prospect, which served as the finish line Sunday for the 56th Annual Des Plaines River Canoe and Kayak Marathon.

    Des Plaines River racers pay tribute to event’s founder

    For the first time in the 56-year history of the Des Plaines River Canoe and Kayak Marathon, the man who was its guiding force was absent. But the memory of Ralph Frese, who died in December at the age of 86, loomed large over the race from Libertyville to Prospect Heights.

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    White House senior advisor Dan Pfeiffer, appearing on CBS’s “Face the Nation” Sunday, said no senior officials were involved in the decision to give Tea Party groups extra scrutiny by the IRS.

    White House adviser blasts IRS

    White House senior adviser Dan Pfeiffer said Sunday that the question of whether any laws were broken as part of the IRS scandal is “irrelevant” to the fact that the agency’s actions were wrong and unjustifiable.

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    MBTA Police Officer Richard Donahue smiles with his wife, Kim, during an interview at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston’s Charlestown section, Sunday, May 19, 2013. Donahue almost lost his life after being shot during the crossfire with the Boston Marathon bombing suspects in Watertown, Mass. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

    Officer shot in Marathon showdown wants to work

    With a bullet still in his body, the police officer who survived a showdown with the Boston Marathon bombing suspects said Sunday he’s determined to return to duty.

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    Images from the Grayslake North High School graduation on Sunday, May 19 in Grayslake.

    Images: Grayslake North High School Graduation
    Grayslake North High School held its commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 19 at the school.

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    O.J. Simpson and his defense attorney Ozzie Fumo confer in a Las Vegas court May 17. Simpson seeks a new trial, claiming he had such bad representation that his conviction should be reversed.

    OJ Simpson lawyers say he is closer to freedom

    The latest high-stakes court hearing for O.J. Simpson in the glitzy capital of big gambles has come to a close with the former football star’s defense team feeling confident that their client is closer to getting out of prison. The last time Simpson was in a Las Vegas courtroom, he was convicted of kidnapping and armed robbery.

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    Ahsan Syed, of Bartlett, speaks during a small group session at Sunday’s “Who Is My Muslim Neighbor?” event as Jacki Bakker, of Carpentersville, listens. Syed is a student of Islam at the Institute of Islamic Education in Elgin.

    Elgin event asks: “Who Is My Muslim Neighbor?”

    An event held Sunday at Elgin Community College brought a roomful of people earnestly searching for answers about the religion nearly one in four people on the planet claim as their own. “Who Is My Muslim Neighbor?” was organized by the Coalition of Elgin Religious Leaders and the Elgin Human Relations Commission.

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    Firefighters stand at attention during the dedication ceremony for a firefighter memorial in Fox Lake Sunday.

    Fox Lake dedicates firefighter memorial

    Fox Lake celebrated its history of volunteer firefighters with a new memorial dedicated at the department’s original fire station Sunday afternoon. More than 100 community members came to recognize 105-year history of the Fox Lake Fire Protection District and honor the memory of 68 former firefighters and volunteers who have passed away with two statues unveiled Sunday.

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    The 59th annual Lilac Parade stepped off Sunday on Main Street in Lombard. Members of the Glenbard East cheerleading squad lead the parade.

    Lombard's Lilac Parade gets nostalgic

    Lombard’s Lilac Parade on Sunday took spectators on a trip through the past. The theme of the 59th annual Lilac Parade was “Nostalgia from the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s.” Many of the organizations marching in the parade reflected that theme. The local VFW Post, for example, carried signs that listed “Movies Of Our Time” (“Apocalypse Now”) and...

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    Cassandra Dohr waves to her family during the Wauconda High School graduation at Quentin Road Bible Baptist Church on Sunday in Lake Zurich. There were 341 graduating seniors for the 97th annual commencement ceremony.

    Images: Wauconda High School Graduation
    Wauconda High School held its commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 19 at the Quentin Road Bible Baptist Church in Lake Zurich. There were 341 graduating seniors for the 97th annual commencement ceremony.

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    President Barack Obama gestures as he speaks during the Morehouse College 129th Commencement ceremony Sunday in Atlanta. Morehouse is the historically black, all-male institution that counts Martin Luther King Jr. among its alumni. It was Obama’s second graduation speech of the year.

    Obama exhorts good deeds by Morehouse graduates

    President Barack Obama, in a soaring commencement address on work, sacrifice and opportunity, on Sunday told graduates of historically black Morehouse College to seize the power of their example as black men graduating from college and use it to improve people’s lives.

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    President Barack Obama waves to a crowd gathered at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport on his way to give the commencement speech at Morehouse College Sunday in Atlanta.

    Obama urged to make economy a bigger, bolder topic

    Five months into President Barack Obama’s second term, allies and former top aides worry that his overarching goal of economic opportunity has been diminished, partly drowned out by controversies seized upon by Republicans in an effort to weaken him.

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    Syrians inspect the rubble of damaged buildings due to government airstrikes, in Qusair, Homs province, Syria, Saturday. The town of Qusair has been besieged for weeks by regime troops and pro-government gunmen backed by the Lebanese militant Hezbollah group.

    Syrian troops push into strategic rebel-held town

    Syrian troops pushed into a rebel-held town near the Lebanese border on Sunday, fighting house-to-house and bombing from the air as President Bashar Assad tried to strengthen his grip on a strategic strip of land running from the capital to the Mediterranean coast.

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    Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during the weekly cabinet meeting in Jerusalem Sunday.

    Israeli seeks interim deal with Palestinians

    Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s senior coalition partner says that reaching a final peace agreement with the Palestinians is unrealistic at the current time and the sides should instead pursue an interim arrangement.

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    Elgin Police: One hurt in gang-related shooting

    Elgin police are investigating a shooting from early Sunday morning that may have been gang-related. Police responded to reports of shots fired at about 1:35 a.m. and found a 23-year-old man with a gunshot wound to his leg near Jefferson Avenue and Porter Street, according to officials. The injured man was taken to Sherman Hospital with nonlife threatening injuries, police said.

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    The Fort Payne building at the Naper Settlement living-history museum in Naperville was damaged by fire early Sunday morning. The fort was closed Sunday, but other portions of the Naper Settlement remained open.

    Fire damages reconstructed fort at Naper Settlement museum

    An early morning fire Sunday damaged the Fort Payne building, part of the Naper Settlement living-history museum in Naperville, authorities said. The fort will be closed while a full damage assessment is made, but other buildings on the site remain open, and programs are running as planned.

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    Dean Dimitri hugs Dr. Deb Scerbicke after receiving his diploma during the St. Viator graduation ceremony Sunday at the high school in Arlington Heights.

    Images: St. Viator High School graduation
    St. Viator High School held its 50th annual commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 19 at the school in Arlington Heights.

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    Indoor skydiving coming to Rosemont

    By next spring, visitors to Rosemont’s restaurant and entertainment district will be able to satisfy more than just a craving for food and beverages, comic relief and shopping — they can get their thrills by jumping off a nearly 70-foot-tall building. Plans for a new indoor skydiving facility will go before the village board in June.

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    Schaumburg Youth-In-Government Day Tuesday

    Schaumburg will hold its annual Youth-In-Government Day on Tuesday, May 21, at the Robert O. Atcher Municipal Center. During the event, Schaumburg High School students will be paired with elected officials, department directors and other key staff members to learn more about the activities, services and programs provided by the village.

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    K-9 Memorial fundraisers

    Organizers of the Northern IL Police K-9 Memorial are hosting two fundraising events.

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    What’s for dinner? Help for Aurora police dogs

    An Aurora police support group has organized a drive-through barbecue dinner Tuesday to help raise money for the department’s new K-9 unit. The Citizens Police Academy Alumni of Aurora will host the fundraiser from 4 to 7 p.m at the Aurora Police Department, 1200 E. Indian Trail Road.

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    Countryside fundraiser:

    Palatine-based Countryside Association for People with Disabilities hosts its eighth annual Opportunity Walk/Run/Roll fundraiser at 9:30 a.m. Sunday, June 2, at Independence Grove in Libertyville.

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    CLC benefit golf outing

    Golfers can help raise money for College of Lake County scholarships in an outing on Monday, June 3.

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    Check for beach advisories

    From Memorial Day to Labor Day, Lake County beachgoers can access the latest information on Lake Michigan and inland lake beach advisories and swim bans at http://health.lakecountyil.gov/Population/.

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    Dist. 54 names more new principals, assistants

    Schaumburg Township Elementary District 54 has named two more new principals and two more assistant principals for the 2013-14 school year. Julie Gluff will be principal of Hale Elementary and Nell Haack will be principal of Collins Elementary. Catherine Kurtz will be assistant principal of Einstein Elementary and Joe McCauley will be assistant principal of Hale Elementary.

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    This undated publicity film image released by Paramount Pictures shows, Zachary Quinto, left, as Spock and Chris Pine as Kirk in a scene in the movie, “Star Trek Into Darkness,” from Paramount Pictures and Skydance Productions.

    ‘Trek’ box office falls short of expectations

    “Star Trek Into Darkness” has warped its way to a $70.6 million domestic launch from Friday to Sunday, though it’s not setting any light-speed records with a debut that’s lower than the studio’s expectations. The latest voyage of the starship Enterprise fell short of its predecessor, 2009’s “Star Trek,” which opened with $75.2 million.

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    Grayslake Central High School student Miranda Adams gives her mom thumbs up during Sunday’s graduation ceremony at the school.

    Images: Grayslake Central High School Graduation
    Grayslake Central High School held its commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 19 at the school.

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    Among the challenges college seniors such as National Louis University’s Sarah Ridder and Liz Tsybulski will face when entering the workforce is the pay gap. A report by the American Association of University Women finds women are paid an average of 18 percent less than men one year after graduation.

    Gender pay gap starts right away for college grads

    As college seniors enter the workforce, some are frustrated by one factor that still enters the salary equation -- gender. According to the American Association of University Women, a gender pay gap not only exists, but it develops right away. Women working full time one year after graduation are paid an average of 18 percent less than men also working full time one year later. “We were really...

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    This painting by Army veteran Michael J. Duffy shows the beauty of the Xuan Loc rubber plantation during the war in Vietnam. But the towering trees appear almost as bars on a prison for the artillery forces driving into the jungle, Duffy says.

    Cary businessman turned war's terrors into art

    Cary businessman Mike Duffy studied art after he came home from the war in Vietnam. Duffy's paintings will be part of a new exhibit at the National Veterans Art Museum on Chicago's Northwest Side. "I figured I'd be dead by morning," he says of the intense gunfire that greeted his arrival in Vietnam during the Tet Offensive.

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    A woman prepares to choose her numbers on a lottery ticket Saturday in Oakland, Calif. The record Powerball jackpot has climbed to $600 million, and lottery officials say the winning ticket was sold in Florida.

    $590M-plus Powerball: 1 winning ticket sold in Florida

    It's all about the odds, and one lone ticket in Florida has beaten them all by matching each of the numbers drawn for the highest Powerball jackpot in history at an estimated $590.5 million, lottery officials said Sunday. The single winner was sold at a supermarket in Zephyrhills, Fla., according to Florida Lottery executive Cindy O'Connell. "This would be the sixth Florida Powerball...

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    Katelyn Dahl was awarded the prize for best helmet in the Pooch, Pet, and Pedal Parade during Saturday's Des Plaines Park District Spring Fun Fair.

    Des Plaines spring fair draws crowds

    Dozens of Des Plaines families enjoyed activities, including a pet parade, during the sixth annual Des Plaines Park District Spring Fun Fair Saturday at the Mountain View Adventure Center and in the Juno Lighting parking lot in Des Plaines.

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    Speaker of the House Michael Madigan, a Chicago Democrat, talks with Rep. Elaine Nekritz, a Northbrook Democrat, during a House committee hearing on pension legislation Thursday at the Illinois State Capitol.

    State workers anxious as lawmakers debate pensions

    Anxiety and anger are growing among state employees and retirees who wonder what will happen to their pocketbooks if lawmakers make expected changes to the state's pension systems that could require workers to pay even more toward retirement, increase the retirement age and cut annual increases in benefits.

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    Lexy Bieber performs a solo with the chamber choir during Hampshire High School’s graduation ceremony Saturday at the Sears Centre in Hoffman Estates.

    Images: Hampshire High School graduation
    Hampshire High School held its commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 18 at the Sears Centre in Hoffman Estates.

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    Emily Weyers gets a hug from principal Lynn McCarthy during Dundee-Crown’s graduation ceremony Saturday at the Sears Centre in Hoffman Estates.

    Images: Dundee-Crown High School graduation
    Dundee-Crown High School held its commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 18 at the Sears Centre in Hoffman Estates.

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    Emylee Ballo lets out a laugh during Luke Agase’s “Senior Reflection” speech during the Harvest Christian Academy commencement ceremony Saturday in Elgin.

    Images: Harvest Christian Academy graduation
    Harvest Christian Academy held its commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 18 at the school in Elgin.

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    Rita Zito of Round Lake Park stands in the high school’s gym once last time before she marches off to her new future at the 59th Commencement of Round Lake High School on Saturday.

    Images: Round Lake High School Graduation
    Round Lake High School held its commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 18 at the school.

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    Jessica Kotlarz shows off her diploma jacket to her family in the stands during Harry D. Jacobs High School’s commencement ceremony at the Sears Centre on Saturday, May 18.

    Images: Jacobs High School graduation
    Jacobs High School held its commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 18 at the Sears Centre in Hoffman Estates.

Sports

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    Cubs starting pitcher Travis Wood works against the Mets on Sunday at Wrigley Field.

    Cubs’ Wood rues pitch that got away

    Cubs lefty Travis Wood made one bad pitch in Sunday's 4-3 loss to the Mets at Wrigley Field. But Wood wasn't the main culprit. Cubs batters were 1-for-10 with runners in scoring position, and at times, the approaches were lacking.

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    Cubs shortstop Starlin Castro can’t handle a hit by the Mets’ Daniel Murphy during the first inning of Saturday’s game at Wrigley Field.

    Castro’s potential all ‘up to him’

    The Cubs sitll like the star potential of shortstop Starlin Castro. But manager Dale Sveum said on Sunday the progress isn't happening as fast as the Cubs would like.

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    Ottawa Senators’ Erik Condra, left, Colin Greening, center, Jean-Gabriel Pageau, right, and Daniel Alfredsson celebrate after Greening scores the winning goal against the Pittsburgh Penguins during the second overtime period of Game 4 of their Stanley Cup Eastern Conference semi-final NHL hockey series at Scotiabank Place in Ottawa on Sunday, May 19, 2013.

    Senators beat Penguins in double OT

    OTTAWA — Colin Greening scored 7:39 into double overtime, and the Ottawa Senators rallied for a 2-1 victory over the Pittsburgh Penguins that cut their series deficit to 2-1 on Sunday night. Daniel Alfredsson got Ottawa even 1-1 by scoring a short-handed goal with 29 seconds left in regulation just after the Senators pulled goalie Craig Anderson for an extra skater.“We were just calm,” Anderson said of the Senators’ mood heading into overtime. “We had tied it up. We had momentum. We felt like the fans really rallied behind us.“Going into overtime, we knew we just had to build off the momentum and keep the pressure on.” Anderson made 49 saves, including 18 after regulation. Tomas Vokoun stopped 46 shots for Pittsburgh and took his first loss (4-1) since taking over for No. 1 Penguins goalie Marc-Andre Fleury.Game 4 of the Eastern Conference semifinal series will be in Ottawa on Wednesday. Tyler Kennedy scored with just over a minute to play in the second period to give the Penguins a 1-0 lead. That stood up until Alfredsson tied it in the closing seconds of the third.“Just praying that we get something to the net,” Anderson said of the tying goal. “We practice that drill all the time in practice. Guy drops it off and goes to the net. “It was just the way we practiced. Alfie is one of the best guys in the game. We want the puck on his stick at all times.”Ottawa forward Jason Spezza, who hadn’t played since Jan. 27 — after undergoing back surgery to repair a herniated disc — lined up alongside Milan Michalek and Cory Conacher.The sellout crowd chanted the 29-year-old Spezza’s name during his first shift. Spezza faced a familiar opponent. His last game before surgery was at home against the Penguins, when he earned one assist and logged 21 minutes of ice time. In his first game back, Spezza was slow to backcheck but he managed to generate a few scoring chances and made nice passes.His back was put to the test in overtime when Penguins forward Craig Adams delivered a bone-crunching hit along the boards. Spezza shook off the check. Both teams had good scoring chances in the extra periods. Pittsburgh’s best scoring opportunity came when Pascal Dupuis hit the post with a drive during the first overtime.Anderson was on his game after being pulled in Game 2. He robbed Penguins captain Sidney Crosby early in the second period, and moments later stopped a hard shot by Evgeni Malkin, who smashed his stick against the ice in frustration. He again stymied Malkin with a sprawling save in the first overtime. Anderson’s effort brought the crowd of 20,500 to its feet with chants of “Andy! Andy!”“You just want to give your team a chance to win,” Anderson said. “Sometimes stats are misleading. You just kind of build off the good stuff.”The Senators took seven penalties against the Penguins, who own the top power-play unit in the playoffs, but didn’t allow a goal.Senators defenseman Erik Karlsson took a slashing penalty with less than two minutes left in the game, but Ottawa killed it. Ottawa improved to 3-0 at home in this postseason (3-0).

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    Troy Murray

    Troy Murray: No big adjustments with Stalberg returning

    Q&A with Blackhawks broadcaster Troy Murray

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    Stalberg ‘likely’ to be back in Game 3 for Blackhawks

    After sitting the first two games of the Western Conference semifinals against Detroit, it appears speedy forward Viktor Stalberg will be back in familiar territory — on the third line alongside Andrew Shaw and Bryan Bickell — for a crucial Game 3 at Joe Louis Arena.

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    Cougars drop heartbreaker to Kernels

    In a game that featured four ties and three lead changes, the host Cedar Rapids Kernels delivered a victory in the bottom of the ninth inning on a walk-off sacrifice fly from Dalton Hicks to top the Kane County Cougars 8-7. t was the Kernels’ second walk-off win of the series. The Cougars (20-21) had provided some fireworks of their own. Trailing by 2 runs with two outs in the top of the ninth, David Bote smashed a 2-run homer off Alex Muren to tie the game at 7-7.

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    Boomers improve to 4-0

    Despite accumulating just 5 hits, the Schaumburg Boomers never trailed in sweeping the visiting Washington Wild Things to improve to 4-0 for the first time in franchise history with a 2-1 victory.

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    San Antonio Spurs’ Manu Ginobili (20), of Argentina, drives to the basket as Memphis Grizzlies’ Darrell Arthur, left, defends him during the second half in Game 1 of a Western Conference Finals NBA basketball playoff series, Sunday, May 19, 2013, in San Antonio. San Antonio won 105-83.

    Spurs rout Memphis in Game 1

    SAN ANTONIO — The San Antonio Spurs opened the Western Conference finals resembling the past champions who’ve been there so many times before.The Memphis Grizzlies looked like the first-timers still trying to adapt to their first conference finals appearance.Tony Parker had 20 points and nine assists, Kawhi Leonard scored 18 points and the Spurs struck first by beating Memphis 105-83 on Sunday. San Antonio raced out to a 17-point lead in the first quarter, then came up with a response when Memphis rallied to get within six in the second half. Both teams pulled their starters with over 5 minutes left and the Spurs leading by 21.“I can promise you this: Nobody’s happy in our locker room, because we were up 2-0 (in the West finals) last year and we lost,” Parker said. “It’s just one game. It means nothing. We still have a long way to go.”The Spurs avoided a repeat of their Game 1 loss when the teams met two years ago in the first round. The Grizzlies went on to knock San Antonio out of the playoffs as the top seed that time.Memphis has lost its opener in each round in this year’s playoffs, recovering from an 0-2 hole in the first round against the Los Angeles Clippers and an 0-1 deficit against Oklahoma City in the West semifinals.Game 2 is Tuesday night in San Antonio.“We just didn’t play well. It’s not anything specific,” coach Lionel Hollins said. “It’s just that we were running too fast, we missed some layups, we were taking bad shots and our defense was really awful. And the Spurs played well.”The NBA’s stingiest defense wasn’t up to its usual standards, allowing the Spurs to hit 53 percent of their shots and a franchise postseason-record 14 3-pointers while All-Star power forward Zach Randolph struggled. Randolph had just two points, getting his only basket with 9:26 left in the game. He had a playoff-best 28 points and 14 rebounds in his last game, as Memphis eliminated defending West champ Oklahoma City in Game 5 on Wednesday night.“Obviously, he’s their best scorer. He’s a beast inside,” Parker said. “We know he’s not going to play like that every game. It’s just sometimes it happens.”The Grizzlies started to rally as soon as Randolph came out of the game for the first time in the second half.Quincy Pondexter made a baseline cut for a layup off Darrell Arthur’s pass, then hit back-to-back 3-pointers during a 10-0 burst. Jerryd Bayless’ two-handed, fast-break dunk off a steal got the Grizzlies within 62-56 with 3:43 left in the third quarter.The comeback was short-lived, though.Bayless missed a 3-pointer on the next trip, and Manu Ginobili was able to make one at the opposite end to spark an 11-1 response that immediately restored the Spurs’ lead to 16 by end of the quarter. Leonard hit a pair of 3-pointers and Gary Neal had one as San Antonio kept pouring it on in the fourth.The four regular-season meetings were all won by the team with more points in the paint, but perimeter shooting proved to be a bigger factor in the playoff opener. Memphis, which was second in the NBA by holding opponents to 33.8 shooting on 3-pointers, let San Antonio make 13 of its first 24 from behind the arc and finish 14 of 29.Danny Green connected three times and scored 16, and Matt Bonner hit four of his five attempts for 12 points.“We did a good job of moving the basketball, finding each other, trusting each other,” Green said. “Luckily we made some today.”Pondexter led Memphis with 17 points, Marc Gasol scored 15 and Mike Conley had 14 points and eight assists.“We were just so hyper, just running all over the place on defense,” Hollins said. “We’d have four guys in the paint and nobody would be out on the perimeter guarding anybody. And that’s not how we play defense.”

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    White Sox pitcher Jake Peavy watches as Los Angeles Angels’ Mark Trumbo, background, scores on a bases-loaded walk in the fourth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Sunday, May 19, 2013.

    White Sox powerless against Angels

    ANAHEIM, Calif. — Jason Vargas kept throwing strikes and catcher Chris Iannetta kept taking his walks a winning formula for the Los Angeles Angels on Sunday.Vargas scattered four hits through seven scoreless innings, Erick Aybar and Howie Kendrick each hit two-run doubles, and the Los Angeles Angels coaxed a pair of bases-loaded walks out of Jake Peavy in the fourth inning of a 6-2 victory over the Chicago White Sox.Vargas (3-3) struck out six and walked three while helping the Angels gain a split of the four-game series. The middle of the Chicago lineup — Alex Rios, Adam Dunn and Paul Konerko — were a combined 0 for 8 with a walk against the left-hander, who posted his first victory in six career starts against the White Sox.”When you’ve got three guys like that in a lineup, the biggest key is just to try and keep guys off base when they come up to the plate because it limits the damage that they’re able to do,” Vargas said. “When you can do that, you have more confidence in what you can go about doing with them, and there’s more room for error.”Peavy (5-2) gave up four runs, four hits and five walks over six innings after going 4-0 with a 2.10 ERA in his previous five starts. The 2007 NL Cy Young winner is 0-4 with a 6.06 ERA in six career starts against the Angels.“I felt really good today, and that’s the most frustrating part for me,” Peavy said. “I went out there with a good game plan and felt like we could execute, but I just didn’t quite execute well enough. My slider was the best it’s been all year, so I’ve got some positives to take out of it. It’s just hard to be positive right now.”Los Angeles opened the scoring in the third when Iannetta drew a leadoff walk, J.B. Shuck followed with a single and Aybar drove both of them in with his double to right before he was erased in a rundown.“Obviously the walks are going to kill you, especially leading off an inning. There’s no excuse for that,” Peavy said. “I have all the respect in the world for Chris Iannetta. He’s got a great eye, there’s no doubt about it. But good eye or nothing, I’ve got to throw the ball where he has to swing the bat.”Peavy, who threw 83 of his 117 pitches in the first four innings, walked four more batters in the fourth — including Iannetta and Aybar with the bases loaded — and the Angels increased the margin to 4-0. Two innings later, Peavy struck out the side on 18 pitches.Iannetta’s second walk was his 14th in a span of 33 plate appearances, including four on Saturday. He has 27 overall, just two fewer than he had last season in 221 plate appearances. His career high is 70, with Colorado in 2011.“He’s walking a lot,” manager Mike Scioscia said. “I mean, if you look at Chris’ history, there’s no doubt the walk is in his game. Even when he was going through that little rough spot earlier in the season, he still drew some walks. I think it’s great plate discipline, especially when you’re not swinging the bat that well.”Rios drove in Chicago’s first run with an eighth-inning double against Dane De La Rosa. It extended his hitting streak to 14 games, eclipsing his previous best in 2006 with Toronto.Ernesto Frieri was called in to protect a 4-1 lead, trying to get his second four-out save in two days after giving up a three-run homer in the eighth against Hector Gimenez on Saturday before closing that one out.The right-hander walked three batters in the ninth this time before notching his ninth save in 10 attempts overall. Frieri gave up a sacrifice fly by Alejandro De Aza before retiring Alexei Ramirez on a flyball to end it.Kendrick gave Frieri a couple of insurance runs in the eighth with his double inside third base against rookie Brian Omogrosso.

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    White Sox scouting repor
    Scouting report: White Sox vs. Boston Red Sox

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    At 28 years old, Joakim Noah was an all-star this season and made the NBA all-defensive first team. Noah is also the Bulls’ primary team leader, whether that’s done through words, emotions, energy or example. He’s signed through 2016 and figures to stay in Chicago for a long time.

    Team leader Noah should only improve

    Joakim Noah did something no one thought he could this month.Not fans, opponents and certainly not his own coaching staff. He put the Bulls on his back and carried them to a victory in Game 7 at Brooklyn; outdueling Brook Lopez to the tune of 12-of-17 shooting for 24 points, 14 rebounds and 6 assists.This came after he didn’t exactly guarantee a road win in Game 7, but predicted as much while sitting at his locker following a Game 6 loss. So what did that performance mean for Noah’s future as an NBA player? Tough to tell.

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    Jonathan Toews battles for a faceoff with Pavel Datsyuk of the Red Wings in Game 2 of the Western Conference semifinals at the United Center on Saturday. The Red Wings won 4-1 to tie the series at 1-1.

    Hawks’ best players were invisible in Game 2

    If the Hawks are to rebound from Saturday’s horrendous effort and regain control of the Western Conference semifinal series with the Red Wings, it’s not going to be Stalberg who makes the difference. How about a goal from Jonathan Toews? He has none so far in the playoffs. The Hawks’ top four defensemen — Duncan Keith, Niklas Hjalmarsson, Brent Seabrook an Nick Leddy — all were minus-2 in Saturday’s 4-1 loss in Game 2.

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    Cubs pitcher Kyuji Fujikawa after giving up home run to the New York Mets’ Danel Murphy in the eighth inning to give the Mets a 4-3 lead in a baseball game in Chicago on Sunday, May 19, 2013.

    Late Mets homer puts Cubs away

    Daniel Murphy hit a tiebreaking home run in the eighth inning and the New York Mets beat the Cubs 4-3 on Sunday for their first series win at Wrigley Field since 2007.The Mets won two of three on this trip to Chicago.Murphy hit a leadoff shot against reliever Kyuji Fukikawa (1-1). Murphy has homered twice in three games and has an eight-game hitting streak.Mets rookie Juan Lagares hit first major league homer, a tying, two-run drive in the seventh against Cubs starter Travis Wood.Scott Rice (2-3) pitched two scoreless innings. Bobby Parnell earned his sixth save.Wood hit his first homer of the season and fourth of his career, clearing the left-field bleachers with a drive off Dillon Gee in the fifth to end a scoreless tie.Wood made his ninth straight quality start, allowing three runs and five hits in seven innings. He struck out three and walked two. The last Cubs starter to begin a season with at least nine straight quality starts was Mordecai “Three Finger” Brown in 1908.The Mets cut lead to 2-1 in the sixth on a walk to Gee, a wild pitch and an RBI single by David Wright.The Cubs extended their lead to 3-1 in the bottom half on Ryan Sweeney’s leadoff homer. It was his first home run since July 27, 2011, when he played for Oakland.Gee allowed three runs and eight hits in five innings. He has allowed nine runs in his last nine innings and hasn’t won since May 1.Sweeney tried to stretch a leadoff double into a triple in the fourth but was thrown out at third. The Cubs also had leadoff doubles in the first and fifth.

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    Dream a little dream ... about hockey?

    It’s over ... the dream is over ... the Blackhawks’ dream of winning the Stanley Cup is over. That’s a panicky overreaction, of course, to the Hawks’ loss to the Red Wings in Game 2 of the Western Conference semifinal series. For one thing, no offense to the Hawks or the NHL or Lord Stanley, but how can the dream be over if the last thing I dream about is hockey? I dream about string bikinis, Copper River salmon, 200 mph cars that get 100 mpg, a cure for the common belly, biggest-screen TVs and golf balls that have no idea how to slice. Oh, yeah, and a winning Powerball ticket ... until early Sunday morning I dreamed a lot about a winning Powerball ticket.

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    New York Rangers center Brian Boyle (22) goes down to the ice as he chases the puck against Boston Bruins defensemen Adam McQuaid (54) and Torey Krug (47) during the first period in Game 2 of the NHL Eastern Conference semifinal hockey playoff series in Boston, Sunday, May 19, 2013.

    Bruins two games up on Rangers

    BOSTON — Johnny Boychuk broke a tie midway through the second period, and the Boston Bruins scored two goals in the third to beat the New York Rangers 5-2 on Sunday and take a 2-0 lead in the Eastern Conference semifinal series.Boychuk put a 40-foot shot from the right inside the near post for his third playoff goal to make it 3-2 at 12:08. Brad Marchand, whose overtime goal won the opener, and Milan Lucic stretched the Bruins’ lead in the final period.Boston never trailed as rookie Torey Krug scored the first goal before Ryan Callahan tied it. Gregory Campbell made it 2-1, and New York pulled even again on Rick Nash’s goal.Games 3 and 4 of the best-of-seven series will be played in New York on Tuesday and Thursday, respectively.

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    Naperville Central can’t overcome rough start

    Coming into Saturday, Naperville Central had not lost a game Keegan Hayes started all season. It took one batter to throw that perfection slightly askew.

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    San Jose Sharks center Logan Couture (39) celebrates with Scott Gomez (23) and Brent Burns (88) after Couture scored the winning goal during overtime in Game 3 of their second-round NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff series, Saturday, May 18, 2013, in San Jose, Calif. San Jose won in overtime 2-1. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)

    Couture’s OT goal gives Sharks 2-1 win over Kings

    Logan Couture scored a power-play goal 1:29 into overtime to help the San Jose Sharks bounce back from two losses in Los Angeles to beat the Kings 2-1 in Game 3 of their second-round series on Saturday night.

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    Glenbard West’s Madeline Perez wins the 3,200 meter run at the Class 3A girls state track and field finals at O’Brien Stadium at Eastern Illinois University in Charleston.

    Perez goes the distance

    Courtney Ackerman made every conceivable effort, but the New Trier senior could never solve Madeline Perez.

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    Talise Romain of Neuqua,left, and Abby Joyce of Naperville Central chase the ball during the class 3A Bolingbrook girls soccer regional final Saturday.

    Quick start works well for Neuqua

    Neuqua Valley didn't waste any time. The Wildcats didn't score off the opening kickoff — although they tried — but they did find the back of the net less than two minutes later. They notched a 3-1 victory at Saturday's Class 3A Bolingbrook regional final to eliminate Naperville Central

Business

  •  
    Yahoo Chief Executive Officer Marissa Mayer has been adding features designed to win back users who have fled the Web portal in favor of competing sites such as Facebook Inc. and Google Inc.

    Yahoo takes big leap with $1.1B deal for Tumblr

    Yahoo is buying online blogging forum Tumblr for $1.1 billion as CEO Marissa Mayer tries to rejuvenate an Internet icon that had fallen behind the times.The deal announced Monday represents Mayer's boldest move yet since she left Google 10 months ago to lead Yahoo's latest comeback attempt. It marks Yahoo's most expensive acquisition since the Sunnyvale, Calif., company bought online search engine Overture a decade ago for $1.3 billion in cash and stock.

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    Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO of the country’s biggest bank, faces a key test this week: His shareholders are voting on whether to let him keep both jobs.

    Jamie Dimon under pressure ahead of investor vote

    It’s been just more than a year since JPMorgan Chase revealed a surprise trading loss that tarnished its usually stellar reputation in Washington and on Wall Street, and what a difference it has made. Shareholder groups are calling for the bank to strip Jamie Dimon of his chairman job, a move that would be a bruising referendum against a man who’s normally chieftain even among other big-bank CEOs.

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    Facebook founder, Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg, center, rings the opening bell of the Nasdaq stock market, from Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif., May 18, 2012. Amid the hype and excitement surrounding Facebook’s initial public offering, much has changed at Facebook in the past year.

    A year after IPO, Facebook aims to be ad colossus

    It was supposed to be our IPO, the people’s public offering. Facebook was going to be bigger than Amazon, bigger than McDonald’s, bigger than Coca-Cola. And it was all made possible by our friendships, photos and family ties. Then came the IPO, and it flopped. Facebook’s stock finished its first day of trading just 23 cents higher than its $38 IPO price. It hasn’t been that high in the one year since.

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    Work advice: Which comes first, business or pleasure?

    Karla L. Miller writes an advice column on navigating the modern workplace. Each week she will answer one or two questions from readers.

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    Roberta Bonoff, president and CEO of Creative Kidstuff, a toy store chain, at the store in St. Paul, Minn. The toy retailer based in Minneapolis just expanded by buying a 26-year-old online and catalog toy retailer, Sensational Beginnings. Bonoff said the owner was tired and ready to sell.

    Retiring boomers driving sales of small businesses

    Baby boomers preparing for retirement are driving a surge in small business sales, as they find more and more buyers confident enough in the improving economy to expand their own businesses through acquisitions. In the first three months of this year, the number of sales that closed jumped 56 percent from the same time in 2012, according to BizBuySell.com, an online marketplace for small businesses.

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    U.S. boom transforming global oil trade

    The surge in oil production in the U.S. and Canada and shrinking oil consumption in the developed world is transforming the global oil market. The threat of chronic oil shortages is all but gone, U.S. dependence on Middle Eastern oil will continue to dwindle, and oil will increasingly flow to the developing economies of Asia, according to a five-year outlook published Tuesday by the International Energy Agency.

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    Todd Rosenbluth, director of exchange-traded fund research with S&P Capital IQ, says the number of conventional ETFs on the market may be hitting a ceiling, as it’s become increasingly difficult to launch new products that differ from existing ETFs.

    Exchange-traded funds entering new phase of growth

    The headlines about exchange-traded funds suggest there are no limits to the growth of these low-cost, easily traded alternatives to mutual funds. Among the recent developments: ETFs have attracted at least $100 billion in new cash for each of the past six years, growing at a far more rapid pace than traditional mutual funds.

  •  
    While good times keep rolling for the superwealthy, many Americans at the bottom end of the privileged group with incomes of $250,000 or more are thinking twice. These “two- percenters,” unnerved by the most recent recession, are trading down to less-expensive offerings from Coach and Ralph Lauren rather than pricier goods from Prada and Giorgio Armani.

    U.S. two-percenters save wealth in trade-down to J. Crew

    Jennifer Prentice, a medical-equipment saleswoman in Minneapolis, once had no qualms about dropping $600 or more for Gucci purses. Now she spends $300 for Coach bags and is filling in her Burberry wardrobe with pieces from J. Crew. "The things we went through over the last couple of years definitely have an impact on what I am doing," Prentice, 45, said in an interview. "I tend to be less frivolous now."

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    Put together a team for your job search

    Although much of your job search is done alone, evidence suggests that the chore can be easier when you do it as part of a team. As in sports, surrounding yourself with great people can enhance your ability to win. Likewise, in sales, a lot of people say the best hunting is done in packs. In fact, professional outplacement and search firms such as Lee Hecht Harrison advocate building "job search work teams."

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    A 65-year-old couple retiring this year would need $220,000 on average to cover medical expenses, an 8 percent decrease from last year's estimate of $240,000.

    Retired couples may need $220K for health care

    After years of increasing health care costs, the outlook is improving for seniors worried about paying their medical bills during retirement. For the second time in the last three years, estimated medical expenses for new retirees have fallen, according to a study released Wednesday by Fidelity Investments. A 65-year-old couple retiring this year would need $220,000 on average to cover medical expenses, an 8 percent decrease from last year's estimate of $240,000.

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    A/C recharge is more complex than in the past

    Q. I have a 2008 Toyota Camry and my air conditioning stopped working. I noticed last year toward the end of the summer that it was not as cold as normal. Then this winter my windows did not seem to clear as easily as they have in the past. Is there any relation and where should I go to get it fixed?

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Actors Garrett Hedlund, Justin Timberlake, Carey Mulligan and Oscar Isaac publicize the film “Inside Llewyn Davis” at the 66th international film festival in Cannes Sunday.

    Coens’ folk revival ‘Llewyn’ serenades Cannes

    The Coen brothers’ resurrection of the pre-Dylan folk scene in Greenwich Village serenaded Cannes with its period music and melancholy tale of a self-destructive, feline-toting musician. “Inside Llewyn Davis” was met rapturously at the Cannes Film Festival, where it was to premiere Sunday night. Joel and Ethan Coen said their primary interest was to recreate the atmosphere of the late 1950s, very early ’60s folk revival amid the coffee shops of downtown New York.

  •  
    Discovery's seven-part “North America” introduces viewers to the continent's many fascinating creatures, including the swift fox.

    Discovery Channel goes wild over wonders of 'North America'

    Every year, residents of North America shell out big bucks (and pesos) to explore the wonders of far-off places in search of spectacular natural landscapes and impressive wildlife. What many don't realize is that they don't have to cross an ocean to get just that. Over seven parts airing Sundays starting today, Discovery Channel aims to enlighten these folks with the natural history documentary "North America."

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    Smoked salmons are weighed and packaged at the Ducktrap River company, in Belfast, Maine. Americans are eating a lot more smoked seafood than they used to. That demand, part of a larger trend of infusing everything from salts and cocktails to nuts and teas with a kiss of smoky flavor, has smoked seafood producers like Maine’s Ducktrap River moving fast to expand production.

    Americans eating more smoked seafood products

    There's no smoke and mirrors about it — Americans are eating a lot more smoked seafood than they used to. And that demand — part of a larger trend of infusing everything from salts and cocktails to fruit and teas with a kiss of smoky flavor — has smoked seafood producers like Maine's Ducktrap River moving fast to expand production. "Our sales have increased to the point where we can't keep up," says Don Cynewski, the company's general manager.

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    Children's entertainer Raffi will headline the Paramount Theatre in Aurora at 1 p.m. Sunday, May 19.

    Sunday picks: Take the family to see Raffi in Aurora

    Kids music superstar Raffi headlines a Sunday afternoon show at the Paramount Theatre in Aurora. Today's the last day for Anime Central 2013, the Midwest's largest convention for fans of Japanese animation and manga, in Rosemont. Broadway touring veteran Jason Forbach performs his show “A New Leading Man” in an intimate cabaret concert at North Central College's Madden Theater tonight.

  •  
    “Montaro Caine” by Sidney Poitier

    Poitier debuts as a novelist with ‘Montaro Caine’

    Oscar-winning actor Sidney Poitier's first novel, "Montaro Caine," is a corporate thriller that veers into science fiction as it follows a beleaguered New York CEO on an unexpected quest to secure two mysterious coins that may hold significant scientific and commercial value. The coins first appeared in the hands of two newborn babies that eventually grow up to marry each other. The impending birth of their first child spurs corporate greed and brings together a diverse assortment of collectors, scientists, physicians and lawyers.

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    Container flower gardening on balconies, decks and patios is also quite “hot” as far as gardening trends.

    Great fixes for small outdoor spaces

    Sometimes, as we all know, the best things come in small packages. That can also be true of outdoor living spaces. While many people like to be able to spread out when they are outside, some of the most charming outdoor spaces are those created in a small entryway, balcony, courtyard or patio.

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    LED lighting gives the homeowner a safe way to enjoy the backyard at night.

    Outdoor makeover Week 3: Sliding door to nowhere

    We recently had our kitchen remodeled and had a sliding glass door installed. Now we have to step down onto an old kitchen cabinet to get outside. We have an old fireplace which is a bit rusty and has seen better days. We enjoy cooking out on the charcoal grill even through the winter.

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    This condo offers unique challenges in backyard design.

    Unique condo patio makeover

    My project is unique because I live in a two-story townhouse style condo and the existing space is very small. I’ve never seen a makeover for a condo patio/outdoor living space. The lack of space is why I think my backyard deserves a makeover.

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    A seat wall and expanded paver area will give this yard a larger place for the owners to enjoy the outdoor space.

    Outdoor makeover week 3: The place to be!

    Having been a licensed daycare provider for 10 years now I will say that my backyard belongs to the 9 little people that I care for everyday. When my 11-hour day comes to an end I very much enjoy a relaxing evening with my husband and a glass of wine sitting outside and socializing with everyone that comes out in the summer after a long cold winter.

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    A seating group by Berlin Gardens in all-weather poly-wood.

    Outdoor makeover contest Week 3: From start to finish

    Our daughter and son-in-law never seem to have time to donate to working in the backyard nor do they have an interest to start the project. With 2 children, 5 and 3 there is always something to be done.

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    Senior curator for the Museum of the Confederacy, Robert Hancock, holds the sword carried by Confederate Brigadier General Lewis A. Armistead during the Battle of Gettysburg.

    Museum of the Confederacy focuses on Gettysburg

    Among the swords, the wrenching letters home and the haunting photographs in the Museum of the Confederacy's new exhibit on Gettysburg, few artifacts embody the ferocious battle more than the eight battle flags recovered from the bloodied fields where Pickett's Charge was fought. The flags, among more than 500 in the museum's extensive collection, are the centerpiece of "Gettysburg: They Walked through Blood," which just opened and runs through September to mark the 150th year since the Battle of Gettysburg.

  •  
    Nicole Richie at AOL’s web series NewFront to promote her series “#CandidlyNicole” in New York. The first webisode, where 31-year-old Richie consults with a doctor about having her “tramp stamp” (or tattoo on her lower back) removed, earned 1 million views in just its first week.

    Nicole Richie gets candid in new AOL web series

    As the Twitterverse expands with millions of users, it can be hard to have a unique voice. Nicole Richie doesn't have that problem. Some examples: "It's 8:30am & I've already gotten into 5 fights' — thugs, and parents of toddlers." "This therapist is going to be GREAT for me once I stop lying to him.""I'm gonna dress up as an iPhone so my husband pays attention to me."

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    Queen Elizabeth invested Prince Charles as Prince of Wales at Caernarfon Castle in 1969, following a tradition dating back to the 13th century.

    Scenic Wales enchants with castles, coastlines and quaint towns

    With a population of 3 million — and 9 million sheep — Wales is smaller than New Jersey, but boasts an amazing range of terrain, from broad, sandy beaches to snow-capped peaks climbed by narrow-gauge trains. Towns set in valleys look like the inside of a box of chocolates, the stone houses lined up in rows along winding lanes. And then there are the castles, 641 of them, more per capita than any other place on earth.

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    See the Gothard Sisters perform at the Gaelic Park Irish Fest in Oak Forest.

    On the road: Take in one of nation’s largest Irish fests

    It's easy being green at Gaelic Park's Irish Fest in Southwest suburban Oak Forest. One of the nation's largest festivals of Irish culture, the event includes Gaelic football and hurling, dancing, theater and storytelling, a petting zoo, Irish dogs and ponies, import stores and an Irish tea room. Also, the 24th season of the Blue Coast Artists studio tours has begun and to celebrate the artists are offering Springfest over Memorial Day weekend.

  •  

    Manufacturer’s products may be best for cleaning floor

    Q. Our vinyl kitchen floor (Mannington) has a textured surface with hundreds of small crevices. It looked fine for a few years, but now that we have had the floor for six years it has begun to look very dirty. These small crevices collect dirt, which is not removed by regular mopping.

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    TV will be a lot less gay next year

    As the broadcast TV channels have revealed their fall schedules along with their renewed-or-canceled announcements, one characteristic of the 2013-14 TV season has already been determined: It will be a lot more heterosexual than the current season.

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    Buyers have time to get inspection

    Q. My wife and I are attempting to purchase a short sale property. The contract states that we must do our home inspection within five days of the seller's acceptance. Our problem is the bank will probably either reject our offer or counter our offer. We don't want to pay $350 for a home inspection until we know we will get the house.

  •  
    Each spring, a Carol Mackie daphne’s small, white flowers will infuse the air with a deliciously sweet perfume.

    To Carol with love: Notes on a special daphne

    I fell in love with Carol Mackie almost from the day she arrived here. Carol — a kind of daphne — doesn't stop at just looking good. Every spring, each of her stems is capped by a tight cluster of small, white flowers.

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    Mammoth Cave is the granddaddy of caves, located in southwestern Kentucky.

    Caves hold special coolness factor for kids

    It’s one thing to engage kids in nature above ground. It’s quite another to engage them below ground. Our kids, like most kids, love nature. They love it even more when it’s rainy and they can stomp in a mud puddle. But that’s all standard fun above ground. Take them below ground and there’s a whole new world to explore — one that is equal parts dark and mysterious, spooky and mesmerizing.

  •  
    Have some old clipboards lying around? Turn them into eye-grabbing additions that help you stay organized in style.

    A colorful mudroom serves a wide range of functions

    With her three kids' busy school and sports schedules, it's no wonder Jamie Adcock requires a one-stop spot in her Willowbrook home to keep all of their gear organized and clean. As a bonus, her mudroom is also a style powerhouse thanks to vividly colored cabinetry that hides clutter and makes a statement.

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: Time to pass federal shield legislation
    This Daily Herald editorial, citing the surveillance of AP phone conversations, calls for federal shield legislation that strenghens the protections for source relationships with journalists.

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    Carol Stream T-shirt guy’s work underscores our Business mission

    Have you heard the one about the Carol Stream guy who invented the combo Bulls-Blackhawks playoffs T-shirt? You will soon, says Jim Davis, news director for the DuPage and Fox Valley editions.

  •  

    Government’s heavy hand

    Columnist Michael Gerson: Republicans are fully capable of overreaching in strategy and philosophy — making every disagreement with President Obama into an article of impeachment and conveying a disdain for government itself. Perhaps this is what Obama hopes will happen if he baits the GOP. But this would not solve the nation's problem. We need a federal government that is limited, respected and effective within its proper bounds. And none can call this the Obama legacy.

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    A society grounded in Christianity has hope
    A Palatine letter to the editor: Everyone would benefit from a Christian culture. Not all would be Christians but there would be a Christian consensus. We were once such a Christian nation: one in which life, liberty and property were viewed as unalienable rights endowed by their creator to each citizen. Multiculturalism has led us down the path to an ungodly humanistic culture.

  •  

    Include Cook in concealed carry law
    An Elk Grove Village letter to the editor: Any concealed carry law that excludes the residents of Cook County actually discriminates against the law-abiding citizens of the county. If the politicians think they can use, "public safety" as an excuse for excluding Cook County, they should realize that public safety actually improves whenever a law-abiding citizen is legally allowed to carry a concealed weapon.

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    Cigarettes not an easy tax source
    A Mundelein letter to the editor: As government tries to keep going and possibly to expand service, it needs revenue. However, broadly raising taxes is politically risky, so the slogan is always, "Don't tax you. Don't tax me. Tax the guy behind the tree." Increasingly the guy behind the tree is the cigarette smoker.

  •  

    Batavia food pantry thanks you for help
    A Batavia letter to the editor: The Batavia Interfaith Food Pantry wants to thank local Jewel and Berkley's food stores, all of the more than 100 volunteers who worked the weekend of the Spring Food Pantry "Food Sharing Days" and especially all the patrons who donated food products or made cash donations. The food pantry received 3¼ tons of food and paper products and $1,500 in cash donations.

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    Fire chief’s pension, sick pay outrageous
    A Carpentersville-realted letter to the editor: I would think every taxpayer who doesn't work for the government would be outraged over the obscene $95,640 per year pension the ex-Carpentersville fire chief who retired under a cloud of suspicion is receiving. Plus he received another onetime payment of $28,967.24 for earned vacation and sick days.

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    Teen dance over Benghazi hearings?
    A Wayne letter to the editor: The thing about breaking news especially when its related to the world and our country, is that it should be front page news whether it's the newspaper's opinion or not.

  •  

    Institution you save might be your own
    Institution you save might be your ownThis letter is to the media collective. The Daily Herald reported a Washington Post article about the government seizing Associated Press journalists’ phone and other information in what was described as an unprecedented and broad way. I wanted to laugh except for the seriousness of this event.Why? The liberal media collective has for years belittled the Christian Church, demonized the NRA and its members, and touted the antiquation of the traditional nuclear family. Each of these spheres of American culture, or institutions has seen their civil liberties progressively eroded by the government with the liberal media’s assistance and approval. Now that it’s the media’s turn, they are outraged?The three branches of government are supposed to keep each other in check, but the Bill of Rights is also a check.1st Amendment — The right to free speech, the press, to assemble, to religion, and to petition the government over grievances allows the people to keep an eye on the government and to check any attempts at thought control. 2nd Amendment — To keep and bear arms, gives the people teeth with which to resist government force. 4th Amendment — Freedom from search and seizure grants reasonable privacy as well as permitting property ownership.Each of these rights supports one another. I’ve named institutions that have already been eroded; the media was sure to follow. While the liberal media has been busy taking chunks out of the traditional family, the church, and the NRA’s butts, these same institutions have been busy guarding yours.The IRS has targeted Tea Partyers, Obamacare is targeting religious-based organizations, Obama’s gun control efforts target the NRA and its members, government support of gay marriage targets the traditional family. Wake up media, the institution you save might be your own.Brian Van DineCarol Stream

  •  

    Obama impeachable in Benghazi mess?
    Obama impeachable in Benghazi mess?It seems to me that if Bill Clinton was impeachable for lying about his peccadilloes, Obama certainly should be for his handling of the Benghazi debacle and its aftermath.Don BuckWheaton

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    (No heading)
    A recent study reported by Robert Frank stated that the American wealthy are hands down the most philanthropic in the world. They dominate global giving and are more likely to make philanthropy a priority. The study further goes on to say that multimillionaires donate only about 1 of their wealth to charity, although billionaires tend to give more. Interestingly enough, the wealthy worth $10 million or more state three main reasons for not giving more. First, they needed more confidence that the level of their wealth would continue to support their lifestyle and their family. Second, they said they would give more if the markets improved. Finally, a third of those polled said they needed to find something more to be passionate about. I assume heart, cancer and leukemia research and the like are areas that do not engender passion.Joseph F. MirabellaWheaton

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