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Daily Archive : Monday February 4, 2013

News

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    Lavish words of love on friends and family
    We know that love is more than mere words. However, from time to time, we like to hear sincere words of love expressed to us, says columnist Annettee Budzban.

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    Teachers in West Chicago Elementary District 33 were on picket lines Monday at schools throughout the district, including Pioneer Elementary.

    In West Chicago Dist. 33, even how talks ended is in dispute

    Striking teachers were walking picket lines in West Chicago Elementary District 33 with little immediate hope of a contract settlement. Even the end of Sunday's last-ditch bargaining session was shrouded in controversy. The school board said the union rejected its settlement offer and rejected a suggestion that it postpone a strike, but the union said weren't aware the talks had ended. "The board...

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    Charles Amrich

    Charles Amrich knocked off ballot in Island Lake

    Island Lake mayoral hopeful Charles Amrich can't run in the April election because of a $174 overdue garbage bill he paid after he signed his candidacy statement, an electoral board voted. The 2-1 ruling came after two hours of testimony from Amrich, village Finance Director John Little and the two men who tried to get Amrich knocked off the ballot, Daniel Field and Louis Sharp. Amrich quickly...

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    Abigail “Aby” Villalpando

    Bail set in hammer murder, burning of Aurora teen

    Bail was set Monday for two of three men accused in the murder of Abigail Villalpando, 18, of Aurora, who was beaten to death with a hammer. Her burned body was moved to a wooded area near Montgomery, where it was found Saturday. Villalpando's murder is the first homicide in Aurora since late 2011. By Monday a white cross had been placed near the woods in Villalpando's memory. “Why did they...

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    State Rep. Carol Sente, a Vernon Hills Democrat, has proposed limiting tackling practice for players high school-age and younger to once a week, inspired by a suburban doctor who cites studies showing how many hits to the head players suffer.

    Should tackling be limited in youth, high school football practice?

    Wary of the potential long-term damage young football players can do to their brains, a suburban lawmaker has proposed limiting the number of days they can tackle in practice to once a week. "I think it is a much more complex issue, and I fully expect the bill will be amended based on what my research finds," said state Rep. Carol Sente, a Vernon Hills Democrat.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn is hinting his State of the State speech will remind the public how the state's image has been cleaned up under his watch.

    Quinn's state address to feature pensions, ethics

    Gov. Pat Quinn faces big expectations over how he'll address Illinois' disastrous finances when he delivers his State of the State speech this week, but he's hinting he'll also spend time reminding the public how the state's image has been cleaned up under his watch.

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    Gay marriage expected come up in committee hearing

    Legislation legalizing same-sex marriage in Illinois is expected to come up in a Senate committee meeting Tuesday and could see a floor vote on Valentine's Day, according to state Sen. Heather Steans.

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    Then-White House Chief of Staff Bill Daley addresses the Democratic National Committee in 2011 in Washington, D.C. Daley is considering a run for Illinois governor in 2014.

    Bill Daley: Lisa Madigan's moves won't affect mine

    Former White House Chief of Staff Bill Daley says Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan's next moves won't affect his potential bid for governor. She also is considering running in the 2014 Democratic primary.

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    Illinois Senate President John Cullerton, a Chicago Democrat, is a central player in the debate on how best to save money on teachers' and state workers' pensions.

    Big question looms in pension debate: Are cuts legal?

    As lawmakers resume the debate over Illinois's growing retirement fund debts in the coming weeks, perhaps the biggest looming question is whether cutting employees' pension benefits as proposed is legal. No one knows for sure how the Illinois Supreme Court would eventually rule. But the stakes are high enough that even before lawmakers can find a compromise on pension cost cuts, an eventual...

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    Fire blower burned during Lyric Opera rehearsal

    A Lyric Opera of Chicago performer was burned after setting his head afire during a dress rehearsal of a production of "Die Meistersinger von Nurenberg." Wesley Daniel, who plays a fire-blowing stilt walker, on Monday suffered burns after putting alcohol in his mouth and attempting to blow fire.

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    Sandra Rogers, formerly of Mundelein, is serving a 30-year sentence for a 2003 sledgehammer attack on her ex-husband.

    Mundelein man says he participated in attack to hide affair

    A former Mundelein man who admitted a decade ago to helping attack the father of his then-14-year-old girlfriend testified Monday he agreed to do it to hide a sexual relationship he was having with the girl's mother. Jonathon McMeekin said that while intoxicated about 1:30 a.m. on May 19, 2003, he refused to attack Rick Rogers. However, he said, Sandra Rogers threatened to tell Robin Rogers...

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    Some parents unhappy with proposed U-46 calendar

    A proposal to start classes a week earlier for the 2013-14 academic year in Elgin Area School District U-46 drew criticism at the school board meeting Monday night. The proposed calendar includes keeping school in session on Veterans Day and marking the first day of class Aug. 14. Several people spoke about the lack of parent engagement in the decision-making, noting the proposed changes came as...

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    Elburn may undo ban on video gambling

    The Elburn village board is considering reversing its ban on video gambling. The village board agreed to have its staff bring a proposed ordinance to the committee of the whole next week.

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    Jay Moffat of Geneva is a candidate for Geneva Library board and the Geneva parks board.

    Geneva candidate says he has time, interest, skills for two boards

    Why does Jay Moffat of Geneva want to be on two local government boards? Well, really, he wanted to be on four. It's not about power, he said; it is about a desire to serve the community.

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    Brandt’s Little Cafe will reopen as Brandt’s of Palatine in March. A pair of Palatine residents recently stepped forward to buy the eatery, saving it from the auction block.

    Palatine residents will reopen Brandt’s

    A longtime Palatine staple won't be going to the auction block, after all. New owners Walt Oswald and Jim Iuorio bought the struggling Brandt's Little Cafe and hope to re-brand, refurbish and reopen the burger and rib joint next month as Brandt's of Palatine. "We both love Brandt's and didn't want to see it go away," Oswald said.

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    Fire damages North Aurora duplex

    A fire caused about $50,000 in damage to a duplex in North Aurora on Monday afternoon. North Aurora firefighters responded to the blaze about 1:15 p.m. on the 200 block of Laurel Drive.

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    Federal and local law enforcement officers gather at their trucks after the hostage crisis ended in Midland City, Ala., Monday afternoon. Officials say they stormed a bunker in Alabama to rescue a 5-year-old child being held hostage there after his abductor was seen with a gun.

    Authorities storm Alabama bunker, rescue young boy

    Authorities stormed an underground bunker Monday in Alabama, freeing a 5-year-old boy and leaving his increasingly agitated captor dead after a week of fruitless negotiations that left authorities convinced the child was in imminent danger. Jimmy Lee Dykes, 65, had taken the child off a school bus after fatally shooting the driver.

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    St. Charles aldermen fund creative youth projects

    St. Charles city council announces its 2013 Youth Challenge grants, a program to encourage creative problem solving by local youths.

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    Michelle Kembitzky

    New trustee joins W. Dundee board

    The West Dundee village board has added a new trustee to its ranks.Monday night, trustees unanimously appointed Michelle Kembitzky, a resident who has lived in town for 21 years and has found herself with more time to volunteer, now that her two children are away at college.

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    House to vote on road funds, child-welfare money

    The Illinois House is poised to consider more money for state programs in a plan that takes advantage of new road building funds and shifts money saved from prison closures to child-welfare services, sparing up to 1,900 jobs. The plan includes a $675 million boost to transit construction highly prized by businesses and labor unions and $25 million saved from a bitter fight over closing...

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    Sami Samir Hassoun

    FBI notes: Informant close to entrapping would-be bomber

    Attorneys for a Chiago man who pleaded guilty to placing what he thought was a bomb in a backpack near Wrigley Field have disclosed FBI notes that indicate agents feared an informant might entrap him during their investigation. Sami Samir Hassoun admitted in a plea agreement last year that he took what he thought was a bomb from undercover FBI agents and put it into a trash bin near the home of...

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    Patricia Haugeberg

    Des Plaines council appoints first woman as interim mayor

    The Des Plaines City Council Monday night appointed 1st Ward Alderwoman Patti Haugeberg as interim mayor until the Feb. 19 city council meeting at which time 4th Ward Alderman Dick Sayad will be sworn in to serve until the April 15 council meeting — almost until the end of former Mayor Marty Moylan's unfinished term.

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    Ryan Berry

    Three arrested in Villa Park home invasion

    A Villa Park-area man used a kitchen knife and dishes to fight off three armed robbers during a weekend home invasion, prosecutors said Monday. Twenty-four-year-olds Ryan Berry, Andrew Cotton and Anthony Nutoni have been charged in the attack on the 1S100 block of Dillon Lane in unincorporated DuPage County.

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    In this Jan. 22 released Monday, Malala Yousefzai reads get well cards. The Pakistani girl shot by the Taliban Oct. 9 has made her first video statement since she was nearly killed, released Monday, saying she is recovering.

    Pakistani girl shot by Taliban appears on video

    In her first video statement since she was nearly killed, a Pakistani schoolgirl shot by the Taliban remained defiant in arguing for girls' education, saying Monday she would keep up the same campaign that led to her attack.Speaking clearly but with the left side of her face appearing rigid, 15-year-old Malala Yousufzai said she is "getting better, day by day" after undergoing weeks of treatment...

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    This photo made available by the University of Leicester, England, Monday of the earliest surviving portrait of Richard III in Leicester Cathedral. Richard was immortalized in a play by Shakespeare as a hunchbacked usurper who left a trail of bodies — including those of his two young nephews, murdered in the Tower of London — on his way to the throne.

    Experts find remains of England’s King Richard III

    He was king of England, but for centuries he lay without shroud or coffin in an unknown grave, and his name became a byword for villainy. On Monday, scientists announced they had rescued the remains of Richard III from anonymity — and the monarch's fans hope a revival of his reputation will soon follow.

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    Proposal to double cost of medical licenses advances

    Illinois officials and the physicians they regulate are at odds over how to fairly cover the costs of a watchdog unit that investigates complaints against doctors. Gov. Pat Quinn's administration wants to more than double doctors' licensing fees and to borrow millions of dollars, a proposal a House committee approved by a 7-5 vote on Monday and now moves to the full House.

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    Southwest Airlines is one reason Midway Airport had a record number of passengers traveling through it in 2012.

    O’Hare still No. 2, and Midway creeping up

    2012 was a pretty flat year for America's airlines, new federal figures show. The number of people flying inched up by just 1.4 percent in 2012. Midway Airport was humming, however, while O'Hare is still second-busiest.

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    West Chicago parents scramble to keep kids busy during strike

    As teachers in West Chicago Elementary School District 33 hit the picket lines Monday, parents of some 4,000 students had to find alternate plans to keep them busy. About 940 students in grades one through five were preregistered for the district's "alternative educational instruction" at Gary and Pioneer schools, said Dave Barclay, the school board's spokesman.

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    Tri-Cities police reports
    A man reported four other men had attacked him at a bar in the 100 block of South Batavia Avenue, injuring his head, face and a hand, around 1 a.m. Saturday. Police said they are still investigating.

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    Former Schaumburg police officer Matthew Hudak leaves DuPage County jail Monday after posting $35,000 bond.

    Ex-Schaumburg cop Hudak first of three to bond out of jail

    The first of three former Schaumburg police officers facing drug conspiracy charges walked out of the DuPage County jail Monday after posting a $35,000 bond. Matthew Hudak, 29, left the facility about 4 p.m., after nearly three weeks in custody. He faced a throng of reporters and camera crews but answered no questions.

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    Kristina Kovarik

    Gurnee mayor leads by example on energy program

    Gurnee Mayor Kristina Kovarik says she wanted to lead by example in touting the merits of a program meant to make homes more energy efficient while offering Chicago-area property owners a chance to tap into federal grant money available for recommended work. Kovarik participated in Energy Impact Illinois. It's part of a federal energy grant initiative that can help residents save up to $1,750 by...

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    Hadiya Pendleton, 15, was shot and killed last week in a Chicago park as she talked with friends.

    Police seeking tips in Chicago shooting

    Chicago police say they've been inundated with tips about the death of a 15-year-old girl who had just returned from performing at President Barack Obama's inauguration festivities, but they're still concerned that someone with valuable information is holding out. The reward for information about last week's slaying of Hadiya Pendleton climbed Monday to $40,000. But police, activists and...

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    VHHS to stage ‘Romeo and Juliet’

    William Shakespeare's classic love story, "Romeo and Juliet", is coming to Vernon Hills High School but in an unusual style.

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    Palatine library Book Nook offers discontinued materials

    The Palatine Public Library District recently opened a "Book Nook" area in the meeting room hallway of the main library, 700 N. North Court, Palatine. The shelves feature used books, DVDs and CDs being discarded from the library's collection, as well as items donated by the Friends of the Library nonprofit organization.

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    Norwegian scholarship available

    The Norwegian National League of Chicago is offering scholarships and cash prizes to deserving students who are of Norwegian heritage residing in Cook, Lake, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, McHenry and Will counties.

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    Free tax service at Ela library

    Ela Area Public Library in Lake Zurich will offer an opportunity for seniors to receive free tax preparation.

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    Hoffman Estates to host Valentine’s Day event for seniors

    The Hoffman Estates Commission for Senior Citizens is hosting a Valentine's Day Luncheon at noon on Thursday, Feb. 14, at the village hall, 1900 Hassell Road. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. The cost is $8 per person, which includes food and entertainment.

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    Libertyville’s Wine about Winter is celebrating its eighth year.

    Wine about Winter in downtown Libertyville is Feb. 16

    Spend a wintry afternoon browsing the stores and enjoying the company of other wine lovers at the eighth annual Wine About Winter wine tasting from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, in downtown Libertyville.

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    Piotr Zaniewski

    Masseur accused of sexually assaulting female client

    A 31-year-old Lisle man faces up to 15 years in prison after his arrest Friday on a sex assault charge alleging he inappropriately touched a female client while giving her a massage at a Mount Prospect business. Mount Prospect police arrested Piotr Zaniewski, of the 5800 block of Oakwood Drive in Lisle, at the business Friday on a charge of criminal sexual assault, a Class 1 felony.

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    Judge found not guilty by reason of insanity

    A Cook County judge has been found not guilty by reason of insanity on a misdemeanor battery charge in connection with an altercation with a sheriff's deputy. Judge Cynthia Brim in March was accused of throwing a set of keys and shoving a sheriff's deputy at a security checkpoint. A day earlier, authorities say Brim was seen acting erratically on the bench in Markham.

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    President Barack Obama listens during a meeting with local leaders and law enforcement officials while participating in a roundtable discussion at the Minneapolis Police Department Special Operations Monday in Minneapolis, Minn.

    Obama to campaign for gun proposals in Minnesota

    With his gun proposals dividing Congress, President Barack Obama conceded Monday the challenges he faces in winning support for measures ranging from criminal checks on gun buyers to an assault weapons ban. But, he declared: "We don't have to agree on everything to agree it's time to do something."

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    Heather Surovik, who lost her 8½-month-old unborn son when her car was struck by drunken driver Gary Sheats in 2012, speaks at a news conference Monday, promoting a political drive to grant “personhood” status to unborn fetuses at the Colorado State Capitol in Denver.

    Catholic hospital takes surprise stance in lawsuit

    It was a startling assertion that seemed an about-face from church doctrine: A Catholic hospital arguing in a Colorado court that twin fetuses that died in its care were not, under state law, human beings. When the two-year-old court filing surfaced last month, it triggered an avalanche of criticism — because the legal argument seemed to plainly clash with the church's centuries-old stance...

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    Felix Baumgartner jumps out of the capsule Oct. 14. He reached 843.6 mph. That’s equivalent to Mach 1.25, or 1.25 times the speed of sound. His top speed initially was estimated last October at 834 mph, or Mach 1.24.

    Skydiver fell faster than thought

    Supersonic skydiver Felix Baumgartner was faster than he or anyone else thought when he jumped from 24 miles up. The Austrian parachutist known as "Fearless Felix" reached 843.6 mph, according to the official numbers released Monday. That's equivalent to Mach 1.25, or 1.25 times the speed of sound.

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    Sen. Patty Murray, a Washington Democrat, is among those senators hoping to pass the Violence Against Women Act, after Congress last year failed to do so.

    Senate tries again to move anti-violence bill

    The Senate took up the Violence Against Women Act Monday, seeking to remedy Congress' failure last year to extend and expand a law protecting women from domestic abuse while broadening its coverage to include Native Americans, gays and lesbians.

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    Glen Ellyn cops nab suspect in car theft

    A 24-year-old Chicago Heights man has been charged with possession of a stolen vehicle, driving without a valid license, leaving the scene of an accident and failure to give information after striking property following a bizarre incident in Glen Ellyn, authorities said Monday. Police said the incident began about 5 p.m. Saturday when a man left his 14-year-old child in his car and the vehicle...

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    New Secretary of State John Kerry shows his first diplomatic passport he got when he was eleven years old when his father was in the foreign service, during a ceremony welcoming him as the 68th secretary of state Monday at the State Department in Washington.

    Kerry has ‘big heels to fill’ at State Dept.

    New Secretary of State John Kerry reported for duty Monday, acknowledging that as Hillary Rodham Clinton's successor he has "big heels to fill" and promising to protect U.S. foreign service workers from terrorist attacks overseas.

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    One slightly hurt in Wheaton fire

    One person was slightly injured Monday morning when an unattended candle apparently sparked a fire in a residence on the 1200 block of East Oxford in Wheaton. Firefighters said they responded at 9:33 a.m. and found the fire in a second-floor bedroom. They were able to bring the fire under control in minutes.

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    Dixon sues audit firm for failing to detect fraud

    Dixon, whose former comptroller embezzled almost $53 million is suing its longtime accounting firm for failing to detect the fraud while auditing the city's books. Rita Crundwell pleaded guilty and is scheduled to be sentenced next week. Authorities say the scam lasted 20 years and enabled Crundwell to build a world-renowned quarter horse breeding operation.

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    Talk with the Editor: Strengthening the dailyherald.com conversation

    In this Talk with the Editor, John Lampinen announces dailyherald.com is moving to Facebook commenting to improve the online conversation. The effect of the change will be an end to anonymous commenting.

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    Parents can learn about college athletic recruiting in Lake Villa

    National keynote speaker Doug Plank of Recruiting Realities will bring his presentation on college athletic recruiting to Lakes Community High School at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7, in the auditorium.

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    Robert Fecarotta

    Schaumburg Twp. commissioner holds back funds over lunch tiff

    Schaumburg Township Highway Commissioner Robert Fecarotta said he will hold back $135,000 he'd been planning to transfer to the township's general fund after learning taxpayer money was used to pay for an employee appreciation lunch Friday. "It's nothing against the employees, it's the principle of these spending decisions," Fecarotta said.

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    Former New York City Mayor Ed Koch, who died Friday from congestive heart failure, will be honored at his funeral today by former President Bill Clinton.

    Ed Koch recalled as 'doting' by family at funeral

    Ed Koch had a big heart and a bigger brain, but the quintessential New Yorker's outsized personality was matched by his integrity, family members and politicians said Monday as they honored the colorful former mayor at his funeral in Manhattan. Koch died Friday of congestive heart failure at age 88.

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    Wisconsin homicide probe leads to sexual assault charges
    Authorities say a cold case investigation into a Waupaca County double homicide 21 years ago has led to charges in a 1990 sexual assault. Glendon Gouker is charged with sexually assaulting a woman at a park in Iola in November 1990. The state Department of Justice says DNA evidence from the assault was resubmitted to the State Crime Lab and Gouker was found to be a contributor to the DNA.

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    Annie Dookhan, a former Massachusetts chemist accused of faking test results at a state drug lab, pleads not guilty during her arraignment at Norfolk Superior Court in Dedham, Mass.

    Ex-Mass. chemist in drug lab case heads to court

    A former Massachusetts chemist accused of faking test results at a state drug lab faces her sixth arraignment. Annie Dookhan is scheduled to be arraigned Monday on an obstruction of justice charge in Salem Superior Court. She is charged with falsely claiming she holds a master's degree in chemistry while testifying as an expert witness. Dookhan has already pleaded not guilty to a string of...

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    Pittsburgh girl, 6, crashes car in bid to see dad

    Pittsburgh police say a determined 6-year-old girl didn't hurt anyone when she crashed her mother's car while trying to drive across town to visit her father. Police haven't released the name of the girl whose mother was reportedly still sleeping when the girl took the woman's car keys about 9 a.m. Sunday.

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    Alex Koerner, of Koerner Avation in Kankakee in front of the Luscombe 8C, a rare plane that first rolled out of the factory June 28, 1941, that he has been restoring since 2007.

    Young Illinois pilot restores rare 1941 flyer

    A tale involving aeronautical history and mechanical ingenuity might be expected at the Kankakee airfield that is home to the 86-year-old Koerner Aviation business.It's also predictable that the central characters in that story would be ancestors of the aviation pioneers who first brought flying machines to this area. In the latest story unfolding these days, 24-year-old Alex Koerner is getting...

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    Sarai Sierra, a 33-year-old mother of two from New York City, went missing Jan. 21 while on a solo vacation in Istanbul. Her body was found 12 days later, near the remnants of some ancient city walls.

    Turkish police seek clues in NYC woman’s death

    ANKARA, Turkey — Turkish authorities finished an autopsy Monday on a New York City woman found dead in Istanbul and submitted DNA samples from it to a crime lab for testing, Turkey’s state-run media reported.

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    Trial planned on Beaman’s innocence petition

    An Aug. 6 date is set for a trial on the petition to be declared innocent filed by a man who spent more than 13 years in prison after being convicted of stabbing and strangling an Illinois State University student. Alan Beaman was serving a 50-year sentence when the Illinois Supreme Court reversed his conviction in the 1993 death of Jennifer Lockmiller.

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    Joyce Browne of Naperville says her daughter, Jessica, has learned much through the job skills programs offered at We Grow Dreams. “She has learned to offset the challenge of work with the reward of a paycheck. She has gained maturity and self-esteem.”

    We Grow Dreams helps people with disabilities develop job skills

    Through its greenhouse, craft and market programs, We Grow Dreams in West Chicago offers opportunities for people with disabilities to develop social and vocational skills. Today, Joyce Browne of Naperville talks about what participating has meant to her daughter, Jessica.

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    Notre Dame students to use iPads instead of books

    Students in two Internet-driven courses at the University of Notre Dame will lease iPads instead of buying textbooks under a pilot program this spring. The computer tablets will go to students in "Introduction to the First Amendment: Freedom of Expression in the Digital Age" and "Introduction to Web-Based Interactivity, and Data-Driven Design."

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    Students can soon apply for summer food program

    Low-income Illinois students who want to participate in free food summer programs can apply soon. Programs are available for students up to age 18 when school isn't in session. The Illinois State Board of Education says the application period is March 4 through June 15.

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    How did `Little House’ sister really become blind?

    Any fan of Laura Ingalls Wilder's beloved "Little House" books knows how the author's sister Mary went blind: scarlet fever. But turns out that probably wasn't the cause, medical experts say, upending one of the more dramatic elements in the classic stories. An analysis of historical documents, biographical records and other material suggests another disease that causes swelling in the brain and...

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    Dawn Patrol: 3 charged in teen's beating death; snow advisory

    Three are charged in the beating death of an Aurora woman also found burned in Montgomery. We're getting snow this morning. West Chicago Dist. 33 going on strike. Vernon Township man killed in I-294. All OK after Naperville grease fire. Crazy win for the Baltimore Ravens.

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    Turkey says it knew terrorist attack was planned

    Turkey's president says authorities suspected the outlawed leftist group that bombed the U.S. Embassy in Ankara was planning an attack, but did not have enough information to prevent it from happening.

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    Jasper Pasternak and Josh Beedy make adjustments to the robot in the team’s pit prior to heading to a competition run at the First Lego League state tournament last month at Forest View Educational Center in Arlington Heights.

    Lincoln Middle School students win state with solution to ‘senior’ problem

    When the nine-member Century Strikers First Lego League team at Lincoln Middle School in Mount Prospect organized last fall, their challenge for the year was "Senior Solutions" — identifying a problem older people faced and developing a practical, cost-effective solution. The team did such a good job of meeting the challenge, it took first in the state last month and will compete in April...

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    President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said Monday that he’s ready to take the risk of being the first Iranian astronaut sent into space as part of Iran’s goal of a manned space flight.

    Ahmadinejad wants to be Iran’s first astronaut

    President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said Monday that he's ready to take the risk of being the first Iranian astronaut sent into space as part of Iran's goal of a manned space flight. "I'm ready to be the first Iranian to sacrifice myself for our country's scientists," the official IRNA news agency quoted him as saying in an address to space scientists in Tehran.

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    Pretrial hearing set for USS Cole bombing suspect

    The Guantanamo Bay prisoner accused of orchestrating the attack on the USS Cole faces a pretrial hearing in his war crimes tribunal. The four-day hearing for Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri begins Monday. Video of the proceeding in Cuba, where al-Nashiri has been held by the U.S. since 2006, is being fed to a viewing room at Fort Meade.

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    Investigators continue working the scene where at least eight people were killed and 38 people were injured after a tour bus carrying Mexican tourists careened out of control while traveling down a mountain road, struck a car, flipped and plowed into a pickup truck, near Yucaipa, Calif., Sunday.

    8 killed in Calif. bus crash of Mexican day skiers

    At least eight and as many as 10 people were killed and more than three dozen injured when a bus careened out of control while traveling down a Southern California mountain road, struck a car, flipped and plowed into a pickup, authorities said. A California Highway Patrol spokesman said the number of eight confirmed deaths was expected to rise because the coroner was just starting to remove...

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    Baltimore Ravens running back Bernard Pierce celebrates after their 34-31 win against the San Francisco 49ers in the NFL Super Bowl XLVII Sunday in New Orleans.

    Weekend in Review: Dist. 33 strike; fatal hammer attack in Aurora
    What you may have missed over the weekend: West Chicago Dist. 33 teachers on strike today; Aurora high schooler killed in hammer attack; Huntley man dies in apartment fire; Libertyville gives tax rebates; fire damages Des Plaines business; and Ravens win the Super Bowl even with a power outage.

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    Woodland Primary School’s kindergarten students in Gages Lake watch the Jumpers on Fire team from Loves Park.

    Images: The Week in Pictures
    This edition of The Week in Pictures features a few groundhog photo ops, kids with science and craft projects, and everybody dealing with the dramatic overnight weather changes during the week.

Sports

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    Devin Hester wants a fresh start, and it's the right time for the Bears to give him one.

    Hester just another part of Bears' culture change

    Devin Hester indicated in a published report over the weekend that he needs a fresh start away from Chicago. OK, see ya! Seriously, does Hester really think he has any leverage in this matter? Come to think of it, maybe he does. The Bears might as well send him to, say, Jacksonville for all the good he has done them in recent years. So, yeah, see ya!

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    Cubs still believe Baez is a shortstop

    The widely held assumption around baseball is that Cubs prospect Javier Baez is headed for third base, but talk to the Cubs and they'll tell you they have no plans to shift Baez from shortstop. “A lot of what people think is based on what they saw of Javy as an amateur, and people are stubborn in that way,” said scouting and player development director Jason McLeod.

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    Pacers forward Paul George holds down Bulls forward Luol Deng as he shoots in the first half Monday night.

    Injury-depleted Bulls fall to Pacers

    The Bulls recovered from a slow start and had their chances late in the game, but they fell short in a variety of ways. While losing to the Indiana Pacers 111-101 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse on Monday, the Bulls' small lineup simply couldn't slow down Indiana's big men.

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    Monday’s girls basketball scoreboard
    Here are the results from Monday's varsity girls basketball results as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Monday’s girls gymnastics scoreboard
    Here are the varsity girls gymnastics results from Monday's events, as reported to the Daily Herald.

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    Fremd’s Christine Radochonski works floor exercise during sectional action Monday at Fremd.

    Energized Fremd second at sectional

    Fremd was looking to bounce back after its regional meet, and sophomore duo Sydney Plichta and Christine Radochonski set the tone for the Vikings on Monday. Plichta opened by taking second on the beam (9.5), and Radochonski kept it flowing in the second rotation by taking third on the floor (9.55) in leading Fremd to second place at its own sectional with 146.225 points.

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    The Chicago Fire on Monday acquired the MLS rights to former Columbus Crew and Leeds United midfielder Robbie Rogers, right.

    Fire has ‘valuable asset’ in Rogers

    Maybe the Fire will sign free-agent midfielder Robbie Rogers. Maybe they will ship the occasional U.S. national team member off to another MLS team. For now, though, the MLS rights to Rogers, acquired in the Dominic Oduro-for-Dilly Duka trade, are "a valuable asset," said Fire coach Frank Klopas.

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    Montini’s Malayna Johnson blocks a shot by St. Charles East’s Laney Deckrow Thursday at the Lady Saxon Tournament in Schaumburg.

    For Johnson, this is her time

    Malayna Johnson hears her Montini teammates talk about basketball games they watch. She marches to her own beat. "I would rather paint my nails than watch the Bulls," the Broncos senior said.

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    Chojnowski paces Leyden victory

    Senior Justyna Chojnowski recorded career highs of 20 points and 20 rebounds along with 5 steals to help Leyden's girls basketball team to a 47-27 win over visiting Elmwood Park in the nonconference game in Northlake.

  •  

    Streamwood tops Addison Trail

    Streamwood’s girls basketball team celebrated senior night Monday witha 52-37 win over Addison Trail in nonconference action.Senior Jessica Cerda scored 14 points to lead the Sabres (19-7) and junior Hannah McGlone added 11.Streamwood will play at Bartlett Thursday night on Upstate Eight Conference crossover night.

  •  
    Harvest Christian Academy’s Rachel Oostdyk reaches for a rebound against Cristo Rey St. Martin’s Jessena Fields Monday in Elgin.

    Harvest Christian rolls in regional opener

    Harvest Christian girls basketball coach Kelly Friestad knows the challenge her team is up against in the semifinals of the Class 1A Harvest regional. So Monday night it was time for the Lions to have some fun. Fourth-seeded Harvest Christian raced out to a 22-0 lead after one quarter and Friestad used the rest of the night to freely rotate her players on and off the floor in the Lions' 50-6 win over St. Martin de Porres in the play-in game of the regional tournament.

  •  

    Batavia blows out Oswego East on Senior Night

    Batavia's girls basketball team sent its seniors out with a 70-44 victory over Oswego East in their final home game on Senior Night Monday in Batavia.

  •  

    Geneva honors 1963 state team, Soto

    Geneva High School may be hard-pressed to ever top the Hall of Fame induction it presented Saturday night. How do you do better than welcoming the first wrestler in school history to win a state title, as well as members of the 1963 basketball team that recorded a school-best 30-3 record while reaching the first state finals event at Assembly Hall in Champaign?

  •  
    Retired Batavia boys basketball coach Jim Roberts shakes hands with members of the varsity team as he and his wife Sylvia were honored during the 20th anniversary of Night of Hoops at the school Saturday night.

    Night of Hoops delivers more memorable moments

    Batavia's basketball gymnasium has been host to hundreds of memorable moments through the years, the latest coming Saturday night with the renaming of the Jim and Sylvia Roberts Night of Hoops.

  •  
    Defender Timmy Chandler, left, says he was fully committed to the U.S. team as it opens the final round of World Cup qualifying at Honduras.

    Chandler commits to playing for U.S.

    Nearly two years after playing his first game for the U.S. national team, defender Timmy Chandler is set to commit his future to the Americans rather than leave open the possibility of playing for Germany. With regular right back Steve Cherundolo sidelined by a knee injury, Chandler appears likely to start Wednesday when the U.S. opens the final round of World Cup qualifying at Honduras. "It's a huge opportunity for Timmy," U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann said Monday after announcing his 24-man roster.

  •  
    Syracuse’s C.J. Fair scores against Notre Dame’s Tom Knight during the second half of Monday’s game in Syracuse, N.Y.

    No. 9 Syracuse downs No. 25 Notre Dame 63-47

    C.J. Fair had 18 points and 10 rebounds, freshman Jerami Grant scored a season-high 14 points, and No. 9 Syracuse beat No. 25 Notre Dame 63-47 on Monday night to snap a two-game losing streak that had dropped the Orange three spots in the rankings. "This was a big win," Sycracuse coach Jim Boeheim said.

  •  

    Wright State rallies to beat Loyola 62-59

    Cole Darling scored a game-high 17 points and Wright State used a second-half rally to top Loyola of Chicago 62-59 in a Horizon League matchup Monday night.

  •  
    Bulls guard Marco Belinelli, left, and Pacers forward Sam Young get tangled up in the second half of Monday’s game in Indianapolis.

    Pacers tie up Bulls in Central with 111-101 win

    David West scored 29 points and Paul George had 21 points, 11 rebounds and five assists, leading the Indiana Pacers past the short-handed Chicago Bulls 111-101 on Monday night and into a share of the Central Division lead. Marco Belinelli had a season-high 24 points and Nate Robinson had 19 points, nine assists and five rebounds to lead the Bulls, who lost for only the third time in nine games.

  •  

    Brewster excels in USA championships

    University of Illinois redshirt freshman Will Brewster (Grayslake Central) competed in the 2013 USA Cross Country Championships on Saturday, finishing 10th in a field of 72 runners.

  •  
    Mike Rucinski’s professional hockey career included a stint with the International Hockey League’s Saginaw Blackhawks.

    Rucinski gets his due from Illinois Hockey Hall of Fame

    Well known as a coach and ardent supporter of hockey, Mike Rucinski's playing legacy has finally been honored. Rucinski, 49, who lives in Huntley with his wife (Christine) and four sons (Matt, Justin, Dylan and Cody) was recently inducted into the Illinois Hockey Hall of Fame at the Belvedere Banquet Hall in Elk Grove Village.

  •  

    Boys basketball: Top 20 rankings
    Benet, Neuqua Valley and Larkin have earned the top spots in the most recent rankings of area boys basketball teams.

  •  
    MacKenzie Kern of Hinsdale South High School drives around Claire Graham of Glenbard West.

    Images: Glenbard West vs. Hinsdale South, girls basketball
    Hinsdale South hosted Glenbard West Monday night for girls basketball.

  •  
    Harvest Christian Academy’s Morgan Lockwood drives between Cristo Rey St. Martin’s Rosario Ocamp and Jessena Fields.

    Images: Harvest Christian Academy vs. Cristo Rey St. Martin, girls basketball
    Harvest Christian Academy faced Cristo Rey St. Martin in first-round regional girls playoff basketball action Monday night in Elgin.

  •  
    Blackhawks center Andrew Shaw (65) scores on Minnesota Wild goalie Josh Harding last Wednesday. If Dave Bolland returns to action, Shaw will center the third line against San Jose.

    Shaw’s play at center has Bowman’s attention

    Andrew Shaw isn't off to the greatest start as the Blackhawks' third line center points-wise, but that's apparently not a problem with general manager Stan Bowman."If anything, he's been effective," Bowman said. "Looking at the way that he plays, he's got that ability with his speed, he's always around the puck. The way that he plays with his disruptive style, maybe we haven't noticed it that much because he's been focused on being a reliable player.Shaw has a goal and 2 assists in nine games and is plus-2. He scored his only goal last week at Minnesota.

  •  
    Players huddle on the field Sunday during the power outage in the second half of Super Bowl XLVII.

    Cause of Super Bowl power outage remains unclear

    Who turned out the lights? The day after the 34-minute blackout at the Super Bowl, the exact cause — and who's to blame — were unclear, though a couple of potential culprits had been ruled out. It wasn't Beyonce's electrifying halftime performance, according to Doug Thornton, manager of the state-owned Superdome, since the singer had her own generator. And it apparently wasn't a case of too much demand for power.

  •  

    Warren’s Jones sets school record in 3,000 meters for Augustana

    Augustana's Sarahbeth Jones was named a College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin Women's Indoor Track and Field Athletes of the Week. Jones, a senior from Wadsworth and graduate of Warren High School, set a school record in the 3,000-meter run during the Olivet Nazarene Invitational. Her time of 10:14.66 beat the previous school record of 10:15.27 by Susan Paige in 1999.

  •  

    Verber’s impact was widespread in high school sports

    There are not many coaches from the Chicago suburbs who can say they were part of an IHSA state basketball championship team. But that's what happened for George Verber as an assistant to Maine South coach Quitman Sullins when the Hawks won the 1979 Class AA state title. Verber, who died from leukemia on Jan. 22, went on to become the head coach at Maine West for three seasons and led the Warriors to a conference championship in the 1981-82 season. That was the same year Derril Kipp took over the girls basketball program at Maine West. "He helped teach our kids the 1-3-1 defense we used in 1985 when we beat Maine South to go downstate," said Kipp, a Hall of Fame coach. "Maine South was No. 1 in state and we beat them in the Conant supersectional."

  •  
    Chicago Bandits catcher Shannon Doepking has decided to retire from National Pro Fastpitch after five seasons in the league.

    Veteran NPF catcher Doepking retires

    eteran catcher Shannon Doepking will retire from National Pro Fastpitch after five seasons, the Chicago Bandits announced Monday."This is an announcement we were not looking forward to make," Bandits general manager Aaron M. Moore said in a statement released to the media. "Doepking came in and managed not only Monica (Abbott), but the entire pitching staff so effectively.

  •  

    Boomers sign Lewis outfielder Bolling

    Former Lewis University baseball outfielder Mike Bolling of Chicago has signed a contract with the Schaumburg Boomers of the Frontier League for the upcoming 2013 season."He will be a great fit for the Boomers," Lewis head baseball coach Tim McDonough said. "Mike has a unique set of skills, and his speed will play well at any level."

  •  
    Abdel Nader

    NIU’s Nader wins MAC West weekly honors

    Northern Illinois sophomore Abdel Nader, a Niles North grad, was named Mid-American Conference West Division Player of the Week, league officials announced Monday. Nader averaged 22.5 points and 11.0 rebounds as the Huskies split a pair of contests against Kent State and Toledo.

  •  

    Girls basketball/Top 20
    Montini (28-1) remains atop the Daily Herald Top 20 girls basketball rankings this week with Neuqua Valley (24-2) jumping to No. 2 and Rolling Meadows (24-2) dropping to No. 3.

  •  

    Mike North video: Ravens, John Harbaugh and Joe Flacco Big Super Bowl Winners.

    Seems a lot of people were surprised by the Baltimore Ravens' victory. John Harbaugh is a great coach and a gracious big brother.

Business

  •  

    Proposal would tax athletic shoes 25 cents

    New athletic shoes could cost 25 cents more in Illinois. State Rep. Will Davis from the Chicago suburb of Hazel Crest wants the new tax to pay for a youth job preparation program. Lee Enterprises newspapers reports the Democratic lawmaker wants to raise about $3 million and most consumers wouldn't notice it. The 25 cents per pair of athletic shoes would go to the state's YouthBuild programs.

  •  
    Nancy Chovancek

    New work, ear surgery help Wheaton entrepreneur's creative side

    Kukec's People features Nancy Chovancek, whose life turned around after her parents died and she felt life was too short not to do something she always wanted to do. She left behind a 10-year career in project management, returned to school, graduated magna cum laude from DeVry University with a degree in web graphic design in 2009, and launched her own company, Wheaton-based Pegleg Web Designs. She also overcame hearing loss by having surgery in both ears at the same time.

  •  

    West Dundee OKs video gambling

    Up until Monday night, West Dundee was the odd man out when it came to its ban on video gambling. But by a vote of 5 to 1, West Dundee leaders decided to let it into town, much to the delight of several business owners. "I'm glad they did it," Randy Errington, owner of Bikini Bottom Bar and Grill, said after the vote. "We need it. If they don't, I'm closed."

  •  
    This image provided by Oreo’s shows the image the company’s marketers tweeted some 10 minutes after the power went out during the Super Bowl XLVII football game Sunday. As of Monday afternoon, the image had been re-tweeted more than 15,000 times.

    Live action: Twitter grabs Super Bowl spotlight

    Super Bowl XLVII, like the London Summer Olympics and the U.S. presidential election, was yet another moment in which Twitter became the platform for millions of people to share quick reactions and participate in a massive, public conversation. The question is whether these moments can translate into revenue for the seven-year-old company.

  •  
    Oak Brook-based McDonald’s says it is offering its first new Happy Meal entree in a decade: Fish McBites.

    McDonald’s to put ‘Fish McBites’ in Happy Meals

    Oak Brook-based McDonald's says it is offering its first new Happy Meal entree in a decade: Fish McBites. The world's biggest hamburger chain says the Fish McBites will be widely available at U.S. restaurants starting this week, lasting through March to coincide with Lent. The Happy Meals will come with seven pieces of Fish McBites, French fries, apple slices and a drink.

  •  
    Baltimore Ravens offensive lineman Bobbie Williams walks off the field with the Vince Lombardi Trophy after their 34-31 win against the San Francisco 49ers in the NFL Super Bowl XLVII football game Sunday in New Orleans.

    Super Bowl falls short of ratings record

    With a partial power outage, an overly excited quarterback and a game that suddenly turned from snoozer to sizzler, CBS had its hands full at the Super Bowl. The game fell short of setting a viewership record, but it stands as the third most-watched program in U.S. television history.

  •  
    U.S. stocks fell Monday, driving the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index to its biggest decline since November, on concern that the European debt crisis may intensify and a smaller-than-forecast increase in American factory orders.

    US stocks close down after Dow’s rally to 14,000

    Stocks hit a big milestone, then promptly spun off the road. Major indexes dived the most this year Monday, the first trading day after the Dow broke 14,000 and closed at its highest level since the financial crisis.

  •  
    Canada has begun phasing-out its penny, whose production costs have come to exceed its monetary value.

    In Canada, the phase out of the penny begins

    Canada has begun phasing-out its penny, whose production costs have come to exceed its monetary value.The Royal Canadian Mint on Monday officially ended its distribution of one-cent coins to financial institutions.

  •  

    BP sued by California for alleged hazardous waste violations

    BP Plc units including Atlantic Richfield Co. were sued by California over claims they violated environmental laws by failing to inspect and maintain underground storage tanks at 780 gas stations. Since 2006, BP West Coast Products, BP Products North America Inc. and Arco tampered with or disabled leak detection devices, failed to test secondary containment systems and didn't conduct monthly inspections or maintain operation alarm systems, Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O'Malley said in an e- mailed statement.

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    JPMorgan confronting BofA-led bond bears on loss: credit markets

    The biggest investment-grade bond loss in 14 months is bolstering Bank of America Corp.'s view that the unprecedented bull market in the notes is over. JPMorgan Chase & Co. disagrees. With bonds of the most-creditworthy borrowers from the U.S. to Europe and Asia losing 0.8 percent in January, Bank of America strategist Hans Mikkelsen cut his forecast for investment-grade debt returns last week, saying a sustained shift away from notes will cause borrowing costs to soar.

  •  

    Hewlett-Packard to sell first Chromebook laptop using Google

    Hewlett-Packard Co. will start selling its first Chromebook laptop, entering the market for low-priced portable computers running an operating system from Google Inc. that emphasizes working on the Web. The HP Pavilion 14 Chromebook has a 14-inch screen, 16- gigabyte solid-state drive and Intel Corp. processor. It also comes with 100 gigabytes of free storage on the online Google Drive service for two years, which ordinarily costs about $120.

  •  
    U.S. factory orders increased in December even though companies trimmed their orders for goods that signal investment plans.

    U.S. factory orders up 1.8 percent in December

    U.S. factory orders increased in December even though companies trimmed their orders for goods that signal investment plans. Factory orders rose 1.8 percent in December compared to November, when orders had fallen 0.3 percent, the Commerce Department said Monday. But demand for core capital goods, a category considered a proxy for business investment plans, dipped 0.3 percent in December following strong gains of 3.3 percent in November and 3 percent in October.

  •  

    EU says rescue program for Spain’s banks on track

    The rescue program for Spain's banks is on track, according to a review by EU authorities, but the country faces significant economic challenges, including high unemployment and a shrinking economy.

  •  

    Oracle to buy Acme Packet for about $2.1B

    Oracle is acquiring the network gear company Acme Packet for about $2.1 billion. The software giant will be able to bolster the communications package it offers to customers with the acquisition, it said Monday. Acme makes phone and data network equipment that's used by more than 1,900 service providers and enterprises around the world.

  •  
    The Chicago Department of Aviation says 2012 was a record year for Midway International Airport.

    Midway Airport sees record number of passengers

    The Chicago Department of Aviation says 2012 was a record year for Midway International Airport.About 9.67 million passengers boarded planes at Midway last year. The Chicago Sun-Times (http://bit.ly/14zKUmd ) reports that's the most passengers in Midway's 85-year history.

  •  

    Is this the year you can finally sell your business?

    After way too many years of waiting — for the economy to improve, for banks and investors to loosen up, for buyers to appear — you figure this is the year to sell your business and move on. Small Business Columnist Jim Kendall addresses the topic.

  •  

    Oil down but jitters could make for choppy trade

    Oil prices fell Monday following weeks of strong gains, while analysts warned that trading could be choppy amid growing tensions in the Middle East. Benchmark oil for March delivery fell 46 cents at late afternoon Bangkok time to $97.31 per barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract rose 28 cents to finish at $97.77 a barrel on the Nymex on Friday.

  •  

    Obama says ‘no doubt’ U.S. needs revenue with spending cuts

    President Barack Obama said there is "no doubt" the government needs new revenue from closing tax "loopholes" and limiting deductions, along with enacting spending cuts, to reduce the federal deficit. There's "no reason why we can't have really strong growth in 2013," the president said in an interview with CBS television yesterday before the network's Super Bowl broadcast. He cited a recovering housing industry, strong manufacturing and rising car sales.

  •  
    Brandon Smith, the Alaskan Brewing Co.’s brewing operations and engineering manager, speaks about the company’s new boiler system. The brewery has installed a unique boiler system that burns the company’s spent grain the accumulated waste from the brewing process into steam which powers the majority of the plant’s operations.

    Beer will help power Alaska brewery

    The Alaskan Brewing Co. is going green, but instead of looking to solar and wind energy, it has turned to a very familiar source: beer. The Juneau-based beer maker has installed a unique boiler system in order to cut its fuel costs. It purchased a $1.8 million furnace that burns the company's spent grain — the waste accumulated from the brewing process — into steam which powers the majority of the brewery's operations. Company officials now joke they are now serving "beer-powered beer."

  •  

    UK Treasury chief to announce bank breakup powers

    Britain's treasury chief is set to say that the country's banks could be forcibly split into smaller pieces if they fail to properly insulate their retail operations from their riskier investment arms. George Osborne is due to issue the stark warning during a speech Monday before executives from JP Morgan.

  •  
    A man checks the U.S. dollar exchange rate to the yen at a securities firm in Tokyo Monday.

    Markets subdued as Dow remains in focus

    Markets were subdued Monday following a stellar finish to last week, when many stock indexes around the world hit multiyear highs following encouraging U.S. economic figures.U.S. stocks are particularly in focus as the Dow jones industrial average closed above 14,000 on Friday for the first time in over five years. It's now not far off its all-time high.

  •  

    FAA mandates safety checks for older Piper planes

    The Federal Aviation Administration is requiring inspections on tens of thousands of older model Piper airplanes to check cables that control tail surfaces.The FAA is posting a directive in Monday's Federal Register, prompted by reports of failures in the cable assembly which direct a plane's nose. The rule requires inspections and parts replacement as needed, to correct what the FAA calls an "unsafe condition."

  •  
    Sergeant Scott Weaver, of The Queens Royal Lancers launching a newly issued Black Hornet miniature surveillance helicopter during an operation in Afghanistan.

    UK sends hand-held helicopter drones to war zone

    British soldiers in Afghanistan have been issued with surveillance drones so small they can fit in the palm of a squaddie's hand. The Scandinavian-designed Black Hornet Nano weighs as little as 16 grams (roughly half an ounce) — the same as a finch. The 4-inch -long helicopter is fitted with a tiny camera which relays still images and video to a remote terminal.

  •  
    Janet Leet, owner of $START_URL$SUB5 Dynamic Running Specialist;http://www.sub5dynamicrunning.com$STOP_URL$s in Arlington Heights moves her business from her home to a retail space.

    Avid runner moves business to Arlington Heights
    The owner of UB5 Dynamic Running Specialist moves her business from her home to a retail spot in Arlington Heights.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Faded movie star Norma Desmond (Christine Sherrill) sings of the glory days of silent cinema in “Sunset Boulevard” at Drury Lane Theatre in Oakbrook Terrace. The seven-time Tony Award-winning Andrew Lloyd Webber musical continues through Sunday, March 24.

    Drury Lane’s dark ‘Sunset’ shows Hollywood’s underside

    "Sunset Boulevard" is a dark victory for Drury Lane Theatre in Oakbrook Terrace. The Tony Award-winning Andrew Lloyd Webber musical about faded film star Nora Desmond continues through Sunday, March 24. It's packed with lushly romantic tunes like "With One Look" and "New Ways to Dream" reminiscent of golden-age Hollywood film scores.

  •  

    Shakira shares first baby photo

    Shakira is sharing the first public photograph of her recently born baby, with father Gerard Pique planting a kiss on his infant son's cheek. The 36-year-old Colombian singer announced Monday on Twitter that the photo of "my two angels" could be seen on the website of UNICEF. She has urged people to donate to a baby shower on behalf of needy children helped by the U.N. children's agency.

  •  
    Pamper your sweetheart’s heart with a Valentine’s Day breakfast of berry-sauced whole wheat French toast.

    Red foods keep you, your sweetheart healthy

    Skip the heart-shaped box of chocolates this Valentine's Day and give your sweetheart something that says you want to keep them around for a good long time — like a nice bowl of red fruits and vegetables. Red fruits and vegetables pack a punch when it comes to nutrition; red berries, specifically are naturally sweet and bursting with vitamins, minerals and fiber.

  •  
    Pamper your sweetheart’s heart with a Valentine’s Day breakfast of berry-sauced whole wheat French toast.

    Whole Wheat French Toast with Quick Berry Sauce
    Whole Wheat French Toast with Berry Sauce

  •  
    Beyoncé performs during the halftime show of the NFL Super Bowl XLVII football game between the San Francisco 49ers and the Baltimore Ravens Sunday in New Orleans.

    Following Super Bowl, Beyonce announces world tour

    Beyonce was just warming up at the Super Bowl: The singer has announced a world tour. "The Mrs. Carter Show World Tour" will kick off April 15 in Belgrade, Serbia. She'll come to the United Center in Chicago on Wednesday, July 17. Tickets go on sale starting Monday, Feb. 11.

  •  
    Philip and Etola Zinni of Villa Park say communication, respect and maintaining a sense of humor have helped them maintain a successful 32-year marriage.

    How one suburban couple keeps the romance going

    When cupid first aimed at Philip and Etola, he missed. Philip Zinni was a rugged football player at Addison Trail High School in Addison. Etola Reeser was an artist, coloring her high school canvas outside the lines of sports. "He was a heartthrob in high school," says Etola, a Villa Park resident who has been married to Philip for more than 30 years. "Every girl wanted to date him, except me."

  •  

    Sting, Rihanna, Mars, Clarkson to sing at Grammys

    Sting, Rihanna and Bruno Mars will hit the stage for a special performance at next week's Grammy Awards. The Recording Academy announced Monday that they will perform together at the Feb. 10 awards show. Triple nominee Kelly Clarkson will also take the stage.

  •  
    1967 Plymouth Fury

    Tribute 1967 squad car honors police profession

    Chris Hahn grew up spending a lot of his childhood inside a Plymouth police car. “My uncle was a sergeant with the Elmhurst Police department and I can remember getting rides in his car as a child,” Hahn said. As an adult, he wanted to create a vintage squad from his 1967 Plymouth Fury.

  •  
    Nicholas Hoult plays a zombie whose love for a human redeems him in “Warm Bodies.”

    ‘Warm Bodies’ heats up box office with $20 million

    The love-struck zombies of "Warm Bodies" swarmed the box office on Super Bowl weekend with a $20 million opening. The Lionsgate PG-13 film easily led the box office, according to studio estimates Sunday. The weekend of the Super Bowl always means a significant slide in moviegoing on Sunday, but "Warm Bodies" still lured many teenage fans.

  •  

    Hormone use in early menopause may ease symptoms

    A new study may reassure some women considering short-term use of hormones to relieve hot flashes and other menopause symptoms. Starting low-dose treatment early in menopause made women feel better and did not seem to raise heart risks during the four-year study. However, the research didn't address the risk of breast cancer, perhaps the biggest fear women have about hormones since a landmark study a decade ago.

  •  

    Why it's so important to reduce your stress level

    Today, we are under more stress than ever. From the time we get up to the time we go to bed, there is little time when we are not under some stress of some nature. Stress is not benign. Chronic stress contributes to all illness. And long-term stress is quite damaging to the body.

  •  
    Having healthy ingredients in your kitchen will help you make healthy meals.

    Keys to healthy eating: Planning, prepping, cooking

    If you're serious about maintaining your health for the long haul, you'll probably find yourself spending more time in the kitchen. This isn't to say that you'll eat more, but the extra time will be spent planning, prepping and cooking your meals. It is essential to have the right healthy ingredients in your kitchen to make sure you are eating right. Try this salmon and veggie recipe.

  •  

    Rely on your body’s natural detox system over a fad diet
    The word "detoxification" describes any type of therapy that removes potentially damaging toxins from the body. Pesticides are an example. The idea behind detox diets is that the buildup of toxins in our bodies decreases immunity, leads to chronic disease, decreases energy and slows metabolism. Detox diets claim to cleanse the body of this toxic waste. As toxins are flushed out, so the theory goes, the body functions better and metabolism returns to normal.

  •  
    Carefully picking and choosing healthy items from a menu can make eating out a more pleasurable experience.

    Your health: A plan for dining out
    Read tips on how to eat out in a smart way when you are away from home. And losing weight can involve doing the math to get it right.

  •  
    Anthony Gatti makes a call while resting in a tent where he is living in the Midland Beach section of the Staten Island borough of New York. The image of his brother trapped in a car with water rising to his neck is part of a recurring nightmare that wakes Anthony Gatti up, screaming, at night.

    Sandy leaves mental, emotional damage in its wake

    As communities battered by Sandy clear away the physical wreckage, a new crisis is emerging: the mental and emotional trauma that storm victims, including children, have endured. The extent of the problem is difficult to measure, as many people are too anxious to even leave their homes, wracked by fears of wind and water and parting from their loved ones. Others are too busy dealing with losses of property and livelihood to deal with their grief. To tackle the problem, government officials are dispatching more than 1,000 crisis counselors to the worst-hit areas in New York and New Jersey, helping victims begin the long work of repairing Sandy's emotional damage.

  •  

    Heart attack risk in women linked to some migraines, study finds

    Women who suffer from migraines with visual disturbances like flashing lights, called aura, may be at a higher risk for heart attack and stroke, research found. A study of almost 28,000 women showed that migraine with aura was the second-strongest individual contributor to danger of heart attack and stroke after high blood pressure, said Tobias Kurth, lead author of the research released by the American Academy of Neurology.

  •  

    Stress takes toll on physical health

    Alarms sound and firefighters jump into fire trucks in a flash. Soldiers struggle to survive war. A mother grows exhausted caring for her children. People live wholly different lives, but there's one thing they share: Life is full of stress. Expected and unexpected daily challenges on the job, at home or out and about expose people to a constant barrage of forces that threaten their normal equilibrium. What people don't fully realize is the toll that stress takes on our physical health.

  •  
    Douglas Berg, a social worker at Prospect High School, watches as a student pets Junie, the school's “therapy dog.” Stress, anxiety and panic attacks are on the rise at many U.S. high schools, due to heightened academic expectations and troubles at home made worse by the shaky economy.

    Schools try to ease pressure on stressed students

    The four-legged member of the counseling team at the high school waits patiently, as a crush of students fills the hallways. Her tail wags with the first pat on the head, then another and another. "Puppy! Ohhh, puppy dog!" one teenager croons, as he affectionately tousles the ears of the 18-month-old golden retriever. Junie began her role as a "therapy dog" at Prospect High School less than four months ago. It's just one of a number of ways high schools across the country are trying to address what some call an epidemic of stressed-out, overwhelmed students.

Discuss

  •  

    Editorial: Let’s eliminate local electoral boards

    An upcoming legislative proposal that would help reduce unfair politics of local elections deserves support, a Daily Herald editorial says.

  •  

    Vacuums of sovereignty

    Columnist Michael Gerson: The most important goal in Africa is not to provide temporary substitutes for sovereignty but to strengthen that attribute itself. This is the opposite of colonialism — the building of local military and civil capacity and improving public health and economic growth.

  •  

    From I don’t to I do

    Columnist Kathleen Parker: David Blankenhorn’s personal transformation has resulted in a welcome shift in the public debate about gay marriage. How clever of him to recognize that his allies in strengthening marriage are the very people who for so long have been excluded.

  •  

    Driver’s license law is irresponsible
    A Des Plaines letter to the editor: Do lawmakers really think we believe the illegal aliens will buy insurance and inform authorities where they live? Wake up, stop being politicians and be responsible legislators.

  •  

    Equal treatment needed for gay couples
    A Prospect Heights letter to the editor: Although it is not in my nature to procreate, I do pay taxes to subsidize the children of others who use public schools, libraries, public aid, etc.There should be a mutual respect and support regarding Social Security benefits for all couples paying into the system, and shared insurance benefits done equally.

  •  

    Some thoughts on the gay marriage issue
    An Elk Grove Village letter to the editor: When the fiscal condition of Illinois is so deplorable, why is the issue of "gay marriage" being used to complicate a solution to the fact that we have allowed our elected officials to spend more money than they take from us in taxes?

  •  

    Bullying requires immediate response
    A letter to the editor: "Considering one response after several incidents” only serves to reinforce the bully’s behavior and puts you in the position of repeatedly being verbally battered or worse. There you are waiting for a “pattern” to emerge and getting more angry as the insults continue.

  •  

    ‘Killing’ state pension systems no solution
    A letter to the editor: "Killing” the pension systems does not relieve the state from paying all retirement benefits already earned by public employees who have steadily contributed a part of their salaries toward the system. Rather than look for ways to dodge our obligations, it would be more productive to engage in the hard debate about the changes necessary to meet them.

  •  

    Have adequate smoke alarms in your home
    A letter to the editor: Make sure your family has enough warning by placing smoke alarms on each floor, in living areas and inside and outside of sleeping areas. These simple steps can go a long way to help save lives.

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    Should one be rewarded for stealing?
    A Hanover Park letter to the editor: When the state of Illinois took the money that should have been deposited into the retirement reserve funds, which is mandated in the Illinois Constitution, the state broke the law. And now some Illinois politicians expect the retirees, from whom the money was stolen, to reimburse the state for the state’s illegal action.

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