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Daily Archive : Sunday April 28, 2013

News

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    Artist's sketch of one of the 25 houses proposed for the River Ridge Estates subdivision on North River Road in Algonquin. Homes there would start at $700,000.

    Algonquin gives initial approval for high-end homes

    A preliminary green light has been given for a developer to build a subdivision of 25 high-end homes on 26 acres on North River Road in Algonquin. The Algonquin village board, meeting in committee, granted the early approval. But two neighbors question whether the development, called River Ridge Estates, would exacerbate traffic and flooding headaches.

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    Reviewing points about the value of making good cuts in the game of Ultimate, head coach John Hock of Naperville (wearing hat in center) addresses players on the Windy City Wildfire, Chicago's newest professional sports franchise.

    Wildfire franchise out to make Ultimate a pro sport staple

    A free-spirited game that started with a Frisbee as a laid-back alternative to most organized sports, Ultimate has gone big time. The Windy City Wildfire, our new local team in the professional American Ultimate Disc League, boasts a world-class roster that includes several suburban players.

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    Closure Structure No. 3 Levee 37 along River Road in Mount Prospect.

    Has Des Plaines River flood prevention stalled?

    Nearly 27 years since the twin deluges of 1986 and 1987 set new flooding records affecting thousands of homes and businesses, only three of the six flood control projects proposed by the Army Corps of Engineers have been acted upon. Among the flood control projects that remain is the proposed expansion of Big Bend Lake reservoir in Des Plaines, one of the areas hardest hit by the April 17 storm.

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    Arlington Heights Mayor Arlene Mulder has a laugh with former Mount Prospect Mayor Gerald “Skip” Farley during her goodbye party Sunday at the Arlington Heights Village Hall. Mulder is retiring after holding the position of village president for the last 20 years.

    Arlington Heights says farewell to Arlene Mulder

    Since Arlene Mulder announced in September that she wouldn't be running for another term as village president, the longtime Arlington Heights mayor has been through a long series of last events and public goodbyes. Sunday was the last of the lasts as Mulder was celebrated with a commemorative day in her honor — April 28 was declared Arlene J. Mulder Day in Arlington Heights.

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    Crafters wanted in Antioch

    The Antioch Fine Arts Foundation is seeking crafters to display and sell their work in its gift shop, located in the new gallery.

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    Art Lemke

    Tavern crackdown awaits new St. Charles City Council

    The incoming St. Charles mayor and city council are likely to push through an enhanced crackdown on overserving at downtown taverns. And there are number of routes they can take.

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    Sachi Takahashi teaches a class of third-graders in Dooley Elementary School's dual language program in Schaumburg, which offers Japanese- and English-speaking students the opportunity to become biliterate, bilingual and bicultural.

    Dual language programs prepare students for a global society

    Most kids get excited about pizza and cupcakes when their parents let them host birthday parties. Chase Dorn, now 15, always preferred sushi and seaweed. The Conant High School sophomore's connection to Japanese language and culture was cemented over eight years in one of the nation's only Japanese English dual language programs.

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    4th grader student Chris Rosado from W.J. Murphy School in Round Lake helps make meals at Feed My Starving Children in Libertyville Thursday. About 100 fourth graders and parents participated.

    Images: The Week in Pictures
    This edition of The Week in Pictures features Earth Day events, Arbor Day events, and Runners For Boston fundraising events.

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    Mohammed Sohel Rana, the fugitive owner of an illegally-constructed building that collapsed last week in Bangladesh, killing some 377 people, is paraded by Rapid Action Battalion commandoes for the media in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Sunday.

    Owner of collapsed building captured in Bangladesh

    The fugitive owner of an illegally constructed building that collapsed and killed at least 377 people was captured by commandos as he tried to flee into India. At the disaster site, meanwhile, fire broke out in the rubble and forced authorities to suspend the search for survivors temporarily.

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    Athletes, from left, Olivia Jakubicek of Cary-Grove High School, Meri Bennett-Swanson of Vernon Hills High School, and Ashley McConnell of Fremd High School pose for pictures during the Daily Herald Prep Sports Excellence event at Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates on Sunday.

    Daily Herald celebrates top suburban prep athletes

    About 350 of the suburbs' top high school athletes and their families filled the Sears Centre Arena on Sunday for the Daily Herald Prep Sports Excellence banquet. The first-time event celebrated the prowess, dedication and determination of the athetes. Featured speaker Jarrett Payton encouraged the students to seek greatness and serve their communities.

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    A Glock representative explains features of the Glock 37 Gen 4 .45 caliber pistol at the 35th annual SHOT Show in Las Vegas this past January.

    A new front for gun background checks: the ballot

    After struggling to sway both state and federal lawmakers, proponents of expanding background checks for gun sales are now exploring whether they will have more success by taking the issue directly to voters.

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    Suburban teens among finalists for musical theater awards

    Eight suburban high school actors are among the 24 finalists for the 2013 Illinois High School Musical Theater Awards, and have a shot at the finals in New York, June 26-July 1.

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    Retired teachers spring meeting

    The Lake County Retired Teachers Association hosts its annual spring meeting on May 14 at the Illinois Beach State Park Conference and Resort Center, Wadsworth Road and Lake Front Drive, near Zion.

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    Visitors pause at a makeshift memorial in Copley Square for victims of the Boston Marathon bombings this past weekend in Boston.

    Lawmaker: FBI checking training angle in bombing

    The chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee said Sunday that the FBI is investigating in the United States and overseas to determine whether the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing received training that helped them carry out the attack.

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    Zubeidat Tsarnaeva, left, mother of the two Boston bombing suspects is increasingly the focus of U.S. authorities as they investigate the incident.

    Mother of bomb suspects found deeper spirituality

    The angry and grieving mother of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, Zubeidat Tsarnaeva is drawing increased attention after federal officials say Russian authorities intercepted her phone calls, including one in which she vaguely discussed jihad with her elder son.

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    Elburn teen killed after colliding with vehicle while rollerblading

    Counselors will be available Monday for students at Kaneland Harter Middle School in Sugar Grove coping with the death of a classmate killed Friday when she collided with a vehicle while rollerblading. Caitlyn Phillips, 13, was pronounced dead shortly after the crash in Elburn Friday afternoon.

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    The Naperville Men’s Glee Club performs during the “Voices of Hope” concert Sunday at Wentz Concert Hall at North Central College in Naperville. It was a special concert for people whose lives were touched by cancer.

    Cancer survivors sing in Naperville to spread feeling of hope

    Voices of Hope, a volunteer chorus of men and women touched by cancer and organized by the Naperville Men's Glee Club, performed to a full house Sunday at North Central College's Wentz Hall.

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    Michael Jackson follows his mother, Katherine Jackson, as they arrive for court on the opening day of his child molestation trial in Santa Maria, Calif., Feb. 28, 2005.

    Jurors set to get roadmap of Jackson civil trial

    The most complete account of Michael Jackson's final months is about to unfold in a cramped Los Angeles courtroom nearly four years after the pop superstar's death. Lawyers for Jackson's mother will attempt to convince a jury that the company promoting the pop superstar's 2009 comeback concerts is responsible for his untimely death.

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    Libertyville High blood drive

    The Libertyville High School Student Council will host a blood drive on Wednesday, May 1 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. in the school's main gym.

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    Wonder Lake man loses appeal to manslaughter conviction

    An appellate court panel has rejected an appeal from former McHenry County man, who was sentenced to 23 years in prison for fatally beating and raping his girlfriend in the summer of 2009. Thomas Brown, 43, unsuccessfully argued the victim gave "implied consent" to have sex because she never told him no.

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    Boating safety course in Arlington Heights

    To ensure prospective boaters have a safe and fun time on the water and meet state requirements, the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary is offering an 8-hour boating safety course. Class sessions will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on two consecutive Saturdays, May 11 and 18, at West Marine, 63 W. Rand Road in Arlington Heights.

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    D50 bilingual advisory meeting

    Woodland Elementary District 50 hosts its final Bilingual Parent Advisory Council meeting for the year on Tuesday, April 30 at 6:30 p.m. in the east cafeteria at Woodland Elementary School, 17261 Gages Lake Road, Gages Lake.

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    Athletes, from left, Olivia Jakubicek of Cary-Grove, Meri Bennett-Swanson of Vernon Hills, and Ashley McConnell of Fremd pose for pictures during the Daily Herald Prep Sports Excellence Awards Ceremony at Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates on Sunday.

    Images: Daily Herald Prep Sports Excellence banquet
    The Daily Herald honored area high school athletes during the first Daily Herald Prep Sports Excellence event at the Sears Centre Arena on Sunday, April 28.

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    Mohammed Sohel Rana, centre right, the fugitive owner of an illegally-constructed building that collapsed last week in Bangladesh, killing some 377 people, is paraded by Rapid Action Battalion commandoes for the media along with an unidentified alleged accomplice, left, in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Sunday.

    Collapsed building owner arrested on India border

    The fugitive owner of an illegally-constructed building that collapsed in Bangladesh in a deadly heap last week was captured Sunday at a border crossing with India by members of a commando force. Mohammed Sohel Rana was arrested in Benapole in western Bangladesh, just as he was about to flee into India's West Bengal state, said Jahangir Kabir Nanak, junior minister for local government.

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    Each year, more than 1,000 law enforcement officials receive training at College of DuPage's Homeland Security Education Center in Glen Ellyn.

    The lessons Boston bombing taught us

    Several experts from College of DuPage's Homeland Security Training Institute share their thoughts about what security lessons were learned from the Boston Marathon bombing. “You can't let fear dictate your life,” Michael Casey of the Suburban Law Enforcement Academy said. “Because if you do, then they (the terrorists) have won. But you must be vigilant.”

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    The groundbreaking for the new main branch of the Aurora Public Library is at 2 p.m. Wednesday, May 1, at the southwest corner of River and Benton streets in downtown Aurora. The three-story, 92,000-square-foot facility is expected to open in early 2015.

    Aurora library strives to remain 'vital resource' with new building

    Aurora library officials say the city has needed a new main library since 2000 — something larger with better technology and more space for public gatherings, independent reading and small group study. The facility they will be building starting with a May 1 groundbreaking has been designed to provide technology relevant today and flexibility for the future, library Director Eva Luckinbill...

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    Denise Taylor, along with other residents displaced from the Towers at Four Lakes apartment complex in Lisle, is being housed by Trinity Lutheran Church in Lisle. She's on a waiting list for a senior apartment in Chicago.

    Lisle flood victims get help at church shelter

    Victor and Ashley Atalla say their only asset is their cars. Trouble is, their cars were parked at the foot of the ski hill in Lisle's Four Lakes complex when floodwaters swamped the area April 18. And the Atallas are among about 20 displaced residents who have nowhere to stay but a shelter at Trinity Lutheran Church in Lisle. "I went from suit and tie every day to homeless," said Victor Atalla,...

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    Tony Sciarrone

    Island Lake trustee-elect denies making threats

    In the months after he was removed as Island Lake's interim police chief in 2010, Anthony Sciarrone was accused by three officers of earlier threatening violence against them or village officials, department records reveal. Now a trustee-elect who's set to take office May 9, Sciarrone downplayed the allegations in a conversation with the Daily Herald, saying the comments attributed to him were...

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    The week ahead: ECB, Fed, Facebook, Buffett, Derby

    Hot happenings in business this week: The European Central Bank is likely to cut its benchmark rate in the coming week to keep the recovery it forecasts for later this year on track. The U.S. Federal Reserve will probably vote to continue its record bond- buying program. Plus Facebook will releasing its latest earnings report.

Sports

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    Minnesota left wing Pierre-Marc Bouchard, center, celebrates after his open-net goal with right wing Cal Clutterbuck, left, and center Matt Cullen late in the third period of the Wild’s 3-1 victory over Colorado on Saturday. The Wild will face the Blackhawks in the opening round of the NHL playoffs.

    Hawks wary of Wild, dangerous first round

    The Chicago Blackhawks, who have not advanced past the first round since winning the Cup in 2010, say they know how dangerous eighth-seeded teams like the Minnesota Wild can be in the NHL playoffs. "We're not happy with the way we played the last two years," defenseman Niklas Hjalmarsson said. "Hopefully we can play the way we've done here in the regular season and even step it up because we all know it's a different level of play in the playoffs."

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    Ken Harrelson

    Lovers, haters of Sabermetrics shouldn’t dismiss each other

    Hawk Harrelson, Adam Dunn and other baseball thoughts from Matt Spiegel.

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    Kirk Hinrich, who played nearly 60 minutes of the Bulls’ 142-134 victory over the Nets in triple overtime at the United Center on Saturday, spent much of the game shadowing Deron Williams wherever he went.

    Hobbled Hinrich calls Game 4 ‘exhausting, grueling’

    After playing nearly 60 minutes in Saturday's triple-overtime marathon win, Kirk Hinrich hobbled out of the locker room. A day later, Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau said Hinrich had a bruised calf, but wouldn't speculate on his availability for Monday's Game 5 in Brooklyn.

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    Chicago Bulls’ Taj Gibson (22) and Nate Robinson (2) celebrate a basket against the Brooklyn Nets during the second overtime in Game 4 of their first-round NBA basketball playoff series Saturday, April 27, 2013, in Chicago. The Bulls won 142-134 in three overtimes.

    Robinson has paid big dividends for Bulls

    Nate Robinson former college cornerback, two-time dunk champion - was in such low demand as an NBA free agent last summer, he took a non-guaranteed, minimum-salary deal to join the Bulls on July 31. Needless to say, he's been a valuable pickup.

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    In honor of his 25 years of covering the team, Tim Sassone of the Daily Herald was presented with a Blackhawks jersey by broadcaster Eddie Olczyk, left, and hockey legend Denis Savard during Friday's home game.

    Source: Bolland likely out for Game 1
    Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville has waffled on veteran center Dave Bolland's status for the NHL playoff opener, but a source told the Daily Herald that Bolland probably won't be ready for Game 1.

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    Tyler Greene reacts after being forced out at second base by Tampa Bay second baseman Ryan Roberts during the eighth inning of an MLB baseball game in Chicago, Sunday, April 28, 2013. Tampa won 8-3.

    Sox must stop dropping the ball

    With so many injuries, the White Sox have even less room to make mistakes. But in Sunday's 8-3 loss to Tampa Bay, reliever Nate Jones and right fielder Alex Rios failed to perform and it proved costly for the Sox.

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    Gavin Floyd

    Sox: No structural damage to Floyd’s elbow

    The White Sox officially placed Gavin Floyd on the 15-day disabled list Sunday. The starting pitcher has a flexor muscle strain in his right arm, but an MRI revealed no structural damage.

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    Chicago White Sox third baseman Conor Gillaspie commits an error on a ground ball hit by Tampa Bay Rays’ Desmond Jennings during the first inning of a baseball game in Chicago, Sunday, April 28, 2013.

    White Sox let Rays game slip away
    $PHOTOCREDIT_ON$Associated Press$PHOTOCREDIT_OFF$David Price struck out nine in winning for first time this season, Ben Zobrist hit a go-ahead RBI single in the eighth and the Tampa Bay Rays beat the Chicago White Sox 8-3 on Sunday at U.S. Cellular Field.The 2012 AL Cy Young Award winner allowed three runs and six hits in seven innings. The Rays lost all five of Price’s five previous starts this year and were the second team to lose in the first five starts by a reigning Cy Young winner. The Minnesota Twins lost in Frank Viola’s first seven games in 1989. Price (1-2) walked two and threw 119 pitches.Jose Lobaton homered for Tampa Bay, which improved to 4-9 on the road.Zobrist also had an RBI single in the ninth and Evan Longoria added more insurance with a double to score Zobrist.Paul Konerko hit a two-run home run for Chicago, who are 1-5 against left-handed starters.

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    Hurst, Naperville Central outclassing opponents

    Naperville Central boys lacrosse coach Tim Hurst thought the Redhawks would be contenders in the B Class this spring. What he didn't expect was for his team to get off to such a fantastic start while knocking off Class A teams in the process. The Redhawks opened the season with a statement victory over Neuqua Valley, throttling the Class A Wildcats 12-5. They've followed it up with impressive wins over a handful of other Class A foes, including town rival Naperville North, as well as Benet and St. Charles North, a team that had the state's highest ranking earlier this spring.

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    After a difficult start, White Sox designated hitter Adam Dunn finally had a good weekend at the plate.

    Patience a key factor in every baseball season

    White Sox broadcaster Chris Rongey takes a closer look at three areas of concern for fans: injuries, defense and Adam Dunn. Check out his perspective in today's column.

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    Chicago Cubs pinch hitter Dave Sappelt watches his pop-up to Miami Marlins shortstop Nick Green in the seventh inning of a baseball game in Miami, Sunday, April 28, 2013. The Marlins won 6-4.

    Cubs’ sweep attempt thwarted by Marlins

    MIAMI — Giancarlo Stanton homered twice and drove in four runs Sunday, and the Miami Marlins beat the Chicago Cubs 6-4 to avert a four-game series sweep.Ricky Nolasco (2-2) gave up three runs in seven innings and retired the final 15 batters he faced. The Marlins improved to 6-19, still worst in the majors, and 3-10 at home. They benefited from a rare offensive outburst, scoring more than three runs for only the fifth time this season and twice coming from behind.Stanton led the way, showing further signs he has shaken a prolonged slump to start the season. Last year’s NL slugging leader waited 65 at-bats to hit his first homer Saturday, then hit another in the first inning off Carlos Villanueva to put Miami ahead 2-1. Stanton singled home a run and later scored in the sixth. He homered again leading off in the eighth against Kameron Loe and finished 3 for 3 to raise his average to .243.Stanton had been 0 for 4 with four strikeouts previously against Loe. The multihomer game was his seventh.Nick Green added his first home run since 2009.Nolasco fell behind 3-2 when he permitted the first four batters to reach in the third inning, then didn’t allow another baserunner. He improved to 5-2 against the team that drafted him in 2001.Chicago’s Dioner Navarro homered in the ninth off Steve Cishek, who nonetheless earned his third save in four chances.Villanueva (1-1) allowed four runs in six innings, raising his ERA to 2.29. he Cubs’ poor hitting with runners in scoring position persisted. They went 1 for 8 in those situations. Chicago, last in the NL Central, heads home after going 4-6 on a three-city trip.Stanton’s first-inning homer was the only hit allowed by Villanueva until the sixth, when Juan Pierre singled with one out and stole second. Stanton hit an RBI single and took second on the throw home, then scored on a two-out single by Donovan Solano that put Miami ahead to stay, 4-3.Green drove in his first run this season with a homer off Loe in the seventh.Anthony Rizzo’s double off the wall scored David DeJesus from first base in the Cubs’ first. Villanueva and DeJesus singled to start the third, and Starlin Castro followed with a two-run double that gave Chicago a 3-2 lead.

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    Motivated Hawks look beyond amazing numbers

    It's almost May now, and the Blackhawks have put up numbers that would have been dismissed as absurd in mid-January. Even in a short National Hockey League season, it didn't seem possible that a team could cut through half its schedule without a regulation loss, then keep on keeping on and post a record of 36-7-5. As Blackhawks Team Historian Bob Verdi explains, you could count the team's regulation losses on your hands and have fingers to spare. The Bears lost six games, and they played only 16. The Blackhawks accumulated 77 points in 48 games. There have been seasons when the Blackhawks couldn't gather 77 points in 82 games, and we aren't talking ancient history.

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    While there still is a lot of baseball to be played, the Toronto Blue Jays haven't gotten off to the kind of start that manager John Gibbons and many others expected this season.

    Big thoughts on baseball’s small sample size

    While what happens in April is important, it's just one month of a very long baseball season. And as Len Kasper explains, there's a little bit of thought behind the popular phrase "small sample size." Just ask the Dodgers and the Blue Jays.

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    Quick look Bears’ 2013 draft picks

    Wrapping up the Bears 2013 draft picks

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    Lake Zurich ties Sandburg

    Girls soccerLake Zurich knots tie: Lake Zurich and Sandburg both scored a goal in the first half and that’s how the game ended in the Naperville Invitational at Naperville North. Meaghan Gelinas scored the Bears’ only goal off an assist by Madeline Blasko. Lake Zurich goalie Eleanor Daleske had 7 saves. Lake Zurich is now 5-6-2 on the season.Glenbrook South 2, Grayslake Central 1: Mikala Wollmuth scored the only goal for the Rams, who are now 8-2-1 on the season. Goalkeeper Kajal Chokshi had 12 saves in the losing effort.

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    Carmel perfect in quad

    Boys tennisCarmel Quad: Carmel hosted Wheeling, Lake Forest and McHenry and went 3-0. In a 5-2 win over Wheeling, the Corsairs got decisive wins out of their top teams. No. 1 singles player Brandon Dechter defeated Mataram Yeluri, 6-0, 6-0 while the No. 1 doubles team of Craig Paulson and Michael Butler defeated Kris Evanselista and Jay Chaisvi, 6-1, 6-0. In a 4-3 win over Lake Forest Academy, Carmel got all of its wins in doubles action, led by the No. 1 team of Paulson and Butler, who defeated Brain Alesn and Alex Wang, 6-1, 6-2. In a 6-1 win over McHenry, Dechter got another straight-set shutout, defeating Colin Condon, 6-0, 6-0. Meanwhile, the No. 1 doubles team of Paulson and Butler outlasted Dennis Quitalig and Nick Higgins, 7-6 (5), 6-4.Lakes Invite: Jacobs won the 7th annual Lakes Invite, which involves eight teams. Host Lakes finished fifth while Warren took third, Grayslake North took fourth and Mundelein and Grant finished sixth and seven, respectively. Matt Kizhakkodthu of Grayslake North finished in second place in the No. 2 singles bracket while Warren’s No. 3 doubles team of Kamil Adamski and Kevin Topolewski took second in that bracket.

Business

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    As JP Morgan Chase & Co. undergoes another shuffle at the top following last year’s massive trading losses, there remain calls for the resignation of CEO Jamie Dimon, seen here.

    JPMorgan co-COO Bisignano leaves to run First Data

    JPMorgan Chase & Co. said Sunday that one of its co-chief operating officers is leaving the company, marking the latest high-profile departure since the bank's massive trading loss last year.

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    A new report from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has dramatically lowered estimates of how much of a potent greenhouse gas is being leaked by the natural gas industry.

    EPA methane report further divides fracking camps

    The Environmental Protection Agency has dramatically lowered its estimate of how much of a potent heat-trapping gas leaks during natural gas production, in a shift with major implications for a debate that has divided environmentalists: Does the recent boom in fracking help or hurt the fight against climate change?

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    Jimmy Haslam, CEO of Pilot Flying J, is seen earlier this monthy speaking at a news conference at the company headquarters in Knoxville, Tenn. Haslam also owns the NFL’s Cleveland Browns.

    FBI court documents recount ‘gray side’ of Pilot

    When federal agents descended on the Knoxville headquarters of Pilot Flying J, the country's largest diesel retailer, on April 15, it was the first inkling the public and company executives had of an FBI and Internal Revenue Service investigation that began nearly two years ago.

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    USDA poultry inspector Jose Navarro, who died at 37, shown inside Murray's Chicken in South Fallsburg, N.Y. In interviews, more than two dozen USDA inspectors and poultry industry employees describe a range of ailments they attribute to chemical exposure, including asthma and other severe respiratory problems, burns, rashes, irritated eyes and sinus problems.

    Speed increases chemical danger at poultry plants

    Agriculture Department health inspectors say poultry processing plants are turning to the chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice as processing line speeds have accelerated, in part to meet growing consumer demand for chicken and turkey. The department is now poised to allow a further increase in line speeds, boosting the maximum speed by about 25 percent.

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    The business of payday loans, pawn shops and other high-cost methods of financing has experienced tremendous growth over the past two decades, and in recent years, nearly one in four Americans have used them, according to a new paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research.

    High-cost payday loans exploding

    The business of payday loans, pawn shops and other high-cost methods of financing has experienced tremendous growth over the past two decades, and in recent years, nearly one in four Americans have used them, according to a new paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research.

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    Today’s GED challenge — to prepare high school dropouts for college — is steep, particularly given that many preparation programs squeeze four years of high school material into crash courses offered in church basements, said Terry Grobe, a program director for Boston-based Jobs for the Future.

    GED test goes modern, gets harder

    The GEDvtest has increased in rigor four times since the 1940s. Today's challenge -- to prepare high school dropouts for college -- is steep, particularly given that many preparation programs squeeze four years of high school material into crash courses offered in church basements.

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    Consumer bureau chief defends data collection

    Richard Cordray resumed a familiar position this week: defense. In his semiannual report to Congress, Cordray, the acting head of the government's consumer watchdog agency, defended the bureau's vast efforts to track how Americans shop for mortgages and use credit cards.

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    Some would say work/life balance (and specifically the word “balance”) is a myth. But, to learn more about how a company views work/life issues, you should talk to employees who work there.

    Career coach: Balancing work, life

    Some would say work/life balance (and specifically the word "balance") is a myth. But, to learn more about how a company views work/life issues, you should talk to employees who work there. You can get on their website and learn about them and their values, but this tells you what they say about it — not whether they actually live it.

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    House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., a member of the House Ways and Means Committee, holds a copy of President Barack Obama’s fiscal 2014 budget proposal book during a House Ways and Means Committee heairng on Capitol Hill in Washington.

    House GOP gears up for debt showdown this summer

    Get ready for another debt showdown this summer. House Republicans are preparing for one. The House Ways and Means Committee passed a bill this week to protect Social Security recipients and investors in Treasury bonds if the government hits the limit of its borrowing authority.

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    In certain professions and cultures, boozing is a bonding rite.

    Work advice: The price of not socializing

    Q: At my current job, I made it clear early on when invited to happy hours that I do not drink. My body can’t tolerate alcohol; it is not within my control. It then became clear that this was a problem for the other employees and supervisors. Now, I don’t get invited out at all, and many of the other employees at my level get assignments from the drinking supervisors that I don’t get, get cut tons more slack and are treated more favorably. I am purposely left off the emails, or not asked along even when I am sitting in the office as they are getting ready to go. I only know what is going on because one of the other associates, whom I get along with, has told me. That, and it is all over their Facebook pages.I know all business requires some level of this type of socializing, and I love to go out, talk, go to happy hours — I just don’t want to drink. Throughout my career, this has always been a problem, and I feel it has held me back. What should I do?A: In certain professions and cultures, boozing is a bonding rite, and I’m unfortunately not aware of any discrimination protections for teetotalers. But I wouldn’t say “all business” requires you to get soused to get ahead; otherwise, there would be a lot more 25-year-old CEOs with gout.My first impulse is to wonder how you’ve “made” your abstinence “clear” to your co-workers. An abrupt “I don’t drink” sends a different message from a low-key “I can’t drink” -- and if you have a gussied-up soda in hand, words should be unnecessary.If someone is trying to shove a beer into your other hand and not taking “Thanks, but I’m good” for an answer, there are ways to demur without being labeled Captain Buzzkill: “I’m driving” or “I’m cutting back.” I’m not normally a fan of subterfuge, but such responses work well for recovering alcoholics and secretly pregnant women when full honesty would be irrelevant and potentially disruptive.But none of that will fool your current co-workers, who know all too well that you Do Not Drink. So, see if that friendly associate can get you invited past the velvet rope. Once your colleagues realize that you are not judging them (right?) and want to socialize, they may start inviting you — especially if you’re occasionally willing to play designated driver.If your sobriety continues to be a handicap, perhaps your workplace is suffering from a maturity deficit (party pictures plastered on Facebook) or you’re in the wrong line of business (“Throughout my career, this has always been a problem”). A change of scene may be worth a shot.Ÿ Miller has written for and edited tax publications for 16 years, most recently for the accounting firm KPMG’s Washington National Tax office. Send your questions to wpmagazinewashpost.com. You can also find her on Twitter @KarlaAtWork.

Life & Entertainment

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    Dwayne Johnson, left, as Paul Doyle, Mark Wahlberg as Daniel Lugo and Anthony Mackie as Adrian Doorbal star in "Pain & Gain," which came in at No. 1 at the box office.

    'Iron Man 3' rules world; 'Pain & Gain' takes U.S.

    "Iron Man 3," the Marvel Studios superhero sequel starring Robert Downey Jr., got a head-start on its domestic launch next Friday with a $195.3 million opening in 42 overseas markets, distributor Disney reported Sunday. Director Michael Bay's "Pain & Gain," a true-crime tale of bodybuilders on the make, muscled into first-place domestically with a $20 million debut.

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    In this photo provided by JUMP.DC, Charlotte Bobcats owner Michael Jordan dances with his bride Yvette Prieto during their wedding reception Saturday night at the Bear’s Club in Jupiter, Fla. More than 300 guests were in attendance, including Tiger Woods, Patrick Ewing and Ahmad Rashad, Jordan’s manager Estee Portnoy told The Associated Press on Sunday.

    Ex-Bull Michael Jordan gets married

    Michael Jordan got married over the weekend in front of a few hundred of his family and closest friends. The former Chicago Bull and the Charlotte Bobcats owner exchanged vows with 35-year-old former model Yvette Prieto on Saturday in Palm Beach, Fla., Jordan's manager told The Associated Press Sunday.

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    Live music, shopping and lots of chocolate make up the annual Long Grove Chocolate Festival.

    On the road: Chocolate rules at annual Long Grove Fest

    Enjoy everything chocolate at the 14th Annual Long Grove Chocolate Festival from Friday through Sunday, May 3-5. Treat your mom to a brunch or dinner cruise aboard the Odyssey or Spirit of Chicago on Mother's Day. Each cruise features plentiful brunches or entertaining dinners and all moms receive a rose and complimentary glass of champagne or mimosa.

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    Corbin Bleu plays Jeffrey King, left, and Erika Slezak as Victoria Lord, on the set of “One Life To Live.”

    2 beloved TV soaps revived online

    Taped to a wall at the entrance to the Connecticut Film Center in Stamford is this greeting: “Welcome (back) to Pine Valley.” Pine Valley, of course, is the mythical setting of “All My Children,” a daytime drama that ran on ABC for nearly 41 years until it was snuffed in 2011. But now, in one of those plot twists so common to soap operas but so rare in the real world, “All My Children” has been raised from the dead.

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    Prom deals at a glance

    From formal wear to after-dinner desert, some big brands are offering deals for prom goers this year. Here's a look at three deals.

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    Rockford High School students dance at The Pinnacle Center during their prom in Hudsonville, Mich. Prom spending is expected to rise in 2013 to an average $1,139.

    Teens, parents spending more on prom

    The prom is making a big comeback. The recession forced parents and teens to cut back on spending for the annual high school dance, but wallets are finally opening again. "Dresses are more elaborate," says Marshal Cohen, chief industry analyst at market research firm NPD Group. "They are now buying two pairs of shoes, one to go to prom and one to dance in."

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    Colorful wooden birds are featured at the “Artistry in Wood” woodcarving and woodworking show at Cantigny Park in Wheaton.

    Sunday picks: Admire Artistry in Wood at Cantigny

    See woodcarvers from across the Midwest showcase their works at the Artistry in Wood exhibition at Cantigny Park in Wheaton. Today's the last day for Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo (C2E2), so head down to McCormick Place in Chicago for all the fun. More than a thousand flowers will be judged and displayed as part of the Midwest Daffodil Society Show today at Chicago Botanic Garden in Glencoe.

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    A mobile phone app musician Jorge Drexler created with Wake App designers recently debuted three new songs.

    Jorge Drexler wants to sing an infinite song

    The song Jorge Drexler is singing has no specific end or beginning. The Oscar-winning Uruguayan musician with a salt-and-pepper beard has created a song with more possibilities than the estimated number of stars in the universe. It's all devisable through "n by Jorge Drexler," a mobile phone application he created with Wake App designers that debuts three new songs. In the first song, "Room 316," the user chooses what Drexler will sing from rotating circles of phrases. All of the combinations make sense and no two are the same.

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    Tracy Spiridakos, who stars in the NBC series “Revolution,” airing at 9 p.m. Mondays, says she lives for stunt days on set.

    ‘Revolution’ role is a dream gig for Spiridakos

    Whether she's hopping off cliffs, battling rogue bandits or surviving in the post-apocalyptic wilderness, Tracy Spiridakos makes roughing it in the futuristic wild west of NBC's "Revolution" look easy. That's partly because the self-described tomboy feels right at home playing the intrepid heroine in J.J. Abrams' latest sci-fi offering (airing at 9 p.m. Mondays) about a world without electricity. "She's definitely a rough and tough, can rumble kind of chick," said Spiridakos. "I can relate."

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    Dr. Rod Block works with an elephant, adjusting its pelvis at the Meadowbrook Animal Sanctuary and Haven in Perris, Calif. “

    Animal chiropractors offer pet care alternative

    Thirty years ago, Dr. Gene Giggleman was a veterinarian who thought chiropractors were quacks. Since then, he says he's straightened out thousands of dogs and cats, not to mention the occasional snake, hamster, gerbil and guinea pig. "And I know people who have adjusted pigs, goats and rodeo bulls," said Giggleman, a professor at Parker University in Dallas, which specializes in chiropractic care. In Southern California, Dr. Rod Block has tended to an elephant, a paralyzed iguana, a turkey, pigs, llamas and countless dogs and horses.

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    When old walls are a mess, install new drywall

    Q. The ugly walls of a wood frame house built in 1920 have cellulose insulation, lath and plaster covered with old, cracked wallpaper and multiple layers of lead paint. How should they be fixed?

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    With security deposits, expect documentation of large charges

    Q. I recently moved out of a rental home. My understanding is I can be charged for any cleaning that is reasonable. Of a $2,500 deposit, I was charged $1,600 for cleaning based on a $35 per hour rate. Is that "reasonable?"

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    Dashboard radio screen brightness on the blink

    Q. I own a 2007 Chevy Malibu LE 4 cylinder with 46,000 miles. I love the car except for one thing: the information located in the radio area cannot be read on a bright day. This displays the time, temp, radio station, etc.

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    In today’s plumbing market, you have great choices for laundry sinks.

    Laundry rooms are moving up in the world

    Q. To my wife's amazement, I'm moving our laundry station from the basement and building a laundry room in the area that used to be an open mudroom. Since this room is going to be in the living area, I want to make it fancy with built-in countertops. Can you give me any ideas on what type of laundry sink I should use?

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    Mark Donovan and Mary Ludgin sit in front of the original inglenook at their Oak Park home, which was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright.

    Frank Lloyd Wright homeowners seek originality

    "Residential archaeology" is what Mary Ludgin of Oak Park calls much of the work she and her husband, Mark Donovan, have done over the past 14 years on their 1896 Frank Lloyd Wright-designed home. They are the owners of the Louisa and Harry Goodrich House, one of the nine homes that will be featured on this year's Wright Plus Architectural Housewalk.

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    Tips to keep your refrigerator sparkling

    Think that cleaning your refrigerator (and keeping it clean) takes a lot of effort? Well, chill! Just follow these tips:

Discuss

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    JOE LEWNARD/jlewnard@dailyherald.com Left to right, Cinda Klickna, Illinois Education Association president, and state representatives Tom Morrison and Elaine Nekritz participate in a pension reform forum sponsored by the Daily Herald and Reboot Illinois, held at Harper College in Palatine Wednesday.

    Editorial: A wide and deep gulf in the pension debate

    A Daily Herald editorial sadly observes that if last week's Pension Forum exposed anything, it was the depth of the gulf that exists between the positions of public pensioneers and taxpayers

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    A principled president

    Columnist Michael Gerson: The dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum here has been an occasion for both friends and critics of the former president to press their case.

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    The sequester con game
    A Grayslake letter to the editor: One of the few things a majority of Americans agree with is that the federal government wastes an enormous amount of tax payer money.

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    Flooding relief in Fox Lake
    A Harvard letter to the editor: As a frequent visitor to Fox Lake, I was driving through on Rt. 12 and noticed that Grand Avenue from Rt. 12 to the railroad tracks was dry.

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    Common Core untried, dangerous
    A Lake Bluff letter to the editor: What President Obama has called "college and career-ready standards" is actually a federally mandated education curriculum known as Common Core,

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    Rose should be on the court
    A Fox Lake letter to the editor: Derrick, you're cleared to play!

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    Students fight floods in Addison
    An Addison letter to the editor: I would like to give credit to a couple of volunteer groups that help prevent a serious flooding problem in an area where there has been serious flooding problems in the past.

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    Limits to what the pope can change
    A Glen Ellyn letter to the editor: I read with sadness the letter in the April 23 edition of the Herald about our new pope. I agree with Judith's description of Pope Francis as a humble man and a good priest and I share the world's enthusiasm. However, the comments about change to the role of women in the church show the common misunderstanding about what any Pope can actually change.

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    Newspapering hardly deserves its ‘worst’ label

    Columnist Jim Davis: Sure we're busy, understaffed and stressed out, but at the end of the day there's often a strong sense of accomplishment that comes with what a survey calls the worst job in the nation.

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