SCGT

Daily Archive : Monday November 26, 2012

News

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    Owen Jordan and his mother, Lisa Jordan, of Arlington Heights, hug at a Legoland Discovery Center Chicago event at St. Alexius Medical Center in Hoffman Estates. Three dozen children in the hospital’s community helped set a Guinness World Record for having the “Largest Toy Construction Lesson” on Nov. 15.

    Legoland, St. Alexius children help set world record

    Legoland Discovery Center Chicago received confirmation from Guinness World Record officials that the center helped set the record for the "Largest Toy Construction Lesson." 287 children from around the world participated in the event, including 36 members of the community at St. Alexius Medical Center in Hoffman Estates.

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    Amanda Lyubelsky, left, of Carol Stream and Tim Hayes of Wheaton paint scarecrows at a Tuesday art program.

    Wheaton program helps those with disabilities connect, build friendships

    Amanda Hempe of Winfield, a young woman with cognitive delays, looks forward to Saturday nights when she attends Connections of Friends. At the new Wheaton-based program, she noshes on pizza, plays games, performs karaoke, and just laughs at the funny things that happen. "I like hanging out with my friends and I like the (people) who work there," she said.

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    Primaries take shape in Aurora’s 4th and 9th wards

    Primary elections are taking shape for city council seats in Aurora's 4th and 9th wards. The top four vote-getters in the February primaries for each of the two wards will advance to the April 9 general election.

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    Work continued through the fall on the Red Gate Bridge that will eventually span the Fox River just East of St. Charles North.

    Traffic still a problem as Red Gate bridge prepares to open

    St. Charles officials have some ideas about how to address traffic backlogs at St. Charles North High School as the city prepares to open the new Red Gate Bridge right across Rt. 31.

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    Elizabeth S. Bako

    Grayslake woman charged with stealing from school PTO

    An arraignment is scheduled next week for a Grayslake woman who prosecutors say may have stolen more than $10,000 from a local school’s Parent Teacher Organization. Elizabeth S. Bako, 41, of the 300 block of Woodland Drive, was formally charged with two counts of theft and two counts of using a debit card with intent to defraud under an indictment handed up last week by a Lake County grand jury.

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    Happy Caps founder Ellen Hart, center, began recruiting this team of volunteers and others for her new organization earlier this year. The group knits caps for cancer patients and makes journals for them and behavioral health patients, too.

    Happy Caps helps hospital patients think good thoughts

    In July, Ellen Hart of Wood Dale teamed up with volunteers to form Happy Caps. The group crafts journals for behavioral health and chemotherapy patients, and make caps for the cancer patients, too. "It makes my heart go crazy," Hart said of the project.

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    Despite a law to the contrarty, the U.S. Supreme Court says it continues to be OK to tape Illinois police officers on the job.

    Court rejects plea to block taping of police

    Despite a law to the contrary, it continues to be OK to tape Illinois police officers on the job. The United States Supreme Court today rejected an Illinois prosecutor’s plea to allow enforcement of a law aimed at stopping people from recording police officers on the job.

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    Daily Herald photographer George LeClaire entices a Red-Breasted Nuthatch to land on his hand using peanuts in Glenview. Many Illinois residents have posted on Illinois Audubon Society Facebook page that they have spotted large numbers of the bird for the first time since 2007 and 1989 migrations.

    Images: Migratory birds
    Migrating birds rarely seen in Illinois will be flocking to backyard bird feeders in the suburbs through March. Suburban bird enthusiasts are enjoying seeing a greater amount of birds due to the drought causing a food shortage in the north. This gallery includes photos of red-breasted nuthatches eating peanuts out of Daily Herald photographer George LeClaire's hand, a late rufous hummingbird and...

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    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected an appeal by Cook County State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez to allow enforcement of a law aimed at stopping people from recording police officers on the job.

    Another blow for Illinois anti-eavesdropping law

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday delivered another blow to a 50-year-old anti-eavesdropping law in Illinois, choosing to let stand a lower court finding that key parts of the hotly debated law run counter to constitutional protections of free speech.

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    A backstretch barn is busy during Arlington Park’s racing season, but the troubled horse racing industry resonates statewide.

    Another problem for horse racing: fewer foals

    As gamblers place fewer bets at Arlington Park and prize money drops for winners, the effects are felt far from the track. The number of thoroughbred horses born in Illinois has been dropping steadily, to 429 this year from 1,009 in 2006, according to the Illinois Department of Agriculture. “There’s no future in it in this state at this point,” said Frank Kirby, an Oak Brook...

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    After keeping a low public profile leading up to the 2012 November election, Gov. Pat Quinn now faces one of the most critical times of his tenure where his every move will be scrutinized by Republicans who’ve said the 2014 governorís race is their top priority after devastating losses to the party last week.

    Quinn faces key leadership test in coming weeks

    Through his own insistence, the next few weeks will offer a critical test of leadership for Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn. He has set an early January deadline for solving the state's pension crisis — a decades-old problem he says he was "put on this earth" to solve. He's facing lawmakers intent on expanded gambling in the state despite his veto. And all of it is magnified by the emerging 2014...

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    Alex Campbell

    Ex-massage parlor operator gets life for sex trafficking

    A convicted sex trafficker who ran a massage parlor in Mount Prospect and was described by one of his victims as "pure evil" was sentenced Monday to life in prison. Alex Campbell, 47, of Glenview, was found guilty by a federal jury in January on charges including sex trafficking, forced labor and harboring illegal aliens.

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    Glen Ellyn resident Shaun Emerson founded ProjectBoost to helps raise money and market local nonprofits through the design and sale of T-shirts tailored to each organization’s mission.

    Glen Ellyn businessman gives charities a boost

    Shaun Emerson and his friends were having breakfast when they started talking about social entrepreneurship. It was time for a career change, decided Emerson, 49, a Glen Ellyn father of three. What came of it is ProjectBoost, a startup that helps raise funds and market local nonprofits through the design and sale of T-shirts tailored to each organization's mission.

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    Daniel Baker

    Man convicted of killing girlfriend’s mom denied new trial

    A Lake County judge rejected a new trial request Monday for a man convicted in the 2010 killing of his girlfriend's mother in Vernon Hills. Daniel Baker, 24, of Deerfield, now must prepare for his Jan. 9 sentencing hearing, at which he will face between 20 years to life in prison.

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    Holiday decorations in North School Park in Arlington Heights.

    Parties try to avoid lawsuit over rejected Nativity scene

    Arlington Heights Park District officials said their lawyers are talking with attorneys for the Thomas More Society, which filed a complaint last week asking for a nativity scene to be included in the village's annual holiday lights display.

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    Christopher Brooke Beal

    Former solid waste agency director to plead guilty

    Christopher Brooke Beal, former director of the Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County, will plead guilty to charges of stealing about $900,000 from his former employer, Beal's defense attorney said Monday during a hearing in Skokie.

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    Kaneland board considering bus, computer purchases

    The Kaneland school district has postponed routine replacement of its school buses for a few years, after the Great Recession hit. But even though money is still tight, it’s time to start thinking about buying at least five — preferably 10 — new buses, according to district administrators. The school board Monday approved adding $400,000 to the district’s financial-projection model. The...

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    Crowds again address Dist. 300 school board

    Students, teachers and parents caught in the middle of contract negotiations between the district school board and its teachers union again bombarded the school board during public comments at Monday’s school board meeting. While the turnout failed to reach the numbers that descended upon a board meeting earlier this month, more than 200 audience members packed into the board room and hallway at...

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    Orville St. Peter “Pat” Clavey was Lake County sheriff from 1970 to 1974.

    Former Lake County sheriff dies

    Former Lake County Sheriff Pat Clavey was laid to rest Monday. Orville St. Peter “Pat” Clavey, 80, of Waukegan died Nov. 20 at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. Clavey served as the Lake County coroner and was the sheriff of Lake County from 1970 to 1974. But he later served time in prison for tax evasion and perjury.

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    Rhiana Gunn-Wright gives a commencement speech as she graduates with the class of 2007 from the Illinois Math and Science Academy in Aurora. Gunn-Wright was named a Rhode scholar in November and will begin studying comparative social policy next fall at the University of Oxford in England.

    IMSA grad scores Rhodes Scholarship to study poverty

    Illinois Math and Science Academy graduate Rhiana Gunn-Wright will be heading to the University of Oxford next fall to study comparative social policy thanks to a Rhodes Scholarship she secured by wowing professors with her research in poverty and welfare policy and a trait she’s had since high school. Gunn-Wright, 23, said she was voted “easiest to talk to” during her years at IMSA in Aurora,...

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    David Axelrod was a calming influence on the Obama 2012 campaign team and helped focus on middle-class voters.

    Obama adviser says Ryan pick was a surprise

    A top adviser to President Barack Obama's re-election campaign says one of the biggest surprises of the 2012 election was Mitt Romney's choice of a running mate. Speaking to students at the University of Chicago Monday, senior strategist David Axelrod said by choosing Congressman Paul Ryan, Romney played to his base at a time when he needed to be broadening his appeal.

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    Home catches fire in Huntley

    The Huntley Fire Department extinguished a blaze in a single-family residence in Huntley Monday evening. No one was home when the fire broke out on the 13000 block of Harmony Road.

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    Eddie Money

    Eddie Money show in St. Charles to help hurricane victims

    Ron Onesti, the owner of the Arcada Theatre in St. Charles, is planning a benefit show with Eddie Money, Edgar Winter and Jon Caffferty and the Beaver Brown Band to raise money for single mothers in Sandy-ravaged Hoboken, N.J., the birthplace of Frank Sinatra.

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    Primary needed in one Wheaton race, but 3 unopposed

    The way it stands now, Wheaton will need a February primary election to reduce the number of candidates hoping to represent the city's north side. But candidates seeking three other spots on the city council won't face any opposition.

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    President Barack Obama acknowledges House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio while speaking to reporters at the White House Nov. 16, as he hosted a meeting of the bipartisan, bicameral leadership of Congress to discuss the deficit and economy.

    Despite talk of compromise, fiscal deal elusive

    Talk of compromise on a broad budget deal greeted returning lawmakers Monday, but agreement still seemed distant as the White House and congressional Republicans ceded little ground on a key sticking point: whether to raise revenue through higher tax rates or by limiting tax breaks and deductions.

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    2 teens charged in Hoffman Estates armed robbery

    Two teens were arrested Sunday and charged as adults in an armed robbery that took place in Hoffman Estates in September.

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    Jim Schwantz

    Palatine’s Schwantz unopposed in bid for second mayoral term

    Next year's municipal elections may not be until April 9, but Palatine Mayor Jim Schwantz likely has a second term in office already wrapped up. "I hope this means people are very satisfied with the job we're doing," Schwantz said.

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    Dist. 214 hosts Ask the College Night on Nov. 29

    Ask the College Night will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 29 at Forest View Educational Center, 2121 S. Goebbert Road, Arlington Heights. All District 214 juniors and their parents are encouraged to learn about local community colleges, a four-year in-state public school, a four-year out-of-state public school and a four-year private school.

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    Field of 23 candidates files for Elgin council races

    The list of candidates for Elgin City Council filled out on the last day of filing Monday. Ten people are running for a single 2-year seat, which means a primary will be held Feb. 26. The field of 15 candidates running for four, 4-year seats will not be narrowed with an earlier race. They will face off in the April 9 general election. All three council incumbents, Richard Dunne, Robert Gilliam...

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    Little competition in N. Aurora election

    Unless somebody files as a write-in candidate, it appears North Aurora Village President Dale Berman will have no opponents in the April election. And there are only four candidates for three trustee seats.

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    Barat land gifted to Woodland Academy

    Two pieces of property in Lake Forest purchased by the Society of the Sacred Heart in 1901 will be reunited. In a ceremony Dec. 12, Woodlands Academy of the Sacred Heart will formally accept the gift of 23 acres of the former Barat College.

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    Lake Zurich helping Hurricane Sandy victims

    Lake Zurich's Knights of Columbus Queen of Peace Council will host a fundraiser Saturday, Dec. 1 to benefit Hurricane Sandy victims. Doors open at 7 p.m. at 365 Surryse Road, with the evening featuring Beatles tribute band The Cavern Beat.

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    Strich, Taubman Co. leaving Woodfield Mall

    Marc Strich, the general manager of Woodfield Mall in Schaumburg for 11 years, will transfer in January to the Wellington Green Mall in West Palm Beach, Fla. The move comes as Simon Property Group takes over management of Woodfield from Strich's employer, The Taubman Co., on Jan. 1.

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    Groot Industries Inc. plans to file a siting request for a garbage transfer station at Route 120 and Porter Drive in Round Lake Park. Some residents already are mounting opposition to the plan.

    Garbage transfer plan draws concern in Round Lake Park

    A notice by Groot Industries to file a local siting request for a garbage transfer station in Round Lake Park is drawing concern from residents, who question traffic, noise and other issues. As a regional pollution control facility, the proposal is governed by state law which mandates a public hearing between 90 and 120 days after the plan is filed.

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    Des Plaines police have petitioned six Maine West High School students to juvenile court on charges of battery and hazing in a Sept. 27 incident. District 207 officials have acknowledged that a 2008 hazing incident has similarities to this 2012 incident.

    Attorney criticizes Dist. 207’s response to 2008 hazing

    Attorneys representing the family of a 14-year-old Maine West High School student who says members of the boys varsity soccer team sexually assaulted him in September, criticized the school district Monday for not dealing more harshly with a 2008 hazing incident. "I was appalled to learn that Maine Township school district has just now acknowledged they knew of a hazing incident in 2008,"...

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    12 to compete for four Naperville council seats

    A total of 12 candidates — including nine newcomers — are seeking four open seats on the Naperville City Council next spring. Incumbent Councilwoman Judy Brodhead and Tara Leigh Gregus, a Republican precinct committeewoman, were the last to file at the city clerk's office Monday, the final day candidates could submit their nominating petitions for the April 9 municipal election.

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    1 dead in shooting after Chicago funeral

    Authorities say a known gang member was shot to death and another was wounded outside a Chicago church as people left the funeral of another slain man. The presiding minister at the funeral asked on Twitter for prayers, tweeting after Monday's shooting: "Please pray ... This is Crazy!!"

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    Advocates prep for Indiana gay marriage battle

    Supporters and opponents of gay marriage are already squaring off in a battle over whether to amend Indiana's constitution that could stretch until voters decide the issue in November 2014. Gay marriage supporters released a report Monday showing that writing the state's ban on gay marriage into the constitution could have broad, unintended consequences, dealing with as many as 614 different laws...

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    Carpentersville to tap into county’s CodeRed phone system

    If there's an emergency lockdown or evacuation of some sort in Carpentersville, first responders must now go door-to-door to notify the affected people. But by next spring, all of that is expected to change, once the village joins Kane County's CodeRed program, an emergency notification system that can call 50,000 people in an hour.

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    Bensenville fire displaces five families

    Plumbers started a fire in a Bensenville six-flat Monday afternoon that left five families displaced, authorities said. The Bensenville Fire Protection District responded to a call at 1:22 p.m. for a fire on the 1000 block of West Irving Park Road.

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    Hospital officials lead a tour of the neonatal intensive care unit at Rush-Copley Medical Center in Aurora where they met to review recommendations to decrease the state’s 12 percent prematurity rate.

    Hospitals, others work to reduce premature births

    With one in eight Illinois babies born too soon, hospitals such as Rush-Copley in Aurora and advocacy groups are working to reduce pre-term births. They want to make it easier to track data about prematurity, educate the public about risk factors and provide the best treatment. "We know prematurity is a great burden, first and foremost, to the family members," one advocate said.

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    Frank Napolitano

    Bartlett trustee running for U-46 school board

    Bartlett village Trustee Frank Napolitano will not seek re-election to the village board next year, but instead run for a position on the Elgin Area School District U-46 board.

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    Actors Stark Sands, left, and Billy Porter perform in a preview show of “Kinky Boots” at the Bank of America Theatre in Chicago.

    Tax credit luring pre-Broadway shows to Chicago

    The New York-bound musical "Kinky Boots" enjoyed a pre-Broadway run at a downtown Chicago theater this fall, but only after the state of Illinois lured producers with something that's scarce these days — money. The Cyndi Lauper and Harvey Fierstein production and a second musical, "Big Fish," were the first to apply for a certificate making them eligible for a state theater tax credit.

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    Police reports
    Nicholas P. Izquierdo, 22, of the 600 block of Windermere Way in Lake in the Hills, was arrested Nov. 16 and charged with marijuana possession, possession of drug paraphernalia and speeding, a Huntley police report said. He is scheduled to appear in court on Dec. 7 in McHenry County.

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    Chicago schools CEO has ‘right-sizing’ plan

    Chicago Public Schools CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett said Monday she's willing to commit to a five-year moratorium on school closures starting in the fall — if the district can first "right-size" its classroom space, which now has about 100,000 excess seats.

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    Jesse Jackson Jr. resigned from Congress earlier this month.

    March 19 the date of special election for Jackson’s seat

    Gov. Pat Quinn says the special election to replace former Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. has tentatively been set for March 19, but that could change. However, Quinn says he's going to try to get approval for an April 9 general election, which is the same day as other municipal elections.

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    Kathey Wilk

    Foul play not suspected in death of missing Hampshire woman

    Kane County Sheriff's detectives were able to positively identify the skeletal remains found in a wooded area near Hampshire as those of Kathey Wilk. The cause of death is undetermined; however investigators do not suspect that foul play was involved in her death.

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    Torres considered as full-time administrator in Wauconda

    A familiar name is expected to be named village administrator in Wauconda. The village board Tuesday is scheduled to vote on the appointment of Zaida Torres, the village's finance director, as village administrator. Torres has been serving as interim administrator the past few months as the replacement for David Geary, who resigned in August.

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    Gail Borden tax levy increases slightly

    The Gail Borden Public Library is keeping its tax levy relatively flat for 2012 after doing the same in 2011. Deputy Director Karen Maki said officials felt the need to hold the levy because of the economy. The library requested $11,627,500 for its operating budget last year and will increase that by less than half a percent for 2012. Board members approved a request of $11,673,500 earlier this...

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    Too many preemies
    With one in eight Illinois babies born too soon, hospitals and advocacy groups are working to reduce pre-term births by forming a prematurity caucus among state legislators and pushing for action on several recommendations from a task force assigned to evaluate the issue. Advocates say following the recommendations will make it easier to track data about prematurity, educate the public about risk...

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    Christopher Vaughn, of Oswego, was convicted in the June 2007 killing of his wife and three children in the family’s SUV as they drove to a water park.

    Judge mulls new trial for dad in family slayings

    A judge is considering granting a new trial to a 37-year-old suburban Chicago man convicted of murdering his wife and three children.

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    The U.S. Supreme Court has given new life to Liberty University’s challenge to President Barack Obama’s healthcare overhaul. Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, center, is seen here shaking hands with Jerry Falwell Jr., chancellor of Liberty University, before his commencement speech at the campus in Lynchburg, Va., May 12, 2012.

    Court orders new look at health care challenge
    The Supreme Court has revived a Christian college's challenge to President Barack Obama's healthcare overhaul, with the acquiescence of the Obama administration.

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    Thousands of Egyptians attend the funeral of Gaber Salah, who was who was killed in clashes with security forces in Cairo, Monday.

    Egypt’s president stands by his decrees

    Egypt's President Mohammed Morsi told the country's top judges Monday that he did not infringe on their authority when he seized near absolute powers, setting the stage for a prolonged showdown on the eve of mass protests planned by both supporters and opponents of the Islamist leader.

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    Naperville's Ss. Peter and Paul Roman Catholic School students, staff, and local officials attended an assembly honoring the school for winning status as a Blue Ribbon School from the federal government. After the assembly, the entire student body gathered for a group photo in the shape of a blue ribbon in front of the school.

    Images: The Week In Pictures
    This edition of The Week In Pictures features Ss. Peter and Paul School in Naperville's blue-ribbon celebration, as well as many shots of Thanksgiving generosity, Turkey Trots and Black Friday shoppers.

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    Nursing students, from left, Joseph Brisbois, Jim Owen, Patryk Gusciora and Ann Portmann pose with the plaque that Gusciora had made from his Chicago Marathon medal in honor of the nurses at Northwest Oncology at St. Alexius Medical Center. All four will graduate in December.

    Harper graduates latest class of nursing students

    Harper College will hold its "Celebration Ceremony" on Saturday, when they pin their nursing students and honor the newest members of the health care profession. Among the group will be Patryk Gusciora of Schaumburg, a former paramedic and current Army reservist who will realize a long-held dream. "I enjoyed being a paramedic, but I always felt like we were diagnosing the patient, but not getting...

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    Palestinian schoolchildren walk in the rubble Monday left days after an Israeli strike destroyed the Hamas interior ministry in Gaza City. Israel launched its offensive on Nov. 14 in a bid to halt months of Palestinian rocket attacks. It says it inflicted heavy damage on Gaza militants, but the territory’s armed groups fired hundreds of rockets into Israel before a cease-fire was declared Wednesday.

    Israel, militants begin talks on truce details

    Israel and Palestinian militants from the Gaza Strip began indirect talks Monday in Egypt aimed at forging a new era of relations between the bitter enemies following a cease-fire that ended the heaviest fighting in nearly four years.

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    Fire at German workshop for disabled kills 14

    Firefighters say a fire at a workshop for disabled people in southwestern Germany has killed 14 and injured at least six others.

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    N.Y. police probe shredded documents found at parade

    Suburban New York authorities are investigating how shredded police documents got tossed as confetti to spectators at last week's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City.

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    Wis. Gov. Walker confident he’s clear in probe

    Gov. Scott Walker tells The Associated Press that he remains "absolutely" confident that he is not a subject of a criminal investigation involving former aides in his Milwaukee County office.

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    Police: 13-year-old driver hurt in S. Ind. crash

    State police say a 13-year-old runaway lost control of a stolen car on a southern Indiana highway and it crashed down an embankment. Police say the crash Monday morning at an Interstate 65 interchange a few miles south of Columbus injured both the girl and a 17-year-old boy who was a passenger.

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    Dawn Patrol: 2008 hazing at Maine West; 150 sing for choir director

    District 207 admits 2008 Maine West hazing case similar to recent allegations. Alumni sing for retired Forest View and Elk Grove choir director Jerry Swanson. Jay Cutler is back, and that makes the Bears much better.

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    U.N.: Japan should do more for nuclear victims

    A United Nations rights investigator said Monday that Japan hasn't done enough to protect the health of residents and workers affected by the Fukushima nuclear accident.

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    91-year-old German charged with Nazi crimes

    A 91-year-old former member of the Nazis' Waffen SS has been charged with murder in the 1944 slaying of a Dutch resistance fighter, who was allegedly executed shortly after he was captured, prosecutors said Monday.

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    U.S., Russia name crew for yearlong space mission

    NASA and Russia's Roscosmos have named the two men who will spend a year aboard the International Space Station to gather more data about the effects of weightlessness on humans.

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    Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, the U.S. Army private charged with sending reams of government secrets to WikiLeaks, is expected to testify during a pretrial hearing starting Tuesday at Fort Meade. Manning is seeking dismissal of all charges. He claims his solitary confinement, sometimes with no clothing, was illegal punishment.

    GI’s treatment focus of hearing in WikiLeaks case

    An Army private charged in the biggest security breach in U.S. history is trying to avoid trial by claiming he's already been punished by confinement conditions that a United Nations torture investigator called cruel, inhuman and degrading. Pfc. Bradley Manning is expected to testify about his treatment during a pretrial hearing starting Tuesday at Fort Meade.

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    Man charged with murder in 4 Detroit-area slayings

    A man who authorities say killed four women in December 2011, locked their bodies in car trunks and abandoned them in Detroit has been charged with murder, prosecutors announced Monday.

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    Egyptian protesters clash with security forces near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday.

    Egypt minister says end of crisis ‘imminent’

    Egypt's justice minister said Monday that a resolution was "imminent" to the political crisis over President Mohammed Morsi's decision to grant himself sweeping new powers, a move that has touched off days of violent street protests. Ahmed Mekki spoke to reporters shortly before Morsi was due to meet members of the Supreme Judiciary Council to discuss the decrees the Islamist president announced...

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    Bangladeshi firefighters battle a fire at a garment factory in the Savar neighborhood in Dhaka, Bangladesh, late Saturday. At least 112 people were killed in a fire that raced through the multistory garment factory just outside of Bangladesh’s capital, an official said Sunday.

    Factory fire the deadliest of many in Bangladesh

    The fire alarm: Waved off by managers. An exit door: Locked. The fire extinguishers: Not working and apparently "meant just to impress" inspectors and customers. That is the picture survivors paint of the garment-factory fire Saturday in Bangladesh that killed 112 people who were trapped inside or jumped to their deaths in desperation.

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    Parents swept to sea in effort to save son, dog

    Family members trying to rescue their dog from powerful surf in Northern California were swept out to sea, leaving a couple dead and their 16-year-old son missing, authorities said. Waves reaching 10 feet in height pulled the dog into the ocean as it ran to retrieve a stick at Big Lagoon, a beach north of Eureka, said Dana Jones, a state Parks and Recreation district superintendent.

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    Serbia seeks evidence against freed Croat generals

    Serbia on Monday asked U.N. war crimes prosecutors to hand over evidence against two Croatian generals whose convictions have been overturned, reigniting tensions between the Balkan wartime rival states.

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    Robert Spano, left, and Alan Hugley clean up broken glass Saturday outside of Punta Cana Restaurant & Bar, a few blocks from the site of a Friday-evening gas explosion that leveled a strip club in Springfield, Mass.

    Employee in Mass. gas explosion did right thing

    A natural gas explosion that injured more than 20 people and damaged 42 buildings in Springfield's entertainment district was blamed on a utility worker who accidentally punctured a high-pressure pipeline while looking for a leak. The president of the gas company involved says the employee followed proper procedure and protocol.

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    Teen accused of killing his stepfather with sword

    Authorities in north Georgia say a 16-year-old boy is expected to make his first court appearance Monday after he was accused of killing his stepfather with a sword. Pickens County sheriff's Lt. Kris Stancil says a relative of the teen called 911 Friday night to report the stabbing.

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    DuPage County Forest Preserve officials are paying about $95,000 to an engineering firm to design the next phase of a $19.3 million improvement plan that would ease flooding and improve ecology at Oak Meadows Golf Club in Addison.

    Oak Meadows Golf Club plans: wetlands, new clubhouse, better course

    DuPage County Forest Preserve officials have launched a potential $19.3 million improvement plan for Oak Meadows Golf Club in Addison. “We knew we had golf course needs, but we kind of had a bigger idea,” said Ed Stevenson, forest preserve golf operations director. “We wondered if we could also make the preserve a better preserve by creating more wetlands and natural habitat."

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    New Metra Chairman Brad O’Halloran says the allocation of funds within the agency must be equitable.

    Will new chairman bring Metra some Irish luck?
    Can a Southwest Side boy understand the travel needs of the Northwest and West suburbs? New Metra Chairman Brad O'Halloran thinks so. “We can’t even address growth right now,” O’Halloran said. “What we have to do is catch up on the daily maintenance issues." Plus CTA fare hikes, readers' reaction to Metra fare hikes and your gridlock alert.

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    Freshman Spanish students Mikaela Webb, left, and Victoria Warren do homework on Apple iPad tablet computers.

    All Stevenson High students could get iPads by 2015

    Already widely used on campus, Apple iPad tablet computers could be distributed to all Stevenson High School students by 2015. Every incoming freshman could get one of the popular devices starting next year. “There’s no doubt that the use of tablets in classrooms is one of the biggest technological changes on the educational landscape,” Stevenson spokesman Jim Conrey said.

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    New ad highlights value of Elgin Community College

    Elgin Community College has embarked on a new marketing campaign to stress the value of an education, especially the value of an ECC education that's less expensive than a full four-year university. The college has released a 50-second commercial that is now showing before the previews at movie theaters in Elgin, Lake in the Hills, St. Charles, South Barrington and Carpentersville.

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    It’s that time again. The Daily Herald is giving away two snowblowers in $START_URL$its annual holiday lights contest;http://dhcontests.upickem.net/engine/Welcome.aspx?contestid=44560$STOP_URL$. Submit a photo of your house by Dec. 9, and vote on the entries between Dec. 10 and 16. The top vote-getter will win a Toro Power Clear snowblower worth $850, receive a plaque and be featured in a Daily Herald article.

    Weekend in Review Holiday Edition: Suburban shopping, state football titles
    What you might have missed over the long weekend: Community dinners; Thanksgiving and Black Friday shopping; state titles for Montini, Glenbard West, Aurora Christian; Streamwood woman found dead; Lindenhurst man drowns in lake; Arlington Heights Nativity scene decision challenged; Cutler returns in Bears win; Bulls pull off a win; and Dist. 207 talks Maine West hazing allegations.

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    Sweat with Santa in Mundelein

    Fitness fans ages 14 and older can enjoy free and festive fitness with a canned food donation on Saturday, Dec. 1, at the Mundelein Park and Recreation District’s Park View Health & Fitness Center, 1401 N. Midlothian Road, Mundelein.

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    World AIDS Day event in Waukegan

    The Lake County Health Department is collaborating with several local partners to plan an event commemorating World AIDS Day on Saturday, Dec. 1, in Waukegan.

Sports

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    Utah Jazz guard Gordon Hayward (20) shoots as Denver Nuggets forward Danilo Gallinari (8) defends in the second quarter during an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 26, 2012, in Salt Lake City.

    Jefferson scores 28 as Jazz beat Nuggets 105-103

    Al Jefferson scored a season-high 28 points and Derrick Favors made three free throws down the stretch, helping the Utah Jazz remain unbeaten at home with a 105-103 win over the Denver Nuggets on Monday night.

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    Memphis Grizzlies fans cheer and greet Memphis Grizzlies’ Tony Allen during a timeout late in the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Cleveland Cavaliers in Memphis, Tenn, Monday, Nov. 26, 2012. The Grizzlies won 84-78.

    Grizzlies overcome slow start to beat Cavs 84-78

    Zach Randolph and Marc Gasol scored 19 points apiece to help the Memphis Grizzlies overcame a lethargic performance and escape with an 84-78 victory over the Cleveland Cavaliers on Monday night.

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    Richard Hamilton shoots over Milwaukee Bucks’ Doron Lamb, left, and Beno Udrih during the second half of the Bulls’ loss Monday night at the United Center.

    Bulls let 27-point lead vanish in loss to Bucks

    The Bulls' worst regular-season moment since Derrick Rose joined the team has to be the 35-point blown lead against Sacramento on Dec. 21, 2009. This one wasn’t quite as bad, but it was close. The Bucks erased a 27-point deficit in just eight minutes and went on to shock the Bulls 93-92 at the United Center.

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    Can NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman separate his own interests (to the tune of his $8 million salary) from those of the game? If he doesn’t, there likely won’t be a hockey season at all.

    NHL fate in Bettman’s hands, wallet

    The reason there's no NHL hockey is because Gary Bettman has made promises he can't keep, and if he doesn't keep them and loses half an NHL season -- or more -- in the process, he will be out of an $8-million-a-year job.

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    The Bulls’ Joakim Noah shoots over Bucks center Larry Sanders in the first half Monday at the United Center. The Bucks rallied from a big deficit to win 93-92.

    Bucks’ Gooden Tweets a bit of bathroom wit

    Before the Bulls’ big lead went down the toilet, idle Milwaukee center Drew Gooden added an odd twist to the I-94 rivalry. Gooden announced via Twitter that he’d give his tickets to Monday’s game to the first fan who sent a picture of a Bulls jersey in the toilet.

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    Hornets shut down Griffin in win over Clippers

    The New Orleans Hornets’ defense took Blake Griffin completely out of the game en route to a 105-98 victory over the skidding Los Angeles Clippers on Monday night, ending the Hornets’ seven-game losing streak.

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    Charlotte Bobcats Jeff Taylor (44) dunks the ball on a breakaway in the second quarter of an NBA basketball game against the Oklahoma City Thunder in Oklahoma City, Monday, Nov. 26, 2012.

    Thunder rout Bobcats 114-69

    Russell Westbrook powered home a right-handed slam to put an exclamation point on one of the most dominant first halves in NBA history, putting Oklahoma City up by 40 on its way to a 114-69 blowout of the Charlotte Bobcats on Monday night. The 64-24 advantage was the fifth-biggest halftime lead in NBA’s shot clock era, according to STATS.

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    Detroit Pistons guard Brandon Knight (7) prepares to shoot a free throw during the fourth quarter of an NBA basketball game against the Portland Trail Blazers at the Palace of Auburn Hills, Mich., Monday, Nov. 26, 2012. Knight scored 26 points to lead Detroit to a 108-101 victory.

    Knight leads Pistons to 108-101 win over Portland

    Brandon Knight scored 26 points to lead the Detroit Pistons to a 108-101 victory over the Portland Trail Blazers on Monday night. Detroit had seven players score in double figures, including Kyle Singler with 16 points and Charlie Villanueva with 10.

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    Huntley freshmen Ali Andrews, left, and Kayla Barreto battle with Bartlett’s Elizabeth Arco for possession of the basketball. Huntley is off to a 4-1 start to the season.

    Huntley, Streamwood top the list of good starts

    From the Fox Valley world of good starts, OK starts and, well, not so great starts to the girls basketball season. Topping the list of good starts is Huntley (5-1). Hearing about the Red Raiders this summer and then seeing them play two of their first six games has me convinced — this is a very good team. The blip on the record is a 27-point loss to Hononegah that Huntley coach Steve Raethz and his team would like to forget about but won’t anytime soon, if that makes sense.

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    Brooklyn Nets forward Reggie Evans (30) reacts after blocking a shot by New York Knicks center Tyson Chandler (6) in the first half of their NBA basketball game at Barclays Center, Monday, Nov. 26, 2012, in New York. The Nets won 96-89 in overtime.

    Nets take 1st Brooklyn matchup with Knicks in OT

    The Brooklyn Nets pulled out a 96-89 overtime victory on Monday night, tying the New York Knicks for first place on a breakthrough night for their franchise. With their fans outnumbering and at times outchanting the Knicks’ counterparts for a change, the Nets improved to 7-1 in their new home, sending this new-look rivalry off to a stirring start.

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    Barrington’s Aoife Callanan, left, and Buffalo Grove’s Amanda Salzman dive to the floor while trying to gain possession of a loose ball during Friday’s game.

    Photo gallery: Prep images of the week
    The Prep Photos of the Week gallery includes the best high school sports pictures by Daily Herald photographers. This week's gallery features photos from state football finals and basketball.

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    San Antonio Spurs guard Tony Parker shoots past Washington Wizards guard A.J. Price in the second half of an NBA basketball game Monday, Nov. 26, 2012, in Washington. The Spurs won 118-92. The Wizards are now 0-12.

    Spurs beat winless Wizards 118-92

    San Antonio easily polished off Washington 118-92 on Monday night. In the Wizards’ first 11 games, they lost by 72 points, and never by more than 16. Washington was completely outclassed by the Spurs, who played their usual precise offensive game with pinpoint passes and lots of open shots.

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    Benet’s Kathleen Doyle, left, drives past Bartlett’s Nicole Gerdevich, during girls basketball action at Benet.

    Fresh faces learning about varsity play

    Jason Nichols understands the baggage that comes with carrying five freshmen on a varsity roster. “There’s a lot of Advil involved,” the Montini coach said, “because they give you a headache. You have to have patience, which is one of my weaknesses.” All that being said, Nichols wouldn’t keep the freshmen on varsity if they didn’t have talent or couldn’t handle the mental strain. Montini is one of a few of the area’s top teams banking on freshmen to take on significant complementary roles

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    Girls basketball/Fox Valley roundup

    Elgin Academy 49, Chicagoland Jewish 36: Rachel Cain scored 14 points and Trennedy Kleczewski added 8 as Elgin Academy (2-2) won in nonconference play. Aurora Christian 60, Harvest Christian 15: Kylee Knox had 9 points to lead the Lions (0-2) in this nonconference loss.

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    Wheaton North’s Kegan Calkins, right, will be one of the top wrestlers in DuPage County this season.

    Scouting DuPage County wrestling

    Here's a look ahead at the wrestling season from the perspective of teams in DuPage County.

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    Bears head coach Lovie Smith says he’ll never put one of his players at risk. The reality, however, is that players are at risk every time they step on the field, writes Mike Imrem.

    Smith’s statement the ultimate contradiction

    Considering the nature of football, it's absurd for Lovie Smith or any other NFL coach to say he'll never put a player at risk.

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    Milwaukee Bucks forward John Henson (31) shoots over Chicago Bulls center Joakim Noah (13) during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, Nov. 26, 2012, in Chicago.

    Bucks beat Bulls 93-92

    Ersan Ilyasova scored 14 of his 18 points in the second half and the Milwaukee Bucks overcame a 27-point deficit in a stunning 93-92 win over the Chicago Bulls on Monday night.

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    Notre Dame rolls past Chicago State 92-65

    Notre Dame shot 61 percent from the field, and six players scored in double figures, led by Jerian Grant's 22 in a 92-65 win over Chicago State on Monday night. The Irish also made 55 percent from 3-point range.

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    Football / Top 20
    Glenbard West, Glenbard North and Neuqua Valley have earned the top three spots in the Daily Herald's final ranking of football teams from the area.

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    Girls basketball/Top 20
    Montini, Rolling Meadows and Neuqua Valley are the top 3 teams in this week's Daily Herald girls basketball Top 20.

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    St. Edward’s Galati wins Harlem invite

    St. Edward senior Dean Galati won the individual championship at the Harlem boys bowling invitational on Saturday. Competing against a field of more than 100 bowlers, Galati shot a 6-game series of 1,440 for an average of 240 at Forest Hills Lanes in Loves Park.

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    Holiday over, Wheeling’s Hok gets back to work

    Heather Hok didn't have much time to think about bowling over the Thanksgiving Holiday break. Between helping plan her family's Turkey Day celebration, working at her part-time job as a manager at McDonald's and Black Friday shopping, practice was simply out of the question for the Wheeling senior. The mini-layoff, though, didn't seem affect her at all at Monday's Mid-Suburban League meet at Arlington Lanes — especially in the 10th frame of the last game. First Hok nailed a difficult 4-7-8 split to the delight of the Wildcats fans, then closed it out with a strike as her team swept all three games in a win over Hersey. Two 531 series — by Maryssa Peterson (including a 213 game) and Caily Markiewicz — helped Wheeling achieve the win.

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    Carmel grad Hilary Halford, right, enjoyed a standout collegiate cross country season at St. Francis.

    Carmel’s Halford hits her stride at St. Francis

    St. Francis' Hilary Halford earned some elite status a little more than a week ago. The former Carmel runner now running for the Joliet university became an All-American in cross country in Spokane, Wash. Halford placed 17th out of over 300 runners at the national meet, becoming the first All-American for cross country in St. Francis history. She was clocked in 18:21 on the 5K course.

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    News of mediation in NHL lockout nothing to get excited about

    Guess it can't hurt, right?Looking for a way to jump start negotiations on a new collective bargaining agreement that so far have gone nowhere, the NHL and NHL Players' Association agreed Monday to U.S. federal mediation to help move along the process of ending the lockout.Don't get too excited by this news. The league and union tried mediation twice before the 2004-05 season was canceled.

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    STEVE LUNDY/slundy@dailyherald.com Hersey baseball coach Bob Huber, right, is headed for the Illinois Baseball Coaches Hall of Fame.

    You’ve got to hand it to Hersey Hall of Famer Huber

    When Bob Huber begins his 19th season this spring, he will no longer just be known as the Hersey varsity baseball coach. He will be recognized as the Hersey Hall of Famer. Huber, who has 396 wins, is one of six coaches selected for the Illinois Baseball Coaches Hall of Fame class of 2013. He has directed the Huskies to three regional titles and one Mid-Suburban League crown while winning six divisional titles.

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    Matt Forte runs behind center Edwin Williams at Soldier Field on Sunday. Forte’s status for next week’s game against Seattle will be updated Wednesday.

    Bears’ running game lacking big plays

    The Bears made a strong commitment to the ground game against the Vikings, but now they need to get more production out of their running attack.

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    Starting pitcher Jake Peavy’s two-year contract extension is a good deal for the White Sox, according to Scot Gregor.

    White Sox’ starting rotation, bullpen look solid

    Brett Myers pitched in 35 games as a reliever for the White Sox last season after coming over in a trade from the Astros. Now a free agent, Myers is drawing interest as a starter and the Twins are showing a strong interest.

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    Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel reacts after a touchdown run by teammate Ben Malena during the first quarter an NCAA college football game against Missouri, Saturday, Nov. 24, 2012, in College Station, Texas. Manziel, aka Johnny Football, spoke to the media for the first time this season.

    ‘Johnny Football’ talks nickname, SEC and Heisman hopes

    Freshman Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel finally weighed in on his catchy nickname, joining the SEC and his newfound fame as he spoke to the media for the first time all season. "This season has been incredibly surreal," he said. "It's beyond my wildest imagination.

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    Bears quarterback Jay Cutler looks on as a trainer examines the left leg of injured guard Lance Louis in Sunday’s game against the Minnesota Vikings at Soldier Field. Louis is out for the season with a knee injury.

    Bears upset at losing Louis for season

    A violent and questionable hit from Minnesota Vikings defensive end Jared Allen has ended the season of Bears guard Lance Louis and further depleted an offensive line that was struggling to survive even before that. With an additional injury to guard Chris Spencer, the Bears are down to five healthy O-linemen with NFL experience.

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    George LeClaire/gleclaire@dailyherald.com/file Chicago Fire defender Cory Gibbs has decided to retire after suffering a knee injury.

    Fire’s Gibbs announces retirement

    The knee injury that ended Cory Gibbs' season with the Chicago Fire has also ended his playing career. The veteran defender announced his retirement Monday.

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    Tampa Bay Rays third baseman Evan Longoria has agreed to a new contract through 2022 that adds six guaranteed seasons and $100 million. The agreement was announced Monday with the three-time all-star.

    Rays, Longoria agree to $100 million deal

    Tampa Bay Rays third baseman Evan Longoria, a three-time all-star, has agreed to a new contract through 2022 that adds six guaranteed seasons and $100 million.

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    Illinois center Nnanna Egwu (32) and Gardner-Webb's Kevin Hartley (24) fight for a rebound in Champaign on Sunday. Illinois squeaked by with a 63-62 win and is ranked No. 22 by The Associated Press.

    Illini crack AP Top 25 basketball list

    Indiana is still No. 1 in The Associated Press' college basketball poll, but two more Big 10 teams have cracked the list with 7-0 Illinois ranked No. 22 after winning the Maui Classic over Butler, and previously unranked Minnesota installed at No. 21 in the poll.

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    Mike North video: Chicago Bears and Notre Dame both win big

    The Bears win convincingly and are in first place by one game, but the rest of the NFL first place teams all have big leads in their divisions. There isn't much parity in the league at this point. Notre Dame quiets the critics and will be playing in the BCS championship game.

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    No. 19 NIU to take on another Top 20 team Friday

    It’s going to be a battle of two Top 20 teams Friday in Detroit when Northern Illinois takes on Kent State for the Mid-American Conference title.

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    New York Giants defensive end Osi Umenyiora (72) knocks the ball away from Green Bay Packers’ Aaron Rodgers (12) during the first half Sunday in East Rutherford, N.J.

    Giants end slide, rout Packers 38-10

    EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — So much for that tired arm for Eli Manning, and that offensive slump for the New York Giants. They got it fixed in their bye week, then routed the Green Bay Packers 38-10 Sunday night.The Packers certainly can attest to New York’s turnaround following a week off. The showcase game was decided early as the Giants outscored the Packers 31-10 in the opening half and cruised. Manning reached 200 career TD passes by throwing for three scores as New York (7-4) snapped a two-game slide, ended Green Bay’s five-game winning streak, and opened a two-game lead in the NFC East.The Packers (7-4) were missing such key starters as linebacker Clay Matthews, defensive back Charles Woodson and receiver Greg Jennings, and it showed as they fell one game behind NFC North leader Chicago. After being manhandled in last season’s playoffs by the Giants, who went on to win the Super Bowl, the Packers weren’t much more competitive this time. Aaron Rodgers was sacked five times, including twice by Mathias Kiwanuka, who spent much of the game at defensive tackle rather than in his usual linebacker spot.New York’s balanced attack was guided by Manning, who had his first strong game in a month with 249 yards passing, and Ahmad Bradshaw, who gained a combined 119 yards and scored a touchdown. He had the first big play of the night to begin the offensive onslaught.New York struck early with a brilliantly conceived screen pass to Bradshaw off a fake reverse to Victor Cruz. Bradshaw sped down the field before being caught at the Green Bay 2, a 59-yard pickup that led to Andre Brown’s scoring run.Green Bay didn’t flinch, with Jordy Nelson getting behind Corey Webster in single coverage down the right sideline for a 61-yard TD reception from Rodgers.The scoring flurry went back in the Giants’ favor — and pretty much stayed there — when Manning hit rookie Rueben Randle in the back of the end zone for a 16-yard TD, Randle’s first NFL score. It was Manning’s first touchdown throw in four games, and he set it up with, of all things, a scramble in which he laid his shoulder into Packers cornerback Tramon Williams for a 13-yard gain.Webster’s interception led to Lawrence Tynes’ 43-yard field goal late in the first quarter for a 17-7 lead, and the Giants weren’t nearly done. Manning’s 9-yard connection with Cruz tied him for the club record with 199 career TD passes, and after Osi Umenyiora’s strip-sack of Rodgers was recovered by Jason Pierre-Paul at the Green Bay 23, Bradshaw scored from the 13.The 31 points were the most New York scored in a half all season and nearly equaled the 33 it scored in its two losses before the bye. And the Giants had more offense in them. Manning threw his 200th TD pass to move ahead of Phil Simms, a 13-yarder over the middle to Hakeem Nicks, who stretched the ball over the goal line as he was tackled. The Giants lost safety Kenny Phillips with a knee injury in the third quarter. He was making his first appearance since Week 4, when he was sidelined with a knee problem. Brown left in the fourth period with a leg injury and right tackle David Diehl sustained a stinger in the first half.

Business

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    Chicago makes top 10 list for startup activity

    A new report says Chicago is one of the top places in the world for startup activity. Crain's Chicago Business reported the city is No. 10 on the recently released list of global entrepreneurial hotspots. The analysis was done by Startup Genome, a crowd-sourced database that maps entrepreneurial communities.

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    Judy Reyes, owner of Gourmet Kernel.

    Gourmet Kernel continues to pop in Algonquin
    Gourmet Kernel in Algonquin offers gourmet popcorn products to the public as well corporations and large groups.

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    Mathew Martoma, right, leaves the federal courthouse with his wife, Rosemary, in New York Monday. Martoma, accused of enabling a quarter of a billion dollars in profits through inside information, appeared in a New York court Monday for the first time and was released on $5 million bail after his 12-minute appearance before a federal magistrate judge.

    Ex-financier free on bail in insider trading case

    A former hedge fund portfolio manager accused of enabling a quarter of a billion dollars in profits by passing along inside information in one of the largest insider trading fraud cases in history appeared in a Manhattan court for the first time Monday and was released on $5 million bail, though his movements were restricted.

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    Ebay is riding the nation’s rising interest in doing business online.

    EBay nears 8-year high as online shopping accelerates

    EBay Inc. rose more than 5 percent, approaching the highest intraday price in almost eight years, on optimism that it will benefit from a surge in online shopping ahead of the year-end holidays.

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    A European Union flag billows in the wind as the Parthenon temple is seen in the background on the Acropolis in Athens Monday. The ministers of the 17 countries that use the euro met in Brussels Monday to settle on Greece’s next rescue loan installment.

    Stocks end lower after a strong week

    Wall Street came back to work after the Thanksgiving weekend and faced leftover worries about the "fiscal cliff" and the European debt crisis. Stocks retreated after one of their best weeks of the year.

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    A worker wearing protective clothing, behind window, toils inside the Heartland Brewery at New York’s South Street Seaport, as bags of garbage from the Superstorm Sandy cleanup sit out front. The South Street Seaport, a popular tourist destination, remains a ghost town since the storm.

    AP Source: Sandy cost New York $42B in damage, loss

    Superstorm Sandy ran up a $42 billion bill on New York and the state and New York City are making big requests for disaster aid from the federal government, according to a Cuomo administration official.

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    Carts full of merchandise ordered online are rolled to the main packing area for shipping at the Overstock.com warehouse, in Salt Lake City.

    Cyber Monday likely to be busiest online sales day

    Americans clicked away on their computers and smartphones for deals on Cyber Monday, which is expected to be the biggest online shopping day in history. Shoppers are expected to spend $1.5 billion on Cyber Monday, up 20 percent from last year, according to research firm comScore.

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    Indiana proposal would move up online sales tax collection

    Two lawmakers say they plan to introduce legislation in the new year that would require Amazon.com and other online-only retailers with a presence in Indiana to begin collecting sales tax on July 1, 2013, six months earlier than a deal brokered by Gov. Mitch Daniels last January. State Rep. Ed DeLaney, a Democrat from Indianapolis, told The Associated Press in a telephone interview Monday that it's unfair that Amazon and other online businesses aren't collecting the sales tax that businesses with brick-and-mortar stores are required to collect.

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    Cary Chessick

    Arlington entrepreneur aims to help

    Kukec's People features Cary Chessick, the founder of Restaurant.com, who now has launched PositivityU.com and two philanthropic units to help people.

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    World stocks muted ahead of meeting on Greece

    Asian stock markets rose modestly Monday after the unofficial start of the holiday shopping season in the U.S. topped expectations. But trading in Europe was subdued hours before finance ministers gathered yet again to discuss what to do about Greece.

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    Oil prices fall as Israel-Hamas truce holds

    The price of oil fell Monday as a truce between Israel and the militant group Hamas that stopped fighting in the Gaza Strip appeared to hold despite a confrontation late last week.

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    A worker wearing protective clothing enters the Heartland Brewery at New York’s South Street Seaport, as bags of garbage from the Superstorm Sandy cleanup sit out front.

    After Sandy, lower Manhattan limps back to life

    Parts of lower Manhattan's Financial District are still laboring to recover nearly a month after Superstorm Sandy.A real estate consulting firm says that of the nearly 50 office buildings shut down after Sandy buffeted the Financial District, about half have reopened. Some of the others that are home to large financial and law firms still could be closed for weeks, if not months.

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    Sherman L. Jenkins

    Aurora’s Sherman Jenkins to retire
    After spending 23 years in economic development in Aurora, Sherman L. Jenkins is retiring at the end of the year.

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    Gary Steinhafel, CEO of Steinhafels Furniture, shared stories about running a growing family-owned business at the recent Fall Business Stampede expo in Vernon Hills.

    Furniture company CEO says family business easing back

    Gary Steinhafel, CEO of Steinhafels Furniture, shared stories about running a growing family-owned business. Like other retailers of its kind, it suffered during the recession, but is easing its way back.

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    Mobile devices give small businesses IT options

    Small Business Columnist Jim Kendall addresses how technology can enable, or inhibit, your business.

Life & Entertainment

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    Turkey served with vegetables is a healthy way to go at the holidays.

    Avoid excuses and stay healthy this holiday season

    The holiday season is upon us. It's the time of year when there seems to be a carefree attitude with keeping up on proper nutrition and exercise. Most people end up gaining weight as the year wraps up and many will struggle to take it back off. Rather than finding yourself in a bad situation come January, let's identify some common misconceptions that could stand in the way of you staying on track during the holiday season.

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    Trust yourself to be your best friend

    Her sister invalidated her concerns during a horrible marriage. Now that she is divorced and looking back, she is realizing maybe her sister really isn't her best frend afterall.

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    HBO announced Monday that a documentary about Beyoncé will debut Feb. 16, 2013. Beyoncé is directing the film and it will include footage she shot herself with her laptop.

    Beyonce documentary premiering on HBO in February

    Beyonce is getting personal. HBO announced Monday that a documentary about the Grammy-winning singer will debut Feb. 16, 2013. Beyonce is directing the film, which will include footage she shot herself with her laptop.

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    Justin Bieber performed during the half-time show at the CFL Grey Cup championship football game between the Toronto Argonauts and the Calgary Stampeders Sunday in Toronto.

    Bieber booed in native Canada by football fans

    Justin Bieber faced a hostile homecoming during his halftime performance at Canada's football Grey Cup, facing boos and jeers. The Toronto crowd booed Sunday when the 18-year-old pop star's face popped up on the JumboTron screen. They booed when a host spoke his name. And they booed as he took the stage and throughout his medley of the chart-topper "Boyfriend" and the disco-inflected "Beauty and a Beat."

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    According to reports Monday, Chris Brown has taken down his Twitter account after a vulgar, online feud with comedian Jenny Johnson.

    Chris Brown deletes Twitter account after feud

    R&B singer Chris Brown has taken down his Twitter account after a vulgar online exchange with comedian Jenny Johnson. Johnson says she's now receiving death threats on Twitter from Brown's supporters.

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    Coronary angiography is little short of miraculous

    Coronary angiography is the gold standard for diagnosing coronary artery disease, a narrowing of the coronary arteries that reduces blood flow to the heart. The miracle of coronary angiography is that the doctor can see not just inside your heart but also inside the arteries that feed your heart — without ever cutting the skin of your chest.

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    Corvette by Karl Kustom Corvettes.

    Modern retros are throwbacks to a treasured time

    It's not unusual for an enthusiast to wrap-up a lengthy and expensive vehicle restoration and realize his yesteryear classic still rides and drives like a decades-old car. For many, this is the pleasure of participating in the hobby. But increasingly, expectations are changing. When it comes to a special ride, more enthusiasts are desiring the creature comforts, safety, technology, performance and fuel economy of a modern car.

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    There are new efforts to introduce younger children to the benefits and fun of tennis.

    New efforts promote tennis among kids

    It's surprising, when you think about it, that a nation so concerned about childhood and adult obesity hasn't embraced tennis. The sport provides a fine workout — especially if you're playing singles — requires relatively inexpensive equipment and is easily accessible at parks and schools, where it can be played free of charge just about any time the weather allows. It's not a difficult sport to learn, and low-cost lessons are widely available.

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    It’s good to eat fish, especially if you know where the fish is coming from.

    Benefits of eating fish outweigh health concerns

    Most of us are probably aware that eating fish — which is low in saturated fat and high in protein, omega-3 fatty acids and such nutrients as selenium and vitamins D and B2 — is an important part of a healthy diet. But it can be difficult to reconcile the knowledge that eating fish helps prevent heart disease, stroke and cancer, reduces hypertension and aids brain development with reports about elevated mercury levels in tuna and swordfish, and with recalls of fish tainted with listeria, salmonella and other dangerous bacteria.

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    Usually 7½ to eight hours of sleep are enough for most people.

    Lack of sleep a chronic public health issue

    Chronic lack of sleep is more than just a nagging problem. It's a serious public health issue, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A sleep-deprived society pays a high cost, with some industrial, public transportation, traffic, medical and other accidents blamed on lack of sleep. “Persons experiencing sleep insufficiency are also more likely to suffer from chronic diseases ... and reduced quality of life and productivity,” the CDC states.

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    A new study reports that itching can be contagious.

    Your health: Can you catch an itch?

    You know how seeing someone scratching an itch makes you feel itchy, too? That’s perfectly normal, a new study says — especially for those who tend to be on the neurotic side, according to The Washington Post. Also learn how to care for your digestive health.

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    Losing a job may increase chances of heart attacks

    Unemployment hurts more than your wallet — it may damage your heart. That's according to a study linking joblessness with heart attacks in older workers. The increased odds weren't huge, although multiple job losses posed as big a threat as smoking, high blood pressure and other conditions that are bad for the heart.

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    A patient uses an oral test for HIV inside the HIV Testing Room at the Penn Branch of the District of Columbia Department of Motor Vehicles, in southeast Washington. A panel of government advisers is proposing that all Americans ages 15 to 64 should get an HIV test at least once.

    New push for HIV testing for Americans

    There's a new push to make testing for the AIDS virus as common as cholesterol checks. An independent panel that sets screening guidelines is proposing that Americans ages 15 to 64 should get an HIV test at least once — not just people considered at high risk for the virus.

Discuss

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    Democrat Terry Link, 30th District state senator

    Editorial: The fundamental problems of holding dual offices
    A bid to be elected Waukegan's mayor by state Sen. Terry Link would put him out of range for the Daily Herald's support -- and with good reason, an editorial says.

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    Looking at the glass half full

    Columnist Susan Estrich: I have friends who were born with the happy gene, who are by their nature sunny, who resolutely believe there is a pony in every pile of you-know-what. If you're one of those people, you can stop reading now.

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    Whiner in chief

    Columnist Ruben Navarrette: We mustn't confuse those "gifts" with the giveaways that Republicans hand out after they win elections — from farm subsidies to tax cuts to increases in defense spending. This is totally different.

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    Start new dialogue on sexual abuse
    A Gurnee letter to the editor: A new national dialogue is necessary to tackle the real questions that need to be answered about rape and sexual assault.

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    Pro-life candidates deserve applause
    A Carol Stream letter to the editor: Not only are they willing to take unfair criticism from pro-abortion groups, but, as we saw this election cycle, they also have to deal with heavy coverage from local and national media, which typically do not understand the implications of the belief that life begins at conception.

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    Students with drive to succeed will do so
    A Glen Ellyn letter to the editor: There are countless Illinois students who genuinely care about their future and work to earn good grades and achieve high goals. Getting into a highly competitive college these days is harder than ever. Seemingly, the perfect student isn't simply the one with straight A's, extracurricular activities and community service, but all of the above plus a one-of-a-kind trait.

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