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Daily Archive : Sunday May 5, 2013

News

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    A sign outside a restaurant in downtown Arlington Heights on Sunday thanks the police department for its handling of a standoff situation. Portions of downtown were cordoned off Saturday night during the standoff, which ended peacefully.

    Arlington Hts. businesses, residents relieved by end to standoff

    As Arlington Heights police continued to investigate a standoff that ended peacefully Saturday night, business owners, residents and shoppers in the village's downtown expressed relief and gratitude for how it was handled.

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    Collin Scheffler, left, and Jesus Sanchez

    Bond set at $2 million for Wheeling murder suspect

    A judge set ond at $2 million Sunday for an Arlington Heights teen charged with shooting a Wheeling man to death Wednesday while trying to gun down a rival gang member.Jesus Sanchez, 18, of the 2000 block of West Nichols Road, was trying to kill a 15-year-old boy who had left his gang to join a rival group when he instead fatally shot 23-year-old bystander Rafael Orozco, a Cook County prosecutor...

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    Gov. Pat Quinn vetoed a plan Sunday to increase ComEd electric rates by roughly $70 million.

    Quinn rejects bill raising electric rates

    Gov. Pat Quinn has rejected a plan to increase electric rates by roughly $70 million, a proposal ComEd says would have helped get so-called Smart Grid technology back on track. Quinn vetoed the plan Sunday saying the bill would undermine oversight and force automatic rate hikes.

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    With a little help from his new left arm, Kent Carson can slip on both of his prosthetic legs quickly during this therapy session at Advocate Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn. Carson is walking on his own just eight months after a nearly fatal bout of Legionnaires’ disease led to the amputations of his left arm and both legs.

    Triple amputee wants Boston victims to know it gets better

    It wasn't a bomb blast, but a nearly fatal bout of Legionnaires' disease that led to the amputations of Kent Carson's left arm and both legs last year. Now the Round Lake Beach man is walking, working on driving again and would love to visit the Boston bombing victims to give them encouragement.

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    Man accidentally shoots brother in Elgin Twp.

    Kane County Sheriff's police are investigating an accidental shooting in unincorporated Elgin Township early Sunday morning. The victim is being treated for nonlife-threatening injuries at Provena St. Joseph Hospital in Elgin. No charges have been filed.

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    Charles Amrich

    Election fights cost Island Lake taxpayers $44,125

    Two activists' lengthy and ultimately fruitless attempts to knock Island Lake Mayor-elect Charles Amrich and Trustee-elect Tony Sciarrone off last month's ballot cost the village nearly $44,125 in legal fees, records show. The petition challenge process dragged on for three months and included two trips to Lake County circuit court.

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    Village President Arlene Mulder speaks to guests during groundbreaking ceremonies for the new Arlington Heights Village Hall on June 8, 2006.

    Looking at Arlene Mulder's legacy in Arlington Heights

    In 1991, Arlene Mulder had been a park board commissioner for 12 years when Village President Bill Maki asked, or as Mulder remembers it, begged, her to run for trustee. Two years later Maki became a judge and Mulder won her first term as mayor. On Monday, she'll bang the gavel for the last time before turning it over to Tom Hayes.

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    Damaged buildings wrecked by an Israeli airstrike are seen in Damascus, Syria, Sunday. Israeli warplanes struck areas in and around the Syrian capital early Sunday, setting off a series of explosions as they targeted a shipment of Iranian-made guided missiles.

    Israeli airstrikes on Syria prompt threats, anger

    Israel rushed to beef up its rocket defenses on its northern border Sunday to shield against possible retaliation after carrying out two airstrikes in Syria over 48 hours — an unprecedented escalation of Israeli involvement in the Syrian civil war. Syria and its patron Iran hinted at possible retribution, though the rhetoric in official statements appeared relatively muted.

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    The Aurora Police Department honored seven of it’s officers, who along with six firefighters, saved the life of 14-year-old Annie Prosser who nearly drowned in March after the vehicle in which she was riding crashed into a retention pond. Edwin Doepel, left, Erik Swastek, Greg Christoffel, Nicholas Gartner, Joshua Sullivan, and Chris Coronado wait in line for a hug from Annie Prosser while she hugs Jeffrey Hahn.

    Images: The Week in Pictures
    This edition of The Week in Pictures features Francis Cardinal George blessing a new hospital, a drive-thru prayer service, and a super crocodile dinosaur exhibit.

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    Kenneth Feinberg, an attorney who managed the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund, spoke two weeks ago at a news conference in Boston as Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick, right, listened. The One Fund was established by Patrick and Boston Mayor Thomas Menino as a central place to gather donations for the Boston Marathon bombing victims.

    Experts warn about donation drives after bombing

    At least two online campaigns aimed to help David Henneberry buy a new boat after his was shot up while a Boston Marathon bombing suspect hid inside. And a handful of drives have cropped up to help the family of Martin Richard, the 8-year-old killed in the attack. Neither recipient had anything to do with setting up those fundraisers. But that didn’t stop the sites from raising tens of thousands...

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    Ruslan Tsarni, right, uncle of killed Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev, speaks with reporters in front of a funeral home in Worcester, Mass., as funeral director and owner Peter Stefan, left, stands nearby Sunday.

    Uncle arranging Boston bomb suspect’s burial rites

    The uncle of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev arrived in Massachusetts on Sunday to arrange for his burial, saying he understands that “no one wants to associate their names with such evil events.”

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    President Barack Obama speaks during the Ohio State University spring commencement in the Ohio Stadium Sunday in Columbus, Ohio. Obama delivered the commencement address before receiving an honorary doctor of law degree. He urged graduating students to be active citizens, to fight for causes they believe in, and to be better than generations before them.

    Obama dares graduates to reject cynical voices

    A year to the day after kicking off his victorious re-election campaign on this college campus, President Barack Obama returned to Ohio State University and told graduates that only through vigorous participation in their democracy can they right an ill-functioning government and break through relentless cynicism about the nation’s future.

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    President Barack Obama speaks at Ohio State University’s spring commencement ceremony Sunday in Columbus, Ohio. Obama urged graduating students to be active citizens, to fight for causes they believe in, and to be better than generations before them.

    What happens when Obama’s promises conflict?

    Absent a magic potion or explosive economic growth, it was all but inevitable President Barack Obama would have to break some of his campaign promises to keep others. If there’s one thing that distinguished them besides their ambition, it was their incompatibility.

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    Chicago Blackhawks’ Michael Frolik (shoots against Minnesota Wild’s Mikko Koivu in the second period of Game 3 of an NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff series Sunday, May 5, 2013 in St. Paul, Minn.

    Images: Blackhawks vs. Wild, Game Three
    The Chicago Blackhawks battled the Minnesota Wild in the third game of the NHL first round playoff series Sunday in St. Paul, Minnesota. The Blackhawks lost to the Wild in overtime 3-2.

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    Archaeologist Dan Elliott uses a scale to weigh a musket ball recovered from a northeast Georgia site where his team discovered artifacts from a Revolutionary War fort, where patriot militiamen turned back British loyalist fighters in a short but violent gun battle in February 1779.

    Frontier fort from Revolutionary War found in Ga.

    Less than two months after British forces captured Savannah in December 1778, patriot militiamen scored a rare Revolutionary War victory in Georgia after a short but violent gunbattle forced British loyalists to abandon a small fort built on a frontiersman’s cattle farm. More than 234 years later, archaeologists say they’ve pinpointed the fort's location in Georgia.

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    Pictured from left to right, Alexian Brothers Daniel McCormick (Provincial), Brother Paul Magner and Brother Tom Klein with Melanie Furlan, Vice President, Advancement, for Alexian Brothers Foundation, show off the silent auction items, including an autographed guitar by John Rzeznik of the Goo Goo Dolls.

    Alexian Brothers supporters celebrate at Ball de Fleur

    Supporters of the Alexian Brothers Health System have a lot to celebrate these days. One month after opening their $126 million Alexian Brothers Women’s & Children’s Hospital in Hoffman Estates, more than 500 people gathered Saturday in Chicago to advance the system’s next health initiatives. They gathered at Chicago’s Palmer House Hilton for the 27th annual Ball de Fleur black tie optional event.

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    MHS dancers to perform

    The Mundelein High School Orchesis dance club will hold its final show of the year at 7 p.m. May 13 in the auditorium, 1350 W. Hawley St.

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    WACO charity golf outing May 22 in Bloomingdale

    The Woodfield Area Children’s Organization’s Charity Golf Classic, “Chipping in for the Kids,” will be held Wednesday, May 22 at the Bloomingdale Golf Club, 181 Glen Ellyn Road in Bloomingdale. Registration starts at 8 a.m. and the shotgun start will be at 10 a.m.

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    ALS Tag Day fundraiser

    On May 11 and 12, volunteers wearing yellow aprons and holding collection canisters will be stationed in front of stores throughout Wauconda and Lake Zurich as part of the Les Turner ALS Foundation’s Tag Days drives.

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    District 220 seeks input on calendar changes

    Barrington Unit District 220’s Input 220 Advisory Council has scheduled a public forum about possible changes to the school year calendar at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 14 at the Early Learning Center, 40 E. Dundee Road, adjacent to Barrington Middle School - Prairie Campus. The forum will allow community members to hear, see and comment on the various options being considered.

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    New officials in Wauconda

    Wauconda Mayor-elect Frank Bart will take the oath of office and begin his 4-year term at Tuesday’s board meeting.

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    Alan Krueger, Chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, speaks to the media last November about middle class tax cuts and spending during a White House news briefing in Washington.

    New jobs and energy gains helping lift US economy

    A stronger-than-expected April rebound in job creation and recent dramatic discoveries of vast U.S. oil and gas reserves are helping to lift the American economy out its long funk. The economic good news is also drawing attention to the importance of private-sector innovation rather than government policy in fostering growth.

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    Sarah Davis, co-owner of Fashionphile.com, poses with her bags in a company warehouse in the Carlsbad, Calif. The Internet company sells rare, vintage, and discontinued previous owned bags and is facing the complicated task of dealing with new state regulations on Internet sale taxes.

    Are you a tax cheat if you shop online tax-free?

    Buy anything on the Internet lately without paying sales tax? In all but a few states, you’re probably a tax cheat. That’s right, even if Internet retailers don’t collect sales tax at the time of the purchase, you’re required by law to pay it in 45 states and the District of Columbia.

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    Slot machines are seen on the floor of the Casino of the Wind at Mohegan Sun in Uncasville, Conn. The spread of casino gambling is reaping billions of dollars for industry and government coffers, but also is creating more compulsive gamblers.

    Gambling’s dark side Compulsive gambling feeds off casino surge

    The unrelenting spread of casino gambling across America is reaping billions of dollars for the industry and government coffers but is also creating more compulsive gamblers. Addiction experts say the sums spent by states for treatment and counseling are too little to keep pace.

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    A remote camera for the Los Angeles Department of Transportation oversees traffic flow. In small towns and big cities, police and politicians are pointing to the surveillance video that was key to identifying the Boston Marathon bombing suspects as a reason to bolster their own networks and get more electronic eyes on their streets.

    Police, politicians push surveillance post-Boston

    Police and politicians across the U.S. are pointing to the example of surveillance video that was used to help identify the Boston Marathon bombing suspects as a reason to get more electronic eyes on their streets. Some in law enforcement, however, acknowledge that their plans may face an age-old obstacle: Americans' traditional reluctance to give up their privacy.

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    A section of a half-mile long concrete wall, six feet tall and a foot or so thick, built in the 1940s and now covered with murals. The wall was built to separate homes planned for middle-class whites from those owned by blacks. The wall remains, a physical embodiment of racial attitudes that the country long ago started trying to move beyond. And slowly, in subtle ways, it is evolving into something else in its community, something unexpected: an inspiration.

    Detroit wall that once divided races remains, teaches

    When Eva Nelson-McClendon first moved to Detroit's Birwood Street in 1959, she didn't know much about the wall across the street. Then she started to hear the talk. "Blacks lived on this side, whites was living on the other side. ... That was the way it was," she said. That's not the way it is anymore. But the wall remains.

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    Richard Duchossois

    What others say about Arlene Mulder
    What others say about Arlene Mulder, outgoing Arlington Heights mayor.

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    Catherine Forrest of South Elgin photographs the interior of the reception hall at Dunham Castle in Wayne on Saturday.

    Public tours of Dunham Castle give glimpses of old glory

    Wandering through rooms of Dunham Castle in Wayne, it’s easy to imagine its long gone glory days, elegant soirees with ladies in gloves and men in long coat tails. Visitors can take a rare tour this weekend of the historic Wayne building. “I love it. It’s absolutely gorgeous,” visitor Catherine Forrest said. Still, it broke her heart to see its poor condition, she added.

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    A June 4 public hearing has been scheduled to help the West Chicago Historical Commission decide if it will give the city permission to demolish the Joel Wiant House.

    Future in doubt for historic West Chicago house

    Time appears to be running out for the Joel Wiant House. After being a fixture in downtown West Chicago for more than 143 years, the redbrick building at 151 W. Washington St. has been vacant for years and fallen into disrepair. The city, which owns the house, is trying to sell it for a dollar. But officials say they’ve been unable to find a buyer capable of rehabilitating the historic...

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    Bob Chwedyk/bchwedyk@dailyherald.com Arlington Heights Village President Arlene Mulder, on the eve of her departure from office. She leaves a lasting legacy.

    Editorial: The tenure of Arlington Heights Mayor Arlene Mulder

    This Daily Herald reflects on the legacy of Arlene Mulder who leaves office this week after 20 years as village president of Arlington Heights, a model suburb that has largely been remade during Mulder's tenure.

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    Arlene Mulder presents Frank Cassell, Roosevelt University dean, with the 1993 Arlington Heights vehicle sticker honoring the university. From 1987 to 1996, Roosevelt’s northwest suburban campus was in the former Forest View High School, 2121 S. Goebbert Road, Arlington Heights.

    Images: Arlene Mulder Through the Years
    One of the benefits, news-wise, of Arlene Mulder's tenure in office has been her high visibility. To make this gallery, our Daily Herald photo staff pored over hundreds of images of the mayor through the years, to choose the ones that best tell the whole story of her public life.

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    Kent Carson of Round Lake Beach cracks a smile during a physical therapy session. Carson survived a nearly fatal bout of Legionnaires’ disease which led to the amputation his left arm and both legs last year.

    Images: Triple amputee Kent Carson
    Kent Carson of Round Lake Beach survived a nearly fatal bout of Legionnaires' disease. Now the triple amputee is walking, working on driving again and would love to visit the Boston bombing victims to give them encouragement.

Sports

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    Cubs starter Edwin Jackson reacts after Cincinnati’s Jay Bruce hit an run-scoring double in the Reds’ 3-run fourth inning Sunday. Jackson fell to 0-5 with the 7-4 loss.

    Cubs have more than their share of problems

    The Cubs sprung a whole lot more leaks Sunday in a 7-4 loss to the Reds at Wrigley Field. They've lost four in a row and five of six, and their problems are starting to pile up.

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    The playoff road only gets rockier for Joakim Noah and the Bulls when they begin the Eastern Conference semifinals today against defending NBA champion Miami.

    Beating Heat will be a Herculean task

    A few weeks ago, the storyline to this Bulls season seemed to be, “They’re not going to beat Miami anyway, so Derrick Rose shouldn’t bother playing.” Now that they pulled off a short-handed first-round win over Brooklyn and will face the Heat, many Bulls fans seem outraged that Rose is not playing.

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    Bulls center Joakim Noah continues to slam home his points about extra effort and team play being keys to winning.

    Heat know what to expect from Bulls

    After waiting around for a week, Heat players are anxious to face the Bulls. “Them being the Bulls is enough,” Chris Bosh said Sunday. “Heat-Bulls, I think that's enough to really get your minds going and have some passion for the series.”

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    How the Bulls fared against Miami this season
    The Bulls spit their season series with the Miami Heat, each team winning two games.

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    It will difficult to remove Dylan Axelrod from the White Sox rotation when some of their starters return from injury.

    True, these are tough times for White Sox

    As the White Sox' struggles continue, Chris Rongey addresses a couple of his listeners’ most common inquiries.

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    Cubs first baseman Anthony Rizzo reacts after striking out in the first inning of Sunday’s 7-4 loss to the Reds at Wrigley Field.

    Some good, some bad for Cubs

    No manager ever totally relaxes, but Dale Sveum and his Cubs coaching staff have had to constantly be on their toes dealing with a bullpen in flux and an offense that has hit with nobody on, but for some reason hasn’t come through enough with men on base. In this week's column, Len Kasper breaks down the hits and misses so far this season.

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    White Sox manager Robin Ventura walks to the dugout before Sunday’s game against the Kansas City Royals at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Mo.

    Sox drop 10-inning tilt to Royals

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. Alex Gordon hit an RBI single with two outs in the 10th and the Kansas City Royals, saved when Billy Butler sent the game into extra innings, rallied past the White Sox 6-5.Butler’s two-out, two-run double in the ninth tied it for Kansas City.Lorenzo Cain led off the 10th with his third hit and stole second with one out. With two outs, Chris Getz was intentionally walked and George Kottaras then walked on five pitches, loading the bases for Gordon.Gordon singled on the first pitch from rookie Brian Omogrosso (0-1), who made his first appearance since being called up Wednesday.Greg Holland (1-1) worked a perfect 10th.Butler’s tying double scored pinch runner Chris Getz and George Kottaras. Addison Reed blew his first save in 18 opportunities dating to Aug. 25. He was 10 for 10 in save chances this season.Alex Rios homered and drove in two runs and Alejandro De Aza contributed a two-run double for the White Sox.Royals reliever Tim Collins started the seventh with a 3-1 lead, but allowed three runs on three hits without retiring a batter. In his past two outings, Collins has yielded five runs on seven hits and gotten only two outs.Chicago scored four times in the seventh. Aaron Crow threw a wild pitch that let one run score and Rios hit his team-leading seventh home run.Royals right-hander Wade Davis, who had allowed 15 runs on 20 hits and seven walks in 8 1-3 innings in losing his previous two starts, held the White Sox to one run on five hits in six innings.Davis gave up a run in the third on Rios’ groundout with the bases loaded.White Sox left-hander Jose Quintana held the Royals hitless for four innings before they scored three runs in the fifth. Miguel Tejada and Alcides Escobar had RBI singles and the other run scored on second baseman Jeff Keppinger’s error.

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    Cubs relief pitcher Carlos Marmol talks with catcher Welington Castillo during a rough appearance Saturday. On Sunday, Marmol worked a 1-2-3 sixth inning against the Reds.

    Cubs’ Marmol will keep getting the ball

    It seems everybody has their take on what the Cubs should do with reliever Carlos Marmol. Manager Dale Sveum said Sunday Marmol will keep pitching despite his recent struggles.

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    Teammates praise Crawford’s performance despite defeat

    Goalie Corey Crawford stood tall again for the Blackhawks on Sunday in Game 3, although there are certain to be some fans finding fault with Jason Zucker’s goal in overtime that beat the goalie to the short side. Not the Hawks. “We had great goaltending,” captain Jonathan Toews said. “Crow kept us in that game all game and without him we probably wouldn’t have stood a chance.”

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    Wild kept the hits coming againt Hawks

    Before Game 3, Minnesota coach Mike Yeo told his team they needed to be more physical. The Wild responded, outhitting the Hawks 34-13 with most of those hits coming against the defensemen.

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    Wild played Game 3 like it was Game 7

    Minnesota can cancel the tee times and plan for at least a couple more games after the Wild outplayed the Blackhawks from start to finish Sunday and scored 2:15 into overtime to take Game 3 and cut their series deficit to 2-1.

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    Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford and center Michal Handzus watch as a Pierre-Marc Bouchard goal goes into the net in Sunday’s first period in Game 3 of the Hawks’ first-round playoff series with the Minnesota Wild.

    How will the Hawks respond to Game 3 loss?

    Knowing they had to be more physical if there was going to be any chance of them winning the series, the Wild delivered in Game 3 of the Western Conference quarterfinals, out-hitting the Hawks 34-13 en route to a 3-2 overtime victory.

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    Cougars blank Dragons

    Left-handers Michael Heesch and Nathan Dorris combined to limit the Dayton Dragons to 5 hits as the Kane County Cougars captured their sixth straight victory — 2-0 on Sunday at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark in Geneva.

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    Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford blocks a shot by the Minnesota Wild’s Torrey Mitchell in the first period of Game 3 of a first-round NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoff series on Sunday, May 5, 2013, in St. Paul, Minn.

    Game 3: Wild edge Blackhawks in OT

    ST. PAUL, Minn. — Jason Zucker scored at 2:15 of overtime to give Minnesota a 3-2 victory over the Chicago Blackhawks on Sunday, pulling the Wild within 2-1 in the Western Conference quarterfinal series.Zach Parise scored for the Wild early in the third period, but Duncan Keith got one back for the Blackhawks with 2:46 left in regulation to force the second overtime in three games of this best-of-seven series. Game 4 is here on Tuesday night.After taking the top-seeded Blackhawks to overtime in Game 1 at Chicago, the Wild fell flat and lost 5-2 in Game 2. They took full advantage of the shift in venue and fed off the noise and excitement in the building in Minnesota’s first home playoff game in five years. The Wild nearly squandered their edge by losing aggressiveness and hanging back to preserve the lead in the waning minutes of regulation. Keith’s snap shot glanced off Wild defenseman Marco Scandella and past goalie Josh Harding to make the score 2-2. But after Matt Cullen ferociously chased the puck along the end boards in the opening action of overtime, Zucker swooped in to surprise Johnny Oduya as the Blackhawks defenseman was about to fight for possession with Cullen.Zucker’s bad-angle shot slipped past goalie Corey Crawford, and the rookie raced toward the corner and jumped into the glass to celebrate.Pierre-Marc Bouchard also had a goal for the Wild after Oduya scored for the Blackhawks late in the first period.The Wild outshot the Blackhawks 29-17 over the first 40 minutes. Crawford made 34 saves for the Blackhawks, and Josh Harding stopped 25 shots for the Wild.The Wild found a potential weak spot on the top shelf. Bouchard flipped his goal over Crawford, and so did Parise, after rookie Charlie Coyle’s relentless forecheck earned him possession of the puck for a sharp pass to Parise in front of the net.The Blackhawks started slowly in the playoffs in 2010, too, when they won the Stanley Cup. With 10 players still around from that season, including most of their star-packed core, they’re poised to make another run for the title. Three years ago, they fell behind Nashville 2-1 in the first round before winning the series in six games. They needed six games to beat Vancouver next, too, before sweeping San Jose to reach the finals.Parise’s goal was the first in three games for the Wild’s top line. Mikko Koivu is still scoreless, but Charlie Coyle has two assists.Bouchard and Stephane Veilleux are the only two players left from the 2003 Wild team that reached the Western Conference finals, and Veilleux played for two other teams before returning last season. They’re two of five players, with Koivu, Harding and Niklas Backstrom, remaining from 2008, the last time they made the playoffs.The Wild recalled Veilleux from their AHL affiliate and put him in Zenon Konopka’s spot on the fourth line with Mike Rupp and Torrey Mitchell. Trying to match the Blackhawks and their speed, deft passing and seemingly infinite depth would be an impossible task for the Wild, so they knew they needed to bring more energy to fuel the crowd and a nasty streak in attempt to distract the Blackhawks a bit from their finesse-based game.Coach Mike Yeo even described before the game a “level of hatred” he wanted the Wild to bring to the ice for the Stanley Cup favorite Blackhawks, a team that will be in their division next season when the NHL realignment kicks in.The Wild heeded the call. Koivu, who took eight of his team’s 16 penalty minutes and posting a minus-3 rating over the first two games, lowered his shoulder and leveled Marcus Kruger near the boards to inspire a roar from the announced crowd of 19,238. The hits in the first period were 17-4 in favor of the Wild.

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    Softball: Top 20 rankings
    Naperville Central (24-0), Barrington (23-1) and Benet (16-2) are still the top 3 teams in this week's Daily Herald Top 20 rankings of area softball teams.

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    Cubs shortstop Starlin Castro, top, jumps after forcing out Cincinnati Reds’ Devin Mesoraco during the eighth inning of an MLB National League baseball game in Chicago, Sunday, May 5, 2013. Cincinnati Reds’ Donald Lutz was safe at first.

    Reds sweep Cubs with 7-4 win
    $PHOTOCREDIT_ON$Associated Press$PHOTOCREDIT_OFF$Joey Votto had three hits, Todd Frazier hit a two-run single and the Cincinnati Reds completed a three-game sweep of the Cubs with a 7-4 victory Sunday at Wrigley Field.The Cubs rallied for three runs off Mat Latos to make it a one-run game in the fifth inning, helped when Reds center fielder Shin-Soo Choo and second baseman Brandon Phillips collided trying to catch Alfonso Soriano’s short fly.Latos (3-0) extended his scoreless streak to 21 innings, tying a career high, but didn’t pitch past the fifth inning for the first time in seven starts this season. He struck out six and walked three.J.J. Hoover earned his second save.Edwin Jackson (0-5) struggled again for the Cubs, allowing four runs and eight hits in five innings. He struck out five and walked one. He has yet to pitch past the sixth inning in seven starts this season.The Reds got a scare in the fifth when Choo and Phillips ran into each other. The ball deflected off Phillips’ glove and hit Choo in the face. Trainers checked both players. \Phillips later exited in the eighth inning. Two runs scored on Soriano’s double, ending Latos’ scoreless streak. Nate Schierholtz followed with an RBI single to cut the lead to 4-3.The Reds got two more in the seventh. Votto’s second double drove in one, and Phillips had a sacrifice fly.The Cubs cut the lead to 6-4 in the bottom of the inning when David DeJesus scored on a groundout, but the Reds added another in the eighth.Jay Bruce hit an RBI double off Jackson in the fourth and the Reds extended the lead to 3-0 on Frazier’s two-run single. The Reds added a run in the fifth on Zack Cozart’s sacrifice fly. Choo scored after he singled, stole second and advanced on catcher Dioner Navarro’s throwing error.The Cubs brought the tying run to the plate in the ninth with no outs after Scott Hairston reached on a single and dvanced to third on Hoover’s throwing error to second when DeJesus hit a chopper to the mound. Hoover got three flyouts to end the game.

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    Looking back on a lifelong bond with baseball
    Matt Spiegel's relationship with baseball began with his father, who crafted a bond between them that has lasted a lifetime, from Ted Williams to Willie Mays to today's young stars. As his father turns 80, Matt celebrates their love of the game.

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    Joakim Noah celebrates with after defeating the Brooklyn Nets 99-93 in Game 7 of their first-round NBA basketball playoff series in New York, Saturday, May 4, 2013. The Bulls won the series to advance to a second-round series against the Miami Heat beginning Monday.

    Bulls prove they don’t need Derrick Rose

    The Nets learned something in Game 7: So much emphasis is placed on the Bulls' hard work and hustle that it's easy to overlook that these guys -- without Derrick Rose -- can play this game, too, Mike Imrem says. Playing without their superstar point guard, as usual, this remarkable group of battered basketball players advanced to the second round of the NBA playoffs Saturday night.

Business

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    An Air France Boeing 777 takes off from Houston’s Bush Intercontinental Airport on its way to Paris, France.

    Boeing pushing 777 upgrade

    Boeing Co. has started to market an upgrade of its 777 jet, the company's biggest twin-engine model, as it nears a final decision to build the plane amid mounting pressure from Airbus SAS's A350. Pricing and scheduling for the so-called 777X are part of the talks with customers.

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    Two packs of Marlboro cigarettes are seen here, the one on the left with a New York City and state tax stamp, and on the right a Virginia tax stamp. New York City’s war on smoking is being undercut by light penalties for merchants caught selling cheap cigarettes smuggled in from low-tax states.

    NYC cigarette tax fight hampered by low fines

    High taxes have emerged as the No. 1 weapon in the war on smoking. The more cigarettes cost, research has shown, the fewer people buy them. That is one of the reasons six states are considering proposals to hike tobacco taxes.

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    Revelers dance to the music played by DJ Cedric Gervais at the Surrender nightclub in Las Vegas. The rise of the Vegas super-club coincides with the decline of the town’s gambling supremacy.

    Casino bosses transform Sin City into Club City

    To step into club XS at the Wynn Las Vegas is to enter the dreamscape of a modern artist with fetishes for gold and bronze and bodies in motion. A golden-plated frieze made from casts of nude women sits atop a shimmering staircase.

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    With the Dow Jones industrial average breaking through 15,000, it’s natural to worry that stocks have gone up too far. But higher priced stocks aren’t necessarily overpriced. They may still be a good deal if corporate earnings are rising fast.

    As the Dow breaks 15,000, is it too late to buy?

    A solid April jobs report on Friday is a sign the economy is strengthening. That could lead to higher profits. What’s more, many of the traditional threats to bull markets — rising inflation and interest rates, a possible recession — don’t seem likely soon. That said, stocks are no bargain. Buy them only if you’re willing to ride the inevitable ups and downs and hold on for a while.

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    Document any incidents that makes you uncomfortable, and take action if you feel you’re being harassed.

    Is dream job worth harassment?

    Q: I just got my dream job a week ago as executive assistant to the managing director of a business. I will also do special projects for the business owner, who is well known in the local music industry. On my second day of work, when my boss was out, the owner asked if I would like to see a music video he had made. He proceeded to show me a video of himself receiving oral sex. He then told me it would be best if I did not share this with my boss. Of course, I told my boss, who included me on a call to our outsourced HR department. During the call, my boss mentioned a former intern at the business who had left prematurely; it was clear to me she left because of something the owner had done. My boss, a father himself, seems to be very protective, and has insisted the owner come in only two days a week for now. The owner has been extremely respectful toward me since then. Is there anything else I should do? I want to keep this job, but I am on a three-month probationary period and want to protect myself. A: Would your “protective” boss make his own daughter spend two days a week hanging around a viper? Because that’s essentially what he’s doing to you. Make no mistake: That Ron Jeremy wannabe is a sicko. This isn’t about telling an off-color joke or misinterpreting a situation. His behavior is predatory and clearly a pattern. You’ve done all the right things so far. If you want to go further, talk to an officer at your local police station about the possibility of pressing charges — yes, I’m serious — and how you can protect yourself. Document the incident and anything else the owner does that makes you uncomfortable. Ask your boss if he can change your job so you don’t have to report to the owner. Employment attorney Sharon Snyder of the Ober Kaler law firm says your employer has taken the legally required “appropriate corrective action” by putting a stop to the behavior and not retaliating against you. But neither of us thinks that will end the matter. The owner is behaving now — five days later, as of your letter — but one rap session with your boss and off-site HR is not going to fix what’s wrong with his wiring. In fact, Snyder is concerned that the owner will try to fire you once things settle down. Personally, I think getting fired should be the least of your worries. You have the right to stay in this dream job, but I frankly can’t imagine any dream being worth the vigilance you will have to maintain to protect yourself.Ÿ Miller has written for and edited tax publications for 16 years, most recently for the accounting firm KPMG’s Washington National Tax office. Send your questions to wpmagazinewashpost.com. You can also find her on Twitter, @KarlaAtWork.

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    Only six insurance carriers have told the state of Illinois they want to sell a combined 165 health policies on the state’s online insurance marketplace under the nation’s new health care law — numbers far lower than expected, raising concerns the trend will hold true across the country.

    Fewer health applicants than expected in Illinois

    Only six insurance carriers have told the state of Illinois they want to sell a combined 165 health policies on the state's online insurance marketplace under the nation's new health care law — numbers far lower than expected, raising concerns the trend will hold true across the country.

  •  
    Frontier Airlines plans to start charging up to $100 for a carry-on bag and $2 for coffee or soda, although its announcement did say that passengers will get to keep the whole can. The new carry-on fee is for bags in the overhead bin, so small bags under the seat will still be free.

    Frontier adds carry-on fee for some passengers

    Frontier Airlines plans to start charging up to $100 for a carry-on bag and $2 for coffee or soda, although its announcement on Wednesday did say that passengers will get to keep the whole can. The new carry-on fee is for bags in the overhead bin, so small bags under the seat will still be free.

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    Small banks demand exemption from U.S. data collection

    Small banks are pushing to be exempted from what they call an unneeded and overly burdensome U.S. data- collection effort to spot how consumers may be abused by checking account overdraft fees and other charges.

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    If the Fairness Act passes, and if you live in a state that collects sales taxes — 45 of them do, plus Washington, D.C. -- that state could choose to require you to pay that tax on all purchases, both offline and online.

    Why I love Internet sales tax plan

    Don't hate the Marketplace Fairness Act, which would require you to pay tax on all offline and online purchases. The bill does something that's almost unheard of: It makes taxes fairer and simpler. There's also a carve-out for small businesses

  •  

    How much risk to take? Assessing fund volatility

    The stock market is in a groove. The Standard & Poor's 500 has climbed six months in a row and finished April at another record high. So far this year the index is up roughly 12 percent. That sounds good, right? A qualified "yes" might be the best answer, but now is a smart time to review the risk level of your portfolio.

  •  
    Lon Finkelstein, CFO of Vermont Tent Company, speaks in South Burlington, Vt. Finkelstein, chief financial officer of Vermont Tent Co., has been trying to figure out how many employees the company would need to provide health coverage for under the new health care law. The South Burlington company, which rents tents and party equipment, has a staff that ranges from 30 in the off-season to 70 during the busy spring, summer and fall months.

    Businesses may get sticker shock on health care

    Small business owners may be experiencing sticker shock now that insurers are revealing the rates they want to charge under the new health care law. Many are worried that paying for health care will hurt profits and have held back on hiring, spending or expanding. The information that's been released to date is providing some insight, but not enough for small businesses to be comfortable about making big financial moves.

  •  
    Buying pet food online may save you money.

    5 ways to cut that doggone pet food tab

    Pet food isn't cheap. Americans are expected to spend $21.3 billion on pet food this year, up 3 percent from $20.6 billion in 2012, according to the American Pet Products Association. Here are some tips on how to cut down costs for you and Fido.

  •  
    Some markets along the East and West coasts have grown red-hot. A handful of other cities remain depressed nearly four years after the Great Recession ended. But many more places are like Grand Rapids — a metro area of roughly 1 million that is strengthening, but a shortage of homes is slowing the recovery.

    Housing rebound is facing obstacle: Too few homes

    Some markets along the East and West coasts have grown red-hot. A handful of other cities remain depressed nearly four years after the Great Recession ended. But many more places are like Grand Rapids — a metro area of roughly 1 million that is strengthening, but a shortage of homes is slowing the recovery.

  •  

    U.S. to delete data on hospital mistakes from website

    Two years ago, over objections from the hospital industry, the United States announced it would add data about "potentially life-threatening" mistakes made in hospitals to a website people can search to check on safety performance. Now the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services plans to remove the eight hospital-acquired conditions, which include infections and mismatched blood transfusions, while it comes up with a different set.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Landscaping on rooftops, such as the Chicago City Hall roof here, is one way to create a “greener” environment.

    Sustainable landscaping is eco-friendly and less work

    Landscaping provides people with a huge array of benefits from shade to rainwater absorption to the prevention of soil erosion and beautification. But it delivers the maximum number of benefits to humankind and the planet when it is designed in such a way that it works with nature, instead of against it.

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    This film publicity image released by Disney-Marvel Studios shows Robert Downey Jr. as Tony Stark in a scene from “Iron Man 3.” The third installment of the franchise made more than $175 million in the U.S. its opening weekend to expand its global haul to more than $500 million.

    Will Downey suit up again after $175M ‘Iron Man 3’ haul?

    “Iron Man 3” has raced to a worldwide total of $680.1 million. That includes $175.9 million in its second weekend overseas, where the film has rung up $504.8 million so far. But could the franchise survive without Robert Downey Jr.? “I honestly don’t know how you can go on with that character without Downey,” said Paul Dergarabedian, an analyst with box-office tracker Hollywood.com. “I think he’s as important to this franchise and to Marvel as any actor is to any character.”

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    This young family would like to fix up the backyard to make it usable for entertaining and to meet the family’s needs as the children grow older.

    Outdoor makeover week 1: Paradise at home

    This part of the backyard is stuck in the ’80s. There is hardly enough room for the small gas grill and two chairs. The step is missing in front of the door that leads to the garage. There is little to no landscape around the area and there is no lighting.

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    The dogs got to this yard, making it more like a mogul field than a manicured lawn.

    Outdoor makeover week 1: My yucky yard

    My yard has been beaten up by big dogs for years. When you mow the lawn it is like skiing a mogul field. It would be so much nicer if it were flat, green, and had a calming water feature to ease the stress of the work day.

  •  
    Courtesy of Lisa Ciesielski Yews had their place in the history of American landscaping — and that’s where this family would like to leave them.

    Outdoor makeover Week 1: Hey yew, get off of my yard

    Remember when yews were the bush in fashion? The house we bought from my in-laws had plenty. They continue to get more and more overgrown every year, and each winter we spend too much effort knocking the snow off (so they don’t die!).

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    The Kendall family would like to enhance their yard with a small pond, a fireplace to gather around in cooler weather and a lovely garden to brighten the otherwise empty space.

    Outdoor makeover week 1: Can blank canvas be a masterpiece?

    This started out as a blank canvas. The homeowners had a sad concrete patio, a few trees and some patchy lawn. They are looking for a space to entertain, enjoy a water feature and colorful plants.

  •  
    Frank Ferrante brings his critically acclaimed one-man show “An Evening With Groucho” to the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre in Arlington Heights on Sunday, May 5.

    Sunday picks: Spend 'An Evening With Groucho'

    Get a sense of the comic performing genius of the late Groucho Marx when Frank Ferrante brings his show “An Evening With Groucho” to the Metropolis Performing Arts Centre in Arlington Heights. Today's the last day to taste chocolate treats of many varieties at the annual Long Grove Chocolate Festival. Kids can test their biking skills on an obstacle course and then receive a safety certificate at a Bike Safety Rodeo in Libertyville.

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    Choose among eight different tour options at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin, one hour west of Madison, Wis.

    On the road: Marvel at the creative genius of Taliesin

    The tour season has opened at the 600-acre Taliesin Estate in Spring Green, Wis. Visitors can get a firsthand look into the creative genius of Frank Lloyd Wright at Taliesin, which contains five Wright-designed structures. An estimated 10,000 beer lovers will congregate for their favorite beverage on Saturday, May 11, at the American Beer Classic at Soldier Field. Also, Mesick Mushroom Festival in northwest Michigan celebrates morels with a carnival, carriage rides, flea market, duck races and a parade.

  •  
    An X-ray of Jack a dog who swallowed pennies, in New York. Hundreds of pets undergo surgery every year to remove items, including panties and bras from their stomachs and intestines.

    Household items can pose risks to pets

    A toy poodle that was rushed to the vet after swallowing a tube sock. A Great Dane that had to be operated on three times for eating his owner's shoulder pads. These are just a couple of examples of the emergency cases Dr. Karen Halligan has seen involving household items that seem harmless until an animal decides to munch on them.

  •  
    Comedian Marc Maron stars in the new IFC comedy “Maron."

    Comedian Marc Maron finally having his moment

    Soon after taking the stage, Marc Maron decides to skip the act. He's got a packed room at a downtown New York club, all eager to see the 49-year-old comic tape what will be a comedy special for Netflix. Normally, such tapings are carefully structured and finely calibrated. Maron promptly decides against it. "No, let's not," he says. "Let's just work through some stuff." Working through stuff is the modus operandi for Maron.

  •  
    The Santuario de Chimayo, a 200-year-old National Historic Landmark, attracts 200,000 visitors a year, many of whom seek cures and miracles from a well of holy dirt.

    New Mexico reveals a mix of cultures from pueblos to Georgia O'Keeffe

    Striped balloons dot a bright blue sky. Red rocks silhouette a lone dead tree. A white ladder leans on a brown adobe dwelling. On a road trip around New Mexico, this mix of motifs and cultures seems to echo across the centuries and turn up at every stop, whether you're visiting 1,000-year-old native villages, churches from the era of Spanish conquistadors or the landscape that inspired 20th-century painter Georgia O'Keeffe.

  •  

    Airlines, passengers extra cautious about security

    Airline personnel and security agents take anything sounding remotely like a threat seriously with good reason. But sometimes it gets out of hand. Several years ago there was the passenger who caused a flight to abort and return to the gate by repeating "Bye, Bye airplane" during the safety demonstration. The passenger was considered a safety risk and removed from the flight. A reasonable response? Perhaps. Except the passenger was 18 months old.

  •  

    Pair of old furnaces should be replaced soon

    Q. I have two 23-year-old, 100,000 BTU Carrier natural gas furnaces heating my 2,900-square-foot two-story home in the Chicago area. A few years ago, a service tech said furnace No. 2 has a small crack in the heat exchanger and needed to be monitored for carbon monoxide leakage.

  •  
    Poet and author Maya Angelou’s latest book, memoir “Mom & Me & Mom,” is a sweet ode to “Lady,” her mother Vivian Baxter, and “Momma,” her paternal grandmother Annie Henderson.

    Maya Angelou honors mom, grandmother in new book

    Writer, actor, dancer. Activist, teacher, composer. In the melange of Maya Angelou's 85 years is also daughter, of two women who deserved one with a good memory. So Angelou writes in her latest literary memoir, "Mom & Me & Mom," a sweet ode to "Lady," her mother Vivian Baxter, and "Momma," her paternal grandmother Annie Henderson, who took her in at age 3 in tiny, segregated Stamps, Ark., and returned her at age 13, when the time was right.

  •  
    In the courtyard of the Lake Forest Showhouse, Craig Bergman Landscape Design complements architect David Adler’s pathway created with rocks from the beaches of Lake Michigan.

    Adler-designed lake mansion inspires decorator in all of us

    Designers who can update a 1916 Italianate villa and make its 15,000-square-feet warm and welcoming can surely answer some of your decorating quandaries. Renowned architect David Adler designed the home, chosen as this year's Lake Forest Showhouse.

  •  
    A smart-divide sink can be a good choice for any new kitchen.

    Ask the plumber: New kitchen sparks ‘Battle of the Bowls’

    Q. We're going to remodel our outdated kitchen and plan to install a cast-iron kitchen sink. I want a single-bowl sink that will be open and large for me to work in. My husband wants a double-bowl sink. He says it will be better for the garbage disposer and, later on, for resale value. Can you help us solve this disagreement?

Discuss

  •  

    The stakes of being too late

    Columnist Michael Gerson: On Syria, President Obama has sometimes seemed isolated within his own administration. As the atrocities have escalated — from the shelling of neighborhoods, to airstrikes on bread lines, to the use of Scud missiles against civilians, to the likely incremental introduction of chemical weapons — the Assad regime's strategy has become alarmingly clear. Unable to retake rebel-held areas, it seeks to depopulate them, producing mass casualties, refugee flows and sectarian conflict. During the last two years, it has been reported that many of Obama's top foreign policy advisers, including David Petraeus, Hillary Clinton, Leon Panetta and Ben Rhodes, have urged more robust action to arrest Syria's downward spiral.

  •  

    Stay active to create good gun laws
    A Northbrook letter to the editor: Gun safety legislation should be enacted to advocate for the best interests of citizens, which is the safety of citizens.

  •  

    Become part of pensions solution
    A Libertyville letter to the editor: Dear public employee, both currently working and retired. As the employee, you have paid in what you were supposed to during your working lifetime. Unfortunately, as the taxpayer, you did not pay in enough.

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