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Daily Archive : Tuesday February 5, 2013

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    Residents unhappy with smart meter related arrests

    Loud and frequent calls for Naperville City Manager Doug Krieger's head on a platter and Police Chief Bob Marshall to turn in his badge and gun went largely unanswered Tuesday night. Naperville residents crowded Tuesday night's city council meeting to voice their displeasure with the recent arrests of two women who stood in the way of crews attempting to install wireless, electronic smart meters...

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    A squad car secures entry to the Cary-Grove High School campus last week during a safety drill involving student response to the sound of a gun shot in the school.

    Quinn calls for school violence drills, assault weapon ban

    Gov. Pat Quinn is calling for Illinois schools to have at least one drill a year to prepare students for how to handle a school shooting. The idea was one of several firearm-related ideas the Democrat pitched in his State of the State address as he gears up for a possibly tough battle with lawmakers over guns.

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    Aurora woman charged with doing dental work without license

    A dental hygenist is accused of doing unlicensed dental work, possibly on undocumented immigrants, during off hours at the North Aurora practice where she worked. Silvia Hernandez, 37, of the 400 block of Iowa Street in Aurora, is charged with unlawful practice of dentistry, deceptive practices and theft.

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    Firefighters prepare to remove the body of a Kaneville woman who was killed Tuesday in a two-vehicle accident involving a truck on Route 38 near Francis Road in Elburn Tuesday.

    Kaneville woman killed in crash west of Elburn

    A 78-year-old Kaneville woman was killed in a crash Tuesday morning at Francis Road and Route 38, west of Elburn.

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    The Mount Prospect Historical Society is seeking bids to begin restoration of Central School, built in 1896. The one-room school has been home over the years to almost a dozen civic, religious and charitable institutions.

    Mt. Prospect Historical Society will seek bids for Central School restoration

    The Mount Prospect Historical Society is putting together bid documents for the initial phase of the renovation of Central School, with work to commence later this year. The one-room school was built in 1896.

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    Illinois lawmakers Tuesday began the process of trying to approve gay marriage in Illinois.

    Illinois Senate gets same-sex marriage plan moving

    Democrats restarted the push to legalize same-sex marriage in Illinois Tuesday, setting the stage for a potential Valentine's Day vote in the full Senate. A Senate committee approved legalizing same-sex marriage by a 9-5 vote. Of suburban members on the panel, Republican state Sen. Matt Murphy of Palatine and Senate Republican Leader Christine Radogno of Lemont voted against the plan. Democratic...

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    Artur Pawlina

    Fourth suspect charged in home invasion near Villa Park

    Bail was set at $300,000 Tuesday for the alleged mastermind of a home invasion and robbery in which the victim was beaten early Sunday near Villa Park. Artur Pawlina, 26, is the fourth suspect charged with the attack on Dillon Lane in unincorporated DuPage County. Court records show he lives less than a mile from the victim.

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    Police: Ex-Ind. teacher secretly filmed students

    A former southern Indiana teacher facing voyeurism charges allegedly had secretly recorded video footage of 16 female students stored on his computer. Thirty-one-year-old Andrew Emmons of Boonville was arrested Friday on 16 counts of child exploitation and 10 counts of voyeurism. He's being held at the Warrick County Jail on a $14,400 bond.

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    Benedictine University in Lisle will celebrate its sixth annual Festival of Asia from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday in the Krasa Student Center.

    Festival celebrates Asian culture at Benedictine University

    Disciples of the Illinois Shaolin Kung Fu school will display the spectacular power and self-control of the martial arts discipline in a show of mind-boggling stunts at Benedictine University's sixth annual Festival of Asia from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, Feb. 8. Grand Master Yang Chen, an expert in Shaolin-style kung fu and the school's instructor, will lead his students in a demonstration of...

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    Noah Dean Baker, left, and his partner, Ken Sprouls, look over the bill Baker received for a liver transplant at their home in Bloomington.

    Liver recipient seeks fresh start

    Noah Dean Baker has a second chance at life, so he's remaking himself. Gone is the high-flying, well-dressed, heavy-drinking real estate professional who was more concerned about money, clothes and travel bonus points than helping his fellow man. "That's so far from who I am now," Baker, 47, said last week in the modest west-side home he owns with Ken Sprouls, his partner since 1997.

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    Jan. snow down in Illinois but rainfall high
    Snow was in short supply across Illinois in January, but the State Water Survey says many areas got relief after a dry 2012 with soaking rain. State Climatologist Jim Angel said Monday in a news release that statewide average precipitation was 3.9 inches last month.

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    Ind. city moves to ban roadway money collections
    A southern Indiana city has taken its first step toward banning charities from collecting money from motorists at intersections. The New Albany City Council voted 5-3 Monday to ban collections on the city's roads. The council is expected to take third and final votes on the proposal Feb. 21. Public works board member Warren Nash says 18 groups last year received permission from the board to...

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    West Chicago Elementary District 33 sixth-grade teacher Amy Wagner shows her solidarity with her union Tuesday on the second day of a teachers strike.

    Dist. 33 teachers, board still talking, still disagreeing

    Negotiating teams for the West Chicago Elementary District 33 school board and teachers union returned to the bargaining table Tuesday in hopes of ending a strike that entered its second day. But so far, it appears no deal is in sight. Hours after a negotiations session with a federal mediator began, key disagreements on salary, health insurance, class sizes and the extended school day remained...

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    Jose M. Becerra

    Bond set for third suspect in Aurora hammer slaying

    A judge set bail at $100,000 for the third man implicated in last week's murder of Abigail Villalpando, a 18-year-old West Aurora High School student. Jose M. Becerra, 20, of Oswego, is charged with concealment of a homicide; police say he helped move Villalpando's body to Montgomery after another person killed her with a hammer and burned her remains in a barrel.

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    Jim Oberweis

    Oberweis reserves conference room, in vain, to oust Brady

    Despite reserving a hotel conference room on his own dime, state Sen. Jim Oberweis of Sugar Grove says he doesn't have the votes to go ahead with a Saturday meeting meant to oust Illinois GOP party Chairman Pat Brady. “It's now too late to call a meeting for Feb. 9. I'm hoping someone else will pick up the gauntlet,” Oberweis said Tuesday.

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    Des Plaines aldermen reject water rate increase

    The Des Plaines City Council voted against a 15 percent increase in the city’s water and sewer rate to pass on a 15 percent water rate increase this year by Chicago and to cover the city’s own higher operation and maintenance costs. Several aldermen suggested the city should find a way to absorb the increased costs to keep residents’ bills down.

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    Teen candidate drops off Wheeling ballot

    Asher Horcher, the youngest person in the area on the ballot in April’s election, withdrew Tuesday as a candidate for Wheeling Village Board. Horcher, who will be 18 March 4, said she thinks it is more important to the village that her father, Pat Horcher, be elected village president, and her candidacy could hurt his.

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    Tsunami generated by 8.0 quake in South Pacific

    A powerful earthquake in the South Pacific generated a tsunami Wednesday that prompting warnings to several island nations. The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said a tsunami of 3 feet was measured in Lata wharf, in the Solomon Islands. No damage was immediately reported.

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    This image provided by Hasbro shows a poster encouraging people to vote for the thimble gamepiece. Hasbro allowed the public to vote on which token should be retired from its classic game Monopoly. Voting ended at midnight and results will be announced today — along with a new replacement token.

    Public shares in retiring a Monopoly token

    The end is near for the shoe, wheelbarrow or iron in the classic Monopoly game. Fans concluded voting Tuesday night just before midnight on which token to eliminate and which piece would replace it.

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    This undated photo released by the FBI on Tuesday shows the pipe FBI agents and negotiators used to communicate with Jimmy Lee Dykes as he held a 5-year-old boy hostage in a bunker on his Midland City, Ala., property for a week. The pipe was also used to send food, medicine and other items into the bunker. The boy was rescued and his captor was killed when federal agents raided the bunker on Monday.

    FBI: Ala. man engaged in ‘firefight’ with officers

    The Alabama man who held a 5-year-old boy captive for nearly a week engaged in a firefight with SWAT agents storming his underground bunker before he was killed during the rescue operation, the FBI said Tuesday night. Also, bomb technicians scouring his rural property found two explosive devices, one in the bunker, one in a plastic pipe that negotiators used to communicate with the man.

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    These are some of the 574 firearms seized by Chicago authorities in the first 28 days of January.

    Cook County passes ordinance aimed at illegal guns in Chicago

    In an effort to slow the flow of illegal guns to Chicago streets, county commissioners approved an ordinance Tuesday that imposes fines of as much as $2,000 on suburban residents who fail to report when their guns are lost, stolen or given to someone else.

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    Pioneering Illinois congresswoman dead at 81

    Cardiss Collins, the first black woman to represent Illinois in Congress, died of complications from pneumonia at a Virginia hospital, a family friend announced Tuesday. Mel Blackwell said Collins died Sunday after suffering a stroke and spending time in a nursing home. Collins originally was elected to fill the seat left vacant when her husband, Congressman George W. Collins, who represented...

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    An unmanned U.S. Predator drone flies over Kandahar Air Field, southern Afghanistan, on a moon-lit night.

    Congress considers putting limits on drone strikes

    Uncomfortable with the Obama administration's use of deadly drones, a growing number in Congress is looking to limit America's authority to kill suspected terrorists, even U.S. citizens. The Democratic-led outcry was emboldened by the revelation in a newly surfaced Justice Department memo that shows drones can strike against a wider range of threats, with less evidence, than previously believed.

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    Homeless men arrested in Villa Park car thefts

    Two homeless men were charged with felony car theft in separate incidents in Villa Park this week. Police caution residents never to leave a running vehicle unattended.

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    Former Schaumburg tactical police officer John Cichy appears for a reduced bail hearing in DuPage County Court on Jan. 31 in Wheaton. He is one of three Schaumburg police officers accused of operating a drug ring.

    Second ex-Schaumburg cop released on bond

    A second accused ex-Schaumburg cop was released from jail Tuesday after he put up a $25,000 bond.

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    An interior photo of the Menard Correctional Center, where two guards and a chaplain were injured Thursday by inmates.

    Inmates attack 3 staffers at Menard prison

    Two guards and a chaplain were injured Tuesday in an downstate prison attack that union officials said involved up to 15 inmates, the latest in a series of violent incidents at the lockup and others in the state.

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    Kane court security union meets with county, could strike

    After more than four years without a contract, officers that provide security for Kane County courtrooms met with county officials Tuesday. If no agreement is reached, the officers could strike as early as Wednesday.

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    Performer’s injury at Lyric Opera prompts investigation

    The Lyric Opera of Chicago says it's cooperating with a federal agency investigating the injury of a fire-blowing stilt walker during a dress rehearsal.

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    Illinois House OKs road funds, child-welfare money

    The Illinois House approved reallocating spending and taking advantage of new funding Tuesday after contentious debate in which Republicans claimed majority Democrats were creating $2 billion in new programs instead of fixing the state's wrecked budget.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    Thieves were seen on a security video stealing a 1998 McClain open top aluminum trailer valued over $50,000 from Stallman Trucking, 1001 Phoenix Lake Ave., Streamwood, around 7:30 p.m. Jan. 26. One of the offenders moved another truck to get to the trailer, reports added.

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    Ray Mullen

    New GLMV Chamber chief has roots in the business community

    Sales executive and former small business owner Ray Mullen of Mundelein has been named executive director of the Green Oaks, Libertyville, Mundelein, Vernon Hills Chamber of Commerce. Mullen, the former owner of Debbie's Floral in Mundelein succeeds Alese Campbell who left last fall for another job.

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    Daily Herald File Photo IDOT thinks it can fix what ails the Circle Interchange.

    IDOT offers plan to fix Circle Interchange

    Flyover ramps! Frontage roads! No more weaving! IDOT's picked a design that will fix the traffic jam that is the Circle Interchange. Now all they need is $420 million.

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    Elgin drug case dropped because of accused Schaumburg cop connection

    The fallout from three Schaumburg detectives accused of misconduct continues as Kane County prosecutors dropped a case against an Elgin man arrested during a cocaine sale in a July 2011.

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    Carol Stream OKs beer sales at gas stations

    Those who stop at gas station convenience stores in Carol Stream may soon be able to pick up a six-pack of beer along with their beef jerky and lotto tickets. The village board agreed this week to allow the sale of beer and wine at gas stations after hearing from three local business owners who said it would help them compete in an increasingly difficult market.

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    Lakemoor hosts meeting on Rockwell:

    Lakemoor village officials will host an informational meeting regarding the progress of the Rockwell development at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 6, at the new Lakemoor police department building, 27901 Concrete Drive just west of Route 12.

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    Mundelein looking for market vendors:

    Mundelein Community Connection is now accepting vendor applications for the 2013 Farmers Market.

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    Daily Herald File Photo Gridlock costs commuters in terms of lost time and gas.

    Paying for express lane one route to avoiding gridlock

    Gridlock is not only wasting time and gas money for Chicago commuters, it's also polluting the region as idling engines emit fumes. But there's a cure, planners say, if drivers are willing to pay a premium to use express lanes.

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    Rondout hosts conservation program:

    Rondout Elementary District 72 will host an evening with Conserve Lake County at 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 11 at Rondout School, 28593 North Bradley Road, Lake Forest.

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    District 158 education foundation awards almost $12,000

    When the Huntley Unit District 158 Education Foundation awarded $11,790 in grants last week, it moved eight teacher projects from dreams to realities. The foundation collects money throughout the year for its annual grant awards. "It's basically like a wish list," said Lori Woods, director of community relations. "Things that aren't typically provided through the district funds, but they also...

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    The DuPage Forest Preserve Commission might hire an architectural firm specializing in historic renovation to do a study of the McKee House, which is located at Churchill Woods Forest Preserve near Glen Ellyn.

    DuPage forest preserve considers McKee House study

    Before local preservationists can attempt to save a landmark structure at Churchill Woods Forest Preserve, they first must know how much money they'll need to raise. Acknowledging that dilemma, the DuPage Forest Preserve Commission might hire an architectural firm specializing in historic renovation to determine possible uses for the McKee house and calculate a price tag for restoring it.

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    Full-price wing at Gurnee Mills:

    Construction has started on a full-price wing at Gurnee Mills, mall officials announced Tuesday.

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    Charles Amrich and Debbie Herrmann are candidates in the race for Island Lake Mayor in the 2013 Election.

    Amrich: Judge will show electoral board wrongly kicked me off ballot

    The morning after an electoral board knocked Island Lake mayoral hopeful Charles Amrich off the April 9 ballot, his political allies on Tuesday predicted a Lake County judge will reinstate the candidate on appeal. Ultimately, Amrich said, the people should decide who will be Island Lake's next mayor. "That's what this is all about, giving the residents of Island Lake an opportunity to choose who...

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    Health services board OKs state’s 1st birth center

    The Illinois Health Facilities and Services Review Board has approved Illinois' first freestanding birth center. Board administrator Courtney Avery says members voted 7-0 Tuesday to approve a certificate of need for the PCC South Family Health Center in Berwyn.

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    Union members call out Quinn at rally

    Roughly 100 members of a local chapter of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees chanted inside a state government building in downtown Chicago where Quinn has an office. Some held signs reading "Gov. Quinn Keep Your Promise."

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    4 defendants plead not guilty to murders in Joliet

    Four people accused of strangling two Joliet men have all pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder charges. Investigators say officers arrived to find three of the suspects playing video games at the Joliet home where the bodies of Eric Glover and Terrence Rankins were found. Authorities say the 22-year-old men were robbed and killed during a Jan. 10 party.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    A man reported four other men had attacked him at a bar on the 100 block of South Batavia Avenue, injuring his head, face and a hand, around 1 a.m. Saturday. Police said they are still investigating.

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    Baker sentencing delayed while Deerfield man re-examined by psychiatrist

    Daniel Baker's sentencing will have to wait another six weeks while a court-appointed psychiatrist re-examines the Deerfield man to determine if he is capable of understanding his own potential prison sentence. The decision to delay Baker's sentencing until March 20 was made after Baker penned a letter to Lake County Judge Daniel Shanes in January in which he explained that his ex-girlfriend,...

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    Kristina Kovarik and Kirk Morris

    Gurnee mayoral candidates Kovarik and Morris differ on term limits

    Gurnee's mayoral candidates differ on the whether the village should have term limits for elected positions. Mayor Kristina Kovarik faces village board Trustee Kirk Morris in the April 9 election. In addition to term limits, the candidates disagree on a variety of issues including money spent on a marketing campaign meant to lure shoppers and diners to the village.

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    Buffalo Grove commissions study of police dept. needs

    As Buffalo Grove continues its search for a new police chief, it also is taking a look inside the police department to determine its future needs. On Monday, the village board voted to hire a consultant to conduct a staffing and organizational analysis of the department. The analysis will look at the deployment of resources, explore shift coverage options and identify optimal organizational...

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    Exhibition showcases works by Oakton art faculty

    The Koehnline Museum is holding a free gala reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7, for a new exhibition by two of Oakton Community College's senior faculty members who will be retiring after long careers with the art department.

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    Sandra Rogers

    Sledgehammer attack witness: Sandra Rogers hit ex-husband

    Sandra Rogers shouted obscenities as she lifted a red sledgehammer over her head and struck her ex-husband several times, an accomplice in the nearly decade-old attack testified Tuesday. Jonathan McMeekin took the witness stand in Lake County Court for the second consecutive day in Sandra Rogers' attempted murder trial to recount the grisly details of the May 19, 2003 attack on Rick Rogers, and...

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    D'Andre Howard

    Howard judge rules against against evidence of abusive childhood

    A Cook County judge ruled Tuesday that defense attorneys for D'Andre Howard — charged with the April 2009 stabbing deaths of three members of the Engelhardt family in their Hoffman Estates home — may not introduce expert testimony related to Howard's childhood diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder.

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    Northwest suburban police blotter

    A Mount Prospect woman was arrested around 7:20 p.m. Feb. 1 at Kohl's in Mount Prospect and charged with retail theft. A security agent reportedly saw her hide the jewelry under a shirt, go into a fitting room and drop the shirt on her way out. Price tags were found wrapped in the shirt. The jewelry and shirts were in her purse and the jeans under the stretch pants she was wearing, reports said.

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    Becky Towner of Elgin is the chairwoman of 175th anniversary committee of First Baptist Church in Elgin. Here she is pictured with Senior Pastor Greg Huguley, who’s been at the church for five years.

    First Baptist in Elgin marks 175th anniversary
    This year marks the 175th anniversary of First Baptist Church in Elgin, which claims the title of the second-oldest church in the city. The church, located on 8.5 acres at 1735 W. Highland Ave., plans to mark the occasion with a big picnic on July 14, the exact date of its founding 175 years ago.

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    A statue of a logger stands outside an elementary school in St. Maries, Idaho, near where a survivalist group plans to build a compound. The proposal is called the Citadel and has created a buzz among folks in this remote logging town 70 miles southeast of Spokane, Wash.

    Another survivalist development in Idaho?

    A group of survivalists wants to build a giant walled fortress in the woods of the Idaho Panhandle, a medieval-style city where residents would be required to own weapons and stand ready to defend the compound if society collapses. The proposal is called the Citadel and has created a buzz among folks in this remote logging town 70 miles southeast of Spokane, Wash.

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    COURTESY CITY OF ELGIN The city of Elgin plans to ask the Illinois Department of Transportation whether it’s feasible to reroute trucks off Liberty Street (Route 25).

    Elgin residents want trucks off Liberty St.

    Liberty Street in Elgin is expected to become a no-passing zone with bike lanes on both sides, possibly by the end of 2013, but what residents really want is for trucks to be prohibited from driving down the street, which is also Route 25, from Slade Avenue to Bluff City Boulevard.

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    Urbana trial witness killed, defendant a no show

    A witness in a trial in Champaign County has been shot to death, and authorities say the defendant didn't show up for the trial's opening. Urbana police tell The (Champaign) News-Gazette that 29-year-old Curtis Mosley was fatally shot Monday night at an Urbana apartment.

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    Barrington Unit District 220 officials are considering a proposal from a software developer to share information with parents and students about a smartphone app that would alert police and others when a child is threatened.

    Dist. 220 considers promotion of child safety smartphone app

    A software developer with a personal connection to Barrington Unit District 220 is hoping a new smartphone app he's created will help protect students in the district from the threat of stranger danger. But while district officials recognize a potential benefit from the LifeLine Response app, they're undecided whether and how to proceed as the middle man for a private firm.

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    Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel

    Chicago mayor called to jury duty, then dismissed

    Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel suffered a setback that many would be happy with: He was dismissed from jury duty. On Tuesday morning, the mayor reported for jury duty at the Richard J. Daley Center. After waiting to be called and even taking in a movie called "How to Be a Juror," Emanuel was told his services were no longer required.

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    Visitors look at sculptures of pregnant women on display in an exhibition 'Ice Age Art : arrival of the modern mind' at the British Museum in London.

    British Museum puts art from the Ice Age on show

    The art world loves hype. Works are touted as the biggest, the rarest, the most expensive. Even in an age of superlatives, the British Museum has something special — the oldest known figurative art in the world. The artworks on display in the new exhibition "Ice Age Art" are so old that many are carved from the tusks of woolly mammoths. But it's not just their age that may surprise...

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    Christian music singer/songwriter Matthew West, of Downers Grove, is nominated for two Grammy Awards.

    Downers Grove songwriter nominated for two Grammy Awards

    More than 25,000 people have sent emails and letters to Matthew West, sharing their life stories with him. The singer/songwriter from Downers Grove has sifted through nearly all of them. The stories that moved him he turned into songs. West's latest album, "Into the Light," is a nominee for Best Contemporary Christian Music Album at the Grammy Awards. "It's about more than just music at this...

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    Iron Girl women’s triathlon coming to Lake Zurich

    Iron Girl has expanded its event series to include a women's triathlon in Lake Zurich. The debut of the one-third mile swim, 14-mile bike and three-mile run triathlon will be June 16 in Paulus Park.

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    A 2011 drone strike in Yemen killed Anwar al-Awlaki, a U.S. citizens. A Justice Department document says it is legal for the government to kill U.S. citizens abroad if it believes they are senior al-Qaida leaders continually engaged in operations aimed at killing Americans.

    Memo gives basis for drone strikes vs U.S. citizens

    An unclassified Justice Department memo reveals that the Obama administration's justification for drone strikes that kill al-Qaida linked U.S. citizens abroad is based on a much broader definition of whether they pose an imminent threat than was previously known. The government does not need information that a specific attack is imminent, the document says, only that the targeted suspect is...

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    The Chicago Auto Show roars into town Saturday through Feb. 18.

    Stingray not only fish in the sea at Chicago Auto Show

    What's hot at the 2013 Chicago Auto Show? Anything that's big and powerful, say experts. Gearheads can rejoice at the resurgence of sports cars like the Corvette Stingray and those on a budget will be interested in some concept cars like Honda's new Urban SUV.

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    Schaumburg Twp. Dems’ appeal set for Feb. 14

    Four Democratic candidates for Schaumburg Township offices have consolidated the appeals of their removal from the April 9 ballot into one case. They will appear together before a single Cook County circuit court judge at 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 14 at the Daley Center in Chicago.

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    A sign posted on a tree in front of the Midland City Town Hall on Monday, Feb. 4, 2013 asks for prayers and a safe rescue for a boy named Ethan who was taken hostage last week. Authorities stormed an underground bunker Monday in Alabama, freeing the 5-year-old boy who had been held hostage in the tiny underground shelter and leaving the boy’s abductor dead.

    Small Ala. town: Relief that child hostage is safe

    A five-year-old boy was back with his ecstatic family and playing with his toy dinosaur after his nearly weeklong ordeal as a hostage in an underground bunker was ended by a sudden police raid and the death of his kidnapper. "If I could, I would do cartwheels all the way down the road," the boy's great-aunt, Debra Cook, told ABC's Good Morning America on Tuesday. "We'd all been walking around in...

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    UK: Surveillance devices to monitor Web traffic

    The U.K. plans to install an unspecified number of spy devices along the country's telecommunications network to monitor Britons' use of overseas services such as Facebook and Twitter, according to a report published Tuesday by Parliament's Intelligence and Security Committee. The devices — referred to as "probes" in the report — are meant to underpin a nationwide surveillance regime...

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    Obama seeks to avoid sequester with short-term fix

    President Barack Obama will ask Congress to come up with tens of billions of dollars in short-term spending cuts and tax revenue to put off the automatic across the board cuts that are scheduled to kick in March 1. Obama will make his request afternoon in a public statement at the White House.

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    Investigators have linked Hezbollah to the bombing of a bus that killed five Israelis and their Bulgarian driver in Bulgaria last year, investigators said Tuesday,

    Bulgaria links Hezbollah to bombing of Israelis

    Hezbollah bombed a bus filled with Israeli tourists in Bulgaria last year, investigators said Tuesday, describing a sophisticated bombing carried out by a terrorist cell that included Canadian and Australian citizens. Bulgarian Interior Minister Tsvetan Tsvetanov, in the first major announcement in the investigation into the July 18 bombing that killed five Israelis and their Bulgarian driver,...

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    Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio

    Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s credit-card info stolen, used at Chicago store

    PHOENIX — It looks like Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio has become a victim of credit card fraud.Sheriff’s officials said Monday that Arpaio’s credit card information was stolen and used to make a $291 transaction at a Chicago grocery store last weekend.Arpaio says he hasn’t been to Chicago since 1957 and that Discover Card representatives alerted him to possible fraudulent activity.

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    Terrorists with Western connections growing threat

    They are called "homegrown terrorists," citizens of Western countries highly prized by Islamist militant groups because they can move across borders and carry out attacks easier than people from Middle East and South Asian countries closely identified with terrorism. Two such people — one Canadian and one Australian — are believed to have been involved in the July bus bombing in...

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    Issa Alzouma, 39, poses in front of his home in Gao, Northern Mali, Thursday Jan. 31, 2013. Alzouma’s arm was amputated by Islamist radicals on Dec. 21, 2012, after being charged by the Islamic tribunal of spying. The northern Malian town of Gao has been celebrating the departure of the Islamic radicals, but the French military intervention came too late for Alzouma and the other men who lost their hands and probably their livelihoods, too, when the militants carried out amputations as punishments for theft and other alleged crimes under Shariah, or strict Islamic law.

    For Mali amputee, Islamic extremist legacy lingers

    The northern Malian town of Gao has been celebrating the departure of the Islamic radicals after nearly 10 months in power. But the French military intervention that caused the armed jihadists to flee came too late for men who lost their hands and probably their livelihoods, too, when the militants carried out amputations as punishments for theft and other alleged crimes under Shariah, or strict...

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    A staffer for Rep. John Garamendi, D-Calif., who is identified as Hispanic on the White House Press gallery list, told The Associated Press Garamendi doesn’t consider himself Hispanic. But the conflicting numbers of Hispanic members of congress illustrate just how elastic Hispanic identity can be, and how it might be pulled for political purposes as parties seek to appeal to the growing Hispanic electorate.

    How many Hispanic members are there in Congress?

    How many Hispanic members are there in Congress? Turns out narrowing it down to one number is not easy. There is no dispute about the Senate, which has three Hispanic senators. The House, however, is another matter.

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    Top House Republican: Party must explain itself

    House Majority Leader Eric Cantor is joining the growing list of Republicans who say the party needs to broaden its political appeal.

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    Courtroom sketch of Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, who is accused of orchestrating the deadly attack on the USS Cole.

    Guantanamo judge allows testimony about torture

    Lawyers for the Guantanamo Bay prisoner accused of orchestrating the deadly attack on the USS Cole will present expert testimony Tuesday at a pretrial hearing on how to conduct a mental examination of a torture victim.

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    Former Nebraska Sen. Chuck Hagel testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the Senate Armed Services Committee’s confirmation hearing. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. is raising the possibility of a filibuster of Hagel to be defense secretary.

    McCain cool to suggestion of Hagel filibuster

    Republican Sen. John McCain, a sharp critic of Chuck Hagel's nomination as defense secretary, said Monday he will not support a filibuster of President Barack Obama's pick, even though he declined to say whether he intends to vote for confirmation. "I do not believe a filibuster is appropriate and I would oppose such a move," McCain told reporters Monday, two days after Senate Republican leader...

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    Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham says Chuck Hagel “seems clueless” on U.S. policy toward Iran and he’s urging the Obama administration to reconsider its defense secretary nominee.

    GOP senator says Hagel ‘seems clueless’ on Iran

    Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham says Chuck Hagel "seems clueless" on U.S. policy toward Iran and he's urging the Obama administration to reconsider its defense secretary nominee. In a statement Tuesday, the South Carolina lawmaker stopped short of saying he would filibuster the choice if the president pushes forward as expected.

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    The FBI posted new data for gun background checks covering through January 2013 that says gun checks dropped more than 10 percent nationwide, from roughly 2.8 million in December 2012 to 2.5 million in January 2013.

    Gun background checks drop by 10 percent in January

    The number of federal background checks for firearm sales declined last month following a surge in gun sales toward the end of the year that's left many retailers out of stock as Washington considered new gun control measures.

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    Associated Press Iran’s President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, right, looks on as and Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, second right, shakes hands with the Iranian delegation at the airport in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013. Ahmadinejad arrived in Cairo on Tuesday for the first visit by an Iranian leader in more than three decades, marking a historic departure from years of frigid ties between the two regional heavyweights.

    Iran’s Ahmadinejad on historic visit to Cairo

    President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad discussed the crisis in Syria with his Egyptian counterpart Tuesday in the first visit by an Iranian leader to Cairo in more than three decades, marking a historic departure from years of frigid ties between the regional heavyweights.

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    A firefighter adjusts a tarp to cover a victim inside after a tow truck lifted a tour bus back onto the road Monday, Feb. 4, 2013, after it collided with two other vehicles and crashed Sunday, killing at least eight people and injuring 38, on Highway 38 just north of Yucaipa, Calif. The bus was carrying a tour group from Tijuana, Mexico.

    Grisly scene after Calif. tour bus crash killed 7

    Gerardo Barrientos and his girlfriend Lluvia Ramirez wanted a week away from the suffering they see every day at a government hospital in Tijuana, Mexico. Looking for a break, they paid $40 apiece for a day trip to the snowy mountains of Southern California. But when the tour bus they were riding in careened out of control and collided with a car and truck, they found themselves in a scene more...

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    Illinois lawmakers back visas for Polish citizens

    Three members of Illinois' congressional delegation have reintroduced legislation that would waive visas for visitors to the U.S. from countries like Poland. U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk and congressmen Mike Quigley and Aaron Schock reintroduced the Visa Waiver Program Enhanced Security and Reform Act on Monday. The program allows foreign citizens of participating countries to travel without a visa in the...

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    Ill. State Police Academy welcomes cadet class
    The Illinois State Police is welcoming its new cadet class. Fifty-five cadets arrived to the academy in Springfield on Sunday. They will undergo 25 weeks of physical training and classroom instruction. Training Academy Commander Kevin Poehls says the cadets will be physically, emotionally and intellectually challenged and made to understand the basic principles of law enforcement.

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    Aging population blamed for Wisconsin job woes

    A new report blames Wisconsin's aging population and lack of business start-ups for job growth that has lagged behind other states since the mid-1990s. The Wisconsin Taxpayers Alliance report shows Wisconsin consistently beat national job growth rates in the late 1980s and early 1990s. But since 1996, the state has outperformed the nation in creating jobs just 27 percent of the time.

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    Dawn Patrol: West Chicago strike Day 2; Island Lake ex-mayor out

    West Chicago strike continues; West Dundee approves video gambling; Island Lake panel tosses Charles Amrich out of election; ex-Schaumburg cop posts bail; three arrested in Villa Park home invasion; Mundelein man revisits his role in attack; bail set in Aurora murder; Bulls lose to Pacers.

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    A simple idea to raise awareness about the abuse of females across the globe has blossomed into a cooperative effort from these officials across Lake County, culminating in a fun and informative Valentine’s Day event in Round Lake Beach.

    Suburbs rise, join billion dancing women to change world

    On the most romantic day of the year, groups around the suburbs will rise up, speak out and dance as part of a worldwide effort to end violence against women. Says 71-year-old Mary Shesgreen, one of the organizers and a longtime member of Fox Valley Citizens for Peace and Justice: "Dancing feels wonderful. It feels liberating. It feels empowering. It's aesthetically expressive. Dance is a very...

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    Lake County Forest Preserve District officials are planning to build new trails and other amenities at the Buffalo Creek preserve near Buffalo Grove. Mike Fenelon talks about the plans last April.

    Projects would boost Lake County forest preserve access

    Lake County Forest Preserve District officials are considering a staff recommendation to add or replace about $3 million in various projects to the capital plan. Proposals include public access to two preserves, as well as trails or trail connections in other locations. "We look at most of these as projects of opportunity," Mike Fenelon, the district's director of planning, conservation and...

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    A new dine-in restaurant/theater similar to this Star Cinema Grill location in Texas will be opening in Arlington Heights later this year.

    Arlington Heights approves new dine-in movie theater

    Star Cinema Grill, a new dine-in movie theater and restaurant, is officially coming to Arlington Heights this spring after receiving approval from the village board. "So many of our residents are excited about getting the theater back and having it open as soon as possible," said Village President Arlene Mulder. The new movie house is set to open mid- to late May.

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    Northwest Fourth Fest fireworks still up in the air

    Despite a second discussion Monday, the Hoffman Estates village board couldn't decide which company to hire for this year's Northwest Fourth Fest fireworks show. The board was asked to award a $39,000 contract to Melrose Pyrotechnics Inc. for a 30-minute fireworks show at the festival. But too many unanswered questions resulted in the matter being sent back to a committee.

Sports

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    Coach David Yates leads Fremd into a fourth Mid-Suburban League championship game under his guidance Wednesday.

    Girls basketball: Scouting the MSL title game

    Here's a look at Wednesday's 40th annual Mid-Suburban League girls basketball championship game between state-ranked Rolling Meadows and visiting Fremd. The game will be played at Rolling Meadows High School.

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    Paul George gets a reverse dunk over Taj Gibson during the Indiana’s victory Monday. The Pacers’ big flaw was lack of a legitimate scorer, but that problem has been erased with the emergence of George.

    How the Bulls are faring against playoff contenders

    The scouting report is complete. Since Jan. 4, the Bulls have played all seven Eastern Conference playoff contenders on the road. They went 5-2, losing to Brooklyn and Indiana on Monday. So which team creates the most concern?

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    Tuesday’s girls gymnastics scoreboard
    Here are the varsity girls gymnastics results from Tuesday's events, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Tuesday’s girls basketball scoreboard
    Here are the results from Tuesday's varsity girls basketball results as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Tuesday’s boys basketball scoreboard
    Here are the results from Tuesay's varsity boys basketball results as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Kelly Urban of Lisle takes one to the net while Anjella Farmer attempts to block during the Lisle at IC Catholic Prep girls basketball Class 2A regional semifinal game Tuesday.

    Fernette clutch in Lisle’s OT victory

    Kristina Fernette’s thoughts were filled with past free-throw failures. When it mattered most, she came through. Fernette knocked in a pair of go-ahead free throws in overtime, and Lisle hung on to beat IC Catholic Prep 40-36 in Tuesday’s Class 2A regional semifinal in Elmhurst.

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    Wheaton Academy wins fourth straight league championship

    The Wheaton Academy boys basketball team has become old hat at this. The Warriors clinched their fourth straight title in the Suburban Christian Conference on Tuesday with a 55-42 victory over Walther Lutheran in Melrose Park.

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    Rachel Dugan of St. Charles co-op performs on the uneven parallel bars during gymnastics sectional at Glenbard West on Tuesday in Glen Ellyn.

    St. Charles co-op edges Glenbard West, Geneva

    Glenbard West, Geneva and St. Charles co-op had so many great performances last week in regional competition that it made Tuesday’s Glenbard West sectional a must-see event for girls gymnastics fans. The Vikings have never advanced to state in their young 13-year history. Meanwhile, St. Charles co-op had earned just a single trip in the past 12 years. The Hilltoppers and Vikings still might celebrate, but they won’t know if they have a reason to until around 9:30 p.m. Thursday. As for St. Charles, it started to party when it was awarded a sectional plaque after a thrilling victory.

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    Hard-working Hersey wins again
    Mary Fendley has been in the business as Hersey girl’s basketball coach for 15 seasons. Never has she had a team work harder than this one. The Huskies fittingly put that work ethic on display in their final home game on Tuesday night at the Carter Gymnasium in Arlington Heights. With junior Morgan Harris (18 points), senior Casey Weyhrich (12) and junior Renee Poulos (12) all reaching double figures, the Huskies won for the fifth time in their last six game by defeating Barrington 56-45.

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    Molini’s fine farewell lifts Prospect

    Playing her final game in the Jean Walker Field House, Michele Molini went out in style. The 5-foot-6 senior sharpshooter made four 3-point baskets in the final 16 minutes to help Prospect’s girls basketball team put away a 58-44 victory over Schaumburg in the Mid-Suburban League crossover. “I’m going to miss playing here,” said Molini (15 points), who joined sophomore teammates Taylor Will (18 points) and Catherine Sherwood (career-17 points) in double figures.

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    Schaumburg overcomes obstacles, Glenbard North

    There was a lot working against Schaumburg on Tuesday night. The host Saxons were facing an athletic Glenbard North squad that likes to trap and use their speed to force turnovers. And to further complicate matters, the Saxons were playing without three-year starter Kyle Bolger, who was sitting out with an undisclosed injury. But through it all, Schaumburg maintained its composure, overcame an outstanding individual performance from the Panthers’ Chip Flanigan and converted at the free throw line in the final minute to pull out a 61-55 nonconference victory.

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    College of DuPage moving on in numbers

    The NCAA begins its football signing period Wednesday, and more than two dozen College of DuPage players will be signing.

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    Niners QB Colin Kaepernick got a little testy Tuesday when reporters questioned him about his fourth-down audible at the end of Super Bowl XLVII.

    Kaepernick: Loss will stick with him forever

    Still steaming over the Super Bowl loss, Colin Kaepernick packed up his belongings in the 49ers locker room and made plans with teammates to work out this off-season. They won’t have to wait long.

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    Glenbard West wins despite off day

    The sign of a good team is winning when you don’t play your best.Glenbard West’s boys basketball team hopes that was the case Tuesday night.Wheaton Warrenville South dictated the pace, but visiting Glenbard West still managed to emerge from the nonconference matchup with a 53-49 victory on Tuesday.

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    Cary-Grove, Crystal Lake S. post wins

    Cary-Grove 55, Dundee-Crown 27: Olivia Jakubicek had 19 points and 8 rebounds and Joslyn Nicholson added 12 points as Cary-Grove (20-6, 11-1) wrapped up the undisputed Fox Valley Conference Valley Division title with its 11th win in a row. The Valley title is the Trojans’ fourth straight and third in a row undisputed. The 20th win also marks C-G’s sixth straight season with 20 wins or more. The Trojans will host Grayslake North Friday at 7 p.m. in the unofficial FVC championship game. Lauren Lococo and Jess Laboy had 8 points each to lead Dundee-Crown (2-23, 0-12).CL South 54, Jacobs 44: Kianna Clark had 11 points and Rachel Rasmussen added 9 to lead the Gators (21-6, 9-3) in the FVC Valley. Payton Berg scored 20 points to lead Jacobs (2-22, 2-10).

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    Burlington Central routs Harvard

    Burlington Central 74, Harvard 27: The Rockets kept their grip on first place in the Big Northern East with an easy win on the road. Bryce Warner had 15 points to lead BC (8-13, 7-1), Sean Fitzgerald had 12, Moter Deng scored 9 and Reed Hunnicutt added 8.Harvest Christian 80, St. Martin de Porres 44: Stuart Wolff had 25 points and 7 rebounds and Dan Turpin added 16 points and 9 boards as the Lions (14-8) won easily in nonconference action. Noah Fox added 14 points for Harvest.

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    West Chicago’s Mike Zajac is fouled by Kaneland’s Matt Limbrunner as he makes a shot for the basket in the third quarter on Tuesday, February 5.

    West Chicago snaps Kaneland’s 7-game streak

    Kaneland might have entered its nonconference game with West Chicago Tuesday with a 7-game winning streak and on the verge of being conference champions — and the Wildcats with a 4-16 record — but those numbers meant nothing to Bill Recchia.

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    Guard play lifts St. Charles East

    St. Charles East put an exclamation point on the long-held dictum in basketball the most important stretch of the game is often the end of the second quarter and the beginning of the second half. The Saints’ girls team hit Oswego with a 13-point unanswered run to close out the first half and ultimately stretched its dominant run to 32-9 during the course of the third quarter in cruising to a 64-46 victory over the Panthers Tuesday night in Oswego.

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    Elgin presses past DeKalb

    A proactive approach helped Elgin’s boys basketball team offset its size disadvantage and pound visiting DeKalb 78-40 Tuesday in nonconference action at Chesbrough Field House. The Maroons countered DeKalb’s 6-foot-7 Andre Harris, 6-6 Jake Smith and 6-5 Justin Love by implementing full-court pressure for the first time this season, resulting in 26 turnovers by the Barbs, 10 in the second quarter alone.

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    Lake County roundup

    Stevenson’s girls basketball team ended its regular season by defeating Antioch 49-45 at home in a North Suburban Conference crossover Tuesday night, improving its record to 18-8.

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    Grayslake North’s Joanna Guhl, center, drives past Grayslake Central’s Lauren Spaulding, left, and Morgan Dahlstrom on Tuesday night at Grayslake Central.

    Grayslake North puts em-phasis on winning

    Emily Stinner and Emily Dugan hit some big long-range buckets to lead the way for visiting Grayslake North in its historic 61-45 win over usually-stingy Grayslake Central on Tuesday night. Grayslake North’s 10th win in a row ran its record to 25-2 and capped a 12-0 run in the Fox Valley Conference Fox Division. It’s the first time the Knights have won the division. They visit Cary-Grove on Friday (7 p.m.) in what amounts to the unofficial FVC championship game.

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    Tim Hardaway Jr. brought Michigan back with a relentless streak of 3-point shooting, then blocked a shot by Aaron Craft in the final seconds of overtime to give the third-ranked Wolverines a 76-74 victory over No. 10 Ohio State on Tuesday night.

    No. 3 Michigan beats No. 10 Ohio State 76-74 in OT

    Tim Hardaway Jr. brought Michigan back with a relentless streak of 3-point shooting, then blocked a shot by Aaron Craft in the final seconds of overtime to give the third-ranked Wolverines a 76-74 victory over No. 10 Ohio State on Tuesday night.

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    Westminster Christian to play for regional title

    The quest for Redbird Arena has officially begun for the Westminster Christian girls basketball team and after a fast-paced, 60-21 regional semifinal win over No. 4 seed Harvest Christian to begin postseason play Tuesday night, it looks as if the Warriors want to be the quickest of any team in Class 1A to make it downstate. Claire Speweik, who had a game-high 15 points to go with 4 steals, scored 8 first-quarter points that helped spark a frantic pace for the Warriors (23-4), who outscored the Lions (7-20) 23-3 and forced 13 turnovers. in the first 8 minutes.

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    No slowing Stevenson as Pats win 8th straight

    Visiting Waukegan was missing its starting point guard, Jordan Johnson, who was on crutches at game time in Lincolnshire. But would it really have mattered that much? Clearly Johnson would have trouble covering the likes of the likes of Connor Cashaw, Jalen Brunson, Andy Stempel and Matt Morrissey. All four of those Patriots players scored in double figures on Tuesday night. Stevenson (18-4) made it eight wins in a row with an impressive 66-49 win over an athletic bunch from Waukegan.

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    Burlington Central’s Alison Colby (42) gets past St. Charles North’s Nicole Davidson Tuesday in Burlington.

    Burlington Central ties school record for wins

    A very strong statement was sent booming off Rocket Hill Tuesday night, even if regular public address announcer Mark Einwich had to miss the game. The Burlington Central girls basketball team is ready for the postseason. The Rockets looked smooth in most every aspect of the game, they played with a full and healthy roster for the first time in the past couple of weeks and they ran past St. Charles North 53-32 in a nonconference win that tied the program record for wins in a season. The victory was BC’s eighth straight.

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    Images from the West Chicago vs. Kaneland boys basketball game, Tuesday February 5, 2013.

    Images: West Chicago vs. Kaneland, boys basketball
    West Chicago traveled to Kaneland and won 54-43 over the Knights Tuesday night in Maple Park.

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    Leyden’s Jonny Woolf, left, takes a shot against the Maine West defense including Allante Bates.

    Leyden turns over an OT winner

    Leyden has prided itself on forcing turnovers this season. Heading into Tuesday night's game against Maine West, Leyden had done plenty of it, as its opponents had committed over 22 turnovers per game. Leyden had forced just 12 turnovers until the final 30 seconds of this game, but came up with two big ones down the stretch to force overtime against Maine West. Leyden then got another key turnover in overtime as the Eagles bounced Maine West 49-42 in Franklin Park.

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    Images from the Leyden vs Maine West boys basketball game on Tuesday, February 5th, in Franklin Park.

    Images: Leyden vs. Maine West, boys basketball
    The Leyden High School boys basketball team hosted the Maine West High School boys Tuesday, Feburary 5th, in Franklin Park .

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    Grayslake Central’s Taylor Peterson, left, ddefends against Grayslake North’s Joanna Guhl.

    Images: Grayslake North vs. Grayslake Central, girls basketball
    The Grayslake Central Rams hosted and lost 61-45 to the Grayslake North Knights for girls basketball action on Tuesday, Feb. 5 in Grayslake.

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    Immaculate Conception Catholic High School hosted Lisle Tuesday night for girls basketball in Class 2A regional semifinal action.

    Images: Lisle vs. Immaculate Conception, girls basketball
    Immaculate Conception High School in Elmhurst hosted Lisle High School Tuesday night for girls basketball.

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    Valparaiso cruises past Illinois-Chicago 86-61

    Ryan Broekhoff scored 22 points, including six 3-pointers, to lead Valparaiso to an 86-61 victory over conference foe Illinois-Chicago on Tuesday night.Broekhoff was 8 of 13 from the floor and 6 of 9 from beyond the arc.

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    Burlington Central’s Rebecca Gerke shoots under the defense of St. Charles North’s Nicole Davidson.

    Images: St. Charles North vs. Burlington Central, girls basketball
    The North Stars of St. Charles North traveled to Burlington to take on the Rockets in a girls basketball matchup Tuesday night. Burlington won 53-32.

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    DePaul forward Cleveland Melvin (12) is fouled from behind by Villanova's Daniel Ochefu as James Bell (32) defends during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013, in Rosemont, Ill. Villanova won 94-71. (AP Photo/Charlie Arbogast)

    Arcidiacono helps Villanova knock off DePaul 94-71<

    Ryan Arcidiacono scored 23 points and Villanova put together an impressive shooting display to pull away for a 94-71 victory at DePaul on Tuesday night. Darrun Hilliard had 17 points and James Bell finished with 16 for the Wildcats (14-9, 5-5 Big East), who bounced back from a pair of disappointing losses to Notre Dame and Providence. Villanova made 22 of 32 shots in the second half and shot 60 percent from the field for the game.

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    Simeon Lucas

    ISU thinks Grant’s Lucas is just wonderful

    Grant High School catcher Simeon Lucas caught the eye of the collegiate scouts during last spring's state tournament, and that led to his recent commitment to a baseball future at Illinois State.

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    Photo courtesy Scott Jamieson David Kellner's been a bright spot in what's turned out to be a challenging season for St. Viator following last year's run to the state championship game.

    Kellner, St. Viator regrouping on the run

    When David Kellner and his St. Viator teammates skated off the United Center ice last March, they were devastated, 5-0 losers in the state championship game against St. Rita. That was only the start of a most challenging run for a proud, prestigious program.

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    The Phillies’ Ryne Sandberg listens to the national anthem before a game against the Marlins on Sept. 11, 2012, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

    Sandberg puts Cubs in past, at home with Phils

    His time with the Cubs just a memory, and now a third base coach for the Phillies, Ryne Sandberg is back in the big leagues for the first time since 1997 when he retired as a player.

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    St. Louis Cardinals starter Chris Carpenter, shown here pitching against the Cubs on Sept. 21, 2012, is not expected to pitch next season due to a nerve injury, according to Cardinals GM John Mozeliak, and his pro career is likely over at age 37.

    Cardinals pitcher Carpenter's career may be over

    Chris Carpenter, one of the best clutch pitchers in the storied history of the St. Louis Cardinals, may have thrown his final pitch. General manager John Mozeliak and manager Mike Matheny announced Tuesday that Carpenter almost certainly won't pitch in 2013 and that his star-crossed career is probably over after a recurrence of a nerve injury that cost him most of last season. Carpenter did not attend, and Mozeliak said the emotions for the 37-year-old are still too raw.

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    United States’ Lindsey Vonn is airlifted after crashing during the women's super-G course, at the Alpine skiing world championships in Schladming, Austria, Tuesday. Vonn will miss the rest of the ski season after tearing knee ligaments and breaking a bone in her leg.

    Her knee shredded, Lindsey Vonn done for season

    Lindsey Vonn will miss the rest of the ski season after tearing knee ligaments and breaking a bone in her leg in a high-speed crash Tuesday at the world championships. The U.S. team expects her to return for the next World Cup season and the 2014 Sochi Olympics.

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    MLB asks Florida paper for records in drug probe

    Major League Baseball officials have asked the Miami New Times for records the alternative newspaper obtained for a story on alleged use of banned substances by several players.

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    The Wolves celebrate a first period goal Tuesday against the Peoria Rivermen at Allstate Arena. The Wolves pulled out a 4-3 OT win.

    Wolves school Peoria with OT thriller

    The Chicago Wolves hosted school groups Tuesday in a monring game against the Peoria Rivermen. Wolves winter Darren Haydar provided a nice math lesson with 3 goals, and Elburn's Bill Sweatt scored the game-winner in overtime to give the Wolves a 4-3 victory.

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    Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis, right, and safety Ed Redd dance during a championship celebration at the team's stadium in Baltimore, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013. The Ravens defeated the San Francisco 49ers in NFL football's Super Bowl XLVII 34-31 on Sunday. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)

    Fans march with Ravens’ parade to packed stadium

    Baltimore celebrated with its Super Bowl champion Ravens on Tuesday, with thousands of fans in purple lining the streets and packing the team's stadium for a celebration. Retiring middle linebacker Ray Lewis, the only current player to have started with the team when it came to the city from Cleveland in 1996, told fans the team had fulfilled a promise to go to New Orleans and win. “The city of Baltimore — I love you for ever and ever and ever and ever,” Lewis told fans in front of City Hall.

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    Red Stars add 3 players to NWSL roster

    The Chicago Red Stars have added three more free agents for the upcoming NWSL season. Former Olympic team captain Lori Chalupny, Taryn Hemmings, and Ella Masar will join the women's pro soccer club, which signed Olympic veteran Leslie Osborne last week.

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    Northwestern hosted Illinois on Nov. 20, 2010 for a Big Ten football game at Wrigley Field. The Wildcats have a deal with the Cubs to play five more games at the historic ballpark, as well as baseball and lacrosse contests.

    Deal with Cubs brings more NU football to Wrigley

    The Cubs have a five-year plan to renovate historic Wrigley Field, and now Northwestern University has a plan to play five more college football games there and a longterm agreement to showcase the school's other sports teams there. Officials from Northwestern Athletics and the Cubs announced Tuesday they have joined forces for a marketing partnership that will include showcasing Wildcat teams at Wrigley Field in coming years, including baseball, lacrosse and football.

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    Waukegan’s Springs leaves NIU basketball

    Freshman guard Akeem Springs of Waukegan Township High School has left the Northern Illinois men's basketball program, head coach Mark Montgomery announced Tuesday.

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    NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell hands the MVP trophy to Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco at a news conference Monday after Super Bowl XLVII in New Orleans. The Ravens defeated the San Francisco 49ers 34-31.

    Goodell: New Orleans ‘terrific,’ despite blackout

    NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell says New Orleans was a "terrific" Super Bowl host and that the Superdome power outage that delayed the game for 34 minutes will have no effect on the city's future bids to host the league's championship. Goodell says, "The most important thing is to make sure people understand it was a fantastic week," and that it "will be remembered as one of the great Super Bowl weeks."

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    Seven-figure payoff draws fans to Florida track

    Big jackpots in the Pick Six stir more excitement than almost anything else in American horse racing. The atmosphere at tracks is electric and fans are obsessed when they have a chance to shoot for a six- or seven-digit payoff.But there has rarely been sustained drama quite like the current mania at Gulfstream Park, where the Rainbow Six — a devilish mutant of the conventional Pick Six — has thwarted bettors for more than a month. When racing resumes on Wednesday, the jackpot will be $1,399,086. Andrew Beyer explains why he considers the Rainbow Six a "sucker's bet."

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    In his second season at Northern Illinois University, men's basketball Mark Montgomery has one of the youngest teams in the nation. The Huskies, who finished 5-26 a year ago, are 5-15 heading into Wednesday's game against visiting Bowling Green.

    The silver lining from NIU’s 4-point playbook

    When he left the security of Tom Izzo's Michigan State program after being a part of three Final Four teams, Mark Montgomery knew there would be tough days as he rebuilt the NIU men's basketball program. But not days like this when they scored only four points in a half and 25 for an entire game. John Feinstein talks with Montgomery about his team's struggles in his second year, and how they were able to come together and rebound after one of the worst shooting performances in NCAA history last month.

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    Comedian and sports talk host Jay Mohr, left, did his Fox Sports radio show from the Score LV studios as the Luxor Hotel last weekend in Las Vegas, as did Mike North.

    A classy move and great job by Jim Harbaugh

    Mike North knows a thing or two about big brothers, and the class act by Baltimore Ravens head coach John Harbaugh proved he's a great coach and an even better big brother. And you won't believe which basketball legend turns 50 later this month.

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    Westminster Christian’s Courtney Gnan passes the ball to teammate McKaila Hays Tuesday in Elgin against Ottawa Marquette Academy.

    Images: Daily Herald prep photos of the week
    The Prep Photos of the Week gallery includes the best high school sports pictures by Daily Herald photographers. This week's gallery features photos from basketball, wrestling and gymnastics.

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    St. Edward’s Abby Madden on the balance beam during sectional action Monday at Fremd.

    Prairie Ridge, Madden all-around successes

    Prairie Ridge co-op had three gymnasts finish in the top five for all-around as the Wolves cruised to their second consecutive sectional title with an impressive 149.525 at Fremd High School in Palatine on Monday. Prairie Ridge became the first of four sectional winners automatically qualifying for the girls gymnastic state meet on Feb. 15 and 16 at Palatine High School.

Business

  •  

    Madigan commends federal government suing S&P

    Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan says the federal lawsuit against Standard & Poor's echoes a lawsuit she's already filed.

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    Congressional Budget Office Director Douglas Elmendorf, speaking Tuesday in Washington, said the federal budget deficit will drop below $1 trillion for the first time in President Barack Obama’s tenure in office.

    CBO: Budget deficit estimated at $845 billion

    The federal budget deficit will drop below $1 trillion for the first time in President Barack Obama’s tenure in office, a new report said Tuesday. The Congressional Budget Office analysis said the government will run a $845 billion deficit this year, a modest improvement compared to last year’s $1.1 trillion shortfall but still enough red ink to require the government to borrow 24 cents of every dollar it spends.

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    In this publicity photo released by Lucasfilm Ltd., actor Jake Lloyd portrays Anakin Skywalker, a young Darth Vader, in “Star Wars: Episode I, The Phantom Menace.”

    Disney working on stand-alone ‘Star Wars’ films

    Disney is mining The Force for even more new films. Walt Disney Co. CEO Bob Iger said Tuesday that screenwriters Larry Kasdan and Simon Kinberg are working on stand-alone "Star Wars" movies that aren't part of the new trilogy that's in the works.

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    Attorney General Eric Holder speaks at the Justice Department in Washington Tuesday. The U.S. government accused Standard & Poor’s of inflating ratings on mortgage investments to boost its bottom line, taking aim at a key player in the run-up to the financial crisis.

    U.S. sues S&P over pre-crisis mortgage ratings

    The U.S. government says Standard & Poor's knowingly inflated its ratings on risky mortgage investments that helped trigger the 2008 financial crisis. The credit rating agency gave high marks to mortgage-backed securities because it wanted to earn more business from the banks that issued the investments, the Justice Department alleges in civil charges filed in federal court.

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    Dell’s $24.4 billion leveraged buyout probably will draw criticism from some shareholders over a potential conflict of interest for founder and chief executive officer Michael S. Dell.

    Dell to go private in $24.4 billion deal led by founder
    Slumping personal computer maker Dell is bowing out of the stock market in a $24.4 billion buyout that represents the largest deal of its kind since the Great Recession dried up the financing for such risky maneuvers.The complex agreement announced Tuesday will allow Dell Inc.'s management, including founder Michael Dell, to attempt a company turnaround away from the glare and financial pressures of Wall Street.

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    Stocks advanced, rebounding from the biggest loss of the year for benchmark indexes, as earnings topped forecasts and Dell Inc. agreed to be taken private in the largest leveraged buyout since the financial crisis.

    Stocks rebound on home prices, earnings; Dow up 99

    The Dow Jones industrial average ended the day 99.22 points higher at 13,979.30, erasing a large part of its loss from Monday. The index traded above 14,000 during the day before falling back in the last hour. The Standard & Poor's 500 gained 15.59 points to 1,511.29. The Nasdaq composite was up 40.41 points to 3,171.58.

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    House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Bob Goodlatte, a Virginia Republican, gives his opening remarks on Capitol Hill in Washington Tuesday, prior to the committee’s hearing on immigration.

    Business, unions negotiating guest worker program

    Business leaders and labor union officials are delving into high-stakes negotiations over a particularly contentious element of immigration reform — a guest worker program to ensure future immigrants come here legally. The issue has traditionally divided labor and business. Labor groups have looked askance on bringing in numerous low-wage workers, while that's an outcome businesses have favored.

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    A new report says about 61 percent of Facebook users have taken a break from the site for at least a few weeks for reasons that range from being busy to getting bombarded with “too much drama.”

    Pew: Majority of Facebook users have taken break

    A new report says about 61 percent of Facebook users have taken a break from the site for at least a few weeks for reasons that range from being busy to getting bombarded with "too much drama." A Pew survey released Tuesday says that of American adults who use the Internet, 67 percent are on Facebook, making it the dominant online social network in the country.

  •  

    Energy Department funding phase 2 of FutureGen
    The U.S. Energy Department has announced it is going ahead with phase two of central Illinois' FutureGen clean-coal project. In announcing the agreement with FutureGen Industrial Alliance on Monday, Energy Secretary Steven Chu says the department is committed to demonstrating carbon capture and storage technologies.

  •  

    U.S. announcing charges in alleged credit card fraud

    Federal authorities on Tuesday announced charges against 18 people in an alleged international credit card scam that officials say stole at least $200 million, which would make it one of the biggest ever broken up by the U.S. Justice Department. Officials say the losses are still being calculated and could grow much higher. Charges were filed in U.S. District Court Newark against 18 people. By Tuesday morning, 13 of them were in custody.

  •  
    The report measures growth in industries that cover 90 percent of the work force, including retail, construction, health care and financial services.

    U.S. service firms grew more slowly in January

    Growth at U.S. service companies slowed slightly in January behind weaker new orders and business activity. But hiring improved, a bright sign for the economy. The Institute for Supply Management says its index of non-manufacturing activity dipped to 55.2 in January. That's down from 55.7 in December, which was the highest level in nearly a year. Any reading above 50 indicates expansion.

  •  
    Deerfield-based Walgreen Co. brought in more revenue from established stores than Wall Street expected last month, as the nation’s largest drugstore chain saw an increase in business due to the flu and its repaired relationship with pharmacy benefits manager Express Scripts Holding Co.

    Key Walgreen revenue metric climbs 3.7 pct in Jan.
    Deerfield-based Walgreen Co. brought in more revenue from established stores than Wall Street expected last month, as the nation's largest drugstore chain saw an increase in business due to the flu and its repaired relationship with pharmacy benefits manager Express Scripts Holding Co.The company said revenue from stores open at least a year climbed 3.7 percent in January, as a 6.2 percent gain in pharmacy sales was tempered by a slight drop in sales from the front end, or the rest of the store.

  •  
    The distorted main lithium-ion battery of the All Nippon Airways’ Boeing 787 which made an emergency landing, in dismantled by the investigators at its manufacturer GS Yuasa’s headquarters in Kyoto, Japan.

    Japan 787 probe finds thermal runaway in battery

    An investigation into a lithium ion battery that overheated on a Boeing 787 flight in Japan last month found evidence of the same type of "thermal runaway" seen in a similar incident in Boston, officials said Tuesday. The Japan Transportation Safety Board said that CAT scans and other analysis found damage to all eight cells in the battery that overheated on the All Nippon Airways 787 on Jan. 16, which prompted an emergency landing and probes by both U.S. and Japanese aviation safety regulators.

  •  
    Federal regulators say they are evaluating a Boeing request to conduct test flights of its 787 Dreamliners, which were grounded nearly three weeks ago after a battery fire in one plane and smoke in another.

    Boeing asks permission to conduct 787 test flights

    Federal regulators say they are evaluating a Boeing request to conduct test flights of its 787 Dreamliners, which were grounded nearly three weeks ago after a battery fire in one plane and smoke in another. The Federal Aviation Administration confirmed the request, but officials declined to elaborate.

  •  
    U.S. home prices jumped by the most in 6 ½ years in December, spurred by a low supply of available homes and rising demand.

    U.S. home prices rose last year by most in 6.5 years

    WASHINGTON — U.S. home prices jumped by the most in 6 ½ years in December, spurred by a low supply of available homes and rising demand. CoreLogic, a real estate data provider, says home prices rose 8.3 percent in December compared with a year earlier. That is the biggest annual gain since May 2006. Prices rose last year in 46 of 50 states. Home prices also rose 0.4 percent in December from the previous month. That’s a healthy increase given that sales usually slow over the winter months.Steady increases in prices are helping fuel the housing recovery. They’re encouraging some people to sell homes and enticing some would-be buyers to purchase homes before prices rise further.Higher prices can also make homeowners feel wealthier. That can encourage more consumer spending.

  •  

    Woman accused of massive China real-estate fraud

    A rural bank officer who allegedly obtained fake identity cards and used them to illegally buy dozens of properties worth hundreds of millions of dollars was in police detention Tuesday, weeks after she became China's newest symbol of official corruption. Police in the central county of Shenmu on Monday arrested Gong Ai'ai, who until recently was the deputy head of the government-run Shenmu Rural Commercial Bank, on suspicion of forging official documents, according to the Xinhua News Agency and a local official.

  •  

    European recovery hopes help shore up markets

    Markets recovered Tuesday, a day after suffering steep losses, as new indicators suggested the economy of the 17-country eurozone may be on the cusp of recovery. A survey of the manufacturing and services sector across the currency union showed activity rose to a 10-month high January. Though it showed the economy as a whole was still likely contracting, the improvement suggests a recovery may be slowly taking hold.

  •  

    BP profit drops 79 percent in Q4 due to settlement

    Oil and gas giant BP's profit fell nearly 80 percent in the fourth quarter in results released Tuesday, dragged down by payouts related to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. BP said that net profit fell to $1.62 billion in the quarter ending on Dec. 31, down from $7.69 billion in the same period the year before. BP took a loss of $3.85 billion for its settlement of all federal criminal charges with the U.S. government. Underlying replacement cost profit for the period, which strips out the changes in the value of inventories, was down 20 percent on the same period last year at $3.98 billion.

  •  

    President signs bill averting government default

    President Barack Obama has signed into law a bill raising the government's borrowing limit, averting a default and delaying the next clash over the nation's debt until later this year. The legislation temporarily suspends the $16.4 trillion limit on federal borrowing. Experts say that will allow the government to borrow about $450 billion to meet interest payments and other obligations.

  •  

    Consumer Reports questions turbocharged engines

    Consumer Reports is warning car buyers that turbocharged engines may not deliver the speed or fuel economy they expect. The magazine said Tuesday that its tests showed turbocharged models from Ford, Hyundai and Kia are less efficient than competitors. It also said the turbocharged Chevrolet Cruze got little extra power or fuel economy.The magazine praised a turbocharged four-cylinder from BMW.

  •  
    Oil prices fell to nearly $96 a barrel Monday as energy prices took their cues from sinking stock markets in Europe, Asia and Wall Street.

    Oil hovers near $96 as US, Asian stocks sink

    Oil prices fell to nearly $96 a barrel Monday as energy prices took their cues from sinking stock markets in Europe, Asia and Wall Street. Benchmark oil for March delivery fell 9 cents at midday Bangkok time to $96.08 per barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract dropped by $1.60 to finish at $96.17 a barrel on the Nymex on Monday.

  •  
    Fans and members of the Baltimore Ravens and the San Francisco 49ers wait for power to return in the Superdome during an outage in the second half of the NFL Super Bowl XLVII football game, Sunday.

    Documents: Worries about outage before Super Bowl

    While authorities investigate the causes of the 34-minute Super Bowl blackout, documents show that Superdome officials were worried last fall about losing power at the big game. Tests on the dome's electrical feeders showed decay and "a chance of failure," state officials warned in a memo dated Oct. 15. Also, the utility that supplied the stadium with power expressed concern about the reliability of the service before the NFL championship.

  •  

    Business, unions negotiating guest worker program

    Business leaders and labor union officials are delving into high-stakes negotiations over a particularly contentious element of immigration reform — a guest worker program to ensure future immigrants come here legally.The issue has traditionally divided labor and business. Labor groups have looked askance on bringing in numerous low-wage workers, while that's an outcome businesses have favored.

  •  

    Eurozone recovery hopes raised again

    Further evidence emerged Tuesday that the economy of the 17 European Union countries that use the euro has started 2013 in better shape than many had expected. Markit, a financial information group, said its purchasing managers' index for the eurozone economy — a closely watched gauge of activity similar to that of the Institute for Supply Management in the U.S. — rose to a ten-month high of 48.6 in January from 47.2 in December.

  •  

    FDA allows generic version of scarce cancer drug

    Federal regulators say approval of the first generic version of cancer drug Doxil will help resolve a lingering shortage triggered by manufacturing deficiencies. The shortage of the Johnson & Johnson injectable medication, made under contract by Ben Venue Laboratories, has continued on and off for a few years. It's resulted in rationing, with some patients with ovarian and other cancers getting less-effective care, and disrupted studies testing Doxil against possible new treatments.

  •  
    Two beef burgers purchased in Ireland, following an outcry over the revelation that some burgers made in the republic and on sale in British supermarkets contained a large proportion of horse meat. The burgers were swiftly withdrawn from sale.

    Horsemeat scandal harming Ireland’s reputation

    Ireland's prime minister says the latest finding of horsemeat in products labeled as Polish beef is harming Ireland's reputation as an exporter of high-quality meat products. Enda Kenny spoke before Tuesday's Cabinet meeting to discuss the widening scandal. Food Safety Authority of Ireland scientists made the discovery last month by conducting DNA tests on dozens of beef burger brands and finding some contained horse as a substantial ingredient.

  •  
    The chief executive of Research In Motion said he’s disappointed the new BlackBerry won’t be released in the United States until mid-March, but he said early data suggests sales in the U.K. are above expectations.

    New BlackBerry to be released in U.S. in mid-March

    The chief executive of Research In Motion said he's disappointed the new BlackBerry won't be released in the United States until mid-March, but he said early data suggests sales in the U.K. are above expectations. Thorsten Heins said in an interview Monday with The Associated Press that he was disappointed in the mid-March U.S. release date. But he said the U.S. and its phone carriers have a rigid testing system. "We need to respect that. Am I a bit disappointed? Yeah, I would be lying saying no. But it is what it is and we're working with all our carrier partners to speed it up as much as we can," Heins said in an interview at the Ritz Carlton in Toronto.

Life & Entertainment

  •  

    Matter of mother, stepmother and grandmother no longer delicate

    Carolyn Hax urges man to pay tribute to his late mother by not blaming the person who cares about the people she left behind.

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    Members of Lance Lipinsky & The Lovers under the marquee of the Ed Sullivan Theater in New York, home of “The Late Show with David Letterman.” From left to right are John Perrin of Elgin, Wyatt Maxwell of Utah, Zach Lentino of Schaumburg and Lance Lipinsky, who plays Jerry Lee Lewis in the Chicago production of “Million Dollar Quartet.”

    Schaumburg father, son performing this week on Letterman

    Father and son Dan and Zach Lentino of Schaumburg will appear on "The Late Show with David Letterman" this week backing up different Elvis tribute artists on different nights. Tuesday will be Zach's second of three nights on the show, as well as his 20th birthday. His father's band, The Fabulous Ambassadors, perform Thursday. All have been floored by the opportunity to reach a nationwide audience.

  •  
    The Eels, “Wonderful, Glorious”

    Eels cheer up on ‘Wonderful, Glorious’

    Fans of the Eels will be surprised to know that the band's frontman, Mark "E" Everett, seems to have been lifted from his melancholy — a sentiment that has inspired the band's previous material. Even the title of the Eels' 10th record, "Wonderful, Glorious," oozes optimism.

  •  
    Tim McGraw, “Two Lanes of Freedom”

    Tim McGraw broadens sound on new album

    Veteran country star Tim McGraw resolutely refers to independence and the highway in the title of his new album, "Two Lanes Of Freedom," his first since leaving Curb Records, his label for two decades. The title cut flaunts that freedom by employing world-music instruments, harmonies and rhythms to communicate just how creatively liberated he feels.

  •  
    Chef Paul Caravelli, executive chef at Libertyville’s 545 North Bar & Grill, is one of 16 professional chefs and home cooks on ABC’s “The Taste.”

    Libertyville chef gets ‘Taste’ of reality TV

    Paul Caravelli, executive chef at Libertyville's 545 North Bar & Grill, appears tonight on "The Taste," ABC's new reality competition show that puts home cooks and professional chefs through a series of culinary challenges. The Palatine High School graduate can't tell us the outcome of tonight's episode, but he can tell us why he tried out and where he'll be watching.

  •  
    Reg Presley, frontman of British rock group The Troggs, has died from lung cancer. He was 71.

    Troggs singer Reg Presley dies of cancer at 71

    Reg Presley, lead singer of The Troggs, whose raunchy, suggestive voice powers "Wild Thing," the paean to teenage lust, died Monday after a yearlong struggle with lung cancer. He was 71.

  •  
    Ben Affleck, nominated for best picture for “Argo,” attended the 85th Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Monday.

    Producers want a brisk pace for Oscars show

    The producers of the Academy Awards have good news for those watching at home: They're trying to cut out the boring parts. Oscar producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron say they watched 40 years of past ceremonies to finds ways to keep the show moving at a brisk pace. They say they are looking to nip and tuck unnecessary moments that can turn the show into a marathon.

  •  

    Mom is overbearing where adult child’s friends are concerned

    Adult child living her mom wants to know what to do about her mother's dislike of some of her friends.

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    Beaujoulais right for Chinese takeout

    If you're looking for a wine that will pair with Chinese takeout like crispy fried egg rolls, silken stir-fried pea pods, salty soy, sweet and spicy hoisin, sweet and sour pork and Mongolian beef, look no further than Beaujolais.

  •  
    Kiefer Sutherland has been named Man of the Year by Harvard University’s Hasty Pudding Theatricals. Sutherland will be roasted and receive his ceremonial pudding pot at a ceremony on Friday, Feb. 8.

    Kiefer Sutherland honored by Harvard theater group

    Golden Globe-winning actor Kiefer Sutherland has been named Man of the Year by Harvard University's Hasty Pudding Theatricals. Sutherland will be roasted and receive his ceremonial pudding pot at a ceremony scheduled for Friday, Feb. 8.

  •  
    The Chicago Auto Show zooms back into McCormick Place for its 105th edition.

    Best bets: Chicago Auto Show revs up at McCormick Place

    See the latest models and concept cars when the Chicago Auto Show revs things up for its 105th edition starting Saturday at McCormick Place in Chicago. Want to spruce up your home? Then don't miss The Old Home New House Home Show at Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles. Comedian and Second City alum Robert Klein brings the laughs to Elgin Community College Saturday.

  •  
    The Clydesdale foal, born Jan, 16, and featured in a Budweiser commercial during Super Bowl XLVII has been named Hope.

    Clydesdale foal in Super Bowl ad named Hope

    The 3-week-old star of Budweiser's Super Bowl ad now has a name: Hope. Anheuser-Busch said Tuesday that its contest to find a name for the foal born Jan. 16 at the company's Clydesdale ranch in mid-Missouri generated more than 60,000 tweets, Facebook comments and other messages. Hope was one of the more popular names generated through the social media effort.

  •  
    Oliver's journey takes him through a succession of lushly drawn towns in the role-playing epic “Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch.”

    'Ni no Kuni' a meaty role-playing adventure with charm

    In "Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch," every frame feels suffused with Tokyo's Studio Ghibli magic, to the point where it overcomes any resistance you might have to its old-fashioned gameplay. The game takes familiar Ghibli themes — parallel worlds, missing parents, humans turned bestial — and turns them into a sweeping role-playing adventure. This is one of the most satisfying games to come out of Japan in years.

  •  
    If you can't find moo shu pancakes at the store, use flour tortillas to wrap up homemade moo shu pork.

    Make your favorite Chinese takeout at home

    Want to stay huddled indoors, yet still want to celebrate the Chinese New Year? Make your take-out favorites — like egg drop soup and moo shu pork — at home. Local expert Ying Stoller and cookbook author Diana Kuan give their tips for stocking your pantry so you can cook your favorite Chinese dishes.

  •  
    “The Hour of Peril: The Secret Plot to Murder Lincoln Before the Civil War” by Daniel Stashower

    ‘Hour of Peril’ is compelling true story

    It's February 1861 and Abraham Lincoln is making his way by train from Springfield, Ill., to his inauguration in Washington, D.C. Allan Pinkerton and his team of detectives have uncovered a plot to assassinate Lincoln before he arrives for his inauguration. "The Hour of Peril" by Daniel Stashower tells the true story of Pinkerton and his team, who created a bold plan to not only uncover the conspirators, but also insure Lincoln's safety.

  •  
    Katharine McPhee, left, and Megan Hilty join forces for a full-out rendition of the pop standard “That’s Life” on “Smash,” which premieres with a two-hour episode at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5, on NBC.

    Not the same old song-and-dance as ‘Smash’ returns

    On with the show! "Smash" is back for its second season of sassy, sexy (and musical!) Broadway derring-do, both on stage and behind the scenes. Last season this series dramatized the blossoming of "Bombshell," a new musical about Marilyn Monroe. As the action resumes (with a two-hour "Smash" at 8 p.m. Tuesday on NBC), "Bombshell" is headed for the Great White Way. Or is it?

  •  
    Sichuan Beef starts with flank steak that is marinated in chili garlic paste, ginger and crushed Sichuan peppers.

    Sichuan Beef
    Sichuan Beef

  •  
    Store-bought Korean barbecue sauce makes Mongolian Beef come together lightening fast.

    Mongolian Beef
    Mongolian Beef

  •  

    Orange Fish
    Orange Fish

  •  
    If you can't find moo shu pancakes at the store, use flour tortillas to wrap up homemade moo shu pork.

    Moo Shu Pork
    Moo Shu Pork

  •  
    Egg Drop Soup, a Chinese restaurant favorite, is surprisingly easy to make at home.

    Egg Drop Soup
    Egg Drop Soup

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: A welcome experiment in fight against drugs

    A Daily Herald editorial says a new coordinated "Chicago Strike Force" could be a useful advance in the battle to keep hard drugs off of suburban streets.

  •  

    Immigration: Getting it right

    Columnist Charles Krauthammer: Enforcement followed by legalization is not just the political thing to do. It is the right thing to do — an act both of national generosity and national interest.

  •  

    A solvable problem

    Columnist Eugene Robinson: President Obama and a group of influential senators of both parties will try to work together to bring 11 million people out of the shadows. Our government is tackling a big problem and may actually solve it. Imagine that.

  •  

    Same-sex marriage not harmful to society
    A Prospect Heights letter to the editor: We believe that homosexuality is a naturally occurring phenomenon that is beneficial to all mankind. Same-sex marriages will allow for publicly recognized love for those who have been struggling for hundreds of years

  •  

    Cupcakes, Cookies & Coffee for College
    Letter to the editor: Mike Baker of the Schaumburg Autism Society invites residents to Cupcakes, Cookies and Coffee for College — a March 30 event to raise money for Harper College Education Foundation scholarships, benefiting adult students with autism and other developmental disabilities, and other organizations.

  •  

    Is lack of cursive writing skills to blame?
    Letter to the editor: Sara Lamb wonders if the problem with Jona Augustyn's petitions isn't due to "cursive writing being jettisoned in our public schools. These young citizens do not know how to sign their own names!" she writes.

  •  

    Township is a little warmer this winter
    Letter to the editor: "Schaumburg Township would like to extend a warm and tremendously deserving thank you to the community for their generosity and thoughtfulness toward the township and the families we assisted, this past holiday season," Supervisor Mary Wroblewski writes.

  •  

    Only one way to know what voters want
    Letter to the editor: Harry Trumfio writes that even though Bill Gnech's petition wasn't worded properly, there was no mistaking he wanted term limits to be voted on in Arlington Hts.

  •  

    Use of ‘hey,’ Spanish are quite insulting
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Kathleen Parker, I don't know if you or your editor are responsible for the "headline" of your article. I find "Hey" very insulting and derogatory as a way to get someone's attention. My children and grandchildren have been taught not to use the word because of the above reasons.

  •  

    Deadly result of disarming a people
    A St. Charles letter to the editor: Before you consider the next piece of anti-gun legislation, I'd like you to consider the following: Thirty-five million uniformed soldiers died in the 20th century fighting in various wars. More soldiers died in the last century in war, than in all other centuries combined.

  •  

    Thanks, Dems, for drop in credit rating
    A Wood Dale letter to the editor: Just wanted to drop a line to all the Democrats in state office and thank them for dropping Illinois's credit rating in the toilet. Their failed policies have once again proved that tax and spend and spend and spend and spend doesn't work.

  •  

    Stan, you are still The Man
    A Glen Ellyn letter to the editor: One great hitter never struck out more than 46 times in a season and that occurred as a 41 year old Methuselah. He went yard 475 times and wasn't even considered a slugger. Oh yes. He hit safely one outta three ... for 22 years. That was Stan Musial, lifetime Cardinal great who died Jan. 19 at 92.

  •  

    No public funds for Ricketts family
    No public funds for Ricketts familyI was pleased to hear Mayor Rahm Emanuel say that the Cubs and the Ricketts family will not be the recipients of funding for renovations to Wrigley Field.The Ricketts family with their millions are amply capable of investing and reaping the rewards of their investment without the public support. There are many other areas of endeavor which requires public assistance in the city of Chicago. I haven’t heard of the Cubs or Ricketts putting up funding to support community centers or educational programs which are sorely needed.The money to invest in Wrigley should come from the Ricketts family and their efforts improving the quality of the team will assure their return on investment. The fans who support the team would return to see them play championship baseball.Good luck with that.Tom RajcanWheaton

  •  

    Clinton’s major failure of leadership
    A Glen Ellyn letter to the editor: In the recent Senate hearing, Secretary of State Clinton was sufficiently vague and incredulous and petulant. With four Americans dead on her watch, one would think the person in charge would be more concerned.

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