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Daily Archive : Friday March 8, 2013

News

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    High school students greet Mario Tricoci in Schaumburg on Wednesday. Tricoci was at his salon speaking to the Young Entrepreneurs Academy participants. The program teaches students about entrepreneurship and professional presence.

    Students talk entrepreneurship at Schaumburg salon

    Local high school students who are learning about entrepreneurship and professional presence got mini makeovers at Mario Tricoci Hair Salon and Day Spa in Schaumburg Wednesday. The students are part of the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA!), sponsored by the Palatine Area Chamber of Commerce and District 211. They are preparing to present their original business ideas and ask for funding in front...

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    Protesters upset with cuts to part-time faculty teaching hours gather outside the Illinois Council of Community College Presidents meeting on Friday at the Westin Hotel in Lombard.

    Adjunct faculty protest community college cutbacks

    Concerned that community colleges are cutting the teaching hours of part-time faculty to avoid providing them health care under the Affordable Care Act, educators are imploring presidents to reconsider. "If you don't have contingent labor, you don't have community colleges," Roosevelt University faculty member Beverly Stewart said afterward.

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    NIU fired Police Chief Donald Grady on Feb. 19, alleging he mishandled evidence in the case of campus police officer accused of sexually assaulting a student.

    Warrant at NIU seeks VP, police chief communication

    The FBI searched the Northern Illinois University police station this week with a warrant seeking, among other information, communications between the school's recently fired police chief and a vice president who took a leave of absence Friday in response to the investigation.

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    Josh Rohde

    Island Lake trustee candidate admits more arrests

    Island Lake trustee candidate Josh Rohde says he's a different person from the young adult who was arrested numerous times in alcohol-related incidents. "It's not me of today," Rohde, 28, said Friday. He spoke to the Daily Herald about his past after court records from one case were posted on a blog about Island Lake politics.

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    Donald Mischke

    Lisle man sentenced to 26 years in prison

    Donald Mischke, 56, will spend the next 26 years behind bars for the murder of a Grayslake woman in 2010. Mischke, of Lisle, was found guilty of first-degree murder for causing an accident while he was fleeing Waukegan police after a robbery.

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    Illinois Republican Party Chairman Pat Brady

    GOP committeemen calling for Brady’s ouster also contradict platform

    The Illinois GOP committeemen calling for Chairman Pat Brady's ouster say they are doing so because his support for same-sex marriage directly contradicts the party platform, its set of governing principles. But a look at the party's 14-page 2012 platform finds some of those committeemen might have also acted in violation of those GOP standards. "The point is that as chairman of the party,...

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    Illinois Republican Party Chairman Pat Brady appears to be getting a reprieve from a possible vote to remove him from his post, as Saturday’s meeting on the matter has been postponed.

    GOP meeting for Brady’s ouster canceled late Friday

    Illinois GOP committeemen late Friday evening moved to cancel a meeting where the ouster of their chairman over controversial remarks supporting gay marriage was supposed to be discussed. Several top Republican party officials confirmed to the Daily Herald that as of 10 p.m. Friday, they had been informed that Saturday's meeting at the Tinley Park convention center had been postponed.

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    Fox Lake traffic stop yields drug arrest

    A 22-year-old Wisconsin man was charged with unlawful possession of a controlled substance following a traffic stop in Fox Lake on Thursday night, authorities said.

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    Ed McGinty

    Island Lake trustee candidates can’t find common ground with rivals

    During recent interviews, three of the candidates running for seats on Island Lake's village board were unable to cite a single proposal endorsed by their rivals that they support.

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    Kathy Brown

    Pension shift wouldn’t have immediate impact on District 95 candidates say

    The finances in Lake Zurich District 95 are sound enough to handle a shift of pension costs from the state to local schools, candidates say. Six candidates, including three incumbents, are vying for four seats on the K-12 district school board. They discussed how pension crisis might affect the district and what may have to be done during an interview with the Daily Herald editorial board.

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    Two dead in McHenry in separate incidents

    Two people died in separate incidents early Friday morning in McHenry, officials said. A seventh-grade girl died after a fire in a single-family home. And a man in the same subdivision died after high levels of carbon monoxide were found in a home.

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    Man cut from car after Schaumburg crash

    A driver had to be extricated from his car Friday night following a two-vehicle crash in Schaumburg, authorities said. The accident occurred at 5:49 p.m. at the intersection of Roselle and Wise roads, according to Schaumburg Fire Department.

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    Fryer catches fire at Carpentersville restaurant

    A deep fat fryer cooking fish and french fries caught fire Friday night at the Culver's restaurant in Carpentersville, authorities said. Fire fighting crews were called to the restaurant at 8000 Miller Road at 6:32 p.m., and were able to put the grease fire out within 10 minutes, according to the Carpentersville Fire Department.

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    A man in Civil War period attire salutes Friday as two flag draped caskets arrive at Fort Meyer Memorial Chapel for services to honor two sailors from the Civil War ship, the USS Monitor.

    Civil War sailors buried in Virginia

    More than 150 years after the USS Monitor sank off North Carolina during the Civil War, two unknown crewmen found in the ironclad's turret when it was raised a decade ago were buried Friday at Arlington National Cemetery.

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    Karen Weinert

    Board member celebrates a Grayslake Elementary District 46 graduate

    After recently settling a three-day teacher strike, Grayslake Elementary District 46 board member Karen Weinert thought it was time to have some positive news at a recent meeting of the elected officials. Toward that end, she introduced a District 46 graduate who recently attained his Eagle Scout badge.

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    This mobile home in Elgin was destroyed in a fire early Friday; a 36-year-old man was found dead inside.

    1 found dead in fire at Elgin mobile home park

    A 36-year-old man was found dead inside a home early Friday morning after a fire in a mobile home park on Elgin's west side. Brendan Gallaghan was found dead after firefighters responded at 3:06 a.m. Friday to a fire on lot 12 on the northeast end of Bueche's Mobile Home Park at 909 S. McLean Blvd., Elgin Fire Department Assistant Chief Dave Schmidt said.

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    Bill Brestal

    Fraud suit against prominent Naperville lawyer dismissed

    A DuPage County judge Friday threw out a lawsuit accusing prominent Naperville attorney Bill Brestal of defrauding his former law firm. Judge Bonnie Wheaton dismissed the case after Brestal's attorney argued the allegations, which date to 2005, didn't meet a 5-year statute of limitations. "I'm glad I'm nnot with that firm any longer, but I'm sad because I worked so hard to keep it going," Brestal...

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    Cardinal Odilo Pedro Scherer arrives for a meeting at the Vatican, Friday, March 8, 2013. The Vatican says the conclave to elect a new pope will likely start in the first few days of next week.

    Cardinals set Tuesday as start date for conclave

    Cardinals have set Tuesday as the start date for the conclave to elect the next pope. The Vatican press office said the decision was taken during a vote Friday afternoon of the College of Cardinals. Tuesday will begin with a Mass in the morning, followed by the first balloting in the afternoon. In the past 100 years, no conclave has lasted longer than five days.

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    Hazel Maria Gonzales

    Aurora Police find missing teen

    A 12-year-old Aurora girl that went missing Thursday has been found, Aurora police officials said Friday night. Hazel Maria Gonzales was "located safe and sound," according to police spokesman Dan Ferrelli, who said more details would be provided Saturday.

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    Elgin says TLC lawsuit is about zoning, has no merit

    Elgin officials say a federal lawsuit filed against the city by a faith-based organization is misleading and without merit. TLC Pregnancy Services has offered free ultrasounds to women in Elgin through a mobile facility for two years, and claims in the lawsuit filed Thursday that new zoning restrictions prevent women from accessing its services.

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    Ron Drake, left, Thomas Hayes, center, and Mark Hellner are candidates in the Arlington Heights mayoral race.

    Arlington Hts. mayoral candidates debate new police station

    The future of a new, possibly $40 million, police station in Arlington Heights may depend on which of three candidates is elected the village's new mayor next month.

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    Applicants sought for Geneva 2nd Ward vacancy

    Applications are being taken for the 2nd Ward vacancy on the Geneva City Council, left when Alderman Ralph Dantino died Feb. 18.

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    Funeral arrangements have been set for former Naperville Mayor Chester “Chet” Rybicki, seen here with his late wife Lillian “Mickey” Rybicki.

    Funeral arrangements complete for former Naperville mayor

    Funeral arrangements have been set for former Naperville Mayor Chester "Chet" Rybicki.

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    Quinn authorizes increase of doctors’ license fees

    Gov. Pat Quinn has authorized the increase of Illinois doctors' license fees after months of discussions among state officials, the physicians they regulate and the legislature.The cost of a three-year license under the new law is $700, up from $300. The fee hadn't increased since 1987.

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    Villa Park VFW Post 2801 was scheduled to play host to its first fish fry since a May 2012 explosion rocked the facility during a Bingo game.

    Villa Park VFW back up and running

    Much of the Villa Park VFW Post 2801 is again open to the public, nearly 10 months after an explosion in the gun range injured 10 people.

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    Judges upholds lawsuit over seizing Peotone airport land

    A Will County judge has sided with the Illinois Department of Transportation in its effort to condemn farmland that lies within the boundaries of a proposed airport south of Chicago. Judge Susan O'Leary on Friday denied a motion to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the department asserting its right to seize 300 acres near Peotone for the planned South Suburban Airport.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    Aaron C. Stull, 19, of St. Charles, was charged with illegal consumption of alcohol by a minor at 1:58 a.m. Thursday in the 300 block of West State Street, according to a police report.

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    Nicholas Cerone

    Batavia candidates talk downtown, economic development

    The future of downtown Batavia intrigues the men running for 6th Ward aldermen. IIncumbent Robert Liva and challengers Nicholas Cerone and Ron Rechenmacher discussed city business during a Daily Herald endorsement interview.Three people seek to represent Batavia's 6th Ward.

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    Sen. Dick Durbin speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill to introduce legislation on assault weapons. Another bill Durbin is pushing would crack down on so-called straw purchasers, those people who buy guns legally and then provide them to criminals and others who are not legally allowed to carry them.

    Durbin talks gun control strategy in Chicago

    U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin and Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy continued their push for tougher gun laws on Friday, bringing along the parents of a girl whose shooting death in January put the city at the center of the national debate on firearms.

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    Building, food workers at U of I vote on contract

    Building and food-service workers at the University of Illinois' Urbana-Champaign campus are voting on whether to accept a new contract offer or go on strike Monday. The Service Employees International Union said in a news release Friday that its more than 700 members at the campus started voting Friday and have until Sunday to cast ballots on the latest offer from the university.

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    U of I looks to rely less on state support

    University of Illinois officials say the likelihood of cuts in the school's state appropriation means they should plan to rely more heavily on private fundraising. Thomas Farrell, president of the University of Illinois Foundation, told university trustees that the foundation's goal is to double cash donations and the size of the school's endowment over the next decade.

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    A board on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange shows the closing number Friday for the Dow Jones industrial average.

    Stocks gain for sixth day

    Optimism that hiring is picking up has been one of the factors bolstering the stock market this year. Stocks have also gained on evidence that the housing market is recovering and company earnings continue to growing.

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    Chicago to recover $21 million from O’Hare contractors

    Contractors involved in a terminal facade project at O'Hare International Airport have agreed to pay the city of Chicago $21 million to settle claims of defective design and construction. The project's general contractor, Chicago-based Walsh Construction, also agreed pay for repairing the work at O'Hare's terminals 2 and 3 at a cost of an additional $26 million.

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    Hanover Park seeking vendors for Spring Maxwell Street

    Vendor applications are now being accepted for the village of Hanover Park's Spring Maxwell Street flea market event taking place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 18, at Lake Street and Barrington Road.

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    Day care at federal court named after Lefkow

    Chicago's Dirksen Federal Courthouse has named its day care center after a current judge who advocated for its establishment a quarter-century ago. As of Friday, the facility is "The Judge Joan Humphrey Lefkow Day Care Center."

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    Quinn OKs eliminating dozens of boards, commissions

    Gov. Pat Quinn's directive eliminates various commissions whose work has been completed such as the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial and Ronald Reagan Centennial commissions. It also lists commissions considered by his office as redundant or dormant.Quinn says this executive order is another step toward increasing government efficiency in Illinois.

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    State urges women, girls to get tested for HIV

    More than 7,000 women and adolescent girls in Illinois are living with HIV. Illinois residents may receive information on where to find free HIV testing locations by texting "IL" and a ZIP Code to 36363.

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    President Barack Obama walks across the South Lawn Tuesday to the Oval Office of the White House.

    Obama to discuss energy at Argonne

    The White House says President Barack Obama will talk about energy and climate change during a visit next Friday to Argonne National Laboratory, near Chicago.

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    School choice meeting rescheduled

    Hawthorn District 73 is hosting a round table discussion regarding Adequate Yearly Progress, federal mandates and the relation to school choice at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 12, at Hawthorn Middle South, 600 N. Aspen Drive, Vernon Hills.

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    Local artist hosts exhibit

    Artist Lia Zuniga Schulze is hosting an exhibition Sunday, March 10, at the Round Lake Beach Cultural & Civic Center, at 2007 Civic Center Way in Round Lake Beach.

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    Deborah Messineo-Jones

    Pond smell, flooding concern Lombard Dist. 1 candidates

    Terrace View Pond on the northwest side of Lombard is the main campaign issue for one District 1 trustee candidate and a concern for all three people seeking the seat in the April 9 election. Deborah Messineo-Jones says her top priority is creating a more biologically healthy water condition at the pond, which she says stagnates and smells. "People don't even call it a pond anymore, and it's very...

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    Barrington Celtic Fest to start March 15

    The third annual, three-day Barrington Celtic Fest will officially begin at 4 p.m. Friday, March 15. The festival occurs at a huge heated tent on the 200 block of of Park Avenue, just East of South Cook Street, and at McGonigal's Pub and its new addition, The Annex, at 105 S. Cook St.

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    PTO Council hosts D-220 candidates’ forum

    The Barrington Unit District 220 PTO President's Council extends an invitation to the school district community to attend its school board candidates' forum at 9:30 a.m. Friday, March 15 at the Village Church of Barrington, 1600 E. Main St. in Barrington. Six candidates are vying for four open seats on the board.

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    Boating safety class in Arlington Heights

    The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary will offer an eight-hour boating safety course from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 13 and Saturday, April 20 at West Marine, 63 W. Rand Road in Arlington Heights. Topics over the course of the two sessions will include boating laws, personal safety equipment, safe boat handling, basic navigation, boating problems, trailoring and storing and more.

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    D95 preschool program:

    Lake Zurich Unit District 95 will operate a preschool program in August, 2013.

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    J&J recalls 3 versions of K-Y Jelly

    Johnson & Johnson has quietly recalled some of its popular personal lubricants in order to avert potentially expensive new regulatory reviews.

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    Deadline for voter registration

    Tuesday, March 12 is the last day to register to vote with local deputy registrars for the April 9 election.

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    Kelechukwu Akuba

    Three nabbed on robbery charges near Clarendon Hills

    Three men accused of robbing a juvenile in unincorporated DuPage County were held Friday on $100,000 bail. Kelechukwu Akuba, 20, of Romeoville; Leverenzel Booth, 18, of Darien; and Jerron Wilbut, 19, of Willowbrook, each face one count of robbery.

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    The Alderney Crystal, a piece of calcite. Researchers say the rough, whitish crystal recovered from the wreckage of 16th century English warship may be a sunstone.

    Researchers: We may have found a fabled sunstone

    In a paper published earlier this week, a Franco-British group argued that the Alderney Crystal — a chunk of Icelandic calcite found amid a 16th century wreck at the bottom of the English Channel — worked as a kind of solar compass, allowing sailors to determine the position of the sun even when it was hidden by heavy cloud, masked by fog, or below the horizon.

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    Palatine Village Manager Reid Ottesen, left, learns about forcible entry through a doorway from Palatine firefighter/paramedic Kevin Burris. Several elected and appointed officials participated in the fire training session Friday on the former Camelot property in Palatine.

    Palatine, Rolling Meadows officials suit up for fire fighting training

    Several elected and appointed officials took part in a Fire Ops 101 training session Friday under the guidance of firefighters from Palatine, Palatine Rural and Rolling Meadows. They headed to the former Camelot School property in Palatine for the hands-on fire fighting and rescue operations workshop, which started with them suiting up in the proper protective equipment.

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    TLC Pregnancy Services filed a federal lawsuit Thursday against Elgin over new zoning restrictions.

    TLC Pregnancy Services sues Elgin over restrictions on mobile van

    TLC Pregnancy Services, a mobile ultrasound provider, filed a federal lawsuit Thursday against the city of Elgin charging that its new zoning restrictions prevents women from obtaining free reproductive health services. According to the filing, TLC began providing ultrasounds and pregnancy tests in September 2010 in Elgin parking lots near Larkin High School with permission of the property...

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    Maribel Molina Cortes hugs and kisses her daughter Mary Ortega during a recent visit. Mary often comes to help her mother run the business. She runs the front so her mother can cook.

    Moving Picture: Aurora woman's restaurant a haven for the hungry

    Maribel Molina Cortes of Aurora knows what it's like to be hungry. Rough circumstances when she arrived in the United States had her grabbing day-old bagels from trash cans. But now that she owns her own Mexican restaurant in Naperville, she enjoys giving back to others. "For me to be here and help other people, it's a blessing for me," she says.

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    Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel walks Friday with U.S. Marine General Joseph Dunford, commander of the International Security Force, upon Hagel’s arrival near Camp Eggers in Kabul, Afghanistan.

    Pentagon chief Hagel makes first trip to Afghanistan

    "We are still at war," Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said, warning the U.S. and its allies to remain focused on the mission while noting that the U.S. never intended to stay in Afghanistan indefinitely.

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    A pedestrian walks down Pennsylvania Avenue Wednesday near the White House.

    Long-lived winter storm plagues New England

    A slow-moving storm centered far out in the Atlantic Ocean dropped more than a foot of snow on parts of New England, caused coastal flooding that washed away a home in Massachusetts, and turned Friday commutes into slushy crawls.Flooding from the enduring storm, which buried parts of the Midwest and mid-Atlantic in deep snow this week before sweeping northward, closed some coastal roads north and...

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    Alberta Adamson

    Wheaton council candidates debate future of downtown

    Four city council hopefuls in the race to represent Wheaton's north district are clashing over strategies to attract new businesses. While city leaders are touting major developments under construction downtown, including a six-story apartment building and a Mariano's Fresh Market grocery store, the candidates in the only contested race for a seat on the council are outlining different...

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    Covering the campaigns at dailyherald.com

    With Election Day only a month away, campaign season is about to kick into high gear.Our election coverage will be kicking into high gear, too. These are the races that are closest to home — municipal contests including a large number for mayor; school, park, library and township boards; referendums; and a few other posts.

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    Martha Heizer, president of the International Movement “We are Church”, meets reporters in Rome. Advocacy groups from around the world have descended on Rome to try to publicize their causes while media attention on the Vatican is high.

    In run-up to pope election, dissidents seek voice

    The election of a new pope always brings with it hopes for change from across the Catholic ideological and theological spectrum. Advocacy groups from around the world have descended on Rome to try to publicize their causes while media attention on the Vatican is high. These lay groups won't determine the vote. But some movements are influencing the debate, particularly those that count hundreds...

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    Cardinal Odilo Pedro Scherer is known for prolific tweeting, appearances on Brazil’s most popular late-night talk show and squeezing into the subway for morning commutes, just like most of the 5 million faithful in his diocese. Scherer is Brazil’s best hope to be the next pope, and one of the top papal contenders from the developing world.

    Cardinal Scherer: Modern ways, traditional message

    Cardinal Odilo Scherer is known for prolific tweeting, appearances on Brazil's most popular late-night talk show and squeezing into the subway for morning commutes — just like most of the 5 million faithful in his diocese. Scherer is Brazil's best hope to be the next pope — and one of the top papal contenders from the developing world.

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    Hungarian Cardinal Peter Erdo is the son of a deeply religious couple who defied communist repression to practice their faith. And if elected pope, Hungarian Cardinal Peter Erdo would be the second pontiff to come from Eastern Europe, following in the footsteps of the late John Paul II, a Pole who left a great legacy helping to topple communism.

    Hungarian cardinal’s parents defied communism

    He's the son of a deeply religious couple who defied communist repression to practice their faith. And if elected pope, Hungarian Cardinal Peter Erdo would be the second pontiff to come from eastern Europe — following in the footsteps of the late John Paul II. A cardinal since 2003, Erdo is known as an erudite scholar with a common touch. An expert on canon law and distinguished university...

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    Effie Harris

    Buffalo Grove honors police department’s finest

    Buffalo Grove honored its finest this week with the recognition of its police department's employee of the year award. This year's recipient was Sgt. Scott Eisenmenger, who has been with the department for 18 years. His selection was based on his excellent work as the department's training coordinator, officials said.

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    Proposed settlement in 2009 Michigan drowning of St. Charles man
    A proposed settlement with the family of a St. Charles man who drowned in 2009 while saving family members from rough waters off southwestern Michigan includes beach safety measures. The Kalamazoo Gazette reports South Haven expects the settlement with the family of Martin Jordan to be approved in the coming weeks. The 45-year-old from St. Charles drowned Aug. 1, 2009, after saving his son and...

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    Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, Osama bin Laden’s son-in-law and spokesman. Abu Ghaith has been captured by the United States, officials said Thursday, March 7, 2013, in what a senior congressman called a “very significant victory” in the fight against al-Qaida.

    Bin Laden spokesman pleads not guilty to plot

    A senior al-Qaida leader and son-in-law of Osama bin Laden, captured in Jordan in the past week, pleaded not guilty Friday in federal court in New York to plotting against Americans in his role as the terror network's top spokesman. Sulaiman Abu Ghaith entered the plea through a lawyer to one count of conspiracy to kill Americans in a case that marks a legal victory for President Barack Obama's...

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    Jury weighs fate of NYPD officer in cannibal plot

    The fate of a suspended New York City police officer accused of plotting to kill and cannibalize women he knew is in the hands of jurors after his defense lawyer told them in closing arguments that his elaborate plans were fantasy role-play and a prosecutor said they were "no joke."

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    Coopertown, Tenn., Police Chief Shane Sullivan at the Coopertown City Hall. The department was disbanded for several months last year after an officer was recorded using a racial slur to describe a black motorist. Sullivan, hired in Nov. 2012, is counting on using a lie-detector test to keep racists off his tiny police force.

    Police chief’s polygraph targets racist applicants

    A police chief hired to rebuild a tiny Tennessee department dismantled by scandal is using a lie-detector test to keep racists off his force. The department was disbanded for several months last year after an officer was recorded using a racial slur to describe a black motorist. Law enforcement experts say Sullivan's polygraph approach is unusual, though some departments use the devices for other...

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    No injuries in Lombard house fire

    A fire caused about $100,000 worth of damage Thursday night to a house in Lombard, but no injuries were reported, authorities said Friday. The fire broke out about 7:40 p.m. on the 100 block of North West Road, and firefighters saw flames from the house's second story when they arrived, authorities said.

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    Cuba’s President Raul Castro salutes as he stands next to the coffin containing the body of Venezuela’s late President Hugo Chavez. A state funeral for Chavez attended by some 33 heads of government is scheduled to begin Friday morning. At right is Chavez’s daughter Rosa Virginia Chavez and center is Vice-President Nicolas Maduro.

    A funeral, and a swearing in, for Venezuela

    With leaders from five continents on hand, Venezuela prepared for a day of distinctly different ceremonies — first the formal state funeral of Hugo Chavez, then the controversial swearing in of his anointed interim successor, who the opposition charges has no constitutional right to the job.

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    Government agencies vary widely in how they are dealing with $85 billion in across-the-board budget cuts that went into effect last week. Federal workers could face seven days of furloughs at the Housing and Urban Development Department, but Homeland Security personnel might see twice that number.

    Furlough plans vary widely at government agencies

    Federal workers could face seven days of furloughs at the Housing and Urban Development Department, but Homeland Security personnel might see twice that number. At the Environmental Protection Agency, workers would get four-day holiday weekends with a catch — one day would be a furlough day. Government agencies vary widely in how they are dealing with $85 billion in across-the-board budget...

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    Former President Bill Clinton says the U.S. Supreme Court should strike down a law he signed 17 years ago that bans same-sex marriage, calling the measure “incompatible” with the Constitution.

    Bill Clinton joins Obama urging top court to back gay marriage

    Former President Bill Clinton says the U.S. Supreme Court should strike down the Defense of Marriage Act he signed 17 years ago that bans same-sex marriage. "I have come to believe that DOMA is contrary to those principles and, in fact, incompatible with our Constitution," Clinton wrote in an op-ed article in The Washington Post newspaper.

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    North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, center, walks with military personnel as he arrives for a military unit on Mu Islet, located in the southernmost part of the southwestern sector of North Korea’s border with South Korea.

    UN sanctions may play into North Korean propaganda

    Seven years of U.N. sanctions against North Korea have done nothing to derail Pyongyang's drive for a nuclear weapon capable of hitting the United States. They may have even bolstered the Kim family by giving their propaganda maestros ammunition to whip up anti-U.S. sentiment. In the wake of fresh U.N. sanctions leveled at North Korea, the question is: Will this time be different?

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    Bei Bei Shuai is charged with murder in the 2011 death of her 3-day-old daughter Angel Shuai. Prosecutors who charged the mother with murdering her infant because she ate rat poison while pregnant are asking an Indiana judge to take steps during the trial that critics say are meant to stifle any sympathy jurors might have for a woman who’s become an international cause.

    Prosecutors seek constraints in Indiana rat poison case

    Prosecutors who charged a mother with murdering her infant because she ate rat poison while pregnant have asked the Indiana judge trying the case to take steps that critics say could stifle any sympathy jurors might have for the woman. Bei Bei Shuai's story has generated a wave of support from advocates who fear that her case could establish an unequal system that would effectively make pregnant...

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    Downed utility poles on Stone Harbor Boulevard, in the Scotch Bonnet section of Middle Township, N.J., Thursday March 7, 2013 after an overnight storm. The roadway is the main access into the beach town of Stone Harbor.

    Late-winter storm hampers New England

    A slow-moving storm centered far out in the Atlantic Ocean dropped up to a foot of snow in New England, caused coastal flooding in Massachusetts and slowed the morning commute in the region to a slushy crawl.

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    Visitors to Chicago’s Lincoln Park Zoo can now get their first look at a recently birthed Moholi bushbaby.

    Baby bushbaby doing well in Chicago zoo
    Visitors to Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo can now get their first look at a recently birthed Moholi bushbaby.In a news release, the zoo says the tiny primate that weighed just 0.3 ounces when it was born in January has recently ventured from its nest.

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    Gary Wade shows off his class ring recently returned to him after it was found by Chris Homoya, in Hurst.

    Class ring found 57 years later

    A huge surprise awaited Gary Wade of Herrin on March 5. Chris Homoya presented him with his high school class ring, an item Wade was sure he would never see again. "It's only been about 57 years. This is quite a surprise," Wade said about getting his Herrin High School ring back. He bought in fall 1955, a few months before he graduated in the spring.

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    Wisconsin man accused of strangling wife waives hearing

    A Racine man accused of killing his wife and setting fire to himself and a house has waived his preliminary hearing. Thirty-six-year-old Joseph Guerrero is accused of strangling Bianca Vite at a Mount Pleasant home one of his relatives had rented. Prosecutors say Guerrero was drinking and taking pills before arguing with his 21-year-old wife.

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    Chicago woman charged with neglect in grandmother’s death

    A Chicago woman whose 90-year-old grandmother was found dead, her body covered with bed sores, skin ulcers and chemical burns caused by lying in her own urine, has been charged with elderly neglect. The Chicago Sun-Times reports that Cook County prosecutors say Nicole Falls did not for months seek medical help for Della Cotton, despite the woman's cries of pain.

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    Ind. family upset with probe of toddler’s death

    Relatives of a northern Indiana toddler who died in 2011 are upset that investigators have closed the case until new leads emerge in the girl's death. Elkhart Police Capt. Mike Sigsbee told relatives of 15-month-old Taylor Hartung-Mann on Thursday that investigators have no further leads in the investigation, but will look at any new information that may come up in the future.

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    Elgin moves to renew contract with chamber of commerce

    After being told that 2012 was a good year for economic development in Elgin, the city council's committee of the whole recommended renewing a $275,000 contract for economic development services from the Elgin Area Chamber of Commerce in a unanimous vote on Wednesday.

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    Dawn Patrol: 5 saved from fire; full house at Buffalo Grove forum

    Dogs die, 5 people saved from a house fire near Lincolnshire. Buffalo Grove candidate forum gets a full house. Crystal Lake Central student accused of secret lockerroom videotaping. Presentations on Muhammad comes to Grayslake. Blackhawks try to continue records, without Sharp.

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    Dolphins play in the wake of a boat off the coast of Sanibel Island, Florida on February 7th.

    Images: Photo Contest Finalists
    Each week you submit your favorite photo. We pick the best of the bunch and select 12 finlaists. Here are the finalists for the week of March 3rd.

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    Chances are that someone in your household is feeling under the weather. What cold remedy do you recommend?

    Poll Vault: What do you take for a cold?

    Is there an over-the-counter product you swear by to get you through the coughs, sniffles and sneezes? What DOESN’T work for you?

Sports

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    Carlos Boozer hugs teammate Marco Belinelli after Belinelli's 3-point basket gave the Bulls the lead and an 89-88 win over Utah on Friday at the United Center. Boozer and Belinelli led the Bulls with 22 points each.

    Belinelli chimes in with another game-winner

    Marco Belinelli, meanwhile, delivered a late-game, go-ahead bucket for the third time in less than two months on Friday. His corner 3-pointer with 5.9 seconds on the clock lifted the Bulls to a tense 89-88 victory over Utah at the United Center.

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    UIC bounced from Horizon League tourney

    Sultan Muhammad hit a 3-pointer with 1.7 seconds remaining as Green Bay defeated Illinois-Chicago 64-63 in the quarterfinals of the Horizon League tournament on Friday night.

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    After four varsity seasons, Benet's McInerney comes to the end

    In four years of varsity basketball you pretty much see everything. For Benet's Pat McInerney, though, this was unique. Friday's loss to West Aurora turned out to be his last game with the Redwings.

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    Jack Benevennti of Benet takes one to the net during the West Aurora vs. Benet Bolingbrook sectional championship game Friday.

    Blackhawks get their revenge

    The bigger the challenge the better for West Aurora. Two days ago after knocking off No. 1 seed Oswego in the semifinals of the Class 4A Bolingbrook sectional, senior forward Spencer Thomas, in looking ahead to the sectional championship game, said "hopefully we get Benet." That's Benet as in the team that blew out West Aurora earlier this season at Batavia's Night of Hoops. The Blackhawks did indeed get the Redwings, and Thomas and his mates got their revenge Friday night with a 42-38 slugfest of a victory in front of a third straight packed house at Bolingbrook this week at a sectional that lived up to the hype of the second-best in the state.

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    Pat McInerney ,left, of Benet and Matt Dunn of West Aurora go for a loose ball during the West Aurora vs. Benet Bolingbrook sectional championship game Friday.

    West Aurora beats pressure, Benet

    West Aurora guard Jayquan Lee had Benet's student section in his ear at the free throw line, yelling "Pressure!" He knocked it down anyway, a usual sight for the Blackhawks on Friday in a third straight thriller at the Class 4A Bolingbrook sectional.

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    Friday’s girls track scoreboard
    High school results from Friday's varsity girls track meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Friday’s girls water polo scoreboard
    High school results from Friday's varsity girls water polo matches, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Friday’s boys water polo scoreboard
    High school results from Friday's varsity boys water polo meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Friday’s boys gymnastics scoreboard
    High school results from Friday's varsity boys gymnastics meets, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Friday’s boys basketball scoreboard
    Here are the results from Friday's varsity boys basketball results as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Stevenson players celebrate their victory.

    Images: Stevenson vs. St. Viator, boys basketball
    Stevenson won 77-58 over St. Viator in the Class 4A Waukegan sectional final boys basketball game on Friday, March 8 in Waukegan.

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    Carmel’s Billy Kirby, left, drives past North Chicago’s JaVairius Amos-Mays during the Class 3A sectional final game at Antioch on Friday night.

    North Chicago stops Carmel

    His team's feel-good season had just ended, but when Carmel Catholic basketball coach Tim Bowen reflected, he couldn't help but feel fabulous for senior starting guard Greg Edkins. The Corsairs will miss Edkins. Again. After missing out on his junior season to take some time off from the game, Edkins wasn't going to miss out on what turned out to be one of the best seasons in more than two decades for Carmel. The Cinderellas of this years's state tournament in Lake County, the sixth-seeded Corsairs played top-seeded North Chicago tough for four quarters before losing 63-46 in the Class 3A Antioch sectional final Friday night.

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    Mark Welsh/mwelsh@dailyherald.com Stevenson celebrates its victory over St. Viator in the Class 4A sectional championship at Waukegan.

    Stevenson tops St. Viator at Waukegan

    Matt Morrissey's effort at both ends of the floor combined with a game-best 24 points from sophomore Jalen Brunson lifted Stevenson to a 77-58 win over St. Viator in Waukegan sectional championship play. Stevenson (27-4) earned the third sectional crown in school history and first since 2007. The Patriots advance to meet DeKalb sectional champion Rockford Boylan (22-8) in the Northern Illinois supersectional at 8 p.m. Tuesday.

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    Senior-led St. Francis up to challenge

    St. Francis answered every challenge. A lineup of battle-tested veterans will do that. Rockford Lutheran erased a 10-point deficit to tie the sectional championship late in the third quarter? No problem. The Crusaders wiped out a 7-point deficit to pull even again midway through the fourth? The Spartans had an answer. St. Francis and its five senior starters with memories of losing in the sectional final last year took everything that Rockford Lutheran could throw at it and held on for a 63-60 victory in the Class 3A Freeport sectional championship game.

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    A dispirited Marian Hossa walks off the ice after the Blackhawks were spanked 6-2 by the Colorado Avalanche Friday night.

    Hawks' streak stopped cold

    Say goodbye to every one of the Blackhawks' streaks. Playing their sixth game in nine nights and in the altitude of Denver, it all caught up to the Hawks on Friday night as they were spanked 6-2 by the Colorado Avalanche at the Pepsi Center. Their first regulation loss came in their 25th game and snapped the Hawks' 11-game winning streak, a franchise record, and 24-game point streak to start the season, an NHL mark.

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    Palatine picks up first win

    Junior Rachel Chumbook had 7 goals, 2 assists and 3 steals to help Palatine to its first victory of the season, an 18-7 victory at Lake Forest in nonconference play.

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    As members of the Colorado Avalanche, back, celebrate a goal by Ryan O’Reilly, Chicago Blackhawks right wing Michael Frolik skates back to the bench in the second period .

    Images: Blackhawks vs. Avalanche
    Images of the Blackhawks vs. Colorado Avalanche at Pepsi Center in Denver. The Blackhawks lost for the first time in regulation this season by a score of 6-2.

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    Admirals rally past Wolves

    The Milwaukee Admirals rallied with 3 goals in the third period to sink the Chicago Wolves 4-3 in an Amtrak Rivalry game Friday night at the Bradley Center.

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    Carmel’s Billy Kirby, left, drives past North Chicago’s JaVairiius Amos-Mays.

    Images: Carmel vs. North Chicago, boys basketball
    Carmel lost 63-46 to North Chicago in the Class 3A Antioch sectional final boys basketball game on Friday, March 8 in Antioch.

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    As members of the Colorado Avalanche, back, celebrate a goal by Ryan O'Reilly, Chicago Blackhawks right wing Michael Frolik (67), of the Czech Republic, skates back to the bench in the second period of an NHL hockey game in Denver, Friday, March 8, 2013. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

    Blackhawks historic streak ends

    The best start in NHL history is over. The Blawkhawks finally left the ice without a point. The Blackhawks were stunned 6-2 by the struggling Colorado Avalanche on Friday night. It was their first loss in regulation and ended a remarkable run in which they earned at least one point in their first 24 games, an NHL record.

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    Colorado Avalanche goalie Semyon Varlamov (1), of Russia, makes a save on a shot by Chicago Blackhawks center Patrick Sharp during the second period of an NHL hockey game, Wednesday, March 6, 2013, in Chicago.

    Bickell gets chance to step up in Sharp’s absence

    Winger Patrick Sharp will miss anywhere from three to four weeks, the Blackhawks officials confirmed on Friday, with the left shoulder injury he suffered Wednesday against Colorado when he was checked hard into the glass by Avs defenseman Ryan O'Byrne.Sharp, who will not require surgery, is the Hawks' third leading scorer with 18 points.

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    Derrick Rose works out before the Bulls-Jazz game at the United Center on Friday. A published report said Rose is cleared medically to return to game action but that he’s not comfortable dunking off his left foot.

    Bulls’ Thibodeau confronts another report about Rose

    Coach Tom Thibodeau’s reaction to the latest Derrick Rose story was to repeat most of the same phrases he’s been using for months. “He’s put a lot of work in,” Thibodeau said before Friday’s game. “No one wants to play more than he does, and we have to trust him. I trust Derrick implicitly. When he’s ready, he’ll let us know and we’ll go from there.”

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    West Aurora players celebrate.

    Images: West Aurora vs. Benet Academy, boys basketball
    West Aurora won 42-38 over Benet Academy in a Bolingbrook sectional championship game Friday night.

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    Palatine passes first Invitational test

    In the opener of the boys water polo tournament it is hosting this weekend, Palatine handled St. Ignatius 13-3. The Wolfpack had been ranked No. 15 in the state preseason rankings by illpolo.com, while Palatine was No. 24.

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    Utah Jazz center Al Jefferson (25) dunks over Chicago Bulls center Nazr Mohammed and Joakim Noah (13) as teammate Enes Kanter (0) watches during the first half of an NBA basketball game on Friday, March 8, 2013, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    Belinell's late 3 lifts Bulls over Jazz 89-88

    Marco Belinelli made a 3-pointer with 5.9 seconds left to lift the Bulls to an 89-88 victory over the Utah Jazz on Friday night. Belinelli missed a potential tying jumper, but got a second chance when Joakim Noah grabbed the rebound. Jimmy Butler then swung the ball back out to Belinelli in the corner, and he connected on the fallaway 3 to put Chicago in front to stay.

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    Sellars’ determination is rewarded at East-West meet

    Barrington's Christian Sellars makes gymnastics look easy. Sellars had never competed in a high school meet before Friday night's Mid-Suburban League East-West meet at Barrington. But that didn't stop the senior from scoring a 9.40 on the floor exercise, the highest score in the event.

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    Ohio State guard Raven Ferguson, right, drives as she looks to a pass against Penn State forward Mia Nickson during the first half of an NCAA women’s college basketball game in the Big Ten Conference tournament in Hoffman Estates on Friday. Among Big 10 teams, Nickson and the eighth-ranked Nittany Lions probably have the best chance to make a Final Four run this season.

    Big 10 has good chance of getting a team into Final Four

    The Big Ten hasn't had a women's basketball team reach the NCAA Final Four since 2005 when Michigan State was the national runner-up. The conference has had just one national champion since the NCAA started crowning women's basketball champions in 1982 — Purdue in 1999. Only four other times has the Big Ten been represented in the Final Four — Minnesota in 2004, Purdue in 2001 and Iowa and Ohio State in 1993. But if the national RPI rankings are any indicator, that could change this year.

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    Penn State forward Ariel Edwards, right, drives to the basket against Ohio State guard Raven Ferguson during the second half of an NCAA women's college basketball game in the Big Ten Conference tournament in Hoffman Estates, Ill., on Friday, March 8, 2013. Penn State won 76-66. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

    Bentley, Lucas lead Penn St. past Ohio St., 76-66

    Alex Bentley scored 20 points, Maggie Lucas added 18, and No. 8 Penn State beat Ohio State 76-66 Friday in the quarterfinals of the Big Ten tournament.

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    Hampshire and ECC graduate Cassie Dumoulin, who played at Illinois this season, passes the ball in warm-ups prior to the Illini’s loss to Wisconsin Thursday at the Big Ten women’s basketball tournament at the Sears Centre in Hoffman Estates.

    Hampshire grad Dumoulin is one who definitely gets it

    For someone who not only played most of the time on her previous teams, but who also starred on those teams, this has been a bit of a strange year of basketball for Hampshire graduate Cassie Dumoulin. That doesn't mean it's been all bad. To the contrary, Dumolulin had the time of her life wearing the orange and blue No. 10 uniform for the University of Illinois this season.

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    Is Oliver Purnell the right coach to guide DePaul into the new basketball-only conference — to be called the Big East — that was officially created Friday?

    Will fresh start revitalize ailing DePaul?

    DePaul got some good news on Friday regarding the revamped Big East Conference. But moving forward, the Blue Demons need to make some major changes if they hope to become competitive in the new league.

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    While the agent for middle linebacker Brian Urlacher has reportedly submitted on offer to the Bears, Bob LeGere contends it's too high for any NFL team to seriously consider.

    Urlacher aside, Bears do have free agent needs

    The Bears want to re-sign middle linebacker Brian Urlacher before he officially becomes a free agent on March 12. But there are a number of other teams' free agents who could help the Bears immediately, if they can find enough room under the salary cap. Although teams cannot sign new players until 3 p.m. next Tuesday, they were allowed to begin negotiating with them at 11 p.m. (Chicago time) on Friday.

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    Tiger Woods looks over his putt on the ninth green during the second round of the Cadillac Championship golf tournament Friday, March 8, 2013, in Doral, Fla. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

    More birdies for Tiger, and the lead at Doral

    Tiger Woods struggled on the practice range, and he didn't feel much better two holes into his second round Friday at the Cadillac Championship. He would not have guessed this would be the day to set a personal record for birdies, much less wind up with a two-shot lead.p.

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    Wisconsin guard Morgan Paige, right, drives to the basket against Purdue guard Dee Dee Williams during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in the Big Ten Conference tournament in Hoffman Estates, Ill., on Friday, March 8, 2013. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

    Purdue women top Wisconsin 74-62

    KK Houser scored 15 points and Purdue defeated Wisconsin 74-62 on Friday in the Big Ten tournament quarterfinals.

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    Nebraska players and staff celebrate after guard Brandi Jeffery, not pictured, scored during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Iowa in the Big Ten Conference tournament in Hoffman Estates, Ill., on Friday, March 8, 2013. Nebraska won 76-61. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

    Nebraska clears Iowa aside, 76-62

    Jordan Hooper helped Nebraska dominate the boards and scored 24 points to lead the No. 21 Huskers to a 76-61 victory over Iowa in the Big Ten tournament quarterfinals on Friday at Sears Centre Arena.Lindsey Moore had 13 points and 6 assists, and Emily Cady had 8 rebounds and 6 assists for the Huskers (23-7), who have nine of their last 10 games and are the second seed in the tournament.

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    Waubonsie Valley boys basketball coach Steve Weemer is stepping down from that position.

    Weemer steps down at Waubonsie Valley

    Steve Weemer, who concluded his eighth season coaching Waubonsie Valley boys varsity basketball in the regional finals on March 1, has stepped down as head coach. Weemer, who went 134-91 with regional titles in 2007 and 2008 at Waubonsie, desires to move into administration, particularly in athletics, as well as spend more time with young children Payton, 8, and Luke, 5. He said he's nearly completed his Type 75 Administrative Certification."To tell you the truth, I wanted to go out with a good group of kids," said Weemer, 42. Also a Waubonsie drivers education instructor who plans on returning in that capacity, Weemer tendered his resignation and told the team on Monday.

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    A second former U.S. speedskater has made sexual abuse accusations against Olympic medalist and former U.S. Speedskating president Andy Gabel, saying he raped her when she was 15.

    Ex-skater accuses Gabel of rape when she was 15

    A second former U.S. speedskater has made sexual abuse accusations against Olympic medalist and former U.S. Speedskating president Andy Gabel, saying he raped her when she was 15.

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    The NHL can thank captain Jonathan Toews and the Blackhawks for taking the focus off the lockout that wiped out almost half of the season.

    NHL owes Blackhawks one very big thank you

    Not quite all Blackhawks, all day, it just seems that way in this week's Spellman's Scorecard. Mike's also got thoughts on the Cubs, White Sox, and much more.

Business

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    Homes that have been sold are marked with buttons on a model in the sales office of Hovnanian Enterprises Inc.’s Four Seasons housing development in Beaumont, California.

    Jobs growth dents unemployment rate

    Last month capped a fourth-month hiring spree in which employers have added an average of 205,000 jobs a month. The hiring has been fueled by steady improvement in housing, auto sales, manufacturing and corporate profits, along with record-low borrowing rates.

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    Vernon Hills-based CDW has hired banks to handle an initial public offering later this year, according to published reports.

    Report: CDW hires banks to handle IPO

    Vernon Hills-based CDW has hired banks to handle an initial public offering planned for later this year, according to published reports. The Reuters news agency quoted unnamed sources that the IT product and services retailer has hired JPMorgan Chase, Barclays PLC and Goldman Sachs Group to lead the IPO efforts. The offering could raise about $750 million for the company, according to Reuters' sources.

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    Motorola Mobility Holdings Inc. in Libertyville.

    Google cut 1,200 more Motorola Mobility jobs

    Libertyville-based Motorola Mobility has cut another 1,200 jobs worldwide. Cuts in the United States were completed on Friday while others worldwide, including in China and India, may take longer. Still, the company is on target to move into downtown Chicago sans the incentive package.

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    Whole Foods: Products will carry GMO labeling
    Whole Foods says all products in its North American stores will have labels disclosing whether they contain genetically modified ingredients by 2018. The company says it's the first national grocery chain to set such a deadline for labeling foods that contain genetically modified organisms, or GMOs.

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    Feds close probe into Ford SUVs rolling away

    U.S. safety officials have closed an investigation into allegations that three Ford SUVs can roll away when the transmissions are in park. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says the probe involved about 1.5 million Ford Explorer, Mercury Mountaineer and Lincoln Aviator SUVS from the 2002 to 2005 model years.

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    Shipping containers are stacked at the Port of Miami. U.S. wholesalers boosted their stockpiles in January by the largest amount in 13 months, even though their sales dropped sharply.

    U.S. wholesale stockpiles rise 1.2 percent

    U.S. wholesalers boosted their stockpiles in January by the largest amount in 13 months even though their sales dropped sharply. Inventories at the wholesale level rose 1.2 percent in January compared with December when inventories had edged up a slight 0.1 percent, the Commerce Department said Friday. It was the biggest gain since a similar increase in December 2011. Sales at the wholesale level dropped 0.8 percent after being flat in December.

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    Oil slips as strong dollar offsets jobs data

    The price of oil was down slightly Friday, as a strong U.S. jobs report was offset by gains in the dollar. Benchmark oil for April delivery was down 22 cents to $91.34 a barrel in morning trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The U.S. government said employers added 236,000 jobs last month, far exceeding economist predictions. The unemployment rate fell to 7.7 percent from 7.9 percent. That could signal increased demand for oil products if more drivers are joining the daily commute.

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    United Airlines said a key measure of revenue rose as much as 7.5 percent in February, after a weak showing a year earlier.

    United Airlines passenger revenue up sharply

    United Airlines said a key measure of revenue rose as much as 7.5 percent in February, after a weak showing a year earlier.United reported late Thursday that passenger revenue for each seat flown one mile rose an estimated 6.5 percent to 7.5 percent for the month. A year earlier, a switch to a new computer system for predicting demand hurt passenger revenue growth.

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    In this Jan. 24, 2013 photo, Joseph Kolly, director National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Office of Research and Engineering, holds an fire-damaged battery casing from the Japan Airlines Boeing 787 Dreamliner that caught fire at Logan International Airport in Boston, at the NTSB laboratory in Washington.

    Boeing 787 battery fire was difficult to control

    The smoking, hissing battery smoldering away inside the belly of the parked 787 in Boston had already injured one firefighter. The airport fire commander wanted it off that plane. Six bolts held it fast. A quick-disconnect knob — just a quarter turn would pop the battery free — had melted away. Firefighters with gloved hands tried to turn the bolts with pliers, which is like trying to slice an onion with a rubber spatula while wearing oven mitts.

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    OSHA proposes fines in death at Peoria plant
    The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration has charged Komatsu America Corp. with safety violations at its plant in Peoria and proposed an $82,000 fine in the death of an employee.Stanley Musgrave Jr. of Norwood died Aug. 24, 2012, after he was injured two days earlier at the plant. The Journal Star in Peoria reports that the 53-year-old Musgrave was testing hydraulic equipment when his arm was severed.

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    Oak Brook-based McDonald’s says a monthly sales figure dipped again as it struggled with intensifying competition and challenging economic conditions around the world.

    McDonald’s sales fall 1.5 percent in February
    Oak Brook-based McDonald's says a monthly sales figure dipped again as it struggled with intensifying competition and challenging economic conditions around the world. The company said sales at restaurants open at least 13 months fell 1.5 percent in February. It noted that February sales last year benefited from an extra day because it was a leap year. When excluding the impact of that extra day, it said sales rose 1.7 percent.

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    Markets buoyant ahead of US payrolls figures

    The buoyant mood in financial markets showed few signs of abating Friday as investors appeared confident ahead of U.S. monthly jobs figures, a key measure of strength in the world's largest economy.On Thursday, positive weekly jobs claims figures helped push the Dow to another record. Better-than-expected Chinese export figures gave markets another jolt higher in the run-up to the payrolls figures, which often set the market tone for a week or two after their release.

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    Apple seeks to revive patent claims against Motorola

    Apple Inc. asked a U.S. appeals court today to reinstate patent-infringement claims it filed against Google Inc.'s Motorola Mobility unit over touch-screen technology used in mobile phones. "This is Apple's first touch-screen patent," Apple lawyer Joshua Rosenkranz of Orrick Herrington in New York told a three- judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington.

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    A pair of specialists work at a post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Surging stock prices and steady home-price increases have finally allowed Americans to regain the $16 trillion in wealth they lost to the Great Recession.

    U.S. household wealth regains pre-recession peak

    It took 5½ years.Surging stock prices and steady home-price increases have finally allowed Americans to regain the $16 trillion in wealth they lost to the Great Recession. The gains are helping support the economy and could lead to further spending and growth. The recovered wealth — most of it from higher stock prices — has been flowing mainly to richer Americans. By contrast, middle class wealth is mostly in the form of home equity, which has risen much less.

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    In this Jan. 4, 2010 photo, TSA officer Robert Howard signals an airline passenger forward at a security check-point at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in SeaTac, Wash. Flight attendants, pilots, federal air marshals and even insurance companies are part of a growing backlash to the Transportation Security Administrationís new policy allowing passengers to carry small knives and sports equipment like souvenir baseball bats and golf clubs onto planes.

    Backlash grows to allowing knives, clubs on planes

    Flight attendants, pilots, federal air marshals and even insurance companies are part of a growing backlash to the Transportation Security Administration's new policy allowing passengers to carry small knives and sports equipment like souvenir baseball bats and golf clubs onto planes. The Flight Attendants Union Coalition, which representing nearly 90,000 flight attendants, said it is coordinating a nationwide legislative and public education campaign to reverse the policy announced by TSA Administrator John Pistole this week.

Life & Entertainment

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    TV personality Kelly Osbourne was hospitalized after fainting on the set of E!’s “Fashion Police.” A spokeswoman for Osbourne told the cable network Thursday that the 28-year-old TV personality is awake, alert and in stable condition.

    Osbourne confirms seizure, tweets hospital photo

    Kelly Osbourne says she had a seizure and doctors are trying to figure out why. The 28-year-old TV personality posted a photo on Twitter late Thursday of an IV in her tattooed left arm. She thanked her fans for their "beautiful well wishes."

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    David Gregory is the moderator of NBC’s “Meet the Press.”

    David Gregory pressing guests on ‘Meet the Press’

    You can only imagine the rush David Gregory felt when his "Meet the Press" guest, Vice President Joe Biden, took a cue from him and blurted out some history. Midway through that memorable interview last May, Biden seized the bait when Gregory happened to ask his position on gay marriage. "Once he mentioned the societal impact of Will & Grace,"' says Gregory, "I knew we were off to the races." That kind of Beltway Booyah moment helps account for why Gregory loves hosting "Meet the Press," NBC's venerable Sunday morning public-affairs program he took over four years ago.

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    Get all of Verdi in 1 big box

    From the ever-popular “Aida” to the obscure “Alzira,” all 28 of Giuseppe Verdi’s operas have been repackaged in a boxed set to commemorate the great Italian composer’s 200th birthday — along with his other compositions: the “Requiem,” songs, choral works, even a string quartet and capriccio for bassoon and orchestra.

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    Beatrice (Noomi Rapace), left, involves Victor (Colin Farrell) in her plans for revenge in “Dead Man Down.”

    ‘Dead Man Down’ is lifeless, ludicrous

    Suspending disbelief is a part of watching most any action film, where bullets fly like birds and mayhem explodes as easily as a shaken soda can. But even in such a contrived movie world, the lifeless "Dead Man Down" takes far too many silly leaps of logic.

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    Canadian singer Justin Bieber performs at the O2 Arena in east London Monday. Bieber is recovering Friday after fainting backstage Thursday at a concert in London.

    Bieber scuffles with photographers in London

    Justin Bieber's week just got worse. Following a brief hospital stay after fainting backstage, the 19-year-old pop star's preparation for a final concert in London on Friday hit a speed bump. Bieber got into an altercation with insult-hurling paparazzi, lashing out at a photographer with a stream of expletives as he was restrained by minders.

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    Constantine Maroulis stars as the murderous Edward Hyde and Deborah Cox as the prostitute Lucy in the Broadway-bound national tour of the 1997 musical “Jekyll & Hyde.”

    'Jekyll & Hyde' helps bring back extensive pre-Broadway tours

    In the next few weeks, Chicago's theater district will be home to a bonanza of Broadway musicals. Constantine Maroulis and R&B diva Deborah Cox star in a touring revival of "Jekyll & Hyde," coming to the Cadillac Palace Tuesday, March 12, before it opens on Broadway in April. And "Priscilla Queen of the Desert" and "Catch Me If You Can" are coming to Chicago via post-Broadway tours.

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    Joy Behar is leaving the ABC daytime talk show “The View” at the end of the current season in August 2013.

    Joy Behar leaving ‘The View’

    Joy Behar will be enjoying "The View" for only five more months. The 70-year-old comedian is leaving the ABC daytime talk show at the end of the current season in August. The network said in a statement Thursday that it wishes Behar "all the best in this next chapter, and are thrilled that we have her for the remainder of the season."

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    Glen Ellyn's Jaclyn Dougherty is performing in the chorus of Paramount Theatre's production of “Fiddler on the Roof.”

    Stage beckons young Glen Ellyn actress

    Theater stereotypes cast child actors as whiny little divas, pushed into the spotlight by crazed Mama Rose-like stage mothers. Glen Ellyn's plucky Jaclyn Dougherty — 10 years old and currently appearing in Paramount Theatre's production of "Fiddler on the Roof" — is nothing like that.

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    Constantine Maroulis stars as the scientist Dr. Jekyll in the Broadway-bound national tour of the 1997 musical “Jekyll & Hyde,” which plays the Cadillac Palace Theatre in Chicago from Tuesday, March 12, through Sunday, March 24.

    The many faces of 'Jekyll & Hyde'

    The Broadway-bound revival of "Jekyll & Hyde" is just the latest guise of this cult musical, which has a devoted fan base known as "Jekkies." "There are a lot of Jekkies who are really very, very passionate and close to the show. But we love them because they let their opinions be known and without them, there would be no 'Jekyll & Hyde,'" said star Deborah Cox.

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    Bartender Alissa Lowery pours a Spotted Fox martini at the Spotted Fox Ale House in St. Charles. The signature cocktail is made with vanilla vodka, chocolate liqueur and a splash of Baileys with a cinnamon finish.

    Spotted Fox Ale House impresses with extensive craft beer menu

    The Spotted Fox Ale House with its more than 30 craft beer offerings and full menu has taken over the space of a former Bennigan's in St. Charles. The well-trained staff are ready to help further your beer education or just recommend a draft you're sure to enjoy. So, sit back, watch the game, enjoy distinctive beers, and have a good burger or appetizers with friends.

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    Theater events: Two actors play a dozen characters in ‘Stones’
    A pair of down-on-their-luck locals get roles as extras in a big-budget movie being filmed in their small Irish town in Marie Jones’ two-hander “Stones in His Pockets” at Northlight Theatre. The Metropolis Performing Arts Centre presents a comic whodunit while Naperville's BrightSide revives a contemporary comedy of manners this week in suburban theater.

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    Many housing-related costs aren’t tax deductible

    Most homeowners know that they can deduct their annual interest charges and property-tax payments, but there's a host of other housing-related costs that don't qualify for a quick write-off.

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    Institutional investors buying up houses

    Could rental houses owned and managed by deep-pocketed hedge funds and big investors be the post-bust steppingstones to homeownership for huge numbers of renters? Could they also provide a form of safe harbor or sanctuary for thousands of families who were displaced by financial difficulties?

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    What to do after your home inspection

    Q. We are buying a house. The home inspection is scheduled for next week, but we're not sure what to do once we get the report. Is the inspection report just for our information, or can we use it to negotiate with the sellers? Can we walk away from the deal if we don't like the report?

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    Big cabinets work in every sized room, from a cavernous gallery with a high ceiling that reaches up to the heavens, or a tiny little nook that’s as cozy as a Hobbit hole.

    Large cabinets are a top-shelf design idea

    I have a color-outside-the-lines personality. Maybe that's why I really enjoy being a decorating myth-buster. Here's a misconception I want to shatter: Big cabinets don't work in small spaces.

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    Today’s larger, modern kitchens often feature a breakfast bar, a cooktop separate from ovens and furniture-quality cabinetry with lighting.

    Today’s larger kitchen has work zones, rather than a work space

    The work triangle, which determines placement of the refrigerator, stove and sink in relation to a primary work space, assumes the kitchen has one cook. It has been the traditional tool of kitchen design for decades. It worked — then.

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    Keep your garage door on the right track

    It's more common than not to have an automatic garage door opener these days. They sure make life easier. All you have to do is push a button to open and close it, and you can stay warm and dry in your car. We get so used to it that it's really inconvenient when it won't work right. Here are some tips that you can try to keep it working smoothly every time you need it:

Discuss

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    Endorsements: Sweet, Richmond, Sauceda for South Elgin village board
    The Daily Herald endorses Scott Richmond, John Sweet and Robert Sauceda for South Elgin village board.

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    Editorial: Bullwinkel for Villa Park village president
    The Daily Herald endorses Deborah Bullwinkel for Villa Park village president.

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    Endorsements: Hannigan, Harrington, Gohl for Barrington Hills trustee
    The Daily Herald endorses Colleen Konicek Hannigan, Michael Harrington and Fritz Gohl for Barrington Hills village board.

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    Endorsements: Henley, Porter, Buschick for Volo village board
    The Daily Herald endoses Bruce Buschick, Stephen Henley and Carol Porter for Volo village board.

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    Endorsement: Bender for Fox Lake mayor
    The Daily Herald endorses Ed Bender for Fox Lake mayor.

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    Endorsements: Shaw, Prigge, Dunne, Gilliam, Armstrong for Elgin City Council
    The Daily Herald endorses John Prigge, Rich Dunne, Bob Gilliam and Tom Armstrong for 4-year seats on the Elgin City Council and Toby Shaw for a 2-year seat.

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    Endorsement: Dvorak for Oak Brook Terrace in Ward 1
    The Daily Herald endoses James Dvorak in Ward 1 for Oakbrook Terrace City Council.

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    Endorsements: Moy, Young, Baar for Oak Brook village trustee
    The Daily Herald endoses Mark Moy, Steven Young and John Baar for Oak Brook village board.

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    Anu Danath

    Budget solution is hiding in the Caymans
    Guest columnist Anu Danath: Many American corporations and individuals use complicated accounting tricks to take advantage of loopholes in the tax code by moving their U.S. income to shell companies in tax havens like the Cayman Islands. They pay little or no taxes on those profits, leaving the rest of us — average citizens and small businesses — to pick up the tab.

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    Without gay marriage, system is unbalanced
    A Libertyville letter to the editor: My friend accepted her identity and, because of that, she now had inferior rights to me. I don't deserve more rights than her just because of my sexual orientation.

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    Keep commitment to public workers, too
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Most public employees and former employees realize some changes need to be made to solve the pension crisis for the benefit both the state and the pension system. Most would accept change and sacrifice as long as the burden is shared.

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    Walsh should find himself a job
    A Shcaumburg letter to the editor: Joe Walsh complains that “we’re taxed too much.” Perhaps he’s right. But somebody’s got to pay for the unemployment benefits for all those people who can’t get a job.

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    No cuts seen in Congress’ paychecks
    A letter to the editor: Enough with squeaking by on temporary spending bills and manufacturing one crisis after another culminating in the “sequester” of across-the-board budget cuts. Indifferent to the struggles of ordinary people, it should come as no surprise that while the rest of us live out the terms of their deal, congressional salaries are exempt from any reduction.

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    Drive-by shooters are really terrorists
    A Wesy Chicago letter to the editor: We elect our federal and state legislators because we believe they are more knowledgeable than we are, and indeed, most of them hold academic degrees in areas the average voter doesn't.

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    The GOP vote on gay marriage
    A Lombard letter to the editor: Jason Barickman was the lone Republican who voted for the gay marriage bill. He voted for the bill because the majority of the people he represents wanted him to vote for the bill.

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    Happy to get a hot dog, bag of popcorn
    A Naperville letter to the editor: I had to laugh when I read the letter on Feb. 23 from Pete Mallon regarding the Daily Herald's coverage of overspending by school districts on special events, particularly the expensive meal at Morton's. Mr. Mallon took exception to the coverage, noting that they didn't have to pay airfare to get to the conference.

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    Doesn’t president approve the budget?
    A Big Rock letter to the editor: Congress puts together that budget, but the president (CEO) approves it. Sure, a Congressional veto can override his vote, but how often does that happen? Wait a minute, do we even have a budget? When was the last time we did have one?

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    Daily Herald slants county board news
    A Kane County letter to the editor: Too much of what Jim Fuller is writing and his editors are allowing to be printed is slanted opinion rather than accurate news reporting.

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